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Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
Online class   intro to agile & scrum - final
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Online class intro to agile & scrum - final

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Here are the slides from online Intro to Agile

Here are the slides from online Intro to Agile

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  • 1. Copyright Conscires 2011<br />1<br />Intro to Agile & Scrum<br />Presenter:<br />BachanAnand<br />T: @bachananand<br />E: bachan.anand@conscires.com<br />
  • 2. Agenda<br />2<br />Intro to Agile & Scrum<br />Scrum Framework<br />Scrum Roles<br />Planning & Estimation<br />Team Engagement<br />Q&A - Class feedback<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />2<br />
  • 3. Agile Manifesto<br />3<br />Individuals and interactions over processes and tools <br />Working software/product over comprehensive documentation <br />Customer collaboration over contract negotiation <br />Responding to change over following a plan <br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />3<br />
  • 4. Class Agenda - Taskboard<br />4<br />
  • 5. Agile 12 Principles<br />5<br />Highest priority is to satisfy the customerthrough early and continuous deliveryof valuable software<br />Welcome changing requirements<br />Deliver working software (Product) frequently<br />Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project<br />Build projects around motivated individuals<br />Most efficient and effective method of conveying information is face-to-face conversation<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />5<br />
  • 6. Agile 12 Principles<br />6<br />Working software (product) is the primary measure of progress<br />Agile processes promote sustainable development (maintain a constant pace indefinitely)<br />Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility<br />Simplicity (art of maximizing amount of work not done) is essential<br />Best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams<br />At regular intervals, team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts<br />http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />6<br />
  • 7. Scrum Foundation<br />7<br />Empiricism <br />Detailed up-front planning and defined processes are replaced by just-in-time Inspect and Adapt cycles<br />Self-Organization<br />Small teams manage their own workload and organize themselves around clear goals and constraints<br />Prioritization<br />Do the next right thing<br />Rhythm<br />Allows teams to avoid daily noise and focus on delivery<br />Collaboration<br />Leaders and customers work with the Team, rather than directing them<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />7<br />
  • 8. Scrum Values<br />8<br />Transparency<br />Everything about a project is visible to everyone<br />Commitment<br />Be willing to commit to a goal<br />Courage<br />Have the courage to commit, to act, to be open and to expect respect<br />Focus<br />Focus all of your efforts and skills on doing the work that you have committed to doing<br />Respect<br />Respect and trust the different people who comprise a team<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />8<br />
  • 9. Scrum Framework<br />9<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />9<br />
  • 10. Scrum and Waterfall Differences<br />10<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />10<br />
  • 11. Scrum Roles<br />11<br />Product Owner<br />Maximize the value of the work done by prioritizing the features by market value<br />Scrum Master<br />Manages the Scrum framework<br />Team<br />Self-organizing empowered individuals motivated by business goals<br />Other Stakeholders<br />Anyone who needs something from the team or the team something from<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />11<br />
  • 12. Scrum Roles Details – Product Owner<br />12<br />Thought Leader and Visionary<br />Drives the Product Vision (for example, with Story Mapping)<br />Prioritizes the User Stories <br />Maintains the Product Backlog with the team<br />Accepts the Working Product (on behalf of the customer)<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />12<br />
  • 13. Scrum Roles Details – Scrum Master<br />13<br />Servant Leader<br />Facilitates the Process<br />Supports the Team<br />Removes Organizational Impediments<br />Socializes Scrum to Management<br />Enable close collaboration across all roles and functions<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />13<br />
  • 14. Scrum Roles Details – Scrum Team<br />14<br />Cross-Functional <br />5-8 Members<br />Self-Organizing<br />Focused on meeting Commitments<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />14<br />
  • 15. Roles Relationship<br />15<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />15<br />
  • 16. Management Roles (Servant Leadership)<br />16<br />Is a servant first and ensures other people – i.e. followers or stakeholders – highest priority needs are being served <br />Empowers others and supports an environment of trust <br />Has empathy and sensitivity to the needs and interest of all stakeholders <br />Is open to the voice of others by supporting discussions that includes those without a voice<br />Accept risks; takes the risk of failure along with the chance of success, while trusting others <br />My cup is always full – my focus is now; I’ve learned from yesterday and I’m planning for tomorrow<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />16<br />
  • 17. Scrum roles vrs tradition roles<br />17<br />
  • 18. Pre-Scrum Planning<br />18<br />Pre-Scrum is where projects are approved, budgets and resources assigned <br />Project Portfolio’s are expensive<br />They are risky<br />Do we have the right people with the right experience and skills?<br />Can we afford the project?<br />What are the objectives of the project? Clear goals.<br />Lack of commitment<br />Can we verify the promise was met?<br />The business want value and a return on investment<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />18<br />
  • 19. Pre-Scrum Planning<br />19<br />Pre-Portfolio<br />Active Portfolio<br />Post-Portfolio<br />Reject<br />Success or<br />Failure<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />Projects <br /><ul><li>Being formulated
  • 20. Evaluated
  • 21. Pending approval</li></ul>Projects<br /><ul><li>Approved
  • 22. Pending Kick-off
  • 23. Executing</li></ul>Projects <br /><ul><li>Executed
  • 24. M & E </li></ul>19<br />
  • 25. 20<br />
  • 26. Product Vision & Role Engagement<br />21<br />A goal to aspire to<br />Can be summarized in a short statement of intent<br />Communicate it to the team<br />Common format:<br />For: (Our Target Customer)<br />Who: (Statement of need)<br />The: (Product/Product name) is a (Product/Product category)<br />That: (Product/Product key benefit, compelling reason to buy and/or use)<br />Unlike: (Primary competitive alternative)<br />Our Product: (Final statement of primary differentiation)<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />21<br />
  • 27. Product Backlog<br />22<br />A living list of requirements captured in the form of User Stories<br />Represents the WHAT of the system<br />Prioritization with respect to business value is essential!<br />Each story has estimated Story Points, which represent relative size, and is determined by those actually doing the work<br />Higher priority items are decomposed and lower priority items are left as larger stories (epics)<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />22<br />
  • 28. Relative Estimation<br />23<br />Humans are better at relative estimates than absolute estimates<br />Many heads are better than one<br />Estimates are made by those who perform the work<br />Estimate size/complexity – Derive duration<br />The goal is to get useful estimates with minimal effort<br />Estimates are not commitments<br />Planning Poker is the common method for estimation<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />23<br />
  • 29. Fruit Salad – Relative estimation<br />24<br />
  • 30. Relative Estimation<br />25<br />Story Points:<br />Commonly used in Agile estimation<br />No real-world dimensions<br />Compare one story to another<br />Based on effort, complexity, risk<br />Precision is not critical<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />25<br />
  • 31. Scrum Release - Velocity<br />26<br />Total number of story points completed by a team in a Sprint<br />Can be used by the team as a reference during Sprint Planning<br />Used by Product Owner to plan out the releases<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />26<br />
  • 32. Scrum Release Planning<br />27<br />Product Owner, in conjunction with the team, formulates Release Plans by applying the team Velocity to the Product Backlog<br />Release Plans are revisited after every Sprint<br />Two ways to approach<br />Fix scope and determine how many sprints are needed<br />Fix time and determine how much scope can be completed<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />27<br />
  • 33. User Stories<br />28<br />Product requirements formulated as one or more sentences in the everyday or business language of the user<br />As a <user>, I would like <function> so that I get <value><br />Each User Story has an associated Acceptance Criteria that is used to determine if the Story is completed<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />28<br />
  • 34. Sprint Backlog<br />29<br />List of stories, broken down into tasks, that is committed for any particular Sprint<br />Owned and managed by the Team<br />Any team member can add, delete or change the sprint backlog with additional tasks<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />29<br />
  • 35. User Stories<br />30<br />Independent<br />Not overlap in concept and be able to schedule and implement them in any order<br />Negotiable<br />Not an explicit contract for features; rather, details will be co-created by Product Owner and Team<br />Valuable<br />Add business value<br />Estimated<br />Just enough to help the Product Owner rank and schedule the story's implementation<br />Sized Appropriately<br />Need to be small, such as a few person-days<br />Testable<br />A characteristic of good requirements<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />30<br />
  • 36. Task Board<br />31<br />Active visual indicator of flow of work<br />Should be visible to team members at all times<br />Should be kept current<br />Encourages self-organization, and collaboration<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />31<br />
  • 37. DOD - (Definition of Done)<br />32<br />Team creates its own definition of Done in the interest of creating quality software<br />Definition can evolve over sprints<br />Example checklist (not exhaustive):<br />Unit tests pass (ideally automated)<br />Customer Acceptance tests pass<br />User docs written<br />UI design approved by PO<br />Integrated into existing system<br />Regression test/s pass (ideally automated)<br />Deployed on staging server<br />Performance tests pass<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />32<br />
  • 38. Definition of Done<br />33<br />
  • 39. Sprint Burn-down<br />34<br />Shows daily progress in the Sprint<br />X-axis is the number of days in the Sprint<br />Y-axis is the number of remaining stories<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />34<br />
  • 40. Release Burn-down<br />35<br />Shows progress across Sprints<br />X-axis is the number of Sprints<br />Y-axis is the total number of stories<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />35<br />
  • 41. Daily Standup Meetings<br />36<br />Meetings held in same location, same time, every day<br />Time-boxed at 15 minutes<br />Encourages self-organization, rhythm, and collaboration<br />Not a status meeting<br />Each Team member speaks to:<br />What did I accomplish in the last 24 hours<br />What do I plan to accomplish in the next 24 hours<br />Any impediments getting in the way of my work<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />36<br />
  • 42. Sprint Planning<br />37<br />Sprint Planning meeting held at beginning of each Sprint<br />Time and Resources are fixed in any given Sprint <br />Goal is to have prioritized Sprint Backlog, broken down into tasks, that the Team can commit to<br />During planning, Team commits to scope that can be completed in the Sprint, taking into account the definition of Done<br />Story points may be refined<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />37<br />
  • 43. Sprint Review<br />38<br />Occurs at the end of each Sprint<br />Inspect and Adapt the product (Empiricism)<br />The team meets with the Product Owner (and Stakeholders) to demonstrate the working software from the Sprint<br />This is a hands-on software demo (not a PowerPoint) that usually requires some prep beforehand<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />38<br />
  • 44. Retrospectives<br />39<br />Occurs at the end of each Sprint<br />Inspect and Adapt the process (Empiricism)<br />Team and ScrumMaster meet to reflect on what went well and what can be improved<br />Tone of the meeting is that everyone did their best and now look to how can we improve<br />Retrospectives must conclude with team commitments to action<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />39<br />
  • 45. Scrum Myths<br />40<br />Scrum Myths:<br />No quality/no testing<br />People burnout because of short and frequent delivery cycles (sprints)<br />No culture change is needed<br />Will make a better team<br />Scrum is the only Agile method<br />Solution to all<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />40<br />
  • 46. Class Retrospective<br />41<br />
  • 47. Scrum Myths<br />42<br />Scrum Myths:<br />A silver bullet<br />Management believes it will solve all problems<br />Easy to implement<br />Cowboy coding<br />No documentation<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />42<br />
  • 48. Scrum Facts<br />43<br /><ul><li>Scrum:
  • 49. Exposes issues sooner
  • 50. Increases visibility, leading to faster issue resolution
  • 51. Facilitates complete feedback & continuous improvements
  • 52. Allows people to fail and learn from failure
  • 53. Moves away from the blame culture
  • 54. Embraces small incremental changes
  • 55. Simple but not easy</li></ul>Copyright Conscires 2011<br />43<br />
  • 56. Take Away<br />44<br /><ul><li>Scrum is a lightweight framework with a simple set of rules, built on foundations and values
  • 57. Scrum enables teams to discover their true potential and deliver quality software that adds business value</li></ul>Copyright Conscires 2011<br />44<br />
  • 58. Appendix - Roles<br />45<br />Product Owner<br />Thought Leader and Visionary, who drives the Product Vision, maintains the Product Backlog, prioritizes the User Stories, and accepts the Working Software (on behalf of the customer)<br />ScrumMaster<br />Servant Leader, who facilitates the process, supports the Team, removes organizational impediments, and socializes Scrum to Management<br />Team<br />Cross-Functional group of 5-8 Members that is self-organizing and focused on meeting Commitments<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />45<br />
  • 59. Appendix – Artifacts<br />46<br />Product Backlog<br />A living list of requirements captured in the form of User Stories, prioritized according to business value<br />Sprint Backlog<br />List of stories, broken down into tasks, that is committed for any particular Sprint; owned and managed by the Team<br />Taskboard<br />Active visual indicator of flow of work<br />Sprint Burndown Chart<br />Shows daily progress in the Sprint<br />Release Burndown Chart<br />Shows progress across Sprints<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />46<br />
  • 60. Appendix - Ceremonies<br />47<br />Sprint Planning<br />Held at beginning of each Sprint, with the goal to have prioritized Sprint Backlog, broken down into tasks, that the Team can commit to<br />Daily Standup<br />Meetings held in same location, same time, every day, with the goal of ensuring that team members are in synch (not a status meeting)<br />Sprint Review<br />Occurs at the end of each Sprint, with the goal of inspecting and adapting the Product<br />Retrospective<br />Occurs at the end of each Sprint, with the goal of inspecting and adapting the process<br />Copyright Conscires 2011<br />47<br />

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