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Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
Wireless Industrial Applications
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Wireless Industrial Applications

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Year after year, updates in industrial wireless technologies are among most popular Control Engineering articles and Webcasts. Experts will provide expert assessments of industrial wireless projects …

Year after year, updates in industrial wireless technologies are among most popular Control Engineering articles and Webcasts. Experts will provide expert assessments of industrial wireless projects and lessons learned. An exam and certificate are available for one professional development hour (PDH), according to Registered Continuing Education Program rules (from the American Council of Engineering Companies).

Visit www.controleng.com to view this as an "On Demand Webcast," download the slides, and to take the CEU Exam. One (1) RCEP / ACEC Certified Professional Development Hour (PDH) available.

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  • Hello, this is Mark Hoske, content manager with Control Engineering, part of CFE Media. Thanks for joining us for the next installment in the Control Engineering Webcast SeriesWireless industrial applicationsSponsored by Advantech and Moxa.
  • To access the presentation slides, or to learn more about our sponsors, use the “links” option at the top of your screen. From this option, you can download the presentation, or visit our webcast sponsor, at any time. The Links tab also has information on how to get your certificate of completion. If you’re watching the presentation from the archive, you’ll see that the instructions are a little different. Simply click “Meeting Links” on your console.   There will be a Q&A session after the presentations. You can use the question box to type questions to speakers during their presentations and we’ll answer as many as possible later in the broadcast.  This webcast is being recorded, including the Q&A session. We’ll post the archive on the Control Engineering Website in a few days, and send you an email message with a link connecting directly to it. We are offering a professional development hour (PDH) for attending today’s event. Please fill out the evaluation form at the end of the event and once you click submit, you will be lead to a page where you can download your PDH certificate. If you are having technical problems with audio or the slides, click the Help button to bring up a list of system checks you should try before escalating to an online technician. If you need a technician, type a message into the question box and one will get to you as quickly as possible.
  • Control Engineering has met the standards and requirements of the Registered Continuing Education Program. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to RCEP at RCEP.net. A certificate of completion will be available for each participant to download upon completion of an evaluation at the end of the presentation.As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by RCEP.
  • This Control Engineering webcastwill provide information about ...• Overview of industrial wireless technologies (ISA100, HART Wireless, WiFi, WiMax), including economics and how to develop a new engineering mindset• Engineering decision criteria, including essential requirements and desired requirements• Need for a long-term wireless strategy• Specifications downfalls when evaluating radio aspects of the technology• Rapid prototyping of wireless sensors in an industrial environment• Define best practices to RF design in complex/harsh RF (radio frequency) environments, such as manufacturing/industrial/power generation facilities• Review real examples of wireless sensor deployments in industrial environments for workforce efficiency and condition-based monitoring.
  • Thank you to our expert presenters for this webcast ... -- Stephen Muenstermann, RoviSys Building Technologies, DC market manager, previously served as the leader of wireless field solutions for a major automation company for North America and the global interface for all industrial wireless infrastructure. He has more than 10 years of experience in industrial applications, after having begun with radio frequency and communications military intelligence overseas, continuing with industrial instrumentation and commercial wireless technologies. He has written white papers and articles on wireless security, regulatory issues resolved, enterprise wireless inventory management, remote SCADA, OSHA wireless safety, and data center BMS infrastructure management, among other topics. He has consulted with major refinery, oil and gas, pharmaceutical, mission critical infrastructure, ethanol, chemical, municipal and other industries in development of wireless strategies. He has conducted more than 300 seminars on industrial wireless technology. www.rovisysbt.com-- Damon Brady, section manager, SAIC Energy, Environment & Infrastructure, has more than 15 years of technical and managerial experience in network communications and critical infrastructure services, including 10 years of experience leading network design, implementation, and integration processes for utility, energy, and public safety clients. He has expertise in telecommunications voice and data network architectures, including fiber optics, wireless local area network, point-to-point, and point-to-multipoint wireless radio technology. Brady has significant experience developing wireless and wireline communications solutions that form the basis of core infrastructures connecting critical components in smart grid infrastructures.-- Douglas Bowers, senior project manager, SAIC Energy, Environment & Infrastructure, has more than 15 years of experience in system integration for communication and network systems. He specializes in working with clients to identify requirements and write specifications, then taking specifications and working with SAIC development teams from design through testing/delivery. The last several years have been spent in the rapid prototyping and development of new sensor systems for industrial environments with emphasis on nuclear generation and critical infrastructure, such as airports. www.saic.com/EEandI-- Moderator: Mark T. Hoske, webcast moderator, has been content manager for Control Engineering since 1994, and has authored or edited scores of articles relating to industrial wireless technologies. He’s written about automation technology topics since 1987.
  • The cloud has created forced adoption into the technology. Those that do not conform will be left behind. (explain LDAR)
  • When you boil it down there are numerous open protocol standards that you are dealing with today in the wired world. At the end of the day all these standards are digital. With anything that is a digital standard its format can be converted to any format. When comparing it to the wireless standards it is no different. All these standards can easily co-exist in the same world. Most WiMax – (Pay as you go, better throughput, long distance) Although the standards allow operation in any band from 2 to 66 GHz, mobile operation is best in the lower bands which are also the most crowded, and therefore most expensive
  • To do it yourself would, or could be very dangerous. If you delivered a cobbled system then faith in reliability, security, and safety in the technology will always be questioned. It could also take months without a proper FEED wireless analysis to get the network to communicate and organize properly. However, if the system is implemented properly, it goes in very quickly, there are little to no hiccups. I compare it to my vehicles at home. As technology has grown over the years I have grown to understand that if the issue is beyond simple diagnosis, even with my PC software to discern issues and trouble codes, it is better for me to send it to the expert. The sophistication has grown beyond my breath of knowledge. And even though I have a solid understanding of the issue. To gain the proper result I am better to leave it in a trusted experts hands. And like your mechanic, when you outsource assure you have a trusted source. I am sure we have all experienced an agonizing bill on something that may not have even repaired the actual problem.
  • Controlling your cloud is critical. You really need to know how your air space is being managed and how it will be used. I have seen many cobbled systems even to the point of aluminum foil being utilized as a RF enhancer. Just like the old rabbit ears on the television pre-HD signals.Wireless opens up a lot of new windows of opportunity. So while your plan may be limited in scope the design could offer future flexibility that would allow thousands of points in at a low investment for the information.
  • This is only a small look into the network capabilities. Each area is critical. (Cover why)
  • Ad-hoc solutions (designed for purpose) try and make you believe that they are the only answer and that you would not need other technologies like a wireless RF analysis. While these designs may work in areas that are completely unobstructed, no potential interferences, and proper mounting considerations, most vendors only analyze the IT or communication protocol connection. They do not worry about the RF connection because they can see on their PC that the network is linking. This leaves out huge potential issues related to interference, emitting RF warping, cross talk, multipathing and more. Beware of the ‘need no survey’ claims. All cell networks require design analysis.
  • These observations are basic points you should consider when specifying a wireless network. Remember this technology is HOT and new to the market. You will have a lot of people that are selling equipment that do not understand the technology. It is not hard but like anything you must have a good knowledge base, use the right tools and document what you design. You are saving huge cost in the infrastructure installation, time to function, true information, 80% of what Fieldbus Foundation Delivers, and massive scalability. Do not shortcut your design documents.
  • In a standard whip dipole antenna you get less distance but greater height In a high gain antenna your signal transmits further but is more pancaked as the signal rush is produced out of the base of the antennaThe green represents the ‘near field’
  • A Yagi is the typical directional antenna. However a parabolic antenna offers a tighter focus and less RF splash on the back side of the signal.If you will note the yagi is much like a TV antenna. It does require aiming in proximity of the desired target. The parabolic requires even greater aiming.
  • What does warping mean? If you are in a open field and you have a circle of people 100 feet in diameter around you and you yell loudly most people will be able to make out what you say.Now you have the people forming a semi-circle of equal distance around you but now your yelling into the wall. How well can the people hear you? Not well.Now look at the antennas all lined up in a row. Now imagine you are talking to a colleague across the room. Now a new person comes over and he is talking to his colleagues across the room while turned towards your ear. Two more join directly next to each other. Every time you add another device it is like adding another person in your crowd of people if they are too close and at the exact same level. However stagger them, provide mega phones, maybe foreign language as a mix and you can receive this signal/message. Now receiver sensitivity starts to plummet. How would your hearing stand up if you had someone yelling in your ear every day, all day?Data is loss as only a certain amount of the packets can be read. So the data slows to roughly 50% per device when you have near field overlap in a anti-collision designed format like 802.11 or other designed DSSS technologies.
  • What does warping mean? If you are in a open field and you have a circle of people 100 feet in diameter around you and you yell loudly most people will be able to make out what you say.Now you have the people forming a semi-circle of equal distance around you but now your yelling into the wall. How well can the people hear you? Not well.Now look at the antennas all lined up in a row. Now imagine you are talking to a colleague across the room. Now a new person comes over and he is talking to his colleagues across the room while turned towards your ear. Two more join directly next to each other. Every time you add another device it is like adding another person in your crowd of people if they are too close and at the exact same level. However stagger them, provide mega phones, maybe foreign language as a mix and you can receive this signal/message. Now receiver sensitivity starts to plummet. How would your hearing stand up if you had someone yelling in your ear every day, all day?Data is loss as only a certain amount of the packets can be read. So the data slows to roughly 50% per device when you have near field overlap in a anti-collision designed format like 802.11 or other designed DSSS technologies.
  • Spectrum analyzers can offer a lot of characteristic information about your RF environment. Even if you are not the designer of your RF environment it is a good low cost tool to use. In this situation it can show you if your signal will penetrate a wall with enough confidence to use as a access point location. As you can tell the micro-wave signal is more susceptible to attenuation over the lower frequency UHF signal.
  • Line of Site takes numerous factors into consideration. Given a clean Fresnel zone (No obstructions) the LOS is as far as the limit of RF signal trand=smission and receiver sensitivity will permit.
  • Spectrum analyzers can offer a lot of characteristic information about your RF environment. Even if you are not the designer of your RF environment it is a good low cost tool to use. In this situation it can show you if your signal will penetrate a wall with enough confidence to use as a access point location. As you can tell the micro-wave signal is more susceptible to attenuation over the lower frequency UHF signal.
  • (After Steve finishes here...)Mark: Thanks, Steve. Now on to Damon and Doug, from SAIC.
  • Graphics are examples Advanced modeling of PSEG facility, Hope Creek. Outdoor Coverage, Deliver Senior level wireless engineers with proper credentialingDefine and prioritize applications and ConOps, define throughput needs, which affects AP density, which affects backhaul, switching, power requirements, etc…Aggregate all drawing, conduct Passive Survey of facility, including Power Block import all data into modeling SW to generate preliminary design Return for Active survey to capture actual RF patterns from AP. We then utilize this data to fine tune design perimeters of final design.Work with Plant It and Engineer of record to formulate build package and iterative reviews during installation process And Finally commissioning, testing, tweaking of operational system.
  • Critical Infrastructure Systems – Increasingly a complex blend of old and new systems (varying tolerances and management requirements).Old Infrastructure: Expensive to instrument, monitor and maintain – accidents happen (PG&E NG Explosion, San Onofre steam leak, Kinder-Morgan Pipeline ExplosionNew Infrastructure: Generates an unmanageable ‘firehose’ of data – SDG&E SA, PSEG HMI overload, SWN Water ManagementSystems approach - everything is a point solution, creating analysis paralysis and investment fear due to risk of obsolescence.
  • Work Better, Faster, Cheaper. Hit the low hanging fruit, lay the groundwork for significant BPT
  • So really – the integration approach is as simple as A + B + C = SUCCESS…We can do all this – we just haven’t, but the timing is right to do this now.
  • So, really – the integration approach is as simple as A + B + C = SUCCESS…We can do all this – we just haven’t, but the timing is right to do this now.
  • Thank you to today’s webcast sponsors; Advantech and Moxa
  • This Control Engineering webcast covered • Overview of industrial wireless technologies (ISA100, HART Wireless, WiFi, WiMax), including economics and how to develop a new engineering mindset• Engineering decision criteria, including essential requirements and desired requirements• Need for a long-term wireless strategy• Specifications downfalls when evaluating radio aspects of the technology• Rapid prototyping of wireless sensors in an industrial environment• Define best practices to RF design in complex/harsh RF (radio frequency) environments, such as manufacturing/industrial/power generation facilities• Review real examples of wireless sensor deployments in industrial environments for workforce efficiency and condition-based monitoring. For those listening live, please continue to submit questions. We’ll move on to answering those now. Please take the survey that should appear on your screen at this time.And now, the first question... After Q&A: Thanks again to our experts and to our sponsors for this webcast, copyright 2013, CFE Media. For Control Engineering, this is Mark Hoske. Thank you.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Wireless Industrial Applications Sponsored by:
    • 2. Related information regarding the webcast: • Download slides: http://www.controleng.com/index.php?id=7279 • Take the CEU Exam: http://www.controleng.com/index.php?id=7285 • For more information on Advantech: http://www.advantech.com • For more information on Moxa: http://www.moxa.com • For more information on another Control Engineering webcast visit http://www.controleng.com/media-library/webcasts.html
    • 3. RCEP standards Control Engineering has met the standards and requirements of the Registered Continuing Education Program. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to RCEP at RCEP.net. A certificate of completion will be issued to each participant. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by RCEP.
    • 4. Purpose and learning objectives • Overview of industrial wireless technologies (ISA100, HART Wireless, WiFi, WiMax), including economics and how to develop a new engineering mindset • Engineering decision criteria, including essential requirements and desired requirements • Need for a long-term wireless strategy • Specifications downfalls when evaluating radio aspects • Rapid prototyping of wireless sensors in an industrial environment • Define best practices to RF design in complex/harsh RF (radio frequency) environments, such as manufacturing/ industrial/ power generation facilities • Review real examples of wireless sensor deployments in industrial environments for workforce efficiency and condition- based monitoring.
    • 5. Speakers Moderator: Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media, covering industrial wireless and, among other topics, since 1994. Stephen Muenstermann, RoviSys Building Technologies, DC market manager - Lead wireless field solutions for a major automation company for North America and the global interface for all industrial wireless infrastructure. - More than 10 years of experience in industrial applications, radio frequency and communications military intelligence, industrial instrumentation and commercial wireless - Conducted more than 300 seminars on industrial wireless technology. Damon Brady, section manager, SAIC Energy, Environment & Infrastructure More than 15 years of technical and managerial experience in network communications and critical infrastructure services, with 10 years leading network design, implementation, and integration processes for utility, energy, public safety, and Smart Grid clients. Douglas Bowers, senior project manager, SAIC Energy, Environment & Infrastructure More than 15 years of experience in system integration for communication and network systems, identifying requirements, writing specifications, design, testing, and delivery, including rapid prototyping and development of sensor systems for industrial environments.
    • 6. RF & Wireless Technology Simplifying the Beast! By: Stephen Muenstermann, RoviSys
    • 7. Objectives Learning objectives are to understand: • Overview of industrial wireless technology, including economics and how to develop a new engineering mindset • ISA-100, HART Wireless, WiFi, WiMax, proprietary • Engineering decision criteria, including essential requirements and desired requirements • Need for a long-term wireless strategy • Specifications and downfalls when evaluating radio aspects of the technology
    • 8. What do we know? • Wireless will happen (or has happened) at your facility! • Wireless creates some level of fear • We can access a wealth of information today through wireless • There is power in using wireless • It is not an engineering norm to use wireless in an industrial environment • Not in typical FEL practice FEL = front end loading
    • 9. Today • The cloud has created forced adoption; it cannot be ignored. – Scalability – Design and set-up immediately – Proof of concept with minimal infrastructure cost – Plant floor security is rock solid – Great economic advantage – Huge savings a reality • Brownfield apps carry biggest gains • Regulatory wins huge • Inventory management • LDAR • SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition)
    • 10. Whose standard is best? • 802.11 a, b, g, and n • 802.15.4 (ZigBee®) • ISA® 100.11a • HART Wireless • 802.16 (WiMax®) • Proprietary • Coexistence? ZigBee is a registered trademark of Zigbee Alliance in the U.S. and/or other countries. ISA is a registered trademark of the International Society of Automation in the U.S. and/or other countries. WiMax is a registered trademark of WiMax Forum in the U.S. and/or other countries.
    • 11. Evaluation criteria • Do wireless! But, have a strategy. • DIY? (Do it yourself?) – Things to consider – Shortcuts can cost – Vendor claims will hurt • Outsource? – Evaluation process – Background – RF or IT – Big difference • Success in connectivity can only derive if RF works RF = radio frequency IT = information technology
    • 12. Evaluation criteria • Do wireless! But, have a strategy. • Building a managed radio frequency (RF) network – How would you do wired? • Control your cloud • Wireless FEED (front-end engineering design) • Build for scalability • Integration is easy – Learn RF’s simple tribulations
    • 13. Need for strategy Sensor network ISA®, HART and proprietary Handheld HMI/remote worker SCADA/HMI/BMS/EPMS Security/regulatory Safety HMI = BMS = EPMS = ISA is a registered trademark of the International Society of Automation in the U.S. and/or other countries.
    • 14. Other reasoning strategy planning • Don’t leave design to ad-hoc measures • Current security issues likely exist – Business-level over plant floor • Managing RF/noise environment • RF and antenna management • Appoint a wireless manager lead/leader RF = radio frequency
    • 15. Specifications and shortfalls simple observations to learn • Communication – antenna and RF • Near field and robbing BW • Hops – rings and understanding mesh • Organized process – Is it self-healing? • Spectrum analysis tools • Coexistence with everything and noise floor • Simple security/HR problems • LOS – line of site – true meaning • ISA® symbols to live by: RF = radio frequency HR = Human Resources BW = ISA is a registered trademark of the International Society of Automation in the U.S. and/or other countries.
    • 16. Communication – antenna and RF D Near field RF = radio frequency
    • 17. Directional = greater distance Yagi and parabolic typical Communication – antenna and RF D RF = radio frequency
    • 18. Problems: • Antenna signal warping due to metal proximity • All antennas at same frequency mounted at same level • Crowding near field, which means receiver sensitivity breaks down, data loss/overlap Near field and coexistence potential mounting issues
    • 19. Near field and coexistence potential mounting issues Problems: • Busy tower • Antennas are properly staggered • Directional antennas aimed to not cross paths
    • 20. Rings of mesh! CR 1 2 3 4 5 Every hop results in a 50% drop in packet delivery. Mesh design strength is only as solid as its design. Beware of the vendor that says, “Just throw in another repeater.” You may get the data, but with what issues? Within your four rings, it is possible to have hundreds of sensors, depending on architecture.
    • 21. Mesh has different meanings • Not all mesh networks are self-healing – Does it require a master controller? – Can the nodes/routers act as gateways? – How many routes will it list internally? – Does it require integration to organize mesh? • Is the mesh only radio sets or sensors? • Can end-points mesh? • Where does redundancy end? – Any single point of failure?
    • 22. Spectrum analysis tools 900 MHz 2.4GHz/5GHz ISM bandsWall Attenuating source ISM = industrial, scientific, and medical
    • 23. Coexistence-noise floor • Every transmitter adds to the noise floor • Most industrial wireless networks will coexist • Microwave ovens, CCTV, other; proximity is key CCTV = closed- circuit television
    • 24. Security – HR issues Real security • Authentication • Encryption • Deterministic • FHSS • Anti-collision • Notification Attacks • Extremely expensive • Highly sophisticated • No real impact if successful Real insecurity - easy Chain-link fence tossed into substation FHSS = frequency hopping spread spectrum
    • 25. LOS/Fresnel zone LOS = line of sight
    • 26. Spectrum analysis/Line of RF site 900 MHz 2.4 GHz/5 GHz ISM bands Wall Attenuating sourceISM = industrial, scientific, and medical
    • 27. Summary of objectives • Overview of industrial wireless technology, including economics and how to develop a new engineering mindset • ISA-100, HART Wireless, WiFi, WiMax, proprietary • Engineering decision criteria, including essential requirements and desired requirements • Need for a long-term wireless strategy • Specifications and downfalls when evaluating radio aspects of the technology
    • 28. Wireless Monitoring, Sensing By: Damon Brady, SAIC Douglas Bowers, SAIC
    • 29. Objectives • Educate viewer on rapid prototyping of wireless sensors in an industrial environment. • Define best practices to radio frequency (RF) design in complex/harsh RF environments such as manufacturing/industrial/power generation facilities. • Review real examples of wireless sensor deployments in industrial environments for workforce efficiency and condition-based monitoring.
    • 30. • Enterprise cyber security assessments, design, and remediation • Critical infrastructure IT network design and build (IP voice and data, fiber/copper cable plant) • Wireless networking • Control systems hands-on experience • Infrastructure design, implementation and operations Wireless and mobility – field and plant (IT) services • Real-time data and predictive analytics • Comprehensive technology support • Location-based services for people and assets • Asset management and optimization • Application support (work management, asset management, scheduling) 32 IP = Internet Protocol
    • 31. Wireless and mobility –Wireless design practice Business challenge: To design wireless connectivity for multiple domestic nuclear power plants. Including power block and turbine facilities (radioactive areas). Approach • Senior-level engineering teams with proper credentialing for passive and active surveys to each location • Develop advanced computer-based modeling of each facility in order to develop highly accurate radio frequency (RF) model and drive final design and bill of materials • Retain RF engineers for installation process oversight • Perform commissioning, testing and validation Results • This approach will deliver highly accurate designs, reducing materials costs and need for design modification after installation, • Allows for delivery of new, advanced applications into all areas of facility, increasing safely and efficiency • Lower dose for install crews (less time in radioactive environments). It gets done faster … 33
    • 32. Wireless infrastructure deployment Design development process • Discovery activity • Requirements verification • Engineering analysis (RF allowability, etc.) • Analysis of drawings • Site walkdown (challenge briefings, etc.) • Onsite wireless surveys • Passive survey: RF data collection, spectrum analysis, building composition analysis, outdoor features/topology noted. Deliverable: preliminary design • Active survey: Validation exercise for our preliminary AP placements. Measure actual signal performance. Deliverable: final design • Wireless modeling and network design • Final bill of materials (equipment specifications and unit counts) • Design team: • Range of skills (systems/RF/network engineering) 34 RF = radio frequency AP = Access Point
    • 33. 35 The critical infrastructure problem • Critical infrastructures have unique monitoring needs that are not being met. – Old: expensive to instrument, monitor and maintain – accidents happen – New: generate an unmanageable “firehose” of uncorrelated data • Compliance requirements are reactionary and constantly evolving • The market is flooded with fragmented point solution offerings • Industry lacks a “systems approach” solution to the market • Results from failure to monitor and act – Accidents – Shutdowns – Cyberattack These are not perceived problems – they are happening today and are a matter of national and international importance.
    • 34. • Problem – legacy, aging equipment may be “un-instrumented,” and data acquisition on performance and maintenance may be natively impossible. Being able to retrofit adhoc instrumentation and communicate to gather data and metrics would allow better operational monitoring and maintenance planning and reduce downtime • Solution – technology and approach – development of ad-hoc (off- the-shelf) modules for sensor types (humid, temperature, vibration, pressure, magnetic) to allow rapid deployment of communicating sensors to gather data • Advantages, benefits and efficiencies – allows ad-hoc, short-term, or emergency surveillance of problem devices. Allows a modular approach to wireless sensor measurement in an aging plant environment without large-scale digital equipment upgrades Ad-hoc instrumentation and metering The availability of a pervasive wireless network within the plant allows the deployment of extremely low-cost sensors and meters for tactical or short-term operational needs. A „ ”bug-like” approach for the deployment of multi-sensor devices, specific for operation‟s needs is used. For example, suspect faulty motor or pump gets a camera, vibration sensor, Hall-effect monitor attached to the housing. In the new world, the sensor takes three minutes to assemble the modules in the “plant shop,” and one minute to provision on the network.
    • 35. • Wireless acts as a common enabling technology • How Provides ubiquitous communications capabilities Cross-operational value and utility Common IP access using standards with robust cybersecurity Reduces lead-time and costs associated with wired cabling Wireless plant communications Provides the communications foundation to address many of the challenges of facility process transformation
    • 36. Innovation areas of focus • Goal: Develop innovative technology solutions to achieve strategic goals. • Guiding principles – Enabling – Modular – Scalable and replicable – Standards-based … generally – Financially viable • Focus areas – Operations/workflow efficiency – Radiation protection and safety – Regulatory compliance
    • 37. Critical infrastructure integrity monitoring reference architecture P2P/PMP = Point to Point/Point to Multipoint ULP = Ultra Link Processing XML = Extensible Markup Language S/A = Situational Awareness MOM = Manager of Managers PCN = Process Control Network ERP is enterprise resource planning software ® ERP Connecting software
    • 38. Emergency planning zone radiation monitoring • Key business drivers – Support real-time emergency decision making – Extend emergency planning zone (EPZ) monitoring area to 50 miles – Provide low-cost situational awareness • Innovative approach – Developed long-life battery-powered sensors – Benefit from unique RF communications technology – Deliver data via SQL plus XML stream – XML standard equals reduced software integration to PDS • Return on investment targets – Reduce regulatory compliance costs – Increase planning accuracy – resource targeting – Low-cost insurance and customer service benefit • Status – Pilot phase successful, very strong business case identified – Have been asked to field a complete system at second facility PDS = Plant Display Software SQL = Search and Query Language XML = Extensible Markup Language
    • 39. Wireless micro vibrational sensor • Key business drivers – Preventive/predictive maintenance of critical components through • Vibration analysis • Condition monitoring • Machine health • Independent monitoring and diagnostics • Safety shutoff sensing • Innovative approach – Enable independent data capture outside of traditional SCADA systems – Significantly reduce cost to allow monitoring of a larger sample of components – Leverage ORW to reduce overall infrastructure costs • Battery life, form factor, etc. • Reduce number of access points (APs), network infrastructure • Significantly increase number of sensor sets able to communicate across unlicensed bandwidth • Return on investment targets – Enable dose optimization, achieve/exceed ALARA targets – Reduced worker time in plant through automation of equipment monitoring function – Shift from predictive to condition-based maintenance ORW = On ramp wireless ALARA = As low as reasonably achievable (radiation exposure levels)
    • 40. Today’s Webcast Sponsors
    • 41. Question and answer session Ask a panelist a question by entering your question in the “Question & Answer” box and clicking submit. Mark T. Hoske, webcast moderator, content manager, Control Engineering Stephen Muenstermann, RoviSys Building Technologies, DC market manager www.rovisysbt.com Damon Brady, section manager, SAIC Douglas Bowers, senior project manager, SAIC www.saic.com/EEandI
    • 42. Wireless Industrial Applications Sponsored by:

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