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2011 ATE Conference Panel Session
 

2011 ATE Conference Panel Session

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Panel: Community Input on a National Research Council (NRC) Summit on the Changing Dynamics in STEM Education Between Two-Year and Four-Year Colleges and Universities

Panel: Community Input on a National Research Council (NRC) Summit on the Changing Dynamics in STEM Education Between Two-Year and Four-Year Colleges and Universities

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    2011 ATE Conference Panel Session 2011 ATE Conference Panel Session Presentation Transcript

    • Community Colleges in the Evolving  STEM Education Landscape ‐ A National Summit A National Summit THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES National Academy of Sciences National Academy of Engineering  Institute of Medicine Institute of Medicine National Research Council Catherine Didion (NAE) ( ) Linnea Fletcher (Austin CC) Margaret Hilton (NRC) Jay Labov  (NAS, NRC) Jay Labov (NAS, NRC) ATE PI Conference – Washington, DC October 27, 2011
    • Goals for this Session Goals for this Session• Learn about the basis for NSF’s support of this Learn about the basis for NSF s support of this  project.• Description of the project Description of the project.• Comments from other project leaders.• Feedback and ideas from session participants.
    • PURPOSES OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES To advance science and technology To advise government  on applications of science and engineering t policy i i to li  on policy for science, engineering, and health care d h lth
    • NAS ACT OF INCORPORATION: 1863• Added to the end of the Act, “... shall, whenever called upon by any department of the Government, investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any i i t d t subject of science or art ...”• “... but the Academy shall receive no compensation whatever for any services to the Government of the United States.”
    • As a result of the charter’s restrictions,  , the U.S. National Academies are a  private, non profit organization that is  private non‐profit organization that is independent from the U.S. Government  and whose work depends on volunteers. and whose work depends on volunteersSources of studies: For access to all National•Federal Government (Congress, Agencies) Academies’ reports•States States (now all reports can be•Private Sources (e.g., Foundations) freely downloaded):•Internal support (endowments)•Board-generated p p g proposals http://nap.edu
    • For More Information About the For More Information About the National Academies: http://nationalacademies.orgFor Access to National Academies  o ccess to at o a cade es reports: http://nap.edu h // d 6
    • ‘Conventional Wisdom’ About the Role of Community Colleges in the U.S. Higher Education System Other Pursuits  High School  High School (Personal Skills  (P l Skill Students and Interests) Older  and  Community Colleges (Associate Degrees and  (Associate Degrees and Four‐Year Colleges  Returning  Returning Technical Education  and Universities Students Certification) Students from  WorkforceLocal Industries
    • Emerging Roles of Community Colleges in the U.S. Higher Education System – Institutional Changes Four Year Applied  Baccalaureate and   Other Pursuits  High School  High School Postbaccalaureate (Personal Skills  (P l Skill Students Degrees and Interests) Older  and  Community Colleges (Associate Degrees and  (Associate Degrees and Four‐Year Colleges  Returning  Returning Technical Education  and Universities Students Certification) Students from  WorkforceLocal Industries
    • Emerging Roles of Community Colleges in the U.S. Higher Education System – Institutional Changes Four Year Applied  Baccalaureate and   Other Pursuits  High School  High School Postbaccalaureate (Personal Skills  (P l Skill Students Degrees and Interests) Older  and  Community Colleges (Associate Degrees and  (Associate Degrees and Four‐Year Colleges  Returning  Returning Technical Education  and Universities Students Certification) Students from  WorkforceLocal Industries Teacher Education  T h Ed i and Professional  Development
    • Emerging Roles of CCs in the U.S. Higher Education System – 2 Examples of Changing Student Populations Four Year Applied  Baccalaureate and   Other Pursuits  High School  High School Postbaccalaureate (Personal Skills  (P l Skill Students Degrees and Interests) Dual Enrollment D lE ll t Older  and  Community Colleges (Associate Degrees and  (Associate Degrees and Four‐Year Colleges  Returning  Returning Technical Education  and Universities Students Certification) Students from  Workforce Local Industries Teacher Education  T h Ed i and Professional  Development
    • Additional Roles: Additional Roles:• Service to lifelong learning & to local communities. Service to lifelong learning & to local communities.• Student Research and Partnerships with Industry,  National Labs, etc. ,• Applied graduate degrees• Regional Centers for Technological Innovation and Regional Centers for Technological Innovation and  Sustainability• Increasing importance of introductory courses  g p y (especially for transfer students) g• Growing contributions to STEM education.
    • Emerging Issues: Emerging Issues:• Students are voting with their feet about where to Students are voting with their feet about where to  attend college – community colleges are benefitting  – and facing new problems with this changing reality.• Policy is shifting to emphasize the kinds of education  traditionally offered by community colleges.• State‐level articulation agreements are opening new  opportunities – and placing new pressures – on the  higher education system. h h d• Some faculty and administrators at 4‐year colleges  and universities are oblivious, or even resistant, to  d i iti bli i it t t these changes. 
    • The New Reality: The New Reality:It’s not your parents’ It’ t t’ community college  community college anymore!
    • The National Academies Project The National Academies ProjectWhat new opportunities for students, faculty, What new opportunities for students faculty and institutions of higher education might  emerge if: emerge if:• the higher education and education policy  communities were better informed about the  communities were better informed about the changing and evolving roles of community colleges?• Analysis and synthesis of research could lead to new  a ys s a d sy es s o esea c cou d ead o e working relationships between 2‐ and 4‐year colleges  and universities to improve STEM education?
    • The National Academies have reported on many issues  important to STEM in Community CollegesAll reports from the National Academies can be freely downloaded at http://nap.edu
    • Many Units of the National  Academies Are Involved• National Academy of Engineering• Board on Higher Education and Workforce• Board on Life Sciences Board on Life Sciences• Board on Science Education• Teacher Advisory Council T h Ad i C il
    • Overview of Project Overview of Project• A 1‐Day Summit on the Changing and Evolving A 1 Day Summit on the Changing and Evolving  Roles of Community Colleges in STEM – December 15 in Washington (about 1 year after the December 15 in Washington (about 1 year after the  White House Summit on Community Colleges) – Approximately 100 invited participants Approximately 100 invited participants – Live web broadcast to up to 100 sites – Series of commissioned papers to describe research Series of commissioned papers to describe research – Report from the Summit to be widely distributed  through collaboration with ATE and AACC through collaboration with ATE and AACC
    • Emphases of the Summit Emphases of the Summit• Draw national attention to STEM education at the intersection Draw national attention to STEM education at the intersection  of 2‐ and 4‐year colleges, both the challenges and new  opportunities. • Suggest evidence‐based solutions to some of the major  challenges.• Bring together critical stakeholders with the relevant research  to create new communities of concern and practice .• Create a leadership discussion around these issues that can Create a leadership discussion around these issues that can  act as a catalyst for systemic change.• Identify high‐priority areas for practical solutions and future  y g p y p research.
    • Topics for the Commissioned  Papers• Transfer and Articulation Between Two‐ and  g Four‐Year Colleges and Universities:  Policies and Practices• Effective Outreach Recruitment and Effective Outreach, Recruitment, and  Mentoring into STEM Pathways: Strengthening  Partnerships with Community Colleges Partnerships with Community Colleges• Mathematics Curriculum and Student Progress  to Completion of STEM Programs of Study in  to Completion of STEM Programs of Study in the Community College
    • Topics of Interest to NSF for  Possible Future Work • Interactions Between Two‐ and Four‐Year Postsecondary  Institutions:• Changing STEM Education Pathways and Their Effects on  Employment of Graduates Employment of Graduates• Roles of Community Colleges in Broadening Participation for  Students• Transfer of Community College Courses• Demographics of Community College Faculty• Student Advising Student Advising• Economic Impacts of Community Colleges• Role and Value of Community Colleges in the System of Higher  Education• External Funding of Community Colleges
    • Your Input and Contributions Your Input and Contributions• Today, Tomorrow at Breakfast, and Tomorrow at the ATE  Center Directors meeting – Identify promising practices from ATE projects that could inform  the commissioned papers the commissioned papers• Before and During the Summit – Comment on final versions of commissioned papers on the  Summit website – Participate in the live webcast with colleagues from your project  (up to 100 sites) (up to 100 sites)• After the Summit – Host discussions of the National Academies report that results
    • Comments from Panelists and  General Discussion Thank you!!
    • For Additional Information and to  Provide Additional Comments:• Jay Labov (PI) National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council jlabov@nas.edu jl b @ d• Margaret Hilton (Senior Program Officer) Margaret Hilton (Senior Program Officer) National Research Council mhilton@nas.edu• Summit website:  http://nas‐sites.org/communitycollegessummit/ htt // it / it ll it/
    • Your Input and Contributions Your Input and Contributions• Today, Tomorrow at Breakfast, and Tomorrow at the ATE  Center Directors meeting – Identify promising practices from ATE projects that could inform  the commissioned papers the commissioned papers• Before and During the Summit – Comment on final versions of commissioned papers on the  Summit website – Participate in the live webcast with colleagues from your project  (up to 100 sites) (up to 100 sites)• After the Summit – Host discussions of the National Academies report that results