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Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies
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Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies

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Industrial Ethernet implementations continue to gain traction on the plant floor and in process plants. What are the key industrial Ethernet technologies being installed today and why? Learn from …

Industrial Ethernet implementations continue to gain traction on the plant floor and in process plants. What are the key industrial Ethernet technologies being installed today and why? Learn from automation system integrators about criteria used to choose types of switches, cabling, and topologies being applied for industrial Ethernet applications. Ethernet survey results are discussed. An exam and certificate are available for one professional development hour (PDH), according to Registered Continuing Education Program (RCEP) rules from the American Council of Engineering Companies.

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  • 1. Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies Sponsored by:
  • 2. RCEP Standards Control Engineering has met the standards and requirements of the Registered Continuing Education Program. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to RCEP at RCEP.net. A certificate of completion will be issued to each participant. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by RCEP.
  • 3. Today’s Webcast Sponsors
  • 4. Purpose and Learning Objectives • Identify the Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard for Industrial Premises to choose the proper cabling infrastructure for a particular network environment • Identify the Ethernet features required for particular network protocols and environment • Identify the best network topology for a particular plant layout. • Examine the 2013 Ethernet trends in CE’s “Mobility, Ethernet and Wireless” report • Look at trends from other Ethernet research
  • 5. Technical Questions and Support Technical problems? • Click on the “Question Mark Symbol” on the upper right hand corner of your screen, where you will be directed to a list of system checks. • If you are experiencing issues with your slides or audio please refresh your browser, or click the “Refresh Media” button directly under the presenter’s headshot. • You can control the volume settings of this webcast by adjusting the volume on your computer, or by adjusting the volume on the webcast platform. • If you need a technician, type a message into the “Ask a Question” box and someone will get to you as quickly as possible. Individual technical questions will be answered in the “Answered Questions” on the left hand side of your screen.
  • 6. Speakers • Mike Robbins, Network Engineering Manager, TriCore Inc. • Moderator: Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media, covering industrial networking, among other topics, since 1994
  • 7. Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies Mike Robbins Network Engineering Manager TriCore Inc.
  • 8. Industrial Ethernet Technologies • TIA standards for Ethernet copper cabling • The categories and how to choose. • Best practices • Industrial Ethernet networks • Type of networks • Ethernet switch features • IGMP snooping • VLAN’s • Ethernet topologies
  • 9. TIA Twisted-pair cable categories Category Makeup Data rate Network compatibility Cat-1 2 pair 1 Mbps Analog voice Cat-3 4 twisted pairs 10 Mbps – 2 pair 10BaseT Cat-5 4 twisted pairs 10 Mbps – 2 pair 100 Mbps – 2 pair 10BaseT 100BaseTX Cat-5e 4 twisted pairs 10 Mbps – 2 pair 100 Mbps – 2 pair 1 Gbps – 4 pair 10BaseT 100BaseTX 1000BaseTX Cat-6 4 twisted pairs 1 Gbps – 4 pair 10 Gbps – 4 pair (55m) 1,000BaseTX 10,000BaseTX Cat-6a 4 twisted pairs 10 Gbps – 4 pair 10,000BaseTX
  • 10. Fixed cabling & patch cables • Patch cables typically use stranded conductors • Can extend up to 10 meters (33 ft) • Terminated at the factory • The cabling between patch panels and jacks are referred to as fixed or “horizontal” cabling • Can extend up to 90 meters (295 ft) • Normally solid conductors • Terminate with modular jacks or punch down Ethernet over copper cable is limited to 100m
  • 11. CAT5e 100Mb max 24/26 AWG CAT6a 10Gb max 23 AWG Center spline CAT6 1Gb max 23 AWG Categories for Industrial Applications
  • 12. TIA-568 Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling Standard • The TIA 568 standard defines these areas: • Backbone • Connecting hardware • Cords and jumpers • Horizontal (solid wires) cables • Stranded (patch) cables • Optical fiber •Type of fiber, transceivers, and supported distances
  • 13. TIA-1005 Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard for Industrial Premises • In contrast to the TIA-568 standard, which addresses commercial buildings, the central concept of this standard is the potential exposure to hostile environments in the industrial space. • A prime design principle of the standard is the special cabling system requirements for industrial operations. •Category 6 or better cabling shall be used for the Automation Islands.
  • 14. TIA-1005: MICE definition M1I1C1E1 - Worst case commercial environment M2I2C2E2 - Worst case light industrial environment M3I3C3E3 - Worst case industrial environment
  • 15. Telecommunications Room Control Room Typical MICE Range 1 (commercial grade) Factory Floor Network Distribution Typical MICE Ranges 1-2 from commercial grade to light industrial Work Area Consolidation points Typical MICE Ranges 1-2 from commercial grade to light industrial Automation island Control Panels, On Machine (distributed) MICE Ranges 1-3 from commercial grade to harsh environment rated
  • 16. Cabling best practices • Planning is key • Include cable management • Color coded cabling • Patch panels • Naming scheme • Label!
  • 17. Network documentation • Understanding of critical network dependencies • Assists with troubleshooting • Point of reference for expansion
  • 18. Industrial networks What is the role of your network? • SCADA • Systems that collect data from PLCs. • Use explicit (unicast) communications • Control network Controls drives, I/O, servos, etc. • EtherCAT • EtherNet/IP • Modbus TCP • Profinet • etc.
  • 19. Multicast: GroupCommunication consumer producer producer producer Industrial Ethernet switches IGMP Snooping HMI HMI
  • 20. Industrial Ethernet switches Broadcasts Broadcast 192.168.1.0 192.168.5.0
  • 21. Industrial Ethernet switches Router Broadcast Domain 1 Broadcast Domain 2 Router BroadcastBroadcast 192.168.1.0 192.168.5.0
  • 22. Industrial Ethernet switches VLAN (virtual local area network) Broadcast Domain 1 Broadcast Domain 2 Router BroadcastBroadcast 192.168.1.0 192.168.5.0 Switch w/VLAN’s VLAN 1 VLAN 2
  • 23. Industrial Ethernet switches VLAN 2 VLAN 2 VLAN 3 VLAN 3 VLAN 3 VLAN 2 VLAN 3
  • 24. Industrial Ethernet switches How fast are they? 10ms 10ms 2.5µs 2.5µs 2.5µs Total latency = 7.5µs
  • 25. Ethernet topologies Star
  • 26. Ethernet topologies Tree
  • 27. Ethernet topologies - Ring Ring requirements: • Managed switches • Ring protocol enabled
  • 28. Ethernet topologies Redundant star
  • 29. Industrial Ethernet Technologies • Use the TIA-1005 standard to select the proper infrastructure for your industrial network. • Document your network in detail. • If you have a control network with Ethernet/IP, make sure you use managed switches and enable IGMP snooping. • Ethernet topologies commonly used for industrial Ethernet networks
  • 30. Mobility, Ethernet and Wireless Research Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media
  • 31. Introduction and methodology Objective Control Engineering performed this research to better understand more about integration, use, and spending for mobility, Ethernet, and wireless technologies and how they help users of automation, controls, and instrumentation to be more productive. Sample The sample was selected from recipients of Control Engineering for whom email addresses were available. Method Subscribers were sent an email asking them to participate in this study. The email included a URL linked to the questionnaire.  Data collected: Oct. 11, 2013, through Oct. 29, 2013  Respondents were asked about the technologies or services they buy or specify that use, connect with, or support mobility, Ethernet, or wireless technologies. Those responding positively were asked about specific products, spending trends, use of mobility devices, integration, protocols, security, and mobile applications.  Number of respondents: 200  Margin of error: +/- 6.9 at a 95% confidence level  Incentive: Survey participants were offered the opportunity to enter a drawing for a $150 VISA gift card.
  • 32. CE Ethernet research topics • Ethernet products specified • Future spending and productivity resulting from Ethernet use • Products and services spending comparison • Servicing and integrating Ethernet products • Where Ethernet technologies are used in the workplace • Ethernet protocols used. (An Ethernet protocol is the software that runs over the Ethernet physical layer.) • How integrated is Ethernet? • How easily was Ethernet implemented? • Ethernet adoption benefits • Ethernet adoption challenges
  • 33. Ethernet products specified Q: Identify the specific products you use, buy, or specify, or expect to within the next 12 months for business/professional purposes. (n=200) Switches, wire or cable, networks, connectors and routers are the most common products specified. 64% 59% 54% 52% 49% 40% 35% 31% 19% 19% Switches Wire or cable Networks Connectors Routers Cordsets Gateways Other infrastructure hardware Other infrastructure software Services for infrastructure
  • 34. Future spending and productivity Q: Complete the following statements by estimating: (n=200) Analysis 9% 40% 41% 4% 8% Productivity outlook 9% 40% 43% 6% 3% Products and services spending outlook Not sure Decrease Remain the same Increase Significantly increase
  • 35. Products and services budget Q: For the products and services you purchase, what do you spend more money on for Ethernet and wireless? (n=200) By a three-fold margin, products get more budget than Ethernet services, said respondents. Products, 59% Services, 16% About the same, 25%
  • 36. Servicing and integrating Q: For the following, indicate who most often works on, services, and integrates these devices at your location: (n=200) Operations or engineering and business IT were evenly split among those working on, servicing, and integrated Ethernet devices. 30% 19% 31% 14% 4% 4% Operations or engineering Manufacturing IT Business IT System integrator Consultant Other
  • 37. Servicing and integrating (continued) Q: Where do you interface with the industrial mobility, Ethernet, or wireless technologies mentioned above? (n=200) Where Ethernet, industrial mobility, and wireless technologies are used... 77% 50% 39% 36% 35% 21% 19% Place of business (plant floor/operations) Place of business (reaching into enterprise) Other company locations Customer locations Home With service providers or system integrators With product suppliers, vendors
  • 38. Ethernet protocols Q: Which Ethernet protocols are used in your facility? (n=200) Most-used Ethernet protocols are EtherNet/IP, TCP/IP and UDP, Modbus TCP, and Profinet. 72% 67% 42% 29% 19% 16% 10% 9% 8% 7% 6% 6% 5% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1%
  • 39. Integrated technologies Q: Currently, how integrated with controls, automation, instrumentation are following technologies? (n=200) 46% of respondents see Ethernet as highly integrated with controls, automation and instrumentation, and 40% see Ethernet as somewhat integrated. 46% 40% 12% 3% Highly integrated Somewhat integrated Not very integrated Not integrated
  • 40. Integration experience Q: How was the integration experience in the last 12 months? (n=200) Most respondents said Ethernet was relatively easy to install. 42% 37% 14% 3%5% Easy (plug and play) More challenging (plug, configure, and play) Difficult (plug, configure, unplug, call someone) Tried, but didn't have resources (tried, gave up) Knew better than to even try
  • 41. Ethernet technology benefits Q: What are the primary benefits of industrial use of Ethernet technologies at your location (or company)? (n=200) By far, the primary Ethernet benefit is greater data access. Next benefits are ease of use and productivity increases, followed by cost savings. 63% 37% 37% 28% 23% 22% 20% 20% 17% 14% 14% 5% 3%
  • 42. Ethernet adoption challenges Q: What challenges do you see with adoption (or additional use) of these technologies in your business? (n=200) Security and lack of training and education and support are among major adoption challenges. 23% 22% 18% 17% Security issues Lack of training/education/ processes to support adoption or integration No budget, lack of investment for capital investments No budget, lack of investment for system integration or services investments 14% 13% 9% 5% Lack of knowledge of use cases or benefits Lack of business case to support investment Safety issues No need for these technologies
  • 43. Summary of CE Ethernet research • Most common products: Switches, wire or cable, networks, connectors and routers • 40% of respondents expect to spend more on Ethernet and increase productivity. • Around 60% of what’s spent on Ethernet goes to products. Services get less. • Operations or engineering and business IT were evenly split: Ethernet workers • Ethernet, industrial mobility, and wireless technologies are used 77% on the plant floor or operations areas. • Most used Ethernet protocols: EtherNet/IP, TCP/IP and UDP, Modbus TCP, Profinet, and EtherCAT. • 46% of respondents see Ethernet as highly integrated with controls, automation and instrumentation, and 40% see Ethernet as somewhat integrated. • Most respondents said Ethernet was relatively easy to install. • Data access is the greatest technology benefit of Ethernet by 63% of respondents. • Security and lack of training, education and support are among major adoption challenges.
  • 44. Industrial Ethernet switches, routers
  • 45. Industrial Ethernet components
  • 46. Ethernet is gaining on fieldbus
  • 47. Ethernet growth for motion control Use of Ethernet with motor drives and motion controllers will more than triple in 2016 from 1.8 million new connected nodes in 2011, IHS said.
  • 48. Ethernet for process industries Use of Ethernet as an industrial communications technology in motion control to more than triple by 2016, IHS said.
  • 49. Ethernet switches get a boost • Industrial Ethernet (IE) switches, driving by discrete automation, will get a boost from increased use in process and infrastructure applications, said ARC Advisory Group in May 2013. • IE differs from commercial switches: ruggedized enclosures, high IP ratings, mounting and connector types, ability to withstand extended temperature ranges, redundant components, and conformance to industrial infrastructure standards, among others. • Infrastructure applications include smart grid and intelligent rail. • The mix of form factors, point counts, port speeds, media types, and other device characteristics continues to expand. • Availability of switches that meet requirements such as IEC 61850-3 for substation automation and EN 50155 for rail only further enhances Ethernet’s suitability in infrastructure applications.
  • 50. Ethernet research from others • IHS commented recently on decline in growth of stand-alone industrial routers, as use of managed switches is expected to grow steadily over five years. • While annual fieldbus connections still outpace industrial Ethernet connections, IHS believes that within 10 to 15 years industrial Ethernet will be the dominant networking technology in industrial environments and almost all components will offer Ethernet connectivity as standard. • Use of Ethernet as an industrial communications technology in motion control will more than triple by 2016, IHS said. • Industrial Ethernet nodes in process industries are projected to rise to 8.7 million units in 2016, up a 96% from 4.4 million in 2011, IHS said. • Industrial Ethernet switches, driving by discrete automation, will get a boost from increased use in process and infrastructure applications, said ARC Advisory Group.
  • 51. Submitting Questions, Exit Survey and Archive Question? Type your question in the “Ask a Question” box on the Webcast console and click “Send.” We will get to as many questions as we have time for. Questions that are for today’s presenters will be answered verbally during the Q&A session at the end of the webcast. Exit Survey: Please take a moment to answer a few questions on our exit survey that will pop up on your screen at the conclusion of the webcast. We use the answers to help make improvements to our webcast program. Archive: • Within 7 days, an archive with Q&A will be posted • We will send an email to registered attendees with hyperlink • Can also access from www.controleng.com home page
  • 52. Speakers • Mike Robbins, Network Engineering Manager, TriCore Inc. www.tricore.com • Moderator: Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media, covering industrial networking, among other topics, since 1994 www.controleng.com
  • 53. Thanks to Today’s Webcast Sponsors
  • 54. Industrial Ethernet, Part 2: Case Study Applications will be held on Thursday, November 21, 2013 Click here for more information and to register for part 2 of this Webcast series.
  • 55. Industrial Ethernet, Part 1: Technologies Sponsored by:

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