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CNA Chapter Two
CNA Chapter Two
CNA Chapter Two
CNA Chapter Two
CNA Chapter Two
CNA Chapter Two
CNA Chapter Two
CNA Chapter Two
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CNA Chapter Two
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CNA Chapter Two

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  • Ethics and Legal Issues
  • Ethics and Legal Issues
  • Ethics and Legal Issues
  • Ethics and Legal Issues
  • Transcript

    • 1. Unit 1 Introduction to Health Care CNA
    • 2. Introduction to Health Care
      • As a member of the Nursing Department, the nurse aide plays an important role in resident care.
      • The nurse aide spends more time in direct contact with the resident than any other member of the health care team.
    • 3. Introduction to Health Care (continued)
      • A knowledge of the role, function, legal limitations, expected qualities, personal habits and obligations is important to provide quality care. This unit also explores the types, purposes and organizational structure of health care facilities that employ nurse aides.
    • 4. CNA Role Of The Nurse Aide
    • 5. Role of the Nurse Aide
      • Important in the care of people who are ill & unable to care for themselves
      • Assistant to the licensed nurse
      • Provide physical care and emotional support
    • 6. Role of the Nurse Aide
      • Important in the care of people who are ill & unable to care for themselves
      • Assistant to the licensed nurse
      • Provide physical care and emotional support
    • 7.
      • Contribute to the resident’s comfort
      • Make observations and report
      • Directed and supervised by licensed nurses
      Role of the Nurse Aide (continued)
    • 8. The Nurse Aide Works In A Variety Of Settings
      • Hospitals
      • Long term care facilities
      • Rehabilitation centers
      • Clinics
      • Hospices
      • Psychiatric facilities
      • Home care
    • 9. Functions of Nurse Aide
    • 10.
      • Discuss the functions of the nurse aide in providing care to residents.
      • Identify 22 functions of the nurse aide.
      OBJECTIVES
    • 11. Functions of Nurse Aide
      • Hygiene
      • Safety
      • Nutrition
      • Exercise
      • Elimination
      • Mobility
      Help residents with personal needs:
    • 12. Functions of Nurse Aide (continued)
        • Communication
        • Socialization activities
        • Comfort measures
        • Restorative procedures
      Help residents with personal needs (continued) :
    • 13. Functions of Nurse Aide (continued)
      • Assist with resident care responsibilities:
        • Collecting specimens
        • Measuring and recording vital signs
        • Transporting residents
        • Environmental cleanliness
        • Cleaning and care of equipment
    • 14. Functions of Nurse Aide (continued)
      • Assist with resident care responsibilities (continued) :
        • Standard precautions
        • Fire drills and disaster drills
        • Answering call signals
        • Observation of resident response to care
    • 15. Functions of the Nurse Aide (continued)
      • Assist with resident care responsibilities (continued) :
        • Measuring and recording height/weight
        • Intake and output
        • Admission and discharge of residents
    • 16. Legal Limitations Of The Nurse Aide
    • 17.
      • List eight legal limitations for the nurse aide.
      OBJECTIVE
    • 18. Legal Limitations of Nurse Aide
      • Nurse aides do not do sterile procedures.
      • Nurse aides do not give information about the diagnosis or treatment plans to the resident or his/her family.
      • Nurse aides do not give medications.
      • Nurse aides do not insert or remove tubes from the resident’s body.
    • 19. Legal Limitations of Nurse Aide (continued)
      • Nurse aides do not take oral or telephone orders from a physician
      • Nurse aides do not diagnose or prescribe treatments or medications for residents.
      • Nurse aides do not supervise the work of other nurse aides.
    • 20. Legal Limitations of Nurse Aide (continued)
      • Nurse aides do not agree to do something beyond the nurse aide’s scope of practice as defined by the North Carolina Board of Nursing.
    • 21. Qualities and Characteristics of Nurse Aide
    • 22.
      • Describe the personal qualities and characteristics of the nurse aide.
      • Discuss the importance of punctuality and commitment on the job.
      OBJECTIVES
    • 23. Qualities and Characteristics of the Nurse Aide
      • Cheerful
      • Enthusiastic
      • Responsible
      • Considerate
      • Courteous
      • Cooperative
    • 24. Qualities and Characteristics of the Nurse Aide (continued)
      • Dependable
      • Empathetic
      • Honest
      • Patient
      • Respectful
      • Trustworthy
    • 25. Qualities and Characteristics of the Nurse Aide (continued)
      • Willing to learn
      • Tactful
      • Competent
      • Committed to job
      • Punctual
      • Self-aware
    • 26. Personal Health & Hygiene
    • 27.
      • Suggest ways for the nurse aide to maintain acceptable personal hygiene and exhibit appropriate dress practices.
      OBJECTIVE
    • 28. Factors That Promote Good Health
      • Rest and sleep
      • Diet
      • Exercise
      • Good posture and body mechanics
      • Eye examinations
      • Dental care
      • No use of drugs, alcohol or cigarettes
    • 29. Personal Hygiene Practices
      • Taking a daily bath or shower
      • Using deodorants/antiperspirants
      • Brushing teeth and using mouthwash
      • Keeping hair clean and neatly styled
      • Cleaning and maintaining short, smooth nails
    • 30. Personal Hygiene Practices (continued)
      • Washing hands after using bathroom
      • Wearing clean underwear, socks or stockings and uniform daily
      • Do not use products having odors that might be offensive to residents
    • 31. Professional Dress Practices
      • Uniform clean, pressed
      • Shoes polished and comfortable
      • Shoe laces clean
      • Stockings without holes/runs
      • Jewelry limited to watch and wedding ring
    • 32. Professional Dress Practices (continued)
      • Name tag or photo ID tag worn
      • Make-up worn in moderation
      • Strong perfumes/aftershave lotions not used
    • 33. Health Care Team Member Obligations
    • 34.
      • List obligations of the nurse aide as a member of the health care team.
      OBJECTIVE
    • 35. Guidelines For Working With Others
      • Know the responsibilities, functions and role expectations listed in job description
      • Display qualities and characteristics befitting a nurse aide
      • Be prompt in reporting to work
    • 36. Guidelines For Working With Others (continued)
      • Notify facility of absence ASAP
      • Display good health and hygiene practices
      • Follow facility dress code policy
      • Practice ethical & legal actions
      • Direct questions about things you don’t understand to supervisor
    • 37. Guidelines For Working With Others (continued)
      • Follow instructions and directions of supervisor
      • Display pride in appearance
      • Promptly report unusual observations to the supervisor
      • Make supervisor aware of family and resident complaints
    • 38. Guidelines For Working With Others (C ontinued)
      • Perform duties in spirit of cooperation
      • Do not waste supplies and equipment
      • Follow facility rules and regulations
      • Be accurate in measuring, recording and reporting
      • Notify supervisor when leaving and returning to unit
    • 39.
      • Assist other health care workers willingly
      • Never use supplies or equipment belonging to the facility or resident
      • Never discuss personal problems with the residents
      Guidelines For Working With Others (continued)
    • 40. Resident Care Conferences
      • Assist to develop/revise care plans
      • Share care suggestions
      • Report observations
    • 41. Planning Work Assignments
    • 42.
      • Explain the necessity for planning work assignments.
      OBJECTIVE
    • 43. Work Assignments
      • Made by a licensed nurse
      • Based on needs of residents and availability of staff
      • Allows staff to work as team
      • Includes being cooperative and helping others when asked
    • 44. Work Assignments (continued)
      • Includes never ignoring a resident that needs help, is uncomfortable or in danger
    • 45. Work Assignments (continued)
      • Includes notifying the supervisor of unfinished assignments
      • Includes answering call signals even though not assigned to the resident
    • 46. Considerations For Planning A Work Assignment
      • Workload
      • Resident condition
      • Time
      • Support services assigned
    • 47.
      • Identify the need to establish priorities when providing resident care.
      OBJECTIVE
    • 48. Establishing Priorities for Care
      • Activities of daily living
        • Meeting hygiene needs
        • Positioning and providing for exercise
        • Maintaining proper nutrition
        • Providing for elimination of wastes
      1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
    • 49. Establishing Priorities for Care (continued)
      • Examples of special procedures
        • Taking vital signs
        • Measuring urine
      1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
    • 50. Establishing Priorities for Care (continued)
      • Support services
        • Providing drinking water
        • Delivering and picking up meal trays
        • Providing clean linen and making beds
        • Cleaning and caring for equipment
    • 51. Establishing Priorities for Care (continued)
      • Documentation/reporting
        • Presenting oral reports to supervisor
        • Writing on record if directed to do so
    • 52. Health Care Facilities and Agencies
    • 53.
      • Differentiate among the various types of health care facilities and agencies.
      OBJECTIVE
    • 54. Long-term Care Facilities (Nursing Homes)
      • Provide health care services to individuals unable to care for themselves:
        • elderly persons
        • disabled or handicapped persons
        • people with chronic illness
    • 55. Long-term Care Facilities (Nursing Homes) (continued)
      • Services provided
        • Medical
        • Nursing
        • Nutritional
        • Recreational/religious
        • Rehabilitative
    • 56. Long-term Care Facilities (Nursing Homes) (continued)
      • Types of care
        • Home care
        • Intermediate care
        • Skilled care
    • 57. Hospitals
      • Provide care for individuals of all ages with a broad range of health problems
    • 58. Hospitals (continued)
      • Services varied and extensive
        • Diagnostic
        • Medical
        • Surgical
        • Emergency
      • Types of care: acute, chronic and terminal care
    • 59. Hospitals (continued)
      • Services varied and extensive
        • Diagnostic
        • Medical
        • Surgical
        • Emergency
      • Types of care: acute, chronic and terminal care
    • 60. Home Care Agencies (continued)
      • Services provided include:
      • Nursing
      • Physical therapy
      • Occupational therapy
      • Speech therapy
      • Social services
      • Nutritional and food services
      • Respiratory therapy
      • Homemaker services
    • 61.
      • Identify the organizational structure of health care facilities.
      OBJECTIVE
    • 62.
      • Identify the organizational structure of health care facilities.
      OBJECTIVE
    • 63. Organizational Chart
      • Displays chain of command
      • Shows lines of authority
      • Identifies health care worker’s position
      • Identifies immediate supervisor
    • 64. Organizational Structure
        • Responsible for provision of safe and adequate care at a reasonable cost
        • Makes facility policies
        • Delegates management
      • to an administrator
      • Governing body (Board of Directors)
    • 65. Organizational Structure (continued)
      • Department heads
        • Have specific areas of responsibilities
        • Supervise department staff
          • Finance
          • Ancillary services
          • Nursing
    • 66. Organizational Structure (continued)
      • Medical Director
        • Supervises medical staff activities
          • Physicians
          • Residents
          • Interns
    • 67. Organizational Structure (continued)
      • Director of Nursing and Assistant DON
        • Supervises nursing staff activities
        • Responsible for safe nursing care
        • Registered nurses
    • 68. Organizational Structure (continued)
      • Nursing supervisor
        • Assists director of nursing
        • Licensed nurse
        • Assigned areas of responsibility
        • Assigned to specific shift
    • 69. Organizational Structure (continued)
      • Charge Nurse
        • Supervises staff in specific area
          • Registered nurses (RNs)
          • Licensed practical nurses (LPNs)
          • Nurse aides (NAs)
    • 70. Organizational Structure (continued)
      • Charge Nurse
        • Supervises staff in specific area
          • Registered nurses (RNs)
          • Licensed practical nurses (LPNs)
          • Nurse aides (NAs)
    • 71. Unit 2 Communication And Interpersonal Skills COMMUNICATION
    • 72. Communication And Interpersonal Skills Introduction
      • Nurse aides communicate with residents, families, visitors and co-workers.
    • 73. Unit 2 Communication And Interpersonal Skills COMMUNICATION
    • 74. Communication And Interpersonal Skills Introduction (continued)
      • Nurse aides must frequently send and receive information about the care and observation of residents, report thoughts and feelings as clearly and objectively as possible and interact effectively with others.
    • 75. Communication And Interpersonal Skills Introduction (continued)
      • Nurse aides need to be aware of nonverbal communications and need to develop skills in communicating with the sensory impaired.
    • 76. Communication And Interpersonal Skills Introduction (continued)
      • In addition, nurse aides may document on the medical record, which is a legal document. Therefore, all documentation must be in legible, clear and accurate language so that there is no misunderstanding of the meaning.
    • 77. Communication Skills
    • 78.
      • Demonstrate appropriate and effective communication skills.
      Objectives
    • 79. Elements That Influence Relationships With Others
      • Prejudices
      • Frustrations
      • Attitudes
      • Life Experiences
    • 80. Requirements For Successful Communications
      • A message
      • A sender
      • A receiver
    • 81.
      • Describe the importance of developing good listening skills.
      • Identify nine listening skills that can be used by the nurse aide.
      Objectives
    • 82. Listening Skills
      • Show interest
      • Hear message
      • Do not interrupt
      • Ask appropriate questions for clarification
    • 83. Listening Skills (continued)
      • Be patient and help resident express feelings and concerns
      • Eliminate or reduce distractions
      • Understand silence can be form of communication
    • 84.
      • Recognize barriers to effective communication.
      Objectives
    • 85. Barriers to Effective Communication
      • Labeling
      • Talking too fast
      • Avoiding eye contact
      • Belittling a resident’s feelings
      • Physical distance
    • 86. Barriers to Effective Communication (continued)
      • Mental or sensory impairment on the part of the resident such as:
        • Confusion
        • Blindness
        • Aphasia
        • Hearing impairment
    • 87. Barriers to Effective Communication (continued)
      • Changing the subject
      • False reassurance
      • Giving advice
      • Ineffective communication
        • Disguised messages
        • Conflicting messages
        • Unclear meanings
        • Clich é s
    • 88. Interpersonal Skills
    • 89.
      • Explain how the nurse aide will need to modify his or her behavior in response to the resident’s behavior.
      • Define the terms sympathy, empathy and tact.
      Objectives
    • 90. Interpersonal Skills
      • Determined by
        • Standards and values
        • Culture and environment
        • Heredity
        • Interests
    • 91. Interpersonal Skills (continued)
      • Determined by
        • Feelings and stress
        • Expectations others have for us
        • Past experiences
    • 92. Dealing With Resident Behavior
      • Accept every resident
      • Listen to every resident
      • Comply with reasonable requests, when possible
    • 93. Dealing With Resident Behavior (continued)
      • Display patience and tolerance
      • Make an effort to be understanding
    • 94. Dealing With Resident Behavior (continued)
      • Develop acceptable ways of coping with our own negative feelings
        • Leave the room after providing for safety
        • Talk with supervisor, in private, about negative feelings
    • 95. Dealing With Resident Behavior (continued)
      • Develop acceptable ways of coping with our own negative feelings
        • Involve yourself in physical activity
        • Learn to use relaxation techniques that ease stress
    • 96. Dealing With Resident Behavior (continued)
      • Be sensitive to residents’ moods
      • Be able to handle disagreements and criticism
    • 97. Treat Residents As Unique Individuals
      • Do things the residents’ way, when possible
      • Anticipate their needs
      • Give good care
      • Ask for their opinions
    • 98. Treat Residents As Unique Individuals (continued)
      • Be able to see things from the other person’s point of view
    • 99. Communicating With Residents and Families
    • 100.
      • Develop effective nonverbal and verbal communications skills.
      • List six examples of nonverbal communication and six examples of effective verbal communication.
      Objectives
    • 101. Nonverbal Communication
      • Body language
        • Posture
        • Gestures
        • Level of activity
        • Facial expressions
        • Appearance
        • Touch
    • 102. Verbal Communication
      • Speak clearly and concisely
      • Give message by tone of voice
      • Face resident, at eye level, when speaking
    • 103. Verbal Communication (continued)
      • Avoid words having several meanings
      • Present thoughts in a logical, orderly manner
      • Learn to paraphrase
    • 104.
      • Identify proper telephone communication skills.
      Objective
    • 105. Telephone Communication Skills
      • Speak clearly in a pleasant tone of voice
      • Identify the area, yourself and your position
      • Ask, “May I help you?”
      • Be courteous
    • 106. Telephone Communication Skills (continued)
      • Take messages:
        • name of individual calling
        • phone number (including area code)
        • read back message for accuracy
        • date and time of call
    • 107. Telephone Communication Skills (continued)
      • Take messages (continued):
        • ask for assistance if you are unable to handle message
        • permit caller to hang up first
        • follow proper etiquette
    • 108.
      • Identify actions that would facilitate communication with residents’ family and visitors
      Objective
    • 109. Actions to Facilitate Communication with the Resident’s Family and Visitors
      • Ask how they are doing
      • Indicate that you are glad to see them
      • Tell them about activities the resident has been involved with that day
    • 110. Actions to Facilitate Communication with the Resident’s Family and Visitors (continued)
      • Be warm and friendly
      • Use talking and listening skills you would use with resident
    • 111. Actions to Facilitate Communication with the Resident’s Family and Visitors (continued)
      • Share knowledge about the unit
        • Visiting hours
        • Restrictions to visitors
        • Any restrictions on bringing food
        • Activities that include family
    • 112. Actions to Facilitate Communication with the Resident’s Family and Visitors (continued)
      • Report stressful or tiring visits to supervisor
      • Refer requests for information on the resident’s condition to supervisor
    • 113. Actions to Facilitate Communication with the Resident’s Family and Visitors (continued)
      • Share information from family/visitors that would affect resident care with supervisor
      • Report visitor concerns or complaints to supervisor
    • 114.
      • Identify actions that would facilitate communication with hearing impaired residents.
      Objective
    • 115. Actions to Facilitate Communication with Hearing Impaired Residents
      • Encourage to use hearing aid
      • Speak slowly using simple sentences
      • Face resident at eye level when speaking
      • Encourage resident to read lips, if that helps
    • 116. Actions to Facilitate Communication with Hearing Impaired Residents (continued)
      • Lower pitch of voice
      • Direct speech to stronger ear but do not shout
      • Use gestures when possible to clarify statements
      • Write when necessary
      • Learn basic signing, if appropriate
    • 117.
      • Identify actions that would facilitate communication with residents that have decreased vision.
      Objective
    • 118. Actions to Facilitate Communication with Residents Who Have Decreased Vision
      • Sit where resident can best see you
      • Make sure lighting is sufficient
      • Encourage resident to touch objects and yourself
      • Encourage resident to wear his/her glasses
    • 119. Actions to Facilitate Communication with Residents Who Have Decreased Vision (continued)
      • Use touch and talk frequently to communicate your location
      • Use descriptive words and phrases
    • 120.
      • Identify actions that would facilitate communication with residents that have difficulty speaking.
      Objective
    • 121. Actions to Facilitate Communication with Residents Who Have Difficulty Speaking
      • Encourage to use hands to point out objects
      • Use communication boards/card
      • Repeat what you heard to be sure you understood resident
    • 122. Actions to Facilitate Communication with Residents Who Have Difficulty Speaking (continued)
      • Encourage resident to cry or express anger/frustration when he/she has trouble
      • Ask yes and no questions
      • Let other staff members know meaning of a sound or movement
    • 123.
      • Identify actions that would facilitate communication with depressed residents.
      Objective
    • 124.
      • Exercise patience
      • Allow time for resident to say things
      • Sit quietly with resident
      • Return repeatedly until resident responds
      Actions to Facilitate Communication with Depressed Residents
    • 125. Actions to Facilitate Communication with Residents with Memory Loss
      • Encourage to talk
      • Talk about things resident remembers
      • Ask one question at a time, containing one thought
    • 126. Actions to Facilitate Communication with Residents with Memory Loss
      • Encourage to talk
      • Talk about things resident remembers
      • Ask one question at a time, containing one thought
    • 127. Actions to Facilitate Communication with Residents with Memory Loss (continued)
      • Keep questions simple
      • Re-phrase questions not understood
      • Avoid asking resident to make a choice
    • 128.
      • Identify actions that would facilitate communication with residents based on stage of development.
      Objective
    • 129. Actions to Facilitate Communication Based on Stage of Development
      • Treat all residents with dignity and respect
      • Encourage residents to make choices when appropriate
      • Use simple sentences
      • Emphasize positive qualities
    • 130. Actions to Facilitate Communication Based on Stage of Development (continued)
      • Never attempt to exert power over residents
      • Encourage residents to do all they can for themselves
      • Be patient
    • 131. Actions to Facilitate Communication Based on Stage of Development (continued)
      • Take time to explain what residents are to do or what you are going to do for them
      • Use age appropriate speech
      • Encourage residents to express feelings, ideas and frustrations
    • 132. Actions to Facilitate Communication Based on Stage of Development (continued)
      • Gain resident’s attention and speak clearly, in a normal tone of voice
      • Orient residents to reality when appropriate
    • 133. Actions to Facilitate Communication Based on Stage of Development (continued)
      • Never assume that you aren’t heard or understood
      • Never address residents as if they are children.
    • 134. Observation And Reporting
    • 135.
      • Observe by using the senses to report resident behavior to the nurse.
      Objectives
    • 136. Methods of Observation
      • Examples using sight :
      • Rash
      • Skin color
      • Bruising
    • 137. Methods of Observation (continued)
      • Examples using hearing :
      • Wheezing
      • Moans
      • Words spoken by resident
    • 138. Methods of Observation (continued)
      • Examples using touch :
      • Lump
      • Temperature of skin
      • Change in pulse
    • 139. Methods of Observation (continued)
      • Examples using smell :
      • Odor of breath
      • Odor of urine
      • Odor of body
    • 140. Reporting
      • Reports are made:
        • immediately
        • thoroughly
        • accurately
      • Use notepad and pencil to write down information for reporting
    • 141.
      • Discuss differences between objective and subjective data.
      Objective
    • 142. Reporting (continued)
      • When reporting, consider:
        • care or treatment given
        • time of treatment
        • resident’s response to care
    • 143. Reporting (continued)
      • When reporting, consider:
        • observations helpful to other health care workers
        • information resident has given that would affect his or her treatment
        • anything unusual about resident
    • 144. Communicating With Other Staff Members
    • 145.
      • Identify the ways in which the nurse aide communicates with other staff members.
      Objective
    • 146. Forms of Communicating
      • Body language
      • Reporting or communicating orally
      • Written communications
    • 147. Written Communications: Resident Care Plans
      • Resident care plans prepared by nurse
      • One for each resident
      • Kept at nurses’ station
    • 148. Written Communications: Resident Care Plans (continued)
      • Working record to provide consistent, well-planned care on a daily basis
      • Changed and updated as needed by licensed nurse
    • 149. Written Communications: Resident Care Plans (continued)
      • Information included (continued):
        • Short-term and long-term goals
        • Plan to attain goals
        • Date plan initiated and reevaluated
    • 150. Written Communications: Resident Care Plans (continued)
      • Nurse aides contribute by:
        • Helping to identify problems
        • Attending care conferences
    • 151. Written Communications: Resident Care Plans (continued)
      • Nurse aides contribute by (continued):
        • Directing questions about plan to supervisor
        • Reporting resident response to treatment and activities
    • 152.
      • Recognize the importance of maintaining the resident’s medical record.
      Objective
    • 153. Written Communications: Resident‘s Medical Record
      • Includes information from all disciplines providing direct service to residents
      Medical Record
    • 154. Written Communications: Resident’s Medical Record (continued)
      • A record of:
        • assessments, implementations, evaluations
        • management plans
        • progress notes
      • Permanent legal record
      Medical Record
    • 155. Written Communications: Resident’s Medical Record (continued)
      • Purpose
        • Organizes all information on care in one document
        • Accountability so care can be evaluated
        • Documentation so there is knowledge of what each discipline is doing
    • 156. Written Communications: Resident’s Medical Record (continued)
      • Confidential information available only to health care workers involved in care of resident
      Medical Record
    • 157.
      • Review guidelines for charting in the resident’s medical record.
      Objective
    • 158. Guidelines For Charting If Allowed By Facility
      • Make sure entries are accurate and easy to read
      • Always use ink
      • Print, unless script is accepted form
      • Do not use the term “resident”
    • 159. Guidelines For Charting If Allowed By Facility (continued)
      • Use short, concise phrases
      • Always chart after care is performed
      • Make sure writing legible and neat
    • 160. Guidelines For Charting If Allowed By Facility (continued)
      • Record in a logical and chronological manner
      • Be descriptive
      • Make sure all forms added to the chart contain identifying information
      communication
    • 161. Guidelines For Charting If Allowed By Facility (continued)
      • Avoid using words that have more than one meaning
      • Use resident’s exact words in quotation marks whenever possible
      • Always indicate the time of care
    • 162. Guidelines For Charting If Allowed By Facility (continued)
      • Leave no lines blank
      • Sign each entry with first initial, last name and title
      • Correct errors using facility procedure
    • 163. Medical Terminology
    • 164.
      • Document observations using appropriate terms.
      Objective
    • 165. Medical Terminology
      • Medicine has a language of its own
        • Historical development
        • Composed mainly of Greek and Latin word parts
        • Consistent and uniform
      Nurse aide catheter communication
    • 166. Medical Terminology (continued)
      • Three components
        • Prefixes
        • Root words
        • Suffixes
      • Medical dictionary
        • Used for reference
        • Spelling is important
    • 167. Abbreviations
    • 168.
      • Recognize abbreviations used in documenting by the health care facility.
      Objective
    • 169. Abbreviations
      • Help health care workers communicate quickly and effectively
      • Are shortened forms of words
      • Reduce time needed to chart important information
    • 170. Abbreviations (continued)
      • Conserve space on medical record
      • Used primarily in written communication
    • 171. Demonstration and Return Demonstration
    • 172.
      • Demonstrate the ability to document accurate information following proper charting practices.
      Objective
    • 173. Ethical and Legal Issues
    • 174. Ethical and Legal Issues Introduction
      • As a member of the health care team, the nurse aide will frequently be faced with ethical and legal decisions that govern his or her actions.
      • A knowledge of ethical standards, resident’s rights and legal issues are important for the protection of nurse aides, employers, and residents.
    • 175. Ethics
    • 176.
      • Define ethics.
      • List at least six basic rules of ethics for the nurse aide.
      Objectives
    • 177. Ethics
      • Discipline concerned with right or wrong conduct
      • Guides to moral behavior
      • Making choices or judgments
    • 178. Nurse Aide Ethical Standards
      • Show respect for each resident as an individual
      • Understand the limits of role
        • Perform only acts for which adequately prepared
        • Perform acts only within legal scope of nurse aide
    • 179. Nurse Aide Ethical Standards (continued)
      • Carry out assignments to best of ability
      • Be loyal:
        • Maintain a positive attitude toward institution that employs you
        • Support co-workers
    • 180. Nurse Aide Ethical Standards (continued)
      • Be responsible citizen at all times
        • Respect others
        • Respect values that differ from yours
    • 181.
      • Identify the kind of information that should be kept confidential.
      Objective
    • 182.
      • Resident information should be kept confidential
        • Discuss only in appropriate places
        • Discuss only with proper people
        • Refer questions from residents about their condition to supervisor
      Nurse Aide Ethical Standards (continued)
    • 183.
      • Resident information should be kept confidential (continued)
        • Refer questions about resident’s death to supervisor
        • Respect personal religious beliefs
      Nurse Aide Ethical Standards (continued)
    • 184.
      • Respect privacy of others:
        • while dressing
        • while performing personal hygiene
        • during examination or treatment
        • during visits with clergy
        • during visits with spouse or significant other
      Nurse Aide Ethical Standards (continued)
    • 185.
      • Put resident’s needs ahead of your own
      • Be sincere, honest and trustworthy in performance of duties
        • caring and concerned
        • “ golden rule”
      Nurse Aide Ethical Standards (continued)
    • 186.
      • Explain why nurse aides should not accept monetary tips for a health care service.
      Objective
    • 187.
      • Do not accept monetary tips
        • Residents are paying for service
        • You are paid to provide service
        • Do not discriminate regardless of race, creed, color, age, financial resources
        • Provide care based on need
      Nurse Aide Ethical Standards (continued)
    • 188.
      • Do not accept monetary tips (continued)
        • Display tactful and courteous refusal of tips
        • Display continued desire to be helpful
      Nurse Aide Ethical Standards (continued)
    • 189. Age Appropriate Behavior
    • 190.
      • Demonstrate skills supporting age appropriate behavior by encouraging the resident to make personal choices, and by providing and reinforcing other resident’s dignity.
      Objective
    • 191. Age Appropriate Behavior
      • Dependent elderly residents are not children
        • If resident seen as a child
        • If resident treated as a child
        • Then resident behaves as a child
    • 192. Age Appropriate Behavior (continued)
      • Residents are treated as adults in manner appropriate to person’s age
      • Age-appropriate considerations:
        • Recreational activities
        • Social activities
        • Style of dress
        • Hair style and grooming
    • 193. Age Appropriate Behavior (continued)
      • Guidelines for Nurse Aide
        • Address resident in a dignified way
        • Listen to what resident has to say
        • Converse with resident in an adult manner
        • Respect resident’s privacy
    • 194. Age Appropriate Behavior (continued)
      • Guidelines for Nurse Aide (continued)
        • Don’t ignore or humor resident
        • Explain what care you are going to give
        • Promote resident independence
        • Treat resident as you would want to be treated
    • 195. Age Appropriate Behavior (continued)
      • Guidelines for Nurse Aide (continued)
        • Encourage resident to make choices:
          • select clothing to wear
          • select books to read
          • select television programs to watch
    • 196. Age Appropriate Behavior (continued)
      • Guidelines for Nurse Aide (continued)
        • Encourage resident to make choices:
          • select food and nourishments
          • select activities of interest
          • select friends
    • 197. Age Appropriate Behavior (continued)
      • Guidelines for Nurse Aide (continued)
        • Encourage resident to make choices:
          • select food and nourishments
          • select activities of interest
          • select friends
    • 198. Legal Issues
    • 199.
      • List six legal responsibilities of a nurse aide.
      Objective
    • 200. Legal Issues
      • Authorized or based on law
        • Legislated by state and federal government
        • Liable if laws not obeyed
          • Fines
          • Imprisonment
    • 201. Legal Issues (continued)
      • No fear of breaking laws if nurse aide:
        • performs only acts within scope of nurse aide
        • keeps skills and knowledge current
        • keeps resident’s safety and well-being in mind
        • understands directions for care
    • 202. Legal Issues (continued)
      • No fear of breaking laws if nurse aide:
        • follows facility policy
        • does no harm to residents or their belongings
      • Laws designed to protect public welfare
    • 203.
      • Give examples of malpractice and negligence.
      CHAPT 1 Objective
    • 204. Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts
      • Malpractice
        • Giving care for which you are not allowed legally to do
        • Providing improper care
    • 205. Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts (continued)
      • Malpractice
        • Example: nurse aide giving medication
        • Example: nurse aide performing treatment only allowed by licensed nurses
    • 206.
      • Negligence
        • Unintentional wrong
        • Failure to perform in reasonably prudent manner
      Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts (continued)
    • 207.
      • Battery
        • Example: nurse aide striking resident
        • Example: does procedure resident refuses
      Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts (continued)
    • 208.
      • Battery
        • Get informed consent
          • Written – safest
          • Verbal
          • Gesture
      Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts (continued)
    • 209.
      • Invasion of privacy
        • Unnecessary exposure of individual
        • Revealing personal information without consent
      Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts (continued)
    • 210.
      • Invasion of privacy
        • Example: giving news media information without resident’s permission
        • Example: giving information to insurance company without permission
      Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts (continued)
    • 211.
      • False imprisonment
        • Restraining an individual
        • Restricting resident’s freedom
      Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts (continued)
    • 212.
      • False imprisonment
        • Example: use of physical restraints without authorization or justification
        • Example: preventing resident from leaving facility against resident’s will
      Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts (continued)
    • 213.
      • Defamation
        • False statements that cause a resident to be ridiculed or cause damage to their reputation
          • Example: slander – spoken
          • Example: libel – written
      CHAPT 1 Legal Issues: Civil Law Examples Of Torts (continued)
    • 214.
      • Identify the responsibilities of the nurse aide when a resident wishes to make a will.
      ……… . Objective
    • 215. Wills
      • Legal document giving direction on how resident wants property distributed after death
        • Refer requests to prepare will to supervisor
        • Nurse aide may witness signing of will
          • Check facility policy
          • Discuss with supervisor
      … ..
    • 216. Residents' Rights
    • 217.
      • Support the resident’s right to make personal choices to accommodate individual needs.
      Objective
    • 218. Residents’ Rights
      • Basic Human Rights
        • Protected by Constitution
        • Laws clarify these rights:
          • Right to be treated with respect
          • Right to live in dignity
          • Right to pursue a meaningful life
          • Right to be free of fear
    • 219. Residents’ Rights (continued)
      • Basic Human Rights (continued)
        • Behavior that infringes on these rights:
          • addressing residents as children
          • using demeaning nicknames for residents
          • leaving door open during bath
          • threatening a resident with harm
    • 220.
      • Describe the Resident’s Bill of Rights.
      Objective
    • 221.
      • The Resident’s Rights
        • Ethical and legal basis
        • Federal and state regulations
        • Posted in facility
        • Distributed on admission in many facilities
      Residents’ Rights (continued)
    • 222.
      • Residents have the right to:
        • Considerate and respectful care
        • Obtain complete current information concerning diagnosis, treatment and prognosis
        • Receive information necessary to give informed consent prior to treatments or procedures
      Residents’ Rights (continued)
    • 223.
      • Residents have the right to:
        • Considerate and respectful care
        • Obtain complete current information concerning diagnosis, treatment and prognosis
        • Receive information necessary to give informed consent prior to treatments or procedures
      Residents’ Rights (continued)
    • 224.
        • Examine bill and receive explanation of charges
        • Be informed of any facility rules and regulations
      • Residents have the right to (continued) :
      Residents’ Rights (continued)
    • 225.
      • Demonstrate behavior which maintains residents’ rights.
      Objective
    • 226. Behavior That Maintains Residents’ Rights
      • Address as Mr., Mrs., or Miss unless asked to use a specific name
      • Never be rude or unkind
        • Never withhold social responsiveness
        • Never ignore residents
        • Make eye contact
    • 227. Behavior That Maintains Residents’ Rights (continued)
      • Never be rude or unkind (continued)
        • Allow to complete sentences prior to leaving room
        • Don’t shut or slam door to quiet resident
        • Never threaten or intentionally hurt
    • 228.
      • Maintain the resident’s environment and care through the appropriate nurse aide behavior.
      Objective
    • 229.
      • Explain care you plan to give
      • Observe safety precautions
      • Obtain proper consent after identifying resident
      Behavior That Maintains Residents’ Rights (continued)
    • 230.
      • Treat all residents equally
      • Promote positive attitudes
      • Report errors to supervisor immediately
      Behavior That Maintains Residents’ Rights (continued)
    • 231.
      • Explain the purpose and value of a Resident Council.
      Objective
    • 232. Resident Council : advisory group
      • Provides opportunity for discussion
      • Recommendations may be made for:
        • Facility policies
        • Decisions regarding activities
        • Exploration of concerns
        • Resolving grievances
    • 233. Resident Council : advisory group (continued)
      • Gives residents a voice in facility operations
      • Members
        • residents
        • facility staff members (you)
        • representatives from community
    • 234. Mistreatment Of Elderly
    • 235.
      • Administer care which maintains the residents free from abuse, mistreatment, neglect, diversion of drugs, fraud, or misappropriation of property.
      Objective
    • 236. Mistreatment of the Elderly Federal and State Definitions
      • Abuse means willful infliction of injury, unreasonable confinement, intimidation or punishment with resulting physical harm, pain or mental anguish.
    • 237. Mistreatment of the Elderly Federal and State Definitions (continued)
      • Neglect means a failure to provide goods and services necessary to avoid physical harm, mental anguish or mental illness.
    • 238.
      • Misappropriation of property means deliberate misplacement, exploitation, or wrongful, temporary or permanent use of a belonging or money without consent.
      Mistreatment of the Elderly Federal and State Definitions (continued)
    • 239.
      • Diversion of drugs means the unauthorized taking or use of any drug.
      Mistreatment of the Elderly Federal and State Definitions (continued)
    • 240. Mistreatment of the Elderly Federal and State Definitions (continued)
      • Drug means any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans or animals as an aid in the diagnosis, treatment or prevention of disease or other condition or for the relief of pain or suffering or to control or improve any physiological pathologic condition.
    • 241. Mistreatment of the Elderly Federal and State Definitions (continued)
      • Fraud means an intentional deception or misrepresentation made by a person with knowledge that deception could result in some unauthorized benefit to himself or some other person. It includes any act that constitutes fraud under applicable Federal or State Law.
    • 242. Mistreatment of the Elderly Resident’s Right To Be Free From Abuse
      • Physical
      • Verbal
      • Sexual
      • Mental
      • Corporal Punishment
      • Involuntary Seclusion
    • 243. Mistreatment of the Elderly Signs of abuse
      • Fractures
      • Bruises of face, upper arms, upper thighs, abdomen
      • Fearfulness
      • Withdrawn, paranoid behavior
    • 244. Mistreatment of the Elderly Examples of Abuse
      • Threatening resident
      • Frightening resident
      • Pinching, slapping, pushing, grabbing or kicking resident
      • Withholding food or fluids
      • Restraining resident against her/his will without apparent reason and doctor’s order
    • 245. Mistreatment of the Elderly Examples of Abuse (continued)
      • Leaving resident in soiled linen or clothing
      • Yelling angrily at or making fun of resident
      • Refusing to reposition or give treatment
      • Not answering call signal
    • 246. Mistreatment of the Elderly Examples of Abuse (continued)
      • Humiliating resident
      • Making disparaging, derogatory remarks
      • Sexual coercion
      • Sexual harassment
      • Verbal harassment
    • 247. Mistreatment of the Elderly
      • Identification of residents at risk for abusing other residents
        • Residents with history of aggressive behavior
    • 248. Mistreatment of the Elderly
      • Identification of residents at risk for being abused
        • noisy individuals
        • wandering individuals
        • philandering individuals
        • socially/logistically isolated individuals
    • 249.
      • Report any instances of abuse to the appropriate facility/agency staff.
      Objective
    • 250. Reporting Abuse
      • If observed, stop abuse and report immediately to supervisor
      • Cause for immediate dismissal of perpetrator and posted on NA I Registry if proven
      • Know state law
      CHAPT 1
    • 251. Advocates
    • 252.
      • Assist in resolving grievances.
      Objective
    • 253. Advocates
      • Plead cause of another
      • Resolve grievances
      • Protect resident’s rights
    • 254. Advocates (continued)
      • Advocates can be:
        • You and your co-workers
        • Member of resident’s family/support system
        • Resident’s guardian
        • Ombudsman
    • 255. Advocates Facility policy components for resident grievance
      • Acknowledgment
      • Prompt attempt to resolve
      • Resident kept apprised
    • 256.
      • Discuss key elements of Federal Grievance Procedures.
      Objective
    • 257. Grievance Procedures
      • Grievance Procedures
        • Review federal grievance procedures
    • 258. Personal Possessions
    • 259. Residents’ Personal Possessions
      • Protect personal items
      • These possessions may be all they have
      • Items may be impossible to replace
      • Report observed thefts
    • 260. Residents’ Personal Possessions (continued)
      • Handle personal items carefully
      • Add new items to list of resident’s belongings
      • Mark all items with resident’s name
    • 261. The End

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