2011 ATE Conference Concurrent Session 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

2011 ATE Conference Concurrent Session 1

on

  • 644 views

Session 1: Leadership for a Global Workforce: Three International Collaboration Projects

Session 1: Leadership for a Global Workforce: Three International Collaboration Projects

Statistics

Views

Total Views
644
Views on SlideShare
644
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

2011 ATE Conference Concurrent Session 1 2011 ATE Conference Concurrent Session 1 Presentation Transcript

  • Leadership for a Global Workforce: Three International Collaboration ProjectsModerator: Pierre Thiry, MPICT Center1. Computing in the Scottish Highlands Deborah Boisvert, BATEC and Mike Just, Glasgow Caledonian University2. Networking with Paris - ICT Project with Centre des Formations Industrielles Michael McKeever, MPICT and Cécile Montier, CFI Paris-Gambetta3. Renewable Energy in Agriculture in Denmark Jeremy Pickard and Marshall McDonald, ATEEC, Eastern Iowa CCD and Ove Gejl Christensen, Dalum College
  • RFP March 2010• “On a competitive basis, NSF’s Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE) will consider requests for supplemental funding to ATE Center awards to support high quality international educational experiences for small groups of U.S. community college students and their faculty mentors through active collaboration with counterpart technology educators at their respective international sites…..• For this pilot opportunity, international collaborators and sites must be located in Europe. We anticipate making five supplemental awards.
  • Supplemental funding requests should describe:………The plan to assess the impact of the international activities, to encourage participants to stay engaged in science and engineering, and to disseminate the results of the collaboration;
  • Leadership for a Global Workforce: Computing in the Scottish Highlands Deborah Boisvert Mike Just Executive Director Assistant Professor BATEC, Boston GCU, Glasgow, UK2011 ATE Principle Investigators Conference, 26-28 October 2011
  • Our Project• International Collaboration Project between – Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) – Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC) – University of Massachusetts Boston (UMB)• Four-week exchange of BHCC students to GCU in Glasgow• Students tasked with computing projects in GCU areas of expertise• Cultural experience in Scotland27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 5
  • BATEC Service AreaCommunity Colleges• Massachusetts – Roxbury CC – Bunker Hill CC – Middlesex CC Current Partners – Mass Bay CC – Quinsigamond CC – Bristol CC – Northern Essex CC• Now Adding – City Colleges of Chicago – City College of San Francisco – College of Southern Nevada27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 6
  • About BATEC• National Center for IT and Computing (funded September 2011)• Vision: BATEC is scaling its coordinated, self- sustaining, regional IT education and workforce system – one that attracts a diverse student population to IT careers, promotes lifelong learning of technical skills and supports the IT workforce needs in urban cities across our country.27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 7
  • About BATEC• Curriculum and Professional Development – Regionally Connected; Transferable – Advanced in Content and Pedagogy • IT Problem-Solving; Computational Thinking • IT Seamless Pathways that are Stackable • IT Intersections – Forensics, Health, Business – Industry-Linked• Education, Industry and Community Connections – Mutually-Beneficial Partnerships – Career Development – Lifelong Learning – Regional Economic Growth27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 8
  • About GCU• Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) – Officially formed in 1993. History dating to 1875. – Centrally located in downtown Glasgow – Approx. 17,000 students, including 2,000 international students from over 100 countries – Career-focused, industry-linked programmes, with recognized research reputation27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 9
  • GCU – School of Engineering• School of Engineering and Built Environment – More than 100 academic staff – Programmes and research in computing, energy and environment, interaction, and engineering – Theory and hands-on teaching – Bachelors (BA/BSc), Masters (MA/MSc/MPhil), PhD degrees, and Postgraduate Diplomas (PgD) – Support direct entry at 2nd/3rd year from colleges within Scotland and internationally27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 10
  • Computing Projects• Seven computing projects for nine students – At least one GCU staff for each project – BHCC supervisor resident at GCU• Project topic areas – Web programming – Networking – Digital security• Mix of applied and research projects27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 11
  • Management of Computing Projects• Projects and resources – Skills match in advance of visit – GCU computing resources, and personal devices• Staff-student interactions varied – Supervisor + lab instructor, regular meetings – Interaction with a client – Check-in with BHCC resident supervisor• Students encouraged to follow 9-5 workday• Result: Software and documentation27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 12
  • Scottish Cultural Experience• Wednesday afternoons, and weekends• Visits to Edinburgh, Stirling, Highlands27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 13
  • What Went Well (1)• Students well-prepared for projects (skills)• Students adapted well to work environment (maturity)• Students enjoyed overall experience – Culture – Downtown city campus – Surroundings and regional history27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 14
  • What Went Well (2)• Students enjoyed academic experience – University environment and facilities – New skills learned – Problem solving and collaboration• Relationship built between institutions – Trust built from this initial project – Momentum for future opportunities27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 15
  • Areas for Improvement• Timing and schedule alignment – More interaction with local students – Better alignment re: staff holidays• Entry to the UK – Missing “letter of invitation” to BHCC supervisor – Preparation for non-US citizens• Small number of students – Though good for initial relationship-building• Resident supervisor not necessary for full duration27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 16
  • Looking Ahead• BHCC students registered to GCU networking learning environment• Future student exchanges – Repeat of same model, with more students – GCU student exchange to BHCC/UMB• Staff exchanges – Especially in areas of complementary expertise• PhD exchanges – Especially in areas of shared expertise27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 17
  • Leadership for a Global Workforce: Networking with Paris
  • Leadership for a Global Workforce Pierre Thiry MPICT P.I.– City College of San Francisco Michael McKeever – Santa Rosa Junior College Cécile Montier – Centre des Formations Industrielles
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceMPICT’s mission is to coordinate, promote andimprove the quality of ICT education, with anemphasis on 2-year colleges, in a regionconsisting of northern California, northernNevada, southern Oregon, Hawaii and thePacific Territories.
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceAbout CFI : One of the 11 Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry schools One of the 5 technical training schools along with Tecomah, EGF and Gobelins School for Industrial Maintenance Technician Jobs CFI offers training courses in six professional fields (Business networks and Corporate telecommunications, Energy engineering, Industrial vehicle and car maintenance, Lift maintenance, Woodwork and Building layout, Plastics industry) Open to students and professionals attending continuing education courses
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceAll the diploma are prepared in apprenticeshipApprenticeship : Students from 16 to 25 are employeesOrganisation : Two weeks in school : the program is not specific but we insist on general subjects Two weeks in firm : Sutdents have to find the job in touch with their studies and they have to keep it! They are paidWe teach know-how and social skillsKey figures : – Exam Success rate : 88% (2011) – Work integration rate: 85% on average – Breaches of contract rate : 6% (2010-2011)
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforcePositioningA close relationship with professional organisations and leadingcompanies: We offer training programs tailored to the market needs We provide specific vocational certificates We receive grants and apprenticeship taxes
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceInternational programs Eurotruck : advanced vocational training diploma for industrial vehicles • Three European partnerships • ANFA partnership • Léonardo (ECVET) financing program Exchange programs • BASF Germany / Advanced vocational training diploma in Plastics industry • United States City College of San Francisco / Computer Architect / CISCO
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceParis France Project, US Goals: US and French students differentiate their respective ICT educational systems and workplace environments. Students develop and enhance their “soft- skills” Students implement and demonstrate the use of advanced technologies US and FR instructors integrate each other’s “best practices”
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceParis France Project, US Objectives: Develop a “Scalable” Problem-Based-Learning course Conduct the course using online synchronous delivery and conclude in-person in France Student teams formally present their course solutions in- person at Cisco HQ Paris and remotely using TelePresence Visit French ICT workplaces
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceParis France Project, USObjectives: Required Web-based structured student diaries to be kept during the project, to document pre-visit, visit (for the selected students) and post-visit, documenting changes in perception and appreciation of technical and cultural differences especially as they relate to workplace success
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceParis France Project, US Outcomes: Gain firsthand knowledge of how other countries organize Career Technical Education and, in particular, ICT education in the absence of community colleges Distillation of the perceived advantages and disadvantages of the French technical education system and workplace environment as seen by faculty and students
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceParis France Project US Outcomes:Establish a collaboration between a group of 24 ICT studentsselected from the MPICT Regional Partner community collegesand a cohort of 18 students in the "Informatique et Reseaux"Programm from the "Centre de Formations Industrielles (CFI)" inParis-Gambetta, FranceInvite students and graduates of the Cisco NetworkingAcademy on both continents to participate in an experimental,capstone, project-based course, using case a study especiallydesigned for this purpose
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceParis France Project US Outcomes: The opportunity for students in technology to participate in collaborative learning experience with students from a European country - experiences often reserved only for liberal arts students. The opportunity for students, teachers, and the institution to broaden their experience base through development of problem-based instructional experiences using a variety of real-world, concurrent, trans-national inputs and assets
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceParis France Project USOutcomes: Improvement in student engagement and enrichment of student learning outcomes due to the unique opportunity to connect with their French counterparts Improved understanding of the organization and delivery of technical education in the EU that could find application within or beyond the MPICT footprint
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceWhat Happened: Culture exchanges and understandings  Invited back to weddings! US students applied for FR jobs Student initiated discussion, “Where is it better to work, US or FR?”  “The biggest surprise for me was learning how many network jobs were available in France and how high the demand for Cisco trained workers was. This was a big surprise to me and after learning of this I am going to try and get into an exchange program to come and work in France.” – JM
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceWhat Happened: Learned and deployed advanced tech in their team projects  “At the end of day two we had a show stopping technical issue (will save the details). In short, we had an issue with routing and had to solve it. There was the hard way and the harder way. I decided the harder way and ran it by the team.” – SK
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceWhat Happened: The Soft-Skills  “I learned that when working on a team project that it is very important to let everyone contribute and to be open and receptive to new ideas and suggestions, even if you do not necessarily agree. For everyone to get the most value of the project and teamwork, it is important for everyone to participate. If a person is reluctant, they just may be a little shy and/or not confident, if encouraged, they may open up a little more.” – ESM
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceWhat Happened: Use of technology in education –time zones, synchronous  “Everything I needed as a student was available to me at anytime on any computer with a net connection. It is times like this, I really enjoy my field and wish other class were taught like this...” – SK
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceWhat Happened: Cultural Exchanges  “The three lessons that Ive learned as a result of this international experience: First, The balance of life and work, second, communication skills towards non-English speakers and third, the appreciation of what we have in America and the freedom to do what you want and what we want to be.” – SJB  “I found it amazing how alike Americans are to the French when dealing with Technical topics.  I found that the French have an interesting take on life; After the work day is over they forget all about there work life and move on to socialize. I noticed in France that being social and meeting with friends is an essential part of the day. It is almost like they live two separate lives, a work life and a social life.” – JE
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceWhat Happened: What we learned from each other  Cultures, expectation and county core values might seem to make a difference in the students’ efforts, but in both countries, those who strive and put in the extra effort get the better jobs I saw more learning when the teams were engaged than in most of my other classes!!! Student transformations!
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceWhat Happened: Scaling the project  Gave the entire course away to 50 US instructors  Proposal to collaborate with China in 2012  Half the cost  Lessons learned applied  Real time Google translations  Change scenario  Train teachers in use of distance tool  Long term partnership
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceWhat Happened: “To Michael, Pierre, Daniela, Richard, Grace, everyone at Accent I thank you very much. This is one of the moments where a group of people or teachers change a student’s life and I know I am not the only one on this trip. Thank you.” – SK
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceEvaluation of the partnership by the students – In the technical plan: • Tools and modules of training CISCO are the same • On the other hand, the remote work and the work in project mode with French-American teams was a challenge of organization and communication – In the professional plan: • The French Students became aware of the place of their formative company • The testimonies on their companies were precious for them between them, – From the cultural point of view • The French people appreciated to discover another organization of the schooling with a wide place made for the sport, another approach are holidays, taxes • The students of Paris confirmed their interest for the spare time
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceThe appreciation by the teachers – Difficulties: • To convince the French students to put a lot on a project which does not enter the evaluation of the training • Difficult jet lag for the remote courses – Satisfactions: • The very professional presentations of the solutions proposed by the teams • The enthusiasm of the students to work when they met all together
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceEvaluation of the partnership by the Management – The material aspects of the journey in France managed by an outside company what allowed to concentrate on the project – The organization of the companies visits was facilitated by: • The country of origin of the group = > These visits would not be possible for French students! • The good connections maintained by the teachers with their alumni – The project is rewarding for the teachers – The students pull a real profit : will to go abroad – It is a real pleasure to work with a smiling and enthusiastic group
  • Leadership for a Global WorkforceEvaluation by TSI The SaflundInstitute Summer 2011 , Digital Bridge Sister Cities Project DUE 0802298 ,Supplemental Award Available in electronic format  See us at MPICT booth or afterwards
  • NSF ATE Center Collaboration Study Abroad to Denmark June 5 – July 2, 2011
  • Overview• 15 participants – 5 Faculty Members – 10 Students• Representing five Community College from Across the Nation
  • Overview• Representing Five States: – California Mt. San Jacinto College – Iowa Eastern Iowa Community Colleges – Indiana Ivy Tech Community College – New York SUNY Cobleskill College of Agriculture and Technology – North Carolina Central Carolina Community College
  • Overview• Spent 25 days in Denmark studying renewable energy in agriculture – Based out of two towns • Sonderborg (pop. 30,000) • Odense (pop. 175,000) • Copenhagen (pop. 1.9 million) – Hosted by two Colleges • Dalum College – Agricultural Training College • EUC Syd – Vocational and Technical Training College
  • Lely AstronautRobotic Milking Dairy
  • Benefits of Robotic Milking• Calmer more comfortable cows• Increased Milk production• Cows are in the production longer• Cows are milked more often each day (4 times per day)• Shift the human labor resources to additional farm duties and/or time with family which the Danish value Jersey Herd using Robotic Milking Units
  • Higher Production = Higher Profits• The cost of each milking machine is approximately $200,000• Each Robotic Machine will accommodate 60 cows• 60 X $324 = $19,440 Do the 60 X $648 = $38,880• The Robotic machine could pay for itself in 4 – 6 years if you factor in Math labor costs• Is it a good investment in the long term?
  • Project ZeroSonderborg, Germany
  • Project Zero• The vision – Create a carbon neutral Sonderborg by 2029 – Create new jobs in related businesses• Based on – Intelligent Energy Equipment – Comprehensive pig farming• Founders/sponsors – Sønderborg Municipality – Nordea Denmark-foundation – Local agriculture/farmers – SYD ENERGI – regional utility company – DONG Energy – power generation and distribution – Bitten & Mads Clausens fond – the main owners of Danfoss• www.projectzero.dk
  • Wirtschaftsakademie Training Center for Wind Turbine Technicians Husum, Germany
  • BZEE Training Center• BZEE was the first program standard for wind technician training programs.• The training center in Husum was the first in the world.
  • Nacelle top rescue trainingapparatus; training tower
  • Blade Repair Shop
  • Daka Biodiesel
  • Daka Biodiesel www.dakabiodiesel.com• Rendered Animal Fat from processing plant next door• 10 MGY Capacity• Products from Daka Biodiesel: – Biodiesel – Heating Oil – Glycerin – Potassium Sulfate• Utilizes post-transesterificaton distillation of biodiesel for improved cold weather Animal Fat performance Finished Fuel Feedstock
  • Inbicon Biomass Refinery
  • Inbicon Biomass Refinery www.inbicon.com• Ethanol facility using straw for feedstock• Utilizes custom enzymes for conversion of cellulosic material into more easily fermentable sugars.• 10MGY pilot facility
  • Biogas via Anaerobic DigestionObservations of Danish and German Practices (with some contrast to the U.S.)
  • Prevalence and Incentives• AD practiced on farms in Denmark and Germany; more common there compared to U.S. farms• Typically sited on an individual farm but a few centralized digesters also exists which process manure from several local farms• AD system tends to be owned by the farmer with or without additional partners• The practice is subsidized through the price received for electricity; other subsidies may also be in place• Electricity price depends on feedstock and region but generally higher than retail electric rate.
  • Economic Drivers• AD can be a profit center for the farm• In some cases, farm appears to operate as an “energy farm,” the traditional farm enterprises (e.g. pigs) seem secondary• In any case, farm obtains the benefit of energy for farm operations and can export the surplus energy• AD expected to expand on farms in future (“manure = gold” news article)• The structure of the subsidies influence the feedstocks digested and how the energy is used • favor generation of electricity • higher price for energy from biomass crops than energy from manure
  • This pig farm operates 5 digesters, fed with pig manure andcorn silage grown for the digesters. The farm serves as anenergy center producing electricity and heat for thesurrounding community (delivered via undergroundnetwork of hot water pipes). The digesters are a major profitcenter for the farm.
  • Questions?
  • Lely Astronaut Robotic Milking Dairy
  • Biogas fueledboiler at theDalum AgricultureCollege.The digesterproduces biogasfrom the school’smanure.
  • This corn silage is grown for the purpose of feeding it to theanaerobic digester, not for feeding cows. Growing crops fordigestion is rare, if not unheard of, in the U.S.
  • Corn silage is fed into these parallel hoppers,from which it is fed into a grinder and thenconveyed into the digesters.
  • Biodigesters creating gas for electrical production.
  • Farm digesters in the Danish landscape. Visible fromthe road. Not an uncommon sight (at least morecommon than it would be in the U.S.)
  • Inbicon Biomass Refinery
  • Sonderborg harbor
  • Roadside shot of wind turbines
  • Hay barn covered with Photovoltaics; from Germany.
  • Solar thermal system in Aeroskobing. 18,000 square meters of solarthermal provide much of the hot water needs for the town. It’s one ofthe largest solar thermal plants in the world.
  • Offshore wind turbine components on a barge
  • Waste water treatment plant in Sonderborg
  • Municipal waste being used to produce electricity and heatat Vattenfall Energy Plant. No new landfills are beingcreated in Denmark. All municipal waste is now beingburned for energy instead of being buried.
  • Danish Crown Meat Processing
  • Wind Turbine Technician Training Equipment, Wirtschaftsakademie
  • Egeskov Castle
  • Leadership for a Global Workforce: Computing in the Scottish Highlands Deborah Boisvert Mike Just Executive Director Assistant Professor BATEC, Boston GCU, Glasgow, UK2011 ATE Principle Investigators Conference, 26-28 October 2011
  • Our Project• International Collaboration Project between – Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) – Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC) – University of Massachusetts Boston (UMB)• Four-week exchange of BHCC students to GCU in Glasgow• Students tasked with computing projects in GCU areas of expertise• Cultural experience in Scotland27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 2
  • BATEC Service AreaCommunity Colleges• Massachusetts – Roxbury CC – Bunker Hill CC – Middlesex CC Current Partners – Mass Bay CC – Quinsigamond CC – Bristol CC – Northern Essex CC• Now Adding – City Colleges of Chicago – City College of San Francisco – College of Southern Nevada27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 3
  • About BATEC• National Center for IT and Computing (funded September 2011)• Vision: BATEC is scaling its coordinated, self- sustaining, regional IT education and workforce system – one that attracts a diverse student population to IT careers, promotes lifelong learning of technical skills and supports the IT workforce needs in urban cities across our country.27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 4
  • About BATEC• Curriculum and Professional Development – Regionally Connected; Transferable – Advanced in Content and Pedagogy • IT Problem-Solving; Computational Thinking • IT Seamless Pathways that are Stackable • IT Intersections – Forensics, Health, Business – Industry-Linked• Education, Industry and Community Connections – Mutually-Beneficial Partnerships – Career Development – Lifelong Learning – Regional Economic Growth27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 5
  • About GCU• Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) – Officially formed in 1993. History dating to 1875. – Centrally located in downtown Glasgow – Approx. 17,000 students, including 2,000 international students from over 100 countries – Career-focused, industry-linked programmes, with recognized research reputation27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 6
  • GCU – School of Engineering• School of Engineering and Built Environment – More than 100 academic staff – Programmes and research in computing, energy and environment, interaction, and engineering – Theory and hands-on teaching – Bachelors (BA/BSc), Masters (MA/MSc/MPhil), PhD degrees, and Postgraduate Diplomas (PgD) – Support direct entry at 2nd/3rd year from colleges within Scotland and internationally27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 7
  • Computing Projects• Seven computing projects for nine students – At least one GCU staff for each project – BHCC supervisor resident at GCU• Project topic areas – Web programming – Networking – Digital security• Mix of applied and research projects27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 8
  • Management of Computing Projects• Projects and resources – Skills match in advance of visit – GCU computing resources, and personal devices• Staff-student interactions varied – Supervisor + lab instructor, regular meetings – Interaction with a client – Check-in with BHCC resident supervisor• Students encouraged to follow 9-5 workday• Result: Software and documentation27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 9
  • Scottish Cultural Experience• Wednesday afternoons, and weekends• Visits to Edinburgh, Stirling, Highlands27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 10
  • What Went Well (1)• Students well-prepared for projects (skills)• Students adapted well to work environment (maturity)• Students enjoyed overall experience – Culture – Downtown city campus – Surroundings and regional history27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 11
  • What Went Well (2)• Students enjoyed academic experience – University environment and facilities – New skills learned – Problem solving and collaboration• Relationship built between institutions – Trust built from this initial project – Momentum for future opportunities27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 12
  • Areas for Improvement• Timing and schedule alignment – More interaction with local students – Better alignment re: staff holidays• Entry to the UK – Missing “letter of invitation” to BHCC supervisor – Preparation for non-US citizens• Small number of students – Though good for initial relationship-building• Resident supervisor not necessary for full duration27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 13
  • Looking Ahead• BHCC students registered to GCU networking learning environment• Future student exchanges – Repeat of same model, with more students – GCU student exchange to BHCC/UMB• Staff exchanges – Especially in areas of complementary expertise• PhD exchanges – Especially in areas of shared expertise27 October 2011 ATE PI Conference 14