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Monitoring and Intelligently Reacting to ESX Performance Greg Shields Partner and Principal Technologist Concentrated Tech...
This slide deck was used in one of our many conference presentations. We hope you enjoy it, and invite you to use it withi...
Class Discussion <ul><li>What kinds of performance things should one monitor on an ESX server? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why? ...
ESX Performance 101 <ul><li>Processor Use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Processor use on any server > 80% Consider this  “overuse”...
ESX Performance 101 <ul><li>Processor Use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Processor use on any server > 80% Consider this  “overuse”...
ESX Performance 201 <ul><li>Network throughput </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Network throughput > 80% and steady Begin analyzing t...
ESX Performance 201 <ul><li>Network throughput </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Network throughput > 80% and steady Begin analyzing t...
ESX Performance 201 <ul><li>IOPS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IOPS demand > IOPS supply Consider this  “overuse” </li></ul></ul><...
Thank you! Class Dismissed!
Thank you! Class Dismissed! “Uh, Gimme’ a Break, Greg. Is that All You’ve Got?”
ESX Performance 301 <ul><li>The Structured Approach! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Greg ’s TEN STEP Plan to VM Happiness </li></ul...
Step 1:  VMware Tools <ul><li>If the VMware Tools aren ’t working, this will cause numerous low-level issues. </li></ul><u...
Step 2:  Verify Host CPU Saturation <ul><li>CPU saturation on an ESX host creates contention, which slows down all VMs. </...
Step 3:  Verify VM Ready Time <ul><li>If high host CPU usage, then the next step is to see which VM is causing the problem...
Step 3:  Solutions <ul><li>Rebalance VMs.  Move VMs off this host. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase CPU shares available to host...
Step 4:  Verify Guest CPU Saturation <ul><li>Remember that CPU saturation can happen on the host, but it can also happen i...
Step 4:  Solutions <ul><li>The VM is working too hard </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Aren ’t we all?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>N...
Step 4½: Verify VMs are Actually Using their vCPUs <ul><li>An interesting reverse! </li></ul><ul><li>Assigning multiple vC...
Step 4½:  Solutions <ul><li>Reduce assigned vCPUs to one. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>… and don ’t do that again! </li></ul></ul>
Step 5:  Check for Host Memory Swapping <ul><li>Memory swapping is generally always a condition you want to avoid. </li></...
Step 5:  Solutions <ul><li>Limited solutions for memory swapping. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce memory overcommit.  Drop th...
Step 5½:  Check for VM Memory Swapping <ul><li>The solutions for Step 5 can cause downstream effects in each VM. </li></ul...
Step 5½:  Solutions <ul><li>That VM needs more RAM. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You ’ve gone too far with restricting its resour...
Step 6:  Check for Overloaded Storage <ul><li>Many paths for verifying storage utilization. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IOPS is ...
Step 6:  Solutions <ul><li>This indicates that the storage layer cannot keep up with the demands of VMs. </li></ul><ul><ul...
Step 6:  vscsiStats <ul><li>http://communities.vmware.com/docs/ DOC-10095 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IO size </li></ul></ul><ul...
Step 7-1:  Check for Inbound Networking Problems <ul><li>An inbound network problem is a VM that cannot process receive pa...
Step 7-1:  Solutions <ul><li>An inability to process inbound packets usually relates to vProc overutilization. </li></ul><...
Step 7-2:  Check for Outbound Networking Problems <ul><li>An outbound network problem is a VM that cannot effectively send...
Step 7-2:  Solutions <ul><li>An inability to process outbound packets often requires additional pNICs. </li></ul><ul><ul><...
Step 8:  Check for Slow Storage <ul><li>“ Slow” storage is represented by high storage latency. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Esse...
Step 8:  Solutions <ul><li>This indicates that the storage layer cannot keep up with the demands of VMs. </li></ul><ul><ul...
Step 8:  Solutions
Step 9:  Check for Low VM CPU Utilization <ul><li>Wait a minute!  Isn ’t low VM CPU utilization a good thing?  Isn’t this ...
Step 9:  Solutions <ul><li>Suffering end user experience but low CPU utilization usually indicates a wait state. </li></ul...
Step 10:  Check for Memory Reclamation <ul><li>Remember that ESX ’s balloon driver will reclaim memory that it doesn’t bel...
Step 10:  Check for Memory Reclamation <ul><li>Remember that ESX ’s balloon driver will reclaim memory that it doesn’t bel...
Step 10:  Solutions <ul><li>Ballooning occurs when there ’s not enough memory to go around. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You ’re ...
ESX Performance 401
ESX Performance 401 <ul><li>Honestly… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>… go buy a product.  Let someone else do the work! </li></ul><...
ESX Performance 401 <ul><li>Honestly… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>… go buy a product.  Let someone else do the work! </li></ul><...
ESX Performance 401 <ul><li>Another problem throughout these approaches relates to their  “perspective”. </li></ul><ul><ul...
ESX Performance 401 <ul><li>Who ’s Who in Virtualization Performance and Capacity Management </li></ul><ul><li>Source: htt...
Final Thoughts <ul><li>Virtualization adds ridiculous interdependencies to the IT datacenter that weren ’t there before. <...
Monitoring and Intelligently Reacting to ESX Performance Greg Shields Partner and Principal Technologist Concentrated Tech...
This slide deck was used in one of our many conference presentations. We hope you enjoy it, and invite you to use it withi...
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ESX performance problems 10 steps

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  • MGB 2003 © 2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This presentation is for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied, in this summary.
  • MGB 2003 © 2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This presentation is for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied, in this summary.
  • Transcript of "ESX performance problems 10 steps"

    1. 1. Monitoring and Intelligently Reacting to ESX Performance Greg Shields Partner and Principal Technologist Concentrated Technology www.ConcentratedTech.com
    2. 2. This slide deck was used in one of our many conference presentations. We hope you enjoy it, and invite you to use it within your own organization however you like. For more information on our company, including information on private classes and upcoming conference appearances, please visit our Web site, www.ConcentratedTech.com . For links to newly-posted decks, follow us on Twitter: @concentrateddon or @concentratdgreg This work is copyright ©Concentrated Technology, LLC
    3. 3. Class Discussion <ul><li>What kinds of performance things should one monitor on an ESX server? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why? </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. ESX Performance 101 <ul><li>Processor Use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Processor use on any server > 80% Consider this “overuse”. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce processing requirements on VMs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Migrate VMs elsewhere, rebalance. </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. ESX Performance 101 <ul><li>Processor Use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Processor use on any server > 80% Consider this “overuse”. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce processing requirements on VMs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Migrate VMs elsewhere, rebalance. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Memory Use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Memory use on any server > 80% Consider this “overuse” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce assigned vRAM to VMs, if possible. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Migrate VMs elsewhere, rebalance. </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. ESX Performance 201 <ul><li>Network throughput </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Network throughput > 80% and steady Begin analyzing throughput consumption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider re-routing heavy consumption to independent pNICs & independent vSwitches. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rebalance load, although this tends to just shift problems. </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. ESX Performance 201 <ul><li>Network throughput </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Network throughput > 80% and steady Begin analyzing throughput consumption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider re-routing heavy consumption to independent pNICs & independent vSwitches. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rebalance load, although this tends to just shift problems. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Context Switches </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Context switches significantly higher than baseline </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze workload. Consider V2P. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rebalance. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Upgrade hardware to Nehalem / Opteron </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. ESX Performance 201 <ul><li>IOPS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IOPS demand > IOPS supply Consider this “overuse” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze with esxtop or Disk | Usage in Performance tab </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adding disks spreads spindle demand, reduces contention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider more/smaller datastores </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider new storage hardware that can rebalance internally based on observed contention. $$$ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DEMO: ESX performance tab. </li></ul><ul><li>DEMO: Customizing perf stats intervals </li></ul>
    9. 9. Thank you! Class Dismissed!
    10. 10. Thank you! Class Dismissed! “Uh, Gimme’ a Break, Greg. Is that All You’ve Got?”
    11. 11. ESX Performance 301 <ul><li>The Structured Approach! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Greg ’s TEN STEP Plan to VM Happiness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Computers are deterministic. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Virtual computers are as well, however they are much more complicated. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Virtual computers have so many more dependencies than traditional computers. Makes the ad hoc process less intuitive. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Your “gut feeling” with virtual environments is less effective. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Homework Reading: Performance Troubleshooting for VMware vSphere 4 Get it at VMware.com </li></ul>
    12. 12. Step 1: VMware Tools <ul><li>If the VMware Tools aren ’t working, this will cause numerous low-level issues. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Always start by verifying their functionality </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DEMO: Verifying VMware Tools status </li></ul>
    13. 13. Step 2: Verify Host CPU Saturation <ul><li>CPU saturation on an ESX host creates contention, which slows down all VMs. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance | Advanced </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CPU | Usage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is this number consistently above 75%? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If yes, go to Step 3. </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Step 3: Verify VM Ready Time <ul><li>If high host CPU usage, then the next step is to see which VM is causing the problem. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Select Host | Virtual Machines tab | Host CPU – Mhz column. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Locate high-use VM. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select VM | Performance tab | CPU | Ready (all vCPUs) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If Ready > 2000ms for any vCPU, then host CPU saturation exists. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Step 3: Solutions <ul><li>Rebalance VMs. Move VMs off this host. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase CPU shares available to host, if resource constrained. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resource Pools can do this. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reduce the number of vCPUs assigned to VMs. </li></ul><ul><li>Add hosts. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Step 4: Verify Guest CPU Saturation <ul><li>Remember that CPU saturation can happen on the host, but it can also happen in the VM. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Shares/Limits/Other can restrict guest processing. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Everything looks good on the host, but the guest is running at 100%” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Check VM CPU for saturation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Select VM | Performance tab | CPU | Usage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is this number consistently above 75%? </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Step 4: Solutions <ul><li>The VM is working too hard </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Aren ’t we all?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not getting enough resources to accomplish its task. Assign more CPU shares. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Installed workload not well-throttled. Throttle or reconfigure applications. Balance processing across time of day. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add vCPUs. Only do this if the application is multi-threaded. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remove pinning of processes to processors. </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Step 4½: Verify VMs are Actually Using their vCPUs <ul><li>An interesting reverse! </li></ul><ul><li>Assigning multiple vCPUs to a VM that isn ’t using them wastes resources. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If that VM isn ’t using the vCPU, remove it so another VM can use it instead. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select VM | Performance tab | CPU | Usage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look at all vCPU objects. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is usage for all vCPUs but one close to 0? </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Step 4½: Solutions <ul><li>Reduce assigned vCPUs to one. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>… and don ’t do that again! </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Step 5: Check for Host Memory Swapping <ul><li>Memory swapping is generally always a condition you want to avoid. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Swapping exerts an incredible tax on performance. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A solution of last resort. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select Host | Performance tab | Memory | Swap In/Out Rate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are either of these above 0? </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Step 5: Solutions <ul><li>Limited solutions for memory swapping. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce memory overcommit. Drop the level of assigned memory in each VM as appropriate. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Most of us over-assign memory to VMs anyway. So, at least at first, this can sometimes be effective. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce reservations. Too many reservations can impact optimization of memory sharing. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add RAM. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable resource controls. Note that this might cause VM memory swapping. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DEMO: Verifying a VM ’s balloon driver is functioning. </li></ul>
    22. 22. Step 5½: Check for VM Memory Swapping <ul><li>The solutions for Step 5 can cause downstream effects in each VM. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You decrease available RAM </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VM doesn ’t have enough </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VM itself has to swap </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This is a situation just as bad a host swapping. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Select Host | Performance tab | Memory | Real-Time | Stacked Graph (per VM) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are any VMs reporting memory swapping > 0? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If so, then that VM needs more RAM. </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Step 5½: Solutions <ul><li>That VM needs more RAM. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You ’ve gone too far with restricting its resources. </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Step 6: Check for Overloaded Storage <ul><li>Many paths for verifying storage utilization. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IOPS is an emerging metric. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can also verify Command Aborts. Identifies the number of SCSI commands that were aborted. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select host | Performance tab | Disk | Command Aborts | Attached LUNs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are any LUNs showing Command Aborts > 0? </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. Step 6: Solutions <ul><li>This indicates that the storage layer cannot keep up with the demands of VMs. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase storage performance. $$$ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Segregate storage. Modularity assists here. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spread VMFS LUNs across more spindles. Add disks. Reduces storage contention. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use tools like vscsiStats to quantify storage behaviors. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Balance memory with storage. Sometimes throwing more RAM at a VM lessens its storage demand. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Buy new storage. Buy more storage. $$$ </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. Step 6: vscsiStats <ul><li>http://communities.vmware.com/docs/ DOC-10095 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IO size </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seek distance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outstanding IOs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Latency in ms </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. Step 7-1: Check for Inbound Networking Problems <ul><li>An inbound network problem is a VM that cannot process receive packets. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Packets are coming in over the wire, but the VM lacks the resources to process them. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thus, those packets must be dropped and retransmitted, reducing effective performance. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This creates a cascading problem . More dropped packets == more retransmitted ones == more to do == more oversubscription. Yikes! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select host | Performance tab | Network | Receive Packets Dropped </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is this value greater than 0? </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. Step 7-1: Solutions <ul><li>An inability to process inbound packets usually relates to vProc overutilization. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With vNICs, your processor is needed to process their workloads. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not enough processor == a less-capable vNIC </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce VM CPU utilization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase VM CPU reservation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add pCPUs. Add servers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Verify VMs are using the most-effective driver (VMXNET3 for most workloads). </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. Step 7-2: Check for Outbound Networking Problems <ul><li>An outbound network problem is a VM that cannot effectively send packets. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Outbound VM packets are buffered at the vSwitch. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heavy traffic at the vSwitch can overload its attached pNIC. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When this happens, packets get dropped and must be retransmitted. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select host | Performance tab | Network | Transmit Packets Dropped </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is this value greater than 0? </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. Step 7-2: Solutions <ul><li>An inability to process outbound packets often requires additional pNICs. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Aggregate more pNICs to handle outbound load. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure you ’re not using failover mode, but load balancing. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rebalance high network use VMs to other hosts. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rebalance high network use VMs to other vSwitches (which should be attached to different pNICs). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add networking. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce ambient network traffic. Isolate subnets. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ahhh, the old backups network problem. Or, the n00b who multicasts on the server net! We ’ve all been that n00b at some point…  </li></ul></ul>
    31. 31. Step 8: Check for Slow Storage <ul><li>“ Slow” storage is represented by high storage latency. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Essentially, the storage isn ’t responding fast enough. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Storage layer itself could be insufficient, or overloaded. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select host | Performance tab | Disk | Physical Device Read/Write Latency (all LUNs) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are any average latencies greater than 10ms, or any peaks above 20ms.* </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>* These are VMware ’s suggested starting values. Yours may be different based on storage architecture. </li></ul></ul>
    32. 32. Step 8: Solutions <ul><li>This indicates that the storage layer cannot keep up with the demands of VMs. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase storage performance. $$$ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Segregate storage. Modularity assists here. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spread VMFS LUNs across more spindles. Add disks. Reduces storage contention. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use tools like vscsiStats to quantify storage behaviors. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Balance memory with storage. Sometimes throwing more RAM at a VM lessens its storage demand. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Buy new storage. Buy more storage. $$$ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Notice that these are the same as for Step 6! </li></ul></ul>
    33. 33. Step 8: Solutions
    34. 34. Step 9: Check for Low VM CPU Utilization <ul><li>Wait a minute! Isn ’t low VM CPU utilization a good thing? Isn’t this why virtualization works? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Yes, and no. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low VM CPU utilization can mean a low-needs workload. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It can also mean a workload in a wait state. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only check here if end user experience is suffering. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select VM | Performance tab | CPU | Usage (VM) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is this a lower than expected value? </li></ul></ul>
    35. 35. Step 9: Solutions <ul><li>Suffering end user experience but low CPU utilization usually indicates a wait state. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Verify other counters: Network, storage. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Storage response time? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network response time? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other servers or virtual servers that this workload relies upon to do its job? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Another common source: Overly restrictive resource allocations. </li></ul></ul>
    36. 36. Step 10: Check for Memory Reclamation <ul><li>Remember that ESX ’s balloon driver will reclaim memory that it doesn’t believe a VM needs. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>However, that driver has very limited visibility into what each VM is actually doing with its memory. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It becomes a problem when memory that the VM needs is reclaimed. Kind of like a double page fault. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select host | Performance tab | Memory | Balloon </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If this value is greater than 0, then… </li></ul></ul>
    37. 37. Step 10: Check for Memory Reclamation <ul><li>Remember that ESX ’s balloon driver will reclaim memory that it doesn’t believe a VM needs. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>However, that driver has very limited visibility into what each VM is actually doing with its memory. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It becomes a problem when memory that the VM needs is reclaimed. Kind of like a double page fault. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select host | Performance tab | Memory | Balloon </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If this value is greater than 0, then… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select VM | Performance tab | Memory | Stacked Graph (per VM) | Balloon. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is this value greater than 0 for the specific VMs which are experiencing problems? </li></ul></ul>
    38. 38. Step 10: Solutions <ul><li>Ballooning occurs when there ’s not enough memory to go around. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You ’re oversubscribing your RAM. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This can be a good thing, unless it takes memory from where its actually needed. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eliminate memory overcommittment on the host. Essentially, stop assigning more RAM to VMs than you have. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use reservations to ensure adequate memory for VMs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be aware that this may just shift the problem elsewhere. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Buy RAM. Buy servers. $$$ </li></ul></ul>
    39. 39. ESX Performance 401
    40. 40. ESX Performance 401 <ul><li>Honestly… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>… go buy a product. Let someone else do the work! </li></ul></ul>
    41. 41. ESX Performance 401 <ul><li>Honestly… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>… go buy a product. Let someone else do the work! </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This analysis takes time. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Time that you probably don ’t have. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What you want is actionable information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Convert all this math into a ‘click here’ response.” </li></ul></ul>
    42. 42. ESX Performance 401 <ul><li>Another problem throughout these approaches relates to their “perspective”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Virtualization touches everything in the datacenter and introduces dependencies everywhere. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vSphere ’s perspective means that it can only see behaviors as it observes them. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Metaphor: Einstein ’s Theory of Relativity. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Third-party products tie into networking, storage, applications, user experience, etc. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They can interrelate performance from multiple perspectives. </li></ul></ul>
    43. 43. ESX Performance 401 <ul><li>Who ’s Who in Virtualization Performance and Capacity Management </li></ul><ul><li>Source: http://www.virtualizationpractice. com/blog/?p=6749 </li></ul>
    44. 44. Final Thoughts <ul><li>Virtualization adds ridiculous interdependencies to the IT datacenter that weren ’t there before. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No human alive can monitor all those metrics effectively and at all times. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You need actionable information. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use these tips to get you started, solve the immediate problems. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider investing in a set-it-and-forget-it solution. </li></ul></ul>
    45. 45. Monitoring and Intelligently Reacting to ESX Performance Greg Shields Partner and Principal Technologist Concentrated Technology www.ConcentratedTech.com Please fill out evaluations, or more servers will crash ! !!!
    46. 46. This slide deck was used in one of our many conference presentations. We hope you enjoy it, and invite you to use it within your own organization however you like. For more information on our company, including information on private classes and upcoming conference appearances, please visit our Web site, www.ConcentratedTech.com . For links to newly-posted decks, follow us on Twitter: @concentrateddon or @concentratdgreg This work is copyright ©Concentrated Technology, LLC
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