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The data center market has expanded dramatically in the past few years, and it doesn’t show signs of slowing down. Many clients and building owners are requesting modular data centers, which can be …

The data center market has expanded dramatically in the past few years, and it doesn’t show signs of slowing down. Many clients and building owners are requesting modular data centers, which can be placed anywhere data capacity is needed. Modular data centers can help cash-strapped building owners add a new data center (or more capacity) to their site, and can assist facilities with unplanned outages, such as disruptions due to storms. Owners look to modular data centers to accelerate the “floor ready” date as compared to a traditional brick and mortar.

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  • 1. Modular Data Center Design #CSEmodulardatacenter Sponsored by:
  • 2. Today’s Webcast Sponsors:
  • 3. Learning objectives •Learn the differences between the various types of modular data centers. •Know about the benefits—and negative aspects—of specifying modular data centers. •Understand the cooling requirements and issues associated with modular data centers, including compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1 and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). •Understand the unique power/electrical requirements and issues associated with modular data centers.
  • 4. Definitions MDF: main distribution frame IDF: intermediate distribution frame ISO: International Organization for Standardization PUE: power usage effectiveness UPS: uninterruptible power supply #CSEmodulardatacenter
  • 5. Presenters: Bill Kosik, PE, CEM, BEMP, LEED AP BD+C HP Critical Facilities Data Center Energy Technologist Brian Rener, PE, LEED AP M+W U.S. Inc. - A Company of the M+W Group Electrical Engineering Discipline Platform Leader Quality Assurance Manager Amara Rozgus CFE Media Consulting-Specifying Engineer and Pure Power Editor in Chief/Content Manager
  • 6. Sponsored by: Modular Data Center Design #CSEmodulardatacenter
  • 7. Aiming for the data center of the future •Efficient and effective •Self-regulating •Standardized processes •Fully available and resilient •Monitoring & control •Fully service-oriented •Green •Business-centric •Integrated •Modular and elastic •Shared resource pools •Policy-based •Fully automated •Right sourcing
  • 8. (1) IDC Directions 2013: Why the Datacenter of the Future Will Leverage a Converged Infrastructure, March 2013, Matt Eastwood ; (2) & (3) IDC Predictions 2012: Competing for 2020, Document 231720, December 2011, Frank Gens; (4) http://en.wikipedia.org The growing Internet of Things (IoT) Pervasive connectivity Explosion of information Today 400,710 ad requests 2000 lyrics played on Tunewiki 1,500 pings sent on PingMe 208,333 minutes Angry Birds played 23,148 apps downloaded 416,340 tweets Smart device expansion 60 sec 2013 30 Billion By 2020 40 Trillion GB … for 8 Billion 10 Million DATA (1) (2) (3) Devices Mobile Apps (4) The IoT is a world where nearly everything is connected to a data center, items like cars, home appliances, glasses, watches, jewelry, clothes…. even packaged goods. Every one of these devices will, one way or another, be connected to a data center for control, management, and analysis. The required data center capacity cannot be served effectively with current data center and server architectures.
  • 9. Software Defined Server 45 hot-plug cartridges Compute, Storage, or Combination • Single-server = 45 servers per chassis • Quad-server =180 servers per chassis Approximate average 55 W per cartridge (20 W min, 90 W max) 45 servers per chassis = 450 servers per rack = 24 kW per rack 180 servers per chassis = 1800 servers per rack = 97 kW per rack Data centers can put up to 1800 servers in a single, 47U rack, which could take 10X as many racks using a standard architecture. This extreme density reduces, per a given unit of work, the datacenter size, energy consumption, complexity and cost.
  • 10. Modular Data Center Basics • Two basic types of pre-manufactured spaces – ISO containers – Non ISO containers – Modular rooms
  • 11. Modular Data Center Basics Containerized – Lower Capex, scalable, relocatable – ISO • Conform to ISO standards for size. 10-, 20-, 40-, and 53-ft lengths standard, 9.5-ft width typically • Usually built to UL standards and not occupied • Up to 19 conventional IT racks • 3 kW to 40 kW per rack and higher – Non ISO • Can be any size • Maybe built to IFB/IFC codes • Can be occupied.
  • 12. Modular Data Center Basics Modular rooms – Prefabricated rooms, assembled on-site – Expandable construction – Rapid deployment over stick built – General same features as conventional data centers.
  • 13. Modular Data Center Basics Containerized – Many types and configurations • All in ones • IT/data only • MDF/IDFs • Power gear and UPSs • Cooling modules – Can be located outside or inside a structure – Code officials often unfamiliar – Rapid and scalable deployment environments.
  • 14. Server Power Use Efficiency Based on testing data, the average power has been steady with an increase in 2011. The idle power as a percentage of full power has been trending downward over the testing period of 2007-2013.
  • 15. Server Power and Inlet Temperature In general, server power demand increases commensurate with inlet temperature This graph shows server airflow and power requirements based on inlet temperature and workload percent. Notice that the power and airflow both increase as the inlet temperature increases above 28 C, even at an idle workload.
  • 16. Increasing Temperature to Reduce Energy Use Conclusion: Using hotter inlet temperatures works well in hot climates and when using economizer. In cold climates, there is relatively little difference because economization using colder temperatures is available most of the year.
  • 17. PUE Varies Based on Climate 0.35 difference in PUE based on climate and cooling system type
  • 18. Modular Data Center Cooling Technologies Direct OA / Evaporative Consists of a supply fan, filters, direct evaporative media and direct expansion cooling assembly. Is most efficient in cold to moderate temperature environments with low to moderate humidity levels. Indirect Evaporative Consists of a supply fan, filters, indirect evaporative media and direct expansion cooling assembly. Provides separation between environments with high levels of air pollution due to 100% recirculation allowing the unit to a run a closed air circuit. Heat Wheel Consists of multiple supply and exhaust fans, filters, heat transfer wheel and direct expansion cooling assembly. Provides isolation of the outdoor air streams where direct use in the data center is not possible. Air-to-Air HX/Heat Pipe Consists of multiple supply and exhaust fans, filters, heat transfer wheel and direct expansion cooling assembly. Provides isolation of the outdoor air streams where direct use in the data center is not possible.
  • 19. Cooling Modularity and Energy Efficiency • Multiple cooling methods – Adaptable to different climate zones – Tuned to local environment – Provide highest efficiency for a particular location – Use external cooling in most climates, reducing power and water consumption • External containers – Easier installation, maintenance, upgrade – Protection for critical IT equipment – Add containers to conform to increased IT loads
  • 20. Modularity and Energy Efficiency
  • 21. Types of Modular Data Centers Better described as Flexible Facilities Traditional Modular Container Modular Industrialized Modular
  • 22. Growth and Flexibility Traditional Modular Industrialized Data center Power/cooling Expansion
  • 23. Traditional Modular Data Center Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Power/Cooling Infrastructure Data Center Admin and Support Spaces
  • 24. Container Modular Data Center DX Modules
  • 25. Industrialized Modular Data Center
  • 26. About the Mechanical and Electrical Systems
  • 27. Summary of Optimization Levels • Extreme regional variations in CO2 from electricity generation • Determine appropriate balance of water and electricity usage • Climate WILL impact HVAC energy use – select sites carefully • Use evaporative cooling where appropriate • Economizer strategy will be driven from climate characteristics • Design power and cooling modularity to match IT growth • Plan for power-aware computing equipment • Use aisle containment or direct-cooled cabinets • Design in ability to monitor and optimize PUE in real time • Push for highest supply temperatures and lowest moisture levels • Identify tipping point of server fan energy/inlet temperature • Minimize data center footprint by using high-density architecture DataCenterClimateSynergiesConvergence
  • 28. Modular Data Centers - Electrical Containerized power criteria – Typical maximum IT load is around 1 MW – Voltage levels 120/208, 400, 480, 600 Volts – Multiple power sources.
  • 29. Modular Data Centers - Electrical Tier ratings – Available from Tier I to Tier IV
  • 30. Modular Data Centers - Electrical Container examples – Combined DC module – Power modules
  • 31. Modular Data Centers - Electrical Container layout example
  • 32. Modular Data Centers - Electrical Connecting power to a container – Hard-wired – Plug
  • 33. Modular Data Centers - Electrical Power sources – Main switchgear/switchboards – UPS – Generators Separate or containerized
  • 34. Modular Data Centers - Electrical Power sources – Main gear
  • 35. Modular Data Centers - Electrical Grounding
  • 36. Resources • Consulting-Specifying Engineer • Critical Facilities Summit • Pure Power • Uptime Institute • 7x24 Exchange #CSEmodulardatacenter
  • 37. Bill Kosik, PE, CEM, BEMP, LEED AP BD+C HP Critical Facilities Data Center Energy Technologist wjk@hp.com Brian Rener, PE, LEED AP M+W U.S. Inc. - A Company of the M+W Group Electrical Engineering Discipline Platform Leader Quality Assurance Manager Brian.Rener@mwgroup.net Thank You!
  • 38. Presenters: Bill Kosik, PE, CEM, BEMP, LEED AP BD+C HP Critical Facilities Data Center Energy Technologist Brian Rener, PE, LEED AP M+W U.S. Inc. - A Company of the M+W Group Electrical Engineering Discipline Platform Leader Quality Assurance Manager Amara Rozgus CFE Media Consulting-Specifying Engineer and Pure Power Editor in Chief/Content Manager
  • 39. Thanks to Today’s Webcast Sponsors:
  • 40. Modular Data Center Design #CSEmodulardatacenter Sponsored by: