Black White Parent Bill of Rights Walmart
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Black White Parent Bill of Rights Walmart

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August 29, 2013

August 29, 2013
Black White Parent Bill of Rights Walmart
Shopping at Walmart The Eyes Definitely Do Not Have It

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    Black White Parent Bill of Rights Walmart Black White Parent Bill of Rights Walmart Presentation Transcript

    • Stakeholders Communication Management Walmart Canada P. Anna Paddon May 14 2013 Walmart Families Black and White La Compagnie Walmart du Canada Shopping With Your Family Canada
    • A Healthy Shopping Environment : safe at shopping, both physically and emotionally. : Fair treatment, regardless of race, creed, national origin, economic status, gender, or age, as an individual. : Experienced staff, trained : Know that any negative or cruel behavior among students or between students and staff will not be tolerated. Clear, Courteous Communication: treated with courtesy by all members of the staff, the right to participate in meaningful parent-child, family shopping with conferences to discuss,the right to visit grocery stores and become familiar with each and informed, and classes, the right to approach any staff member with a concern and that the staff member will listen carefully and will do everything possible to address the issue. A Healthy Shopping Environment
    • August 28, 2013. Island Parent. August 2013. “The Eyes Definitely Do Not have It.” Dadspeak, Gregg Pratt. Page 52. ISSUU: http://issuu.com/islandparent/docs/aug13 Clear, Courteous Communication As You Shop. Parents and kids discuss every purchase as they shop: whether the parents speak at all, the kids are listening as they sleep and as they accompany people to the grocery store.
    • Policies on Heavy Items Information on Store Policies http://gardengoatquote.wordpress.com/2012/04/
    • Informatio n Special Information Specials Back to School Sales Credit: ur_16682 http://www1.umn.edu/news/features/2004/UR_21163_REGION1.html
    • Parents, kids, and fits By Martha Erickson From eNews, August 19, 2004 When you see a parent smack or yell at a child because the child wants to get out of a grocery cart or is greedily reaching for something on a shelf, would you stand by idly or would you give the parent a piece of your mind? Most of us have been in that situation at one time or another. And we're often not sure what to do, we do nothing and feel bad later. A few years ago, Prevent Child Abuse America (PCAA), a national advocacy organization based in Chicago, surveyed 1,250 Americans about how they have responded in similar situations. Forty-four percent said they had failed to respond upon observing child abuse, and half of those reported they had no idea how to respond effectively. Of those who indicated they did respond, 55 percent said they had given a disapproving look to the offending adult and 63 percent reprimanded the adult verbally. Granted, it feels awkward, and sometimes even dangerous, to intervene in a stranger's interactions with a child. PCAA recommends several ways to respond that are respectful of both the parent and child and that recognize the struggling parent's own need for support and encouragement. Here are some examples: Start a conversation with the adult to direct attention away from the child. For example, you could say, "My child often gets upset at the store too." By identifying supportively with the parent, you often can defuse the situation. Try to divert the misbehaving child's attention by talking to him or her. Shopping with a parent can be boring and frustrating to a child, and sometimes a little attention from fellow shoppers can help ease the tension. Look for an opportunity to praise the child or parent. You might say, "You're a brave mom to venture into a crowded supermarket with a lively toddler." Or you could say to the child, "You were so good to sit in that cart for such a long time. You must be getting really tired." If the child is in danger, offer assistance to the parent. For example, "How about if I unload your cart for you (or carry your groceries to your car) while you comfort your child?" Or you might just say, "You've really got your hands full. How can I help?" And most important of all, avoid making negative remarks or giving looks of disapproval to the parent. Anything perceived by the parent as criticism is likely to increase the parent's anger and make matters even worse for the child. For more information about preventing child abuse, see www.preventchildabuse.org. Martha Erickson is a developmental psychologist and the director of the U's Children, Youth, and Family Consortium. © 2009–2013 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer Last modified on March 9, 2009 Credit: ur_16682 http://www1.umn.edu/news/features/2004/UR_21163_REGION1.html If you see a parent ... yell at a child in a public place, avoid making negative remarks or giving looks of disapproval to the parent.
    • Participation in Decisions Sometimes Participation in Decisions http://www.teluguone.com/comedy/content/english-jokes-23-3058.html
    • Question and Answer Period Promote Your Child’s Social Etiquette and Language Development in Decisions
    • Boisterous kids...urban review How To Take Your Kids To Public Places (Without Being Embarrassed) Posted on Feb 22, 2013 by http://www.danijohnson.com/2013/how-to-take-your-kids-to-public-places-without-being-embarrassed/ Dani Johnson
    • Parent Bill of Rights Parent Bill of Rights Microsoft office.org We believe that parents have rights and that their concerns are reasonable and important. A Healthy Learning Environment: Parents have the right to know that their child will be safe at school, both physically and emotionally. Parents have the right to know that all children will be treated fairly regardless of race, creed, national origin, economic status, gender, or age and that each child will be treated as an individual. Parents have the right to know that the staff is experienced and trained in child development. Parents have the right to know that any negative or cruel behavior among students or between students and staff will not be tolerated. Clear, Courteous Communication: Parents have the right to be treated with courtesy by all members of the staff. Parents have the right to participate in meaningful parent-teacher conferences to discuss their child’s school progress and welfare. Parents have the right to visit schools and classes. Parents have the right to know that they can approach a staff member with a concern and that the staff member will listen carefully and will do everything possible to address the issue. Information on School Policies: Parents have the right to information on academic requirements of the school program. Parents have the right to inspect their child’s record and respond to any statement. Parents have the right to be informed of and to appeal school policies. Parents have the right to be informed of and to appeal administrative decisions. Information on Special Programs: Parents have the right to be informed of all programs in special education. Parents have the right to appeal the placement of their child in a special education class. Parents have the right to extra assistance from the school, including counselling, tutorial, and remedial programs. Participation in Decisions: Parents have the right to give feedback on any changes in scheduling of extracurricular activities. Parents have the right to meet and give feedback on final candidates for principal. Parents have the right to participate in faculty evaluation, recognizing that the responsibility for final evaluation rests with the principal.