2011 ATE Conference PreConference Worskhop D
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  • 1. WORKSHOP D: 21ST CENTURY LEARNING REDUX – TECHNOLOGY‘APPS’ TO ENGAGE YOUR STUDENTS
  • 2. 20th-Century Classroom:Presentations are typicallydeveloped in advance outside ofclass with educators as primarydevelopers 21st-Century Classroom Presentations are developed both inside and outside of class with students as co- developers or as primary developers
  • 3. 20th-Century ClassroomEducator is the presenter andstudents are the audienceEmphasizes exposition: displayingand explaining information 21st-Century Classroom Activity- focuses on students as participants and the educator as guide or mentor Activity- discovery and application: finding, assessing, synthesizing, information
  • 4. 20th-Century Classroom:Is the primary site of access to course content, and access is“linear”-students cannot return to previous classpresentations 21st-Century Classroom Access to course content is augmented by electronic sources and media, access is recursive or on-demand allowing students to return to content when and as often as they’d like.
  • 5. 20th-Century ClassroomStudents and educators have access to one anotherprimarily in the classroom 21st-Century Classroom Students and educators have access to one another via virtual means, online discussions, email, chat, social networking, etc.
  • 6. 20th-Century ClassroomDiscrete disciplinary silos are often established and preserved 21st-Century Classroom Interdisciplinary connections are encouraged and disciplinary silos are seen as porous or even arbitrary [1]
  • 7. Content v/s Concepthttp://visionandchange.org/finalreport ReferenceRankin, W. Abilene Christian University www.iThinkEd.com, 2007