rural areas in transition

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Dirk Strijker - Professor in Rural Development and Chairman of the department of Cultural Geography at the University of Groningen, NL
Willem Foorthuis - President European Co-operation Network for Rural Development

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rural areas in transition

  1. 1. NL DIRK STRIJKER UNIVERSITY GRONINGEN & WILLEM FOORTHUIS, MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE RURAL AREAS IN TRANSITION
  2. 2. Rural areas in transition Vital Rural areas - Norwich September 17, 2009 mm-dd-yy | <ul><li>Prof. dr. Dirk Strijker - Mansholt chair on rural development, Groningen University
  3. 3. Prof. drs. Willem Foorthuis – Wageningen University/Van Hall </li></ul>
  4. 4. Rurality, EU-27 mm-dd-yy |
  5. 5. Table 18.2 Sectoral structure of employment in the EU25 regions, 2004 (% of total employment) Agriculture Industry Services EU15 NEU10 EU15 NEU10 EU15 NEU10 Most rural regions 10 20 26 31 64 49 Intermediate rural regions 5 13 28 33 68 54 Most urban regions 1 2 23 28 75 71 Average 4 12 25 31 71 57
  6. 6. Service sector is leading, also in VRA-regions Agriculture Service Langenhagen 1 71 Vejen 7 62 Rogaland 3 67 Meetjesland 10 53 mm-dd-yy |
  7. 7. Commuting in and commuting out: Vejen RESIDENTS JOBS Night population Commuting in Commuting out Day population TOT Industry, total 22435 6172 7979 20628 Agriculture, forestry and fishing 1583 173 201 1555 Industry 6992 2059 2841 6210 Service 13860 3940 4937 12863 mm-dd-yy |
  8. 8. Percentage of emplyed persons, not working in their own municipality mm-dd-yy | 5 Dutch municipalities, of which three members of Vital Rural Areas Scale: postal code areas
  9. 9. Transition <ul><li>Rural areas: from productivism to post-productivism
  10. 10. Agriculture and industry has declined/is declining, service sector is still growing
  11. 11. Residential use and recreation/tourism is (becoming) leading in many regions </li></ul>mm-dd-yy |
  12. 12. Tourism and residence <ul><li>Residential use is permanent form of tourism
  13. 13. Both have often the same locational factors
  14. 14. Both have comparable economic consequences
  15. 15. So, a landscape that fits for tourism, fits also for permanent living </li></ul>
  16. 16. Transition (cont’d) <ul><li>Rural areas: from productivism to post-productivism
  17. 17. Agriculture and industry has declined/is declining, service sector is still growing
  18. 18. Residential use and recreation/tourism is (becoming) leading in many regions </li></ul><ul><li>Transition requires other infrastructure (e.g. broadband), other spatial patterns, other services </li></ul>mm-dd-yy |
  19. 19. Transition (cont’d) <ul><li>Opportunities are more important than threats </li></ul><ul><ul><li>but keep an eye on people/groups that can’t follow </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The future is knowledge-based </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Schools and universities are around the corner for help </li></ul></ul>mm-dd-yy |
  20. 20. Our communities … <ul><li>Employment is in the service sector
  21. 21. Declining agriculture has impact on our landscapes, but hardly on our employment opportunities
  22. 22. One third or more of all new created jobs will be occupied by non-residents
  23. 23. Our society is in transition: the future is leading, not the past </li></ul>mm-dd-yy |
  24. 24. mm-dd-yy | TRANSITION IS AN EVER CONTINUING PROCESS
  25. 25. mm-dd-yy | TRANSITION IS AN EVER CONTINUING PROCESS
  26. 26. mm-dd-yy | TRANSITION IS AN EVER CONTINUING PROCESS
  27. 27. mm-dd-yy |

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