Meeting needs at higher speed:Improved service delivery through high-speed broadbandConnecting Up Conference – 16 May 2013...
Today I will cover the following topics:1. The Digital Economy – why does it matter?2. How are we currently placed?3. How ...
Now is a difficult time for NfPs
What is the Digital Economy ?Australian Government:"The global network of economic and socialactivities that are enabled b...
Why the Digital Economy mattersDigital Technologies, Skills and Applications enable• Productivity and competitivess• innov...
Why does broadband access matter?A 10% increase in broadband penetration in acountry translates to a 0.9-1.5% increase in ...
Digital Economy - NBN Related ProgramsDigital Hubs $13M over 3 yearsDigital Local Government $17MDigital Enterprise $10MTe...
So how are we placedright now?
Broadband subscription by advertised download speedDBCDE Statistical Snapshot (Last updated 17 April 2013)Sources: ABS 201...
Access to the InternetACMA ReportSource: Roy Morgan Single Source (June 2012)Note: Base is households with or withouta fix...
Smartphone and tablet market, Aust. – key indicatorsACMA ReportNote: Mobile internet subscribers include subscribers using...
Market share of smartphone platformsACMA ReportSource: Kantar World Panel ComTech, 25 November 2012 data.Note: EU includes...
Source: Sensis, Sensis e-Business Report: The Online Experience of small and medium enterprises, August 2012.“Internet usa...
Online Activities – strongest growthACMA ReportSource: ACMA (2012) Report 2 – Australia’s progress in the digital economy:...
Source: ABS, 8166.0—Summary of IT Use and Innovation in Australian Business, 2010–11, June 2012.Value of internet commerce...
So what does this mean for NfPs?
Incrementaltechnology –substitutevalueDisruptivetechnology –game changingcatalystA better mousetrap or a real game changer?
Digital Disruption
The National Broadband NetworkChristmas IslandCocos IslandNorfolk IslandLord HoweIsland
Closing the digital divide
What changes can we expect?• Greater personalisation of services (design led thinking)• More informed and engaged customer...
Design Thinking Model
NBN-enabled home health careAcute careHospitalAssisted living/nursing facilityResidential careCost of care per day$10 $100...
TeleworkingMyth or Reality?
What’s wrong with the way we work?Distance – cripples theAustralian economyCommuting – makes our citiesinefficient, reduce...
Telework the realityAustralia has one of thelowest telework rates inthe worldQueensland has one ofthe lowest rates inAustr...
The Problems with Telework1. Managerial cultures1. OHS concerns2. Trust - working from home seen asslacking off3. Employer...
The Emergence of CoworkCoworking = communalspaces, independent work.• Emerged with wifi networks andmobile computing• shar...
Coworking in and around BrisbaneSample of Coworking businessesaround Brisbane:Thought Fort – Fortitude ValleyRabbit Hole –...
Libraries, TAFE and Universities• The State Library and the Edge• The Cube• Brisbane City Library
Bringing together Cowork and TeleworkTelework(Work undertakenremotely from the centraloffice)Institutional workers oflarge...
One final thought…“Too much information can be overwhelming.Making it so people can act on information…sothey get notified...
Thank YouPaul RussellPaul.russell@innovation.dsitia.qld.gov.au
Smart Assistive TechnologiesSource: HOI (2012) Final Report: Research to inform service delivery models that include the a...
Smart Assistive TechnologiesSource: HOI (2012) Final Report: Research to inform service delivery models that include the a...
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Meeting needs at higher speed: Improved service delivery through high-speed broadband - Paul Russell

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Meeting needs at higher speed: Improved service delivery through high-speed broadband - Paul Russell

  1. 1. Meeting needs at higher speed:Improved service delivery through high-speed broadbandConnecting Up Conference – 16 May 2013Paul Russell, General Manager - Digital Economy andCommercialisation , DSITIA (Qld)
  2. 2. Today I will cover the following topics:1. The Digital Economy – why does it matter?2. How are we currently placed?3. How can we take advantage of the digital world for a better future?4. The growing trend of Mobility and Teleworking•Illustration by Leandro Castelao
  3. 3. Now is a difficult time for NfPs
  4. 4. What is the Digital Economy ?Australian Government:"The global network of economic and socialactivities that are enabled by information andcommunications technologies, such as theinternet, mobile and sensor networks."National ICT Australia:“Wealth creation through the production,distribution and consumption of goods andservices enabled by digital technologies.”Plain English version:The marketplace on the internet.•Illustration by Leandro Castelao
  5. 5. Why the Digital Economy mattersDigital Technologies, Skills and Applications enable• Productivity and competitivess• innovation and creativity• collaboration• new business models•Illustration by Paul Foreman• economic growth• choice and accessibility to services• better living standards• skilled jobs
  6. 6. Why does broadband access matter?A 10% increase in broadband penetration in acountry translates to a 0.9-1.5% increase in GDP.Czernick, et al (2011), The Economic JournalIn Australia that would equate to $12-19 billion.•Illustration by Jack Hudson
  7. 7. Digital Economy - NBN Related ProgramsDigital Hubs $13M over 3 yearsDigital Local Government $17MDigital Enterprise $10MTeleworking/ National Telework Week OngoingLeveraging the NBN to Enhance Service Delivery (DHS) 3 year pilotRemote Hearing and Vision Services for Children $4.9MIndigenous Communications $31M over 4 yearsNBN Enabled Education and Skills Services $27M over 4 yearsBroadband for Seniors $10.4M over 4 yearsDigital Regions $60M (concludes June 2013)Digital Business Ongoing websiteSource – DBCDE website 13 May 2013
  8. 8. So how are we placedright now?
  9. 9. Broadband subscription by advertised download speedDBCDE Statistical Snapshot (Last updated 17 April 2013)Sources: ABS 2013, Internet Activity, Australia, December 2012 and earlier editions, Cat0. No. 8153.0.Note: Data for December 2009 to 2012 are for subscribers to ISPs with more than 1000 active subscribers. Earlier data is for all ISPs.
  10. 10. Access to the InternetACMA ReportSource: Roy Morgan Single Source (June 2012)Note: Base is households with or withouta fixed-line telephone service in the home
  11. 11. Smartphone and tablet market, Aust. – key indicatorsACMA ReportNote: Mobile internet subscribers include subscribers using dongles, USB modems, datacards and mobile phone handsets. m=millions.*Relates to activities in the six months to May 2012.Key indicatorJune 2011 June 2012 % changeMobile services in operation 29.28 m 30.20 m +3.1 %Mobile internet subscribers 18.11 m 22.05 m +21.8 %Persons 18 years+ with asmartphone4.25 m8.67 m(May 2012)+104 %Persons 14 years+ using WiFihotspots during the June quarter1.56 m 2.06 m +32.1%Smartphone users aged 18years+ downloading mobile appsduring June2.41 m 4.45 m +85%Persons 18 years+ going online via*: May 2012> mobile phones 9.19 m> tablets 4.37 m> a mobile phone and a tablet 3.65 m
  12. 12. Market share of smartphone platformsACMA ReportSource: Kantar World Panel ComTech, 25 November 2012 data.Note: EU includes France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy and Spain.
  13. 13. Source: Sensis, Sensis e-Business Report: The Online Experience of small and medium enterprises, August 2012.“Internet usage patternsof Australian SMEs haveremained largelyunchanged over thepast two years.”Online activities undertaken by SMEsACMA Report
  14. 14. Online Activities – strongest growthACMA ReportSource: ACMA (2012) Report 2 – Australia’s progress in the digital economy: Participation, trust and confidenceINDICATORS (Online population aged 14 years and over) Jun-11 Jun-12 % ChangeShopping related activities (buying/selling, etc.) 6.16 m 7.81 m +27%Entertainment and amusement activities (stream onlinevideo content, games, etc.)7.40 m 8.72 m +18%Communication activities (email, VoIP, instantmessaging)10.08 m 11.18 m +11%Research and information activities 10.19 m 10.97 m +8%* - Online activities that have occurred during the month of June.
  15. 15. Source: ABS, 8166.0—Summary of IT Use and Innovation in Australian Business, 2010–11, June 2012.Value of internet commerce, AustraliaACMA ReportNote: ABS defines internet e-commerce as the purchase/order of goods and services online regardless of whether or not thepurchases were paid for online. Data relating to 2011–12 not available.
  16. 16. So what does this mean for NfPs?
  17. 17. Incrementaltechnology –substitutevalueDisruptivetechnology –game changingcatalystA better mousetrap or a real game changer?
  18. 18. Digital Disruption
  19. 19. The National Broadband NetworkChristmas IslandCocos IslandNorfolk IslandLord HoweIsland
  20. 20. Closing the digital divide
  21. 21. What changes can we expect?• Greater personalisation of services (design led thinking)• More informed and engaged customers/citizens (social media)• Government driven by outcomes• Health and Aged Care – Assistive technologies• Education – Online opening the vault to opportunities• Disabilities – NDIS a real game changer• Workforce – BYOD, teleworking, the Cloud
  22. 22. Design Thinking Model
  23. 23. NBN-enabled home health careAcute careHospitalAssisted living/nursing facilityResidential careCost of care per day$10 $100 $1000Home careQualityoflifeSupportedself-management
  24. 24. TeleworkingMyth or Reality?
  25. 25. What’s wrong with the way we work?Distance – cripples theAustralian economyCommuting – makes our citiesinefficient, reduces liveability,increases transport costsSilo-ed Workforce – impedescollaboration and businessinnovation
  26. 26. Telework the realityAustralia has one of thelowest telework rates inthe worldQueensland has one ofthe lowest rates inAustraliaWHY?Access Economics (2010) Impacts of Teleworking Underthe NBNhttp://www.dbcde.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0018/130158/ImpactsofteleworkingundertheNBN.pdf
  27. 27. The Problems with Telework1. Managerial cultures1. OHS concerns2. Trust - working from home seen asslacking off3. Employers value workplace interaction4. Need people to be on hand5. Mot workplaces reward presenteeismnot productivity6. There is an unwillingness to becomeflexible in the central office2. Home is not a social orsupported workplace
  28. 28. The Emergence of CoworkCoworking = communalspaces, independent work.• Emerged with wifi networks andmobile computing• shares ideas• supports collaboration• provides informal training –especially in ICTs• creates businesses and networks• Supports the move towardsActivity Based Work (ABW)• Coworking spaces recognised asBusiness Incubators many aresupported with training andmentoring.Hub Melbourne Photo: Paul Russell
  29. 29. Coworking in and around BrisbaneSample of Coworking businessesaround Brisbane:Thought Fort – Fortitude ValleyRabbit Hole – Fortitude ValleyRiver City LabsCo- spaces – Gold CoastSilicon Lakes – Gold CoastGlobal Directory - Deskwanted.com
  30. 30. Libraries, TAFE and Universities• The State Library and the Edge• The Cube• Brisbane City Library
  31. 31. Bringing together Cowork and TeleworkTelework(Work undertakenremotely from the centraloffice)Institutional workers oflarge organisations whousually work at homeCowork(Independent work,shared facilities)Creative and freelanceworkers usingcommunal offices andfacilitiesFlexibleworkCentres
  32. 32. One final thought…“Too much information can be overwhelming.Making it so people can act on information…sothey get notified of what’s important…withoutbeing overwhelmed…see what’s going on andtake action…that’s where the real value is.”Bill Gates - 2008
  33. 33. Thank YouPaul RussellPaul.russell@innovation.dsitia.qld.gov.au
  34. 34. Smart Assistive TechnologiesSource: HOI (2012) Final Report: Research to inform service delivery models that include the application of Smart AssistiveTechnology. Prepared for Queensland Government Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability ServicesPositive client outcomes for elderly and peoplewith disabilities:1. Increased independence2. Confidence to live at home3. Delay of entry into residential facilities4. Less anxiety about one’s safety5. General improvement in quality of lifeRef - Health Outcomes International Final Report
  35. 35. Smart Assistive TechnologiesSource: HOI (2012) Final Report: Research to inform service delivery models that include the application of Smart Assistive Technology. Prepared forQueensland Government Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability ServicesCurrent and ‘In-The-Pipeline’ Technologies:1. Wearable sensors and systems2. Sensing technology3. Ambient sensors4. Web technology5. Real-time closed captioning

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