Writing For Public Relations: On Spreading Messages

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Writing For Public Relations: On Spreading Messages introduces public relations students to the concept of how messages spread in the modern world. It represents about 20 percent of the material covered in class.

It was presented by Richard Becker, ABC, president of Copywrite, Ink., at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

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  • Writing For Public Relations: On Spreading Messages

    1. 1. On Spreading Messages Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    2. 2. Ancient Origins reach persuasion outdoor advertising oratory town criers press propaganda 98,000 B.C.? 4,000 B.C.? 2500 B.C.? 700 B.C. 650 B.C. 1470 1622 talk cave painting papyrus paper bulletin newspaper Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    3. 3. Modern Origins reach early pr marketing publicity modern pr media relations mass adv. social media 1762 1900 1910 1923 1940 1960 2000 e-mail fax press release Internet yellow journalism objective journalism radio film television advocacy journalism validation Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    4. 4. Mass Media • As communication tools are innovated so are new models for manipulating information. • As communication reaches a larger and larger audience, it is more difficult to manage. • As communication reaches a global audience, it is more difficult to target proximity. • As communication reaches a global audience, it is more difficult to identify publics. • As communication increases in frequency, the more people select other messages. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    5. 5. Communication Challenges. Mass Media intended message • The likelihood of a message remaining intact is increasingly diminished as it passes through multiple channels. original message • By the time it is received, the average media filtered message is five steps removed from its original source. media bias neg • When multiple trusted sources relay information, people tend to believe the media bias pos most frequently reported, not the most social media accurate. *Edelman Trust Barometer. Copywrite, Ink. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    6. 6. Communication Challenges. Mass Media • There is a diminishing rate of return 250,000 on news stories, especially print. total circulation 150,000 • Most people never read a newspaper circulation today or magazine from cover to cover. 50,000 5,000 5 specific section • The chances that someone will see an see specific story organizational story, with the ability to take action, is significantly reduced. act on story Copywrite, Ink. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    7. 7. Communication Challenges. Mass Media multiple secondary sources direct from source • There is an increasing rate of opinions overlaid on existing media stories. original message • There is a steady drop in the number of people who trust the media, with intended public print, radio, and television down 12-20 points.* media • The circle of direct communication has employees shrunk as people get their news from a variety of secondary sources. unintended publics *Edelman Trust Barometer. Copywrite, Ink. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    8. 8. Communication Challenges. Mass Media • Average American consumed 100,000 words of information per day in 2008. • The amount of information consumed increased by 6 percent every year. • The number of times someone has to see a message before they retain it has increased from about 80 times in 1990 to more than 300 times in 2010. University of California, San Diego Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    9. 9. negative Communication Challenges. positive neutral Mass Media blogger • The accuracy of the media is in a identified source. steady decline, with most considering accuracy at a low of 28 percent.* • Dailies have an error rate of about 50 percent; broadcast about 35 percent.** faux news media • The erroneous demise of Gordon Lightfoot was a pivotal example of the decline of accuracy in media reporting. *PEW Internet **Approximation from Regret The Error, Craig Silverman Copywrite, Ink. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    10. 10. A Lesson In Expanding Publics. entire planet Case Study social media major media • Airline has localized crisis related to 10 flights. local media • Local media coverage and then company’s use of social impacted 10 flights media make it a global crisis. • Company continued to talk about the crisis and problem for six months. Copywrite, Ink. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    11. 11. A Lesson In Internal Publics. media coverage reach Case Study social media reacts • Company reported layoffs to shareholders before employees. original message • Media coverage showed intended public cheering executives, ready to turn the company around. internal public • Productivity fails as employees panic and investors quickly change their minds after negative coverage. Copywrite, Ink. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    12. 12. A Lesson In Prioritizing Publics. customer push back Case Study • Company tells customers of rate increase. original message • Customers push back on unaware employees and the intended public media, which receives no comment. internal public • Media seeks input from legislators media and advocacy groups. legislators advocacy Copywrite, Ink. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    13. 13. Communication Solutions. Messages • The most effective messages are shared internally before they are released externally. • The most effective messages prioritize the delivery to multiple publics. • The most effective messages consider how every public will react to the message. • The most effective messages have singular ideas, supported with facts for specific publics. • If you don’t manage the message, the message will manage you. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    14. 14. Social Media Integration. Solutions • Social media can assist public relations in delivering communication. • Social media is not the only means to deliver a message direct to public. • Social media requires real- time supervision. • Ignoring social media does not mean social media ignores you. * one of several Copywrite, Ink. models Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    15. 15. Social Media Integration. Journalists • Write fact-based commentaries that are reasonably objective. • Do not write to make friends, and friendship has no impact on reporting. • Consult with a brain trust of five people, which may or may not be known. • Fact check for accuracy. Seek outside sources. Have limited oversight. • Do not discriminate between the level of expertise/popularity and insight. Thomas L. Friedman Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    16. 16. Social Media Integration. Bloggers • Write some fact-based commentaries, but emphasize advocacy and special interest. • Most write to make friends because there is an incentive to do so. • Are influenced by select peers and those peers are not always known. • Do not fact check on a regular basis and do not seek additional sources. • Do discriminate between expertise/popularity and value of insight. Copywrite, Ink. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    17. 17. Six Divisions Of Modern Media. Blurred • Editor-driven media is the closest model to what we consider traditional news. • Blogger-driven media focuses on specific niches with opinion-based influence. • Citizen-driven media include young journalists, network newspapers, crowd-sourced wikis. • Consumer-driven media is designed to provide readers with affirmation and validation. • Propaganda-driven media is predisposed to reinforcing a singular point of view. • Advertising-driven media is organizational content or news that caters to clients. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    18. 18. Image: 360 Digital Influence, Ogilvy News Releases • The origin of the modern news release is generally considered to be 1907. • The original intent was to establish a “story” before other versions were put out. • Press releases later became a tool to generate publicity, suggest stories, and share announcements. wikipedia example Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    19. 19. Image: 360 Digital Influence, Ogilvy News Releases • The news release became a preferred method of initiating contact with journalists. • They were mailed to editors or journalists. • With the advent of fax machines, most firms faxed releases or used a wire service. • With the advent of e-mail, most firms e-mailed releases or used a wire service. az example Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    20. 20. Image: 360 Digital Influence, Ogilvy News Releases • The modern news release is much more interactive. • It providers additional resources and background information. • It allows for journalists, bloggers, and the public to share information. • It allows public relations professionals to summarize content and provide a link for pitchengine example the release and content. *hat tip to Todd Defren for one of the first conceptualizations in 2007. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    21. 21. Post Media External Check List. Impact • Are all the facts in the story accurate and were they double checked? • Is the story complete and in the proper context? • If outside opinions are included, was the story fair and comments fair? • Was the story told with sufficient depth to capture reader interest? • Did the media give the appropriate amount of time or space to the story? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    22. 22. Post Media Internal Check List. Impact • Did we accomplish the objectives of the release beyond exposure? • What else was accomplished that we did not anticipate? • Did the spokesperson exhibit credibility or express empathy? • Were core messages included in the story to help define our organization? • Was the media satisfied with our information and did we deepen the relationship? • What is the feedback from our various publics and is there follow up to do? • What did we learn and what can we do better next time? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    23. 23. On Spreading Messages Richard R. Becker, ABC President, Copywrite, Ink. copywriteink.com copywriteink.blogspot.com 702.341.7135 Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

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