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Duty, Honor, Country, A Novel of West Point to the Civil war

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They swore oaths, both personal and professional. From the Plain at West Point, through the Mexican War, to the carnage of Shiloh. They were fighting for country, for a way of life and for family. …

They swore oaths, both personal and professional. From the Plain at West Point, through the Mexican War, to the carnage of Shiloh. They were fighting for country, for a way of life and for family. Classmates carried more than rifles and sabers into battle. They had friendships, memories, children and wives. They had innocence lost, promises broken and glory found.

Duty, Honor, Country is history told both epic and personal so we can understand what happened, but more importantly feel the heart-wrenching clash of duty, honor, country and loyalty. And realize that sometimes, the people who changed history, weren’t recorded by it. This book is big, almost twice the length of my usual books, because the story demands a large scale.

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    • 1. What  is  more  important...  Honor  or  Loyalty?Monday, February 11, 13
    • 2. To The Soldiers • 5 April 1862 To The Soldiers of the Army of the Mississippi: I have put into motion to offer battle to the invaders of your country. With the resolution and discipline and valor becoming men fighting, as you are, for all worth living or dying for, you can but march to decisive victory over the agrarian mercenaries sent to subjugate and despoil you of your liberties, property and honor. Remember the dependence of your mothers, your wives, your sisters, and your children on the result; remember the fair, broad, abounding land, the happy homes and the ties that would be desolated by your defeat. The eyes and hopes of eight millions of people rest upon you; you are expected to show yourselves worthy of your lineage, worthy of the women of the South, whose noble devotion in this war has never been exceeded in any time. With such incentives to brave deeds, and with the trust that God is with us, your generals will lead you confidently to the combat— assured of success. C.S.A. General Sidney Albert Johnston (West Point class of 1826)Monday, February 11, 13
    • 3. Why I Wrote This Book • As a plebe at West Point I had to memorize a considerable amount of lore and legend about the Academy and its role in history. • One fact struck me as odd and intriguing: • In the 60 major battles of the Civl War, West Pointers commanded both sides in 55 of them, and one side in the other 5.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 4. West Point ThenMonday, February 11, 13
    • 5. Benny Havens Tavern • Our story starts in May 1840, at Benny Havens Tavern, infamous as a cadet rendezvous just off post of West Point. • William Tecumseh Sherman with Cadets Cord and King, are toasting graduation.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 6. Benny Havens BENNY HAVENS, OH! Come, tune your voices, comrades, and stand up in a row. For to singing sentimentally we are about to go; In the army theres sobriety, promotions very slow, So well sing our reminiscences of Benny Havens, Oh I Chorus. Benny Havens, Oh! Benny Havens, Oh! Well sing our reminiscences of Benny Havens, Oh! • They still sing of Benny Havens at West Point. • Unfortunately for Cadet Cord, Mister Havens’ daughter, Lidia, is in a motherly state. Cadet King challenges Cord to dual over the young woman’s honorMonday, February 11, 13
    • 7. Ulysses S. Grant • Racing for help, Sherman finds Grant at the riding hall along with Cadets Rumble and Longstreet. • Grant was a horse whisperer, renowned in the Corps for his ability with the beasts.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 8. Ulysses S. Grant • Grant excelled in two subjects at West Point: art and mathematics. • The drawing below is one of his works.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 9. William T. ShermanMonday, February 11, 13
    • 10. Ulysses S. Grant • This is the earliest photo of Grant, taken after his graduation in 1843. • He joins Sherman and they gallop down to Benny Havens to stop the dual, along with his friend Cadet Rumble. In the confrontation along the Hudson River, Rumble takes responsibility for Lidia’s condition and thus history is made.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 11. The Corps • Rumble must resign from the Corps. • The Vigilance Committee pays Mister Cord a visit, but he refuses to resign, despite his dishonor.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 12. The Mexican War • Grant believed the Mexican War to be wicked and wrong. But he fought, along with many other West Pointers, setting the stage for the Civil War. • We meet Grant, Lee, Longstreet, Pickett and many other key figures as they battle across Mexico to the final victory in the Halls of Montezuma.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 13. The Mexican War • While Rumble is with Grant in Mexico, Cord is with Fremont’s 1845-1846 Western Expedition. • He joins Kit Carson and Fremont as they battle for California.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 14. The Mexican War • A dashing, young George Pickett, leads the successful assault on the fortress of Chapultepec, hauling down the Mexican colors and raising the American Flag over the Mexican Military Academy. • As the colors go up, members of the Irish Brigade who defected to the Mexican side over their religious beliefs, are hanged at the signal.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 15. The Mexican War • Robert E. Lee, a young major of the Engineers, distinguishes himself in battle, scouting the way for the invading American Army. • The Mexican War, percentage wise, had the highest casualty rate of any American War to date.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 16. Between The Wars • The man who would become the first four star General of the Army resigns his commission on the day he is promoted to Captain. Some suspect he was drunk on duty. • He tries to make a go of civilian life, but fails miserably. • Still, he frees the only slave his wife inherited from her family, despite his own poverty.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 17. Between The Wars • Our characters’ personal lives go through great upheaval between the Mexican and Civil War, but all comes to a head when John Brown is hanged. • Rumble is there along with Robert E. Lee, JEB Stuart, Thomas Jackson (not yet Stonewall) and even John Wilkes Booth was in the audience.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 18. The Civil War • Former Cadet King has chosen to fight for his native South Carolina and goads General Simon Bolivar Buckner into firing the first shots of the war at Fort Sumter.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 19. • First Bull Run At First Bull Run, Rumble (designated by Lincoln to be his eyes and ears in the Army) meets a dashing young George Armstrong Custer, freshly graduated from West Point, albeit last in his class. • The map below is part of a set I had for my military tactics classes at the Academy. A B C D xxxx 3 Run Thorton J.E. JOHNSTON y (12,000) RED HOUSE ck McDowell’s main effort crossed at Ro FORD Sudley Springs, his secondary attack b x FORD x near the Stone Bridge. Other feints Sudley Springs and demonstrations complicated the Centreville MILES 1 plan. RUNYON 1 FORD x Fairfax Court House BURNSIDE NPIK E 4 miles TUR k TON ee RREN Cr WA { n x pi ar HOWARD AD C ath RO E I N STONE T DG TA KE RI N BRIDGE AR N Y OU YM O YM HA ST LE MANSSAS S- B x RI NG D g’ s SCHENCK SU ra S P ( un nc LEY LEWIS’ FORD SUD Yo ) h x Bridges of Franklin LE TE BALL’S FORD P ROBINSON Bull Keyes, Porter, Sherman M RICHARDSON CO and Wilcox (IN SU Ru LEWIS n AD HENRY D LE Haymarket RO HOUSE 2 IL Groveton ISLAND 2 Y 2 miles RA MILL FORD F x EO RO LIN COCKE AD E NT Jackson, Bee, ND Bartow Evans BONHAM PE BALD HILL DE PIK E STUART IN RN TU N Five Forks BLACKBURN’S n TO Ru EN FORD RR WA MITCHELL’S FORD x t la F LONGSTREETx McLEAN’S x FORD Gainesville New Market 1/2 mile BONHAM (-) D.R. JONES MT. PONE McLEAN THRO The timely arrival of Kirby Smith ROUG 3 HFAR E and Early about 1600 hours turned 3 the tide for the Confederacy. x GAP EARLY MAN ASS AS x GAP KIRBY SMITH UNION MILLS x FORD ESVI L LE ROAD EWELL MANA SSAS - GAIN M N A AS SA S BETHLEHEM CHURCH -S U x nch DL EY HOLMES YATES Bra RO FORD AD D s in’ A O wk R Da I L A 4 R 4 CENTREVILLE AND VICINITY, 1861 I A R BATTLE OF FIRST BULL RUN A N D Manassas Junction X Situation at 1400 Hours, 21 July 1861 L E A & G E Bristoe Station A N N 0 1/2 1 1-1/2 2 miles O R SCALE OF MILES HISTORY DEPARTMENT USMA Frank Martini A B C DMonday, February 11, 13
    • 20. In The West • Grant is unable to get accepted back in the Army. He finally gets a commission in the militia and fights in the west, along the rivers. • At Rumble’s suggestion, Abraham Lincoln vaults Grant to general. A B C D Ohio HALLECK 4 Ohio River S River St. Louis (91,000) I DEPARTMENT K E N T U C K Y A O OF MISSOURI N N 41,000 at St. Louis and north 1 1 { Louisville A I CURTIS (15,000 at Rolla, Missouri Frankfort POPE (15,000 in central Missouri BUELL L I M (45,000) Lexington D L iss Versailles iss ip DEPARTMENT pi I N OF THE OHIO AD I RO IL Ri Bardstown RA ve Richmond Ken r Harrodsburg tuck E y ILL xx Perryville NASHV r Riv ve T.L. CRITTENDEN (5,000) er Ri xx Lebanon Danville Camp Dick Robinson LOUISVILLE AND McCOOK (11,000) Calhoun xx io MITCHELL (8,000) Oh xx NELSON (8,000) xx Rock Castle Dept. Dept. G Munfordville THOMAS (13,000) GRANT (20,000) of Mo. of Ohio re en River London 2 Commerce Paducah Columbia Somerset 2 Smithland Glasgow er Riv xx Bowling Green Cu Cairo CLARK HARDEE (7,600) nd mb er Mill Springs Ri v erla AI NS er l xx BUCKNER (8,100) mb NT Ten nd Cu and OU Belmont Hopkinsville r la M nes Columbus POLK FLOYD (2,400) be ND um RL A BOWEN (3,600) s ee C C UM BE (12,000) R i ve M CU BER r Riv K E N T U C K Y LAN er D New Madrid FORT PILLOW G AP HENRY FORT DONELSON T E N N E S S E E FORT Clarksville Union City HEIMAN ISLAND No. 10 Dover Gallatin TILGHMAN Paris (5,000) Carthage Morristown Clinton Charlotte Nashville MISSOURI r Danville ve 3 Lavergne Knoxville 3 Ri ARKANSAS Franklin Sparta IN S ncis A T Du N a U Murfreesboro St. Fr ck O Humboldt Ri M ve r r e Riv AD NASHVILLE RO D N IL FORT PILLOW xxxx McMinnville A RA . R Columbia L . Jackson E R IA A.S. JOHNSTON R E G G B OR ID OAD FORT RANDOLPH IO M er GE H U R Ri v O C R A IL R (43,000) er D AN Ri v D AN AN Shelbyville F i O D ip p E SE IS TUR U is s ES hie H A ’S P Waynesboro NN E ss DECA e M Tullahoma T a lc N FORT HARRIS M E se Mi TE A Bolivar E L qu Crump’s es CH P D ST Bethel nn Se AT L EA Landing A A AND T NO Te Ba Memphis Savannah Decherd W Purdy OG ttl A e Shiloh PITTSBURG LANDING Pulaski Cr Fayetteville NORTH CAROLINA RA eek MEMPHIS AND CHARLESTON RAIL ROAD Hamburg IL R T E N N E S S E E Chattanooga E NASHVILL Grand Junction OAD. Eastport M I S S I S S I P P Corinth I Burnsville G E O R G I A 4 Iuka Athens Stevenson 4 KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE, 1861 Florence MUSCLE SHOALS Huntsville HENRY AND DONELSON CAMPIAGN Tuscumbia Decatur Situation January 1862, Prior to the Opening Campaign ELEVATIONS IN FEET 0 100 500 1000 OVER 0 10 20 30 40 50 Tupelo A L A B A M A Rome SCALE OF MILES A B C DMonday, February 11, 13
    • 21. In The West • Grant wins great victories at Forts Henry and Donelson just west of present day Fort Campbell. • Lincoln gives Grant command in the west. A CAMP B C D HALLECK Landed from 1630, 4 Feb., to 5 night of 5 Feb. Left 1100, 6 Feb. e k Ce es gh Hu Landed night of 5 Feb. Left 1100, 6 Feb. Most of L. WALLACE XX BAILEY’S ok landed here night of 13 Feb. FERRY ro B 1 1 g n k ri e re p C S rk n o L. Fo d brig.) R CR. IS n ra ry B D Cum Pan (-- 1 PANTHE ACE th berland r e ITH reek L. WALL C SM FOOTE Boyd’s XX McCLERNAND C.F. (+ 1 brig.) XX XX Road XX to Dover Attack by 6 gunboats under C.F. Foote replused 14 Feb. by SM XX IT H shore batteries. R McC v e i TE TEL EGR LIN E LE GR L ER r Evacuated 4 Feb. APH 2 A D to N AND 2 ROA P FORT (pa H T HENRY or DIR EC FO RT rt) DO 14 Feb. FORT Grant camped at Ft. Henry NE HEIMAN night 6 Feb. to night 11 Feb. LS ON ek KENTUCKY Grant’s advance elements k 12 Feb. FORT DONELSON Surrendered 6 Feb. ee moved to this line night of Cr Cre TENNESSEE 11 Feb. iney XX P Bear XX BU C.F. SMITH FLOYD CK 12 Feb. XX PILLOW NE XX McCLERNAN D (part) R XX Peytoma 12 L. WALLACE eb. Furnace Fe 14 Feb. 14 F b. eb. AD A B C D 13 F Y R O R 3 In an attempt to break out, Floydd attacked McClernand #1 early on 15 Feb. and drove him to #2. Wallace helped blunt 5 S FE R 3 Cu mb N’ the attack by moving to #3, but Floyd had opened an escape erla YN Lost W nd b CH Creek route by noon. Then, vacillating, Floyd ordered his troops River METAL back with in the entrenchments, possibly influenced by Riv A RLOTTE (F 1 er 1 LANDING Smith’s threatening fire. Grant, in the afternoon, directed 00) Smith to attack (as shown) and ordered McClernand and PILLOW (1,5 YD Wallace to restore the encirclement. Floyd and Pillow then (2 Regts ) FLO abandoned the command to Buckner who asked for terms FORT early 16 February. DONELSON RG O BUCKNER Dover e se E ) R OA D OAD (T ELEGRAPH) (11,500) LE R es V IL DY Fort Henry ED ad to nn ct Ro Dire 2 xx 1 2 Te Creek C. F. SM to P AD ar ITH RO is (- L i ck brig.) Stand ing Rock ) 00 .0 (2 D 3 N 3 A 4 E RN 4 HENRY-DONELSON VICINITY, 1861 xx xx Mc CL 3 WALLAC HENRY AND DONELSON CAMPAIGN Ft. He nry E( - br ig.) Union Advance on Forts Henry and Donelson 2 and situation 14 February 1862 GRANT DOVER AND VICINITY, 1861 (23,000) CAPTURE OF FORT DONELSON Situation on the Night of 15-16 February 1862 4 4 0 1 2 3 4 R e N N 0 100 200 300 400 O ill AD sv SCALE OF MILES SCALE OF FEET to Clark HISTORY DEPARTMENT USMA HISTORY DEPARTMENT Frank Martini USMA Frank Martini A B C D A B C DMonday, February 11, 13
    • 22. Shiloh • Shiloh means place of peace. • This is a reconstruction of the original church from which the bloody battle gained its name.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 23. Shiloh • All our characters are coming together for the great battle that will change the course of the war. Grant. Sherman. Cord. Rumble. And young Ben Rumble, son of Cord, stepson of Rumble.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 24. Shiloh • Our book ends at the close of the first day. • General Grant is sitting under an oak tree, in pouring rain, despondent over his battered army. • Rumble and Cord and Ben are nearby in their own crisis.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 25. Shiloh A B C D AS Johnston’s decision to lead the attack to 8 • Sav personally contributed to the tangle of ann ah committed units to combat as well as the xx DI Sherman comes to Grant, sitting rg AM (-) early use of the reserve that resulted in the bu ON confused Confederate situation at teh close D m IS of the first day. Movement indicated began Ha LA about 0900. ND xxxx to Te n n e s s e e 1 BUEL (-) 1 k ee under the tree, perhaps to urge Cr Gunboats er Riv Lick him to retreat. Positions shown are those to x which Union forces were driven by the end of fighting ok Dill’s Bro on 6 April. ROAD AD x RO xxxx R) VE RI ( • H NA AN BARK GRANT - S AV Sherman: “Well, Grant, we’ve had URG (33,000) HAMB DGE NRI CKI BRE 2 xx 2 HURTBUT ST the Devil’s own day, haven’t we?” xx NE N ET ’S BRAGG (part) H- SAVANNA D W.H. L. WALLACE HO R RG H (RIVER) ROA EA STE M BU RN CORNITH HA xx RO L. WALLACE Tillman Creek xx AD to CRUMP’S LANDING to Savann PRENTISS ah • xxxx Grant: “Yep. Lick ‘em tomorrow x A.S. JOHNSTON (40,000) ROAD 3 HARDEE 3 though!” xx POLK RK SHILOH BA CHURCH McCLERNAND k ee Cr WESTERN CO R Ow NIT l H e (CORNITH- PIT ak TS RO Sn Cr ee BU AD xx BRAGG (part) RG • k ) SHERMAN More Americans died in 2 days at reek Shiloh, than in all previous wars k C Oa h anc Br h ilo Sh 4 Forward Union Positions 4 SHILOH AND VICINITY, 1861 0900 6 April. combined. SHILOH CAMPAIGN Tt Confederate Attack and Situation At End o Co W rn of the First Day, 6 April 1862 in ith ni dy ng r ha Pu m B r a n ch to N 0 1/5 1 1-1/5 SCALE OF MILES HISTORY DEPARTMENT USMA Frank Martini A B C DMonday, February 11, 13
    • 26. Meet Bob Mayer West   Point   Graduate,   former   Green   Beret   and   NY   Times   bestselling   author   Bob   Mayer   has   had   over   50   books   published.   He   has   sold   over   Eive   million   books,   and   is   in   demand   as   a   team-­‐building,   life-­‐changing,   and   leadership   speaker  and  consultant  for  his  Who  Dares  Wins  concept. Bob   Mayer   grew   up   in   the   Bronx.   After   high   school,   he   entered   West   Point   where   he   learned   about   the   history   of   our   military   and   our   country.   During   his   four   years   at   the   Academy  and  later  in  the  Infantry,  Mayer  questioned   the  idea   of   "mission   over   men."   When   he   volunteered   and   passed   selection  for   the  Special  Forces  as  a  Green  Beret,  he  felt  more   at   ease   where   the   men   were   more   important   than   the   mission. In   his   historical   Eiction   novels,   Mayer   blends   actual   events   with   Eictional   characters.   He   doesnt   change   history,   but   instead  changes  how  history  came  into  being. Mayers  military  background,  coupled  with  his  deep   desire  to   understand   the  past   and   how   it   affects   our   future,   gives   his   writing  a  rich  Elavor  not  to  be  missed.Monday, February 11, 13
    • 27. • This book is available in print, eBook and Audiobook. • Check your on-line bookstore or: • www.coolgus.com • Author Bob Mayer is a West Point Graduate, NY Times Bestselling author of over 50 books, and a former Green Beret. • Check out his other Slideshares on more titles: military thrillers, including the Green Beret and Black Ops series, science fiction, including the million copy selling Area 51 series, and nonfiction. • And coming 11 December, his latest: Area 51 Nightstalkers; consider it The Unit Meets Warehouse 13. Click here for a Free Excerpt of Duty, Honor, CountryMonday, February 11, 13

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