ESXi v4.1 Command Line Tricks You Absolutely Must Know Greg Shields Partner and Principal Technologist Concentrated Techno...
This slide deck was used in one of our many conference presentations. We hope you enjoy it, and invite you to use it withi...
Three Parts <ul><li>Part 1:  Understanding the ESXi Command Line and Command-based Management </li></ul><ul><li>Part 2:  T...
Part 1: Understanding the ESXi Command Line and Command Line Management
The ESXi Command Line <ul><li>ESXi ’s command line  is  Linux’s command line. </li></ul>
The ESXi Command Line <ul><li>… however, it is not enabled by default. </li></ul>
Part 2: The Linux Commands
The Linux Commands <ul><li>Basic Linux Navigation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alt-F1, Alt-F2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cd & ls ...
Locating Things with Find & Grep <ul><li>find . –name <something> </li></ul><ul><li>find / -name <something> </li></ul><ul...
Locating Things with Find & Grep <ul><li>find . –name <something> </li></ul><ul><li>find / -name <something> </li></ul><ul...
Searching Files with Grep <ul><li>grep <text string> <filename> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This usage searches <filename> for a...
Reading Files with Cat and Less <ul><li>cat <filename> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pipe the contents of <filename> to the screen...
Reading Ends of Files with Less <ul><li>tail <filename> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Give me the last screenful of lines of <file...
Controlling Services with… <ul><li>Interestingly enough, not  “service”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>service is the Linux comman...
Manipulating text with vi <ul><li>Ahhh, vi, the text editor everyone loves to hate. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Big, bold, compl...
File System Info with df and vdf <ul><li>The Linux command df displays file system information such as partitions. </li></...
Processes with ps and kill <ul><li>The Linux ps command displays running processes. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most commonly us...
Pinging with…uh…ping and vmkping <ul><li>You ’re already familiar with the ping command (we use it every day in Windows). ...
Part 3: The VMware Commands
Swiss Army Knifing with vmkfstools <ul><li>Used for manipulating virtual disk files. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Copying </li></...
Swiss Army Knifing with vmkfstools <ul><li>Creating file systems & virtual disks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools -C vmfs3...
Swiss Army Knifing with vmkfstools <ul><li>New Commands in 4.1! </li></ul><ul><li>Checking and repairing virtual disks </l...
Getting on top with esxtop <ul><li>The Linux top command is excellent for figuring out which process is consuming resource...
Exporting esxtop data to PerfMon <ul><li>Perfmon ’s graphing capabilities can be used to visualize esxtop data, with a lit...
Exporting esxtop data to PerfMon <ul><li>Ship esxtop data directly to Windows using ESXi ’s SMB client and a mount point… ...
The esxcfg- Commands <ul><li>esxcfg-hwiscsi esxcfg-rescan </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-info esxcfg-resgrp </li></ul><ul><li>es...
Networking with esxcfg- <ul><li>Verify which physical NICs are up </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcfg-nics -l </li></ul></ul><ul>...
The vim-cmd Commands <ul><li>vimsh is an interactive shell buffer used for configuration and reporting. </li></ul><ul><ul>...
VM and Storage info with vim-cmd <ul><li>List vim-cmd commands </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Report...
More fun with vim-cmd <ul><li>Check and toggle VM power status </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstat {vmID} </...
The esxcli Commands <ul><li>Another interactive shell framework for configuration and reporting. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mod...
iSCSI Multipathing with esxcli <ul><li>Configure the LUN </li></ul><ul><li>Create VMkernel port groups </li></ul><ul><li>C...
iSCSI Multipathing with esxcli
More fun with esxcli <ul><li>List active TCP/IP connections and ARP entries </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcli network connectio...
Host Updates with esxupdate <ul><li>Installing updates from the command line is a secondary tactic when automation fails. ...
Troubleshoot with vm-support <ul><li>Calls with VMware often require sending them a support bundle. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Part 4: The vMA and Scripting
VMware Management Assistant <ul><li>All of these commands are handy, but the shell is quite limiting. </li></ul><ul><li>Ne...
Installing <ul><li>Because of its Virtual Appliance roots, installing the vMA requires using the vSphere Client. </li></ul...
Installing and Configuring <ul><li>Install vMA Virtual Appliance from OVF </li></ul><ul><li>Update VMX file to correct err...
The vicfg- Commands <ul><li>vicfg-advcfg  vicfg-ntp </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-authconfig  vicfg-rescae </li></ul><ul><li>vic...
Final Thoughts <ul><li>Linux isn ’t hard. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It was just developed by some very weird people over a ver...
ESXi v4.1 Command Line Tricks You Absolutely Must Know Greg Shields Partner and Principal Technologist Concentrated Techno...
This slide deck was used in one of our many conference presentations. We hope you enjoy it, and invite you to use it withi...
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Top ESXi command line v2.0

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  • MGB 2003 © 2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This presentation is for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied, in this summary.
  • MGB 2003 © 2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This presentation is for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied, in this summary.
  • Top ESXi command line v2.0

    1. 1. ESXi v4.1 Command Line Tricks You Absolutely Must Know Greg Shields Partner and Principal Technologist Concentrated Technology www.ConcentratedTech.com
    2. 2. This slide deck was used in one of our many conference presentations. We hope you enjoy it, and invite you to use it within your own organization however you like. For more information on our company, including information on private classes and upcoming conference appearances, please visit our Web site, www.ConcentratedTech.com . For links to newly-posted decks, follow us on Twitter: @concentrateddon or @concentratdgreg This work is copyright ©Concentrated Technology, LLC
    3. 3. Three Parts <ul><li>Part 1: Understanding the ESXi Command Line and Command-based Management </li></ul><ul><li>Part 2: The Linux Commands </li></ul><ul><li>Part 3: The VMware Commands </li></ul><ul><li>Part 4: vMA and Scripting </li></ul>
    4. 4. Part 1: Understanding the ESXi Command Line and Command Line Management
    5. 5. The ESXi Command Line <ul><li>ESXi ’s command line is Linux’s command line. </li></ul>
    6. 6. The ESXi Command Line <ul><li>… however, it is not enabled by default. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Part 2: The Linux Commands
    8. 8. The Linux Commands <ul><li>Basic Linux Navigation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alt-F1, Alt-F2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cd & ls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>find, cat, & grep </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>tail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>kill </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Locating Things with Find & Grep <ul><li>find . –name <something> </li></ul><ul><li>find / -name <something> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Useful for locating files on an ESXi disk. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>find / -name <something> | grep <something> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Useful for filtering located files. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bonus points for whomever knows how “grep” got its name… </li></ul>
    10. 10. Locating Things with Find & Grep <ul><li>find . –name <something> </li></ul><ul><li>find / -name <something> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Useful for locating files on an ESXi disk. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>find / -name <something> | grep <something> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Useful for filtering located files. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bonus points for whomever knows how “grep” got its name… </li></ul>Originally based on the “ed” editor, grep is a pseudo-acronym for g/re/p or global regular expression print.
    11. 11. Searching Files with Grep <ul><li>grep <text string> <filename> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This usage searches <filename> for a <text string> </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Useful for digging through logs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>grep failure /var/log/sysboot.log </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>grep failure|failed|failtastic /var/log/sysboot.log </li></ul></ul><ul><li>grep -r <text string> <filepath> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recursion enables searching the contents of every file in an entire <filepath> for a <text string> </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>grep -r failure /var/log </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Reading Files with Cat and Less <ul><li>cat <filename> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pipe the contents of <filename> to the screen. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>less <filename> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pipe the contents of <filename> to the screen, but do so in a way that ’s actually usable. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Return goes down one line. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ d” goes down one page. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ u” goes up one page. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ q” quits. </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Reading Ends of Files with Less <ul><li>tail <filename> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Give me the last screenful of lines of <filename> </li></ul></ul><ul><li>tail -10 <filename> </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Give me the last ten lines from <filename> </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Controlling Services with… <ul><li>Interestingly enough, not “service”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>service is the Linux command for controlling service state </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Used in ESX </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ESXi uses a slightly different syntax. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Services.sh {start|stop|restart} </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This command will start|stop|restart all services. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cat /etc/chkconfig.db to view the service database. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>/etc/init.d/<servicename> restart </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This command restarts a single service. </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Manipulating text with vi <ul><li>Ahhh, vi, the text editor everyone loves to hate. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Big, bold, complex, oddball, challenging… </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Two modes: Command and Input </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ i” enters input mode. (also “a” and “o”) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ ESC” enters command mode. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Control-F and Control-B move up and down by screen. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>/ <pattern> searches forward for a pattern. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>? <pattern> searches backward for a pattern. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ x” to delete a char, “dd” to delete a line </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>:q! exits without saving, :wq! exits with saving </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. File System Info with df and vdf <ul><li>The Linux command df displays file system information such as partitions. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>df cannot see into VMFS volumes. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The ESX command vdf digs a bit further to gather VMFS information </li></ul><ul><li>Both commands support the -h switch </li></ul><ul><ul><li>-h turns gibberish into human-readable info. </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Processes with ps and kill <ul><li>The Linux ps command displays running processes. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most commonly used with the -ef switch, usually with grep as well. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ps –ef | grep <something> </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Once you have a list of processes, you can kill them by Process ID. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>kill <processID> </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>kill -9 <processID> (kill harder!) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>kill -HUP <processID> (kill and restart!) </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Pinging with…uh…ping and vmkping <ul><li>You ’re already familiar with the ping command (we use it every day in Windows). </li></ul><ul><li>But are you familiar with the VMware vmkping command? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Uses the VMKernel ’s IP stack to another ESX host’s VMKernel port. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Useful for troubleshooting vMotion and network storage issues. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Similar results as ping, but down a different path. </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Part 3: The VMware Commands
    20. 20. Swiss Army Knifing with vmkfstools <ul><li>Used for manipulating virtual disk files. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Copying </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Converting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Renaming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cloning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Importing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exporting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resizing </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Swiss Army Knifing with vmkfstools <ul><li>Creating file systems & virtual disks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools -C vmfs3 -b 1m -S myLabel vmhba1:3:0:1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools -c 2G /vmfs/volumes/…/whatever.vmdk </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cloning virtual disks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools -i {source} {destination} </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Exporting virtual disks to ext3 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools -i -d 2gbsparse {source} {destination} </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Extending virtual disks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools -X 12G /vmfs/volumes/…/whatever.vmdk </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Swiss Army Knifing with vmkfstools <ul><li>New Commands in 4.1! </li></ul><ul><li>Checking and repairing virtual disks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools --fix check /vmfs/volumes/…/whatever.vmdk </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools --fix repair /vmfs/volumes/…/whatever.vmdk </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Getting and resetting disk UUIDs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools --miscop getuuid {vmdkFile} </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vmkfstools --miscop setuuid {vmdkFile} </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Getting on top with esxtop <ul><li>The Linux top command is excellent for figuring out which process is consuming resources. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>top </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The VMware esxtop command goes a step further by digging into VMware-specific resources. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxtop </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Eight displays: “c” cpu, “i” interrupt, “m” memory, “n” network “d” disk adapter, “u” disk device, “v” disk VM, “p” power management </li></ul>
    24. 24. Exporting esxtop data to PerfMon <ul><li>Perfmon ’s graphing capabilities can be used to visualize esxtop data, with a little effort… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxtop -a -b -d {secondsBetweenCaptures} -n {numberOfCaptures} > {filename}.csv </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The -a in the command above captures all counters. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creates a very big file… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can impact performance… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>… but does let you use PerfMon to filter counters (easier). </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. Exporting esxtop data to PerfMon <ul><li>Ship esxtop data directly to Windows using ESXi ’s SMB client and a mount point… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>mkdir /mnt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>mkdir /mnt/perfmon </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>mount -t cifs //{server}/{share} -o username={userName} password={password} /mnt/perfmon </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxtop -a -b -d {secondsBetweenCaptures} -n {numberOfCaptures} > /mnt/perfmon/{filename}.csv </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. The esxcfg- Commands <ul><li>esxcfg-hwiscsi esxcfg-rescan </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-info esxcfg-resgrp </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-dumppart esxcfg-route </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-advcfg esxcfg-scsidevs </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-ipsec esxcfg-init </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-pciid esxcfg-volume </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-module esxcfg-swiscsi </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-nics esxcfg-vmknic </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-nas esxcfg-vswitch </li></ul><ul><li>esxcfg-mpath esxcfg-secpolicy </li></ul>
    27. 27. Networking with esxcfg- <ul><li>Verify which physical NICs are up </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcfg-nics -l </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Creating a quick network connection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcfg-vswitch -a vSwitch2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcfg-vswitch -L vmnic2 vSwitch2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcfg-vswitch -A PortGroup2 vSwitch2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcfg-vswitch -M vmnic2 -p PortGroup2 vSwitch2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcfg-vswitch -v 205 -p PortGroup2 vSwitch2 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enabling and verifying Jumbo Frames </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcfg-vswitch -m 9000 vSwitch2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcfg-vswitch -l </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. The vim-cmd Commands <ul><li>vimsh is an interactive shell buffer used for configuration and reporting. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vim-cmd is a wrapper for the vimsh shell. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This command has different names in different versions: vimsh, vmware-vimsh, vmware-vim-cmd </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consolidates the command syntax overlap between vmware-cmd (not on ESXi) and esxcfg-*. </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. VM and Storage info with vim-cmd <ul><li>List vim-cmd commands </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Report all registered VMs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms (…use this to get vmID!) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Register a VM </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vim-cmd solo/registervm ./whatever.vmx </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gather storage information </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd hostsvc/storage/info | less </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd hostsvc/storage/hba_info | less </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd hostsvc/storage/fs_info | less </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. More fun with vim-cmd <ul><li>Check and toggle VM power status </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstat {vmID} </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd vmsvc/power.off {vmID} </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd vmsvc/power.off {vmID} </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Add a physical USB device to a VM </li></ul><ul><ul><li>/etc/init.d/usbarbitrator start </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd vmsvc/device.connusbdev {vmID} “path:1/0/0 autoclean:1” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Add a license key </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vim-cmd vimsvc/license --set {25CharLicenseKey} </li></ul></ul>
    31. 31. The esxcli Commands <ul><li>Another interactive shell framework for configuration and reporting. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Modular, ability to add namespaces. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be executed in ESX/ESXi/vCLI. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Three namespaces at present: nmp, corestorage, swiscsi. </li></ul></ul>
    32. 32. iSCSI Multipathing with esxcli <ul><li>Configure the LUN </li></ul><ul><li>Create VMkernel port groups </li></ul><ul><li>Create 1:1 vNIC->VMkernel port mappings </li></ul><ul><li>Enable iSCSI </li></ul><ul><li>Connect VMkernel ports to iSCSI Initiator </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcli swiscsi nic add -n {VMkPortGroup} -d vmhba33 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adjust path selection to Round Robin </li></ul><ul><li>Create datastore </li></ul>
    33. 33. iSCSI Multipathing with esxcli
    34. 34. More fun with esxcli <ul><li>List active TCP/IP connections and ARP entries </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcli network connection list </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcli network neighbor list </li></ul></ul><ul><li>List running VMs & kill those non-responding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcli vms vm list </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxcli vms vm kill --world-id {worldID} --type {soft|hard|force} </li></ul></ul>
    35. 35. Host Updates with esxupdate <ul><li>Installing updates from the command line is a secondary tactic when automation fails. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>esxupdate update –bundle=<bundlename.zip> </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can even assist with (major) 4.0 to 4.1 upgrades </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Run the pre-upgrade, then the upgrade bundle while in maintenance mode. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxupdate update --bundle=pre-upgrade-from-ESX4.0-to-4.1.0-0.0.260247-release.zip </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>esxupdate update --bundle=upgrade-from-ESX4.0-to-4.1.0-0.0.260247-release.zip </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>reboot </li></ul></ul>
    36. 36. Troubleshoot with vm-support <ul><li>Calls with VMware often require sending them a support bundle. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inside that bundle are logs, output from commands, and configuration info. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vm-support will create a .tgz archive to send. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can also be used to stop stalled VMs. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These VMs show resources are assigned, but don ’t appear to be running. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vm-support -x then vm-support –X <worldID>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First command gets the world ID </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Second command kills processes of that world ID. </li></ul></ul>
    37. 37. Part 4: The vMA and Scripting
    38. 38. VMware Management Assistant <ul><li>All of these commands are handy, but the shell is quite limiting. </li></ul><ul><li>Needed is a command and scripting environment for managing ESX and ESXi hosts. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One such environment is the vMA. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Installed as a Virtual Appliance. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Client/Server architecture connects to multiple machines, can work with multiple machines at once. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enables use of Perl for scripting. </li></ul></ul>
    39. 39. Installing <ul><li>Because of its Virtual Appliance roots, installing the vMA requires using the vSphere Client. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure you connect vMA to ESXi ’s management network. </li></ul>
    40. 40. Installing and Configuring <ul><li>Install vMA Virtual Appliance from OVF </li></ul><ul><li>Update VMX file to correct error </li></ul><ul><ul><li>scsi0.virtualDev = “lsilogic” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>guestOS = “rhel5-64″ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Configure vMA at first boot </li></ul><ul><li>Add target servers to vMA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vifp addserver {serverName} </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Target a server to run a command against </li></ul><ul><ul><li>vifptarget -s {serverName} </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use! Command! Script! </li></ul>
    41. 41. The vicfg- Commands <ul><li>vicfg-advcfg vicfg-ntp </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-authconfig vicfg-rescae </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-cfgbackup vicfg-route </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-dns vicfg-scsidevs </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-dumppart vicfg-snmp </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-hostops vicfg-syslog </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-ipsec vicfg-user </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-iscsi vicfg-vmknic </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-module vicfg-volume </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-mpath vicfg-vswitch </li></ul><ul><li>vicfg-nas </li></ul>
    42. 42. Final Thoughts <ul><li>Linux isn ’t hard. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It was just developed by some very weird people over a very long period of time. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>That group of people didn ’t always agree on which commands to use. That’s why different distros use different command structures. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Silly UNIX admins. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Always remember two discovery commands… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>find / -name <something> </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li><command> --help </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Those two commands will always help! </li></ul>
    43. 43. ESXi v4.1 Command Line Tricks You Absolutely Must Know Greg Shields Partner and Principal Technologist Concentrated Technology www.ConcentratedTech.com Please fill out evaluations, Do it for the children ! !!!
    44. 44. This slide deck was used in one of our many conference presentations. We hope you enjoy it, and invite you to use it within your own organization however you like. For more information on our company, including information on private classes and upcoming conference appearances, please visit our Web site, www.ConcentratedTech.com . For links to newly-posted decks, follow us on Twitter: @concentrateddon or @concentratdgreg This work is copyright ©Concentrated Technology, LLC
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