Industrial Ethernet,
Part 2: Case Studies
Sponsored by:
RCEP Standards
Control Engineering has met the standards and
requirements of the Registered Continuing
Education Program. ...
Today’s Webcast Sponsors
Purpose and Learning Objectives
Attendees will learn:
• The importance of correct cable installation
and verification
• Re...
Technical Questions and Support
Technical problems?
• Click on the “Question Mark Symbol” on the upper right hand
corner o...
Speakers
• Steve Schneebeli, Director of
Engineering / IT
Malisko Engineering Inc.
www.malisko.com
• Moderator: Mark T. Ho...
Industrial Ethernet, Part 2:
Case Studies
Steve Schneebeli
Director of Engineering / IT
Malisko Engineering Inc.
Agenda – Industrial Ethernet
case studies
• Case Study #1 – Importance of correct cable installation
& verification
• Case...
Case Study #1
The Importance of Correct Cable
Installation and Verification
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
How many people have seen these types of
installation techniques?
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
• On one particular project, the client
decided to install Ethernet cabling using
in-house resources...
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
• Our client decided to stick with their
maintenance people as installers.
• One result was CAT6 cab...
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
• This installation method caused:
– Kinks in the CAT6 cable,
– Stretching of the internal conductor...
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
• The non-trained client’s maintenance
personnel terminated all RJ-45 plugs,
which resulted in:
– CA...
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
• CAT6 non-shielded network cabling was
run within the motor control center, next to
480 V ac VFD an...
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
• During start-up, we noticed some issues with
the 2 new Ethernet enabled MCC sections
and the exist...
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
• We then started checking newly pull
cables and found issues as previously
outlined.
• The biggest ...
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
• After re-terminating several RJ-45
connectors, checking for severe cable
damage during pulling, an...
Case Study #1 (Cont.)
• Lessons we learned from this installation
is to ensure the cable installer knows
industrial Ethern...
Case Study #2
Reasons Why You Should Spend Time
Designing your Ethernet Infrastructure
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Spending time designing your Ethernet
infrastructure is sometimes overlooked.
• By spending the co...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
The following common questions are
sometimes overlooked during a
network design.
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Managed vs. unmanaged switches – Why
should I care?
• Layer 3 vs. Layer 2 switches – When do I
nee...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Managed vs. unmanaged switches – why
should I care?
– Unmanaged switches typically do not have
any...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Managed vs. unmanaged switches – why
should I care?
– Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) provides
path r...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Managed vs. unmanaged switches – why
should I care?
– Managed switches have SNMP (Simple
Network M...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Managed vs. unmanaged switches – why
should I care?
– Managed switches have the ability to
create ...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
Sample VLAN Network
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Layer 3 vs. Layer 2 Switches – When do I
need Layer 3?
– Layer 2 networks forward all traffic, esp...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Port Settings – Auto negotiate vs hard
coding speed and duplex
– Managed switches allow for the ab...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Port settings – Auto negotiate vs hard
coding speed and duplex
– When hard coding a port, care mus...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Cheap consumer grade vs. commercial or
industrial grade components – Why does it
matter?
– Saving ...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Cheap consumer grade vs. commercial or
industrial grade components – Why does it
matter?
– Most co...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Cheap consumer grade vs. commercial or
industrial grade components – Why does it
matter?
– Consume...
Case Study #2 (Cont.)
• Lessons learned executing several
industrial Ethernet network designs is:
– Always make sure your ...
Case Study #3
How to Minimize the Impact of an Existing
Poorly-Designed Network Infrastructure
Case Study #3 (Cont.)
Case Study #3 (Cont.)
• When installing or upgrading an Ethernet
Infrastructure in an existing plant, there is
a possibili...
Case Study #3 (Cont.)
• During our first on-site visit, we took an
inventory of all the switches and network
devices on th...
Case Study #3 (Cont.)
• Once the plant was down for installation of
the new network, we were able to trace
out connections...
Case Study #3 (Cont.)
• We then began to systematically
disconnect existing cabling to come up
with a rough map of the net...
Case Study #3 (Cont.)
• RJ-45 connectors were reviewed and
reinstalled as needed, then checked with a
cable verifier.
• We...
Case Study #3 (Cont.)
• IGMP Snooping was enabled on existing
managed switches.
• All network drops on the new system were...
Case Study #3 (Cont.)
• By systematically reviewing each
connection point in the existing process
network, we were able to...
Case Study #3 (Cont.)
• Lessons learned while dealing with an
existing network infrastructure:
– Make sure you spend time ...
Wrap-up
These three case studies give an insight to
common situations found in the Industrial
Ethernet Network world, and ...
Ethernet research and trends
Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager,
Control Engineering, CFE Media
Ethernet research includes
Information from IHS on:
• Use of routers versus managed switches
• Pace of fieldbus connection...
Industrial Ethernet switches, routers
Industrial Ethernet components
Ethernet is gaining on fieldbus
Ethernet growth for motion control
Use of Ethernet with motor drives and motion controllers will more than triple in
2016 ...
Ethernet for process industries
Use of Ethernet as an industrial communications technology in motion control
to more than ...
Ethernet switches get a boost
• Use of industrial Ethernet (IE) switches, driven by discrete
automation, will get a boost ...
Ethernet research from others
• IHS commented recently on decline in growth of stand-alone industrial
routers, as use of m...
Submitting Questions, Exit Survey and Archive
Question?
Type your question in the “Ask a Question” box on the Webcast cons...
Speakers
• Steve Schneebeli, Director of
Engineering / IT
Malisko Engineering, Inc
www.malisko.com
• Moderator: Mark T. Ho...
Thanks to Today’s Webcast Sponsors
Industrial Ethernet,
Part 2: Case Studies
Sponsored by:
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Industrial Ethernet, Part 2: Case Studies

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Industrial Ethernet case studies provide lessons learned as detailed in specific installations to gain practical advice from working installations, to ensure your next application uses the best practices to maximize benefits in a minimum amount of time. Ethernet survey results will be discussed. An exam and certificate are available for one professional development hour (PDH), according to Registered Continuing Education Program (RCEP) rules from the American Council of Engineering Companies.

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Industrial Ethernet, Part 2: Case Studies

  1. 1. Industrial Ethernet, Part 2: Case Studies Sponsored by:
  2. 2. RCEP Standards Control Engineering has met the standards and requirements of the Registered Continuing Education Program. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to RCEP at RCEP.net. A certificate of completion will be issued to each participant. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by RCEP.
  3. 3. Today’s Webcast Sponsors
  4. 4. Purpose and Learning Objectives Attendees will learn: • The importance of correct cable installation and verification • Reasons why should you spend time designing your Ethernet Infrastructure • How to minimize the impact of an existing poorly-designed network Infrastructure. • Key market trends about industrial Ethernet.
  5. 5. Technical Questions and Support Technical problems? • Click on the “Question Mark Symbol” on the upper right hand corner of your screen, where you will be directed to a list of system checks. • If you are experiencing issues with your slides or audio please refresh your browser, or click the “Refresh Media” button directly under the presenter’s headshot. • You can control the volume settings of this webcast by adjusting the volume on your computer, or by adjusting the volume on the webcast platform. • If you need a technician, type a message into the “Ask a Question” box and someone will get to you as quickly as possible. Individual technical questions will be answered in the “Answered Questions” on the left hand side of your screen.
  6. 6. Speakers • Steve Schneebeli, Director of Engineering / IT Malisko Engineering Inc. www.malisko.com • Moderator: Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media, covering industrial networking, among other topics, since 1994 www.controleng.com
  7. 7. Industrial Ethernet, Part 2: Case Studies Steve Schneebeli Director of Engineering / IT Malisko Engineering Inc.
  8. 8. Agenda – Industrial Ethernet case studies • Case Study #1 – Importance of correct cable installation & verification • Case Study #2 – Why you should spend time designing your Ethernet infrastructure • Case Study #3 – How to minimize the impact of an existing poorly designed network. • Questions? (You can submit these as we go.)
  9. 9. Case Study #1 The Importance of Correct Cable Installation and Verification
  10. 10. Case Study #1 (Cont.) How many people have seen these types of installation techniques?
  11. 11. Case Study #1 (Cont.)
  12. 12. Case Study #1 (Cont.)
  13. 13. Case Study #1 (Cont.)
  14. 14. Case Study #1 (Cont.) • On one particular project, the client decided to install Ethernet cabling using in-house resources. • We stressed the importance of knowledgeable installation techniques, using certified installers, following industry standards, and performing cable verification after installation.
  15. 15. Case Study #1 (Cont.) • Our client decided to stick with their maintenance people as installers. • One result was CAT6 cables being pulled through conduits using techniques an electrician would use for pulling larger conductor cabling.
  16. 16. Case Study #1 (Cont.) • This installation method caused: – Kinks in the CAT6 cable, – Stretching of the internal conductors and conductor pair twisting, – Compression of the cable.
  17. 17. Case Study #1 (Cont.) • The non-trained client’s maintenance personnel terminated all RJ-45 plugs, which resulted in: – CAT6 cable sheaths cut too long, – Cuts into individual conductors from cutting back the cable sheath, – Poorly and inconsistently crimped connectors.
  18. 18. Case Study #1 (Cont.) • CAT6 non-shielded network cabling was run within the motor control center, next to 480 V ac VFD and 120 V ac motor starter wiring. This can cause: – Electromagnetic interference (EMI) resulting in potential interference with Ethernet cabling.
  19. 19. Case Study #1 (Cont.) • During start-up, we noticed some issues with the 2 new Ethernet enabled MCC sections and the existing MCC sections that were retrofitted with Ethernet. • MCCs would randomly drop out of the system tree in the PLC, along with random dropouts of HMI communications. • We knew the majority of the new cabling was pulled through the MCCs. • By pulling out the connection to the MCC, everything started working.
  20. 20. Case Study #1 (Cont.) • We then started checking newly pull cables and found issues as previously outlined. • The biggest cause of the random communications issues were RJ-45 connections. • Several needed to be re-terminated.
  21. 21. Case Study #1 (Cont.) • After re-terminating several RJ-45 connectors, checking for severe cable damage during pulling, and re-routing some cabling through the MCCs, communications were then solid.
  22. 22. Case Study #1 (Cont.) • Lessons we learned from this installation is to ensure the cable installer knows industrial Ethernet network best practices, and at a minimum, tests the installation using an Ethernet cable tester prior to start-up.
  23. 23. Case Study #2 Reasons Why You Should Spend Time Designing your Ethernet Infrastructure
  24. 24. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Spending time designing your Ethernet infrastructure is sometimes overlooked. • By spending the correct amount of time designing and specifying your Ethernet Infrastructure, you can eliminate common problems, and ensure that your network can handle future growth.
  25. 25. Case Study #2 (Cont.) The following common questions are sometimes overlooked during a network design.
  26. 26. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Managed vs. unmanaged switches – Why should I care? • Layer 3 vs. Layer 2 switches – When do I need Layer 3? • Port settings – Auto negotiate vs. hard coding speed and duplex • Cheap consumer grade vs. commercial or industrial grade components – Why does it matter?
  27. 27. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Managed vs. unmanaged switches – why should I care? – Unmanaged switches typically do not have any web-based interfaces to adjust port settings. – Advanced switching technologies, such as Spanning Tree Protocol or IGMP Snooping, are only available in managed switches. (IGMP stands for Internet group management protocol.)
  28. 28. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Managed vs. unmanaged switches – why should I care? – Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) provides path redundancy in the network. – STP provides redundant paths while preventing loops that are created by multiple active paths between switches.
  29. 29. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Managed vs. unmanaged switches – why should I care? – Managed switches have SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) built-in to remotely monitor switches on the network. – Quality of Service (QoS) prioritizes critical traffic (such as video) within managed switches.
  30. 30. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Managed vs. unmanaged switches – why should I care? – Managed switches have the ability to create VLANs or Virtual Networks. VLANs (virtual local area networks) allow a switch to logically group devices together to isolate traffic between these groups even when the traffic is passing over the same physical switch.
  31. 31. Case Study #2 (Cont.) Sample VLAN Network
  32. 32. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Layer 3 vs. Layer 2 Switches – When do I need Layer 3? – Layer 2 networks forward all traffic, especially ARP (address resolution protocol) and DHCP (dynamic host configuration protocol) broadcasts. – Layer 3 switching can contain broadcast traffic to the local network. – Layer 3 switches allow for routing between subnets. – Downside of Layer 3 is a decrease of switching performance due to the overhead needed for routing.
  33. 33. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Port Settings – Auto negotiate vs hard coding speed and duplex – Managed switches allow for the ability to set network speed (10 Mbps, 100 Mbps, 1 Gbps) and port duplex (half or full). – Some applications and network devices recommend hard coding these settings on the switch to match the hard coded setting of the device.
  34. 34. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Port settings – Auto negotiate vs hard coding speed and duplex – When hard coding a port, care must be taken that the settings for the port match the settings hard coded in the device. – Communications issues will arise if both the port and the device do not match.
  35. 35. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Cheap consumer grade vs. commercial or industrial grade components – Why does it matter? – Saving cost of an installation makes it appealing to use consumer grade devices. – These devices do not have the robustness typically found in commercial or industrial grade devices.
  36. 36. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Cheap consumer grade vs. commercial or industrial grade components – Why does it matter? – Most consumer grade devices, such as wireless access points and routers, do not have the range, throughput, or security features (RADIUS Authentication) of commercial or industrial grade devices. RADIUS stands for remote authentication dial in user service.
  37. 37. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Cheap consumer grade vs. commercial or industrial grade components – Why does it matter? – Consumer grade devices typically do not include the ability to implement VLANS or Virtual LAN segregation.
  38. 38. Case Study #2 (Cont.) • Lessons learned executing several industrial Ethernet network designs is: – Always make sure your are following industry standards, – Ask yourself if you need Layer 3 hardware, – Use the right equipment for the job. Don’t sacrifice robustness for cost savings, – Check your port settings!
  39. 39. Case Study #3 How to Minimize the Impact of an Existing Poorly-Designed Network Infrastructure
  40. 40. Case Study #3 (Cont.)
  41. 41. Case Study #3 (Cont.) • When installing or upgrading an Ethernet Infrastructure in an existing plant, there is a possibility you may run into some “not so elegant” installations. • One of our projects was to add a new process center into an existing facility, which had a very primitive controls network.
  42. 42. Case Study #3 (Cont.) • During our first on-site visit, we took an inventory of all the switches and network devices on the existing network. • Our client had a network device list with IP addresses, but not a good cabling diagram. • We would need to tie our new controls network into the existing process network.
  43. 43. Case Study #3 (Cont.) • Once the plant was down for installation of the new network, we were able to trace out connections within the existing network. • We found switches buried in panels up in the ceiling that no one knew of. • Cabling issues were also uncovered.
  44. 44. Case Study #3 (Cont.) • We then began to systematically disconnect existing cabling to come up with a rough map of the network, and document connections on the existing switches. • We replaced consumer-grade switches with industrial-rated switches.
  45. 45. Case Study #3 (Cont.) • RJ-45 connectors were reviewed and reinstalled as needed, then checked with a cable verifier. • We found a switch loop that was causing intermittent drop outs of PLC to PLC communications from the new system to the existing process network.
  46. 46. Case Study #3 (Cont.) • IGMP Snooping was enabled on existing managed switches. • All network drops on the new system were verified with a cable tester.
  47. 47. Case Study #3 (Cont.) • By systematically reviewing each connection point in the existing process network, we were able to ensure solid communications between the existing devices and the new process system.
  48. 48. Case Study #3 (Cont.) • Lessons learned while dealing with an existing network infrastructure: – Make sure you spend time reviewing the physical installation and hardware, – Check existing cabling and connections, – Make sure the existing hardware is configured correctly, – Test the network before connecting your new system into it.
  49. 49. Wrap-up These three case studies give an insight to common situations found in the Industrial Ethernet Network world, and how to remediate them. By following industry standards, such as ANSI/TIA-1005 – M.I.C.E. and ANSI/TIA-569- C.0 (cable lengths), you can eliminate many issues found in typical industrial installations. www.tiaonline.org/standards
  50. 50. Ethernet research and trends Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media
  51. 51. Ethernet research includes Information from IHS on: • Use of routers versus managed switches • Pace of fieldbus connections compared to industrial Ethernet connections over the next 10 to 15 years • Use of Ethernet as an industrial communications technology in motion control • Industrial Ethernet nodes in process industries through 2016 ARC Advisory Group on outlook for industrial Ethernet switches and what is driving the marketplace
  52. 52. Industrial Ethernet switches, routers
  53. 53. Industrial Ethernet components
  54. 54. Ethernet is gaining on fieldbus
  55. 55. Ethernet growth for motion control Use of Ethernet with motor drives and motion controllers will more than triple in 2016 from 1.8 million new connected nodes in 2011, IHS said.
  56. 56. Ethernet for process industries Use of Ethernet as an industrial communications technology in motion control to more than triple by 2016, IHS said.
  57. 57. Ethernet switches get a boost • Use of industrial Ethernet (IE) switches, driven by discrete automation, will get a boost from increased use in process and infrastructure applications, said ARC Advisory Group in May 2013. • IE differs from commercial switches: ruggedized enclosures, high IP ratings, mounting and connector types, ability to withstand extended temperature ranges, redundant components, and conformance to industrial infrastructure standards, among others. • Infrastructure applications include smart grid and intelligent rail. • The mix of form factors, point counts, port speeds, media types, and other device characteristics continues to expand. • Availability of switches that meet requirements such as IEC 61850-3 for substation automation and EN 50155 for rail further enhances Ethernet’s suitability in infrastructure applications.
  58. 58. Ethernet research from others • IHS commented recently on decline in growth of stand-alone industrial routers, as use of managed switches is expected to grow steadily over five years. • While annual fieldbus connections still outpace industrial Ethernet connections, IHS believes that within 10 to 15 years industrial Ethernet will be the dominant networking technology in industrial environments and almost all components will offer Ethernet connectivity as standard. • Use of Ethernet as an industrial communications technology in motion control will more than triple by 2016, IHS said. • Industrial Ethernet nodes in process industries are projected to rise to 8.7 million units in 2016, up a 96% from 4.4 million in 2011, IHS said. • Industrial Ethernet switches, driving by discrete automation, will get a boost from increased use in process and infrastructure applications, said ARC Advisory Group.
  59. 59. Submitting Questions, Exit Survey and Archive Question? Type your question in the “Ask a Question” box on the Webcast console and click “Send.” We will get to as many questions as we have time for. Questions that are for today’s presenters will be answered verbally during the Q&A session at the end of the webcast. Exit Survey: Please take a moment to answer a few questions on our exit survey that will pop up on your screen at the conclusion of the webcast. We use the answers to help make improvements to our webcast program. Archive: • Within 7 days, an archive with Q&A will be posted • We will send an email to registered attendees with hyperlink • Can also access from www.controleng.com home page
  60. 60. Speakers • Steve Schneebeli, Director of Engineering / IT Malisko Engineering, Inc www.malisko.com • Moderator: Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media, covering industrial networking, among other topics, since 1994 www.controleng.com
  61. 61. Thanks to Today’s Webcast Sponsors
  62. 62. Industrial Ethernet, Part 2: Case Studies Sponsored by:
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