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Reckitt Benckiser's presentation at Social Media in a Corporate Context, organised by Communicate magazine

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Reckitt Benckiser presentation on engaging Generation Y at Social Media in a Corporate Context conference, held in Manchester 2010. Organised by Communicate magazine. Presentation given by …

Reckitt Benckiser presentation on engaging Generation Y at Social Media in a Corporate Context conference, held in Manchester 2010. Organised by Communicate magazine. Presentation given by
Drew Spencer, digital communications strategy director, Blackbridge Communications
Claudia Bach, marketing and pr manager, Reckitt Benckiser

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  • Welcome
    How do you catch the attention of the tech-savvy internet generation? Start by speaking to them on their level. We developed a Facebook game to raise company profiles among students – why and how we did it? You will learn in a second.
  • When you saw us on the agenda for today you might have thought Reckitt who?
    And this is the problem we are facing – our corporate brand is not very well know but you might feel familiar with our brands…
    “Can you give us a quick show of hands - How many of you have heard of RB?”
    “Ok, now, show of hands.. How many have heard of Finish, Vanish, Veet, Harpic, Dettol, Gaviscon, Cilit Bang, Clearasil, Nurofen, Strepsils...”
  • “You’ve probably got 10 of their products in your home...” Vanish, Finish, Cillit Bang, Nurofen and Dettol – all iconic well known brands with high awareness level but nearly nobody knows the company behind these fantastic brands.
    “We are in the FTSE 25, successfully outperforming our peers on a regular base, and innovative - nearly 40% of revenues come from products that we’ve brought to market in the last 3 years”
    And because of our success we enjoy an enormous profile in the investment community but we are not interested in being famous. In fact it is not important for us that the corporate brand gets better know by the consumers of our powerbrands but when it comes to recruitment corporate brand awareness is crucial as lack of awareness and consequently familiarity is impeding consideration. So there is an area where it is important that people know our corporate brand in order to think of RB as a place with a very special opportunity on offer.... and it was this opportunity that we had to unpack in order for people to begin to take notice of RB.
    When we started our corporate brand marketing the awareness amongst our target audience of students and early careers was very low, actually it was nearly zero with 2% unprompted awareness in the UK. We knew he had to do something radical to get to a satisfying awareness target.
  • What did we do? First, we dumped our old logo and introduced a more vibrant and dynamic logo which much better represents our culture and core values. As in true RB style fast paced this was done in 6 months time.
    Fortunately we were not in a situation like Gap – so nobody complaint.
    We set our self challenging awareness target for 9 key markets – the objective: to raise awareness amongst students and early careers as a destination employer clearly differentiate ourselves from our peers and open a window to RB showcasing our unique culture and values so ppl could self select themselves.
    Than we did a lot of work to understand our target audience – GenY, the tech-savvy internet generation to learn how we can engage with them so they get to know us and consider us as a potential employer.
    So let’s see what this generation is all about….
  • Here is a typical example of a female GenYer.
  • So who are they? They are the children of Baby Boomers, the largest generation after the boomers, bigger than Gen X. They are tech-savvy, well connected, independent and determined. How they work? They love challenges, are comfortable with speed and seek to make a difference.
    Many organisations focus on these characteristics as a negative. They are unwilling to see a group of people with “high expectations”, “Tech savvy”, and who expect “respect” as a threat to the way they run their business... and yet at RB there are some similarities between our business and the mindset of this generation. However it’s important that we find a way to connect with them without it sounding like we’re trying to be “down with the kids”... plenty of organisations try to market to this generation without being authentic and for RB it’s important that they see that when we say “OPPORTUNITY”, we mean an opportunity for them... based on our viewpoints about their needs in the workplace, our research and our very specific corporate culture, which celebrates people that love a challenge, want to make a difference and... maybe just a little impatient about things being delivered. :)
  • Here are some interesting stats.
    They don’t remember a time when we didn’t have voicemails.
    They don’t think that texting someone is impersonal... and they don’t see the shortening of words in a text message as the “erosion of the English language”
    They think that email is something their dad does to send letters to people.
    They are offended by any organisation that thinks that it’s acceptable to judge them in a professional context for their behaviour on Facebook. That is their personal space and they expect you to understand and respect the difference.
    They are 1,000,000 times better at networking than any previous generation and will slowly but surely realize the power of their connectedness as they move into their mid-career and executive level.
    They are definitely attracted to big, well-known brands... because they respect achievement... and they will decide which brands they care about based on very deep and personally relevant terms.
    They aren’t reading the newspaper – they get the information by speaking to each other- so you have to make your information accessible.
    It is important that you understand why they are the way they are before you begin trying to communicate with them....
    So after all this research it became obvious that we had to go into social networks and we launched….
  • A Facebook, page, a twitter account, a corporate blog, a linkedIn group, RB worldwide our YouTube channel and relaunched our career section on our website. Nearly 12 month down the line we made good progress and fan number and followers were growing – so we provided information but we were still lacking SCALE to meet our ambitious awareness targets. Also we were looking into an idea which even stronger tackle influencing the influencers so mainly their friends. So back to the drawing board….
  • We identified 3 modes which we needed to address when we wanted to make sure that we meet our target audience at relevant times in their life.
    Play
    Learn
    Search
    ... and possibly to begin to use the engagement strategy to create some familiarity with RB and what makes RB so special... so that they will understand why we want their attention.
  • Matching our online estate against them there was still a sweet spot where we could step into. But could we really play a role here? This were Drew came into the game…..
  • Drew to talk about why we felt this was the best platform to step into – friends as key influencers when it comes to employer consideration…..
    At the beginning of the process we set ourselves clear target in terms of number of fans and game plays we wanted to reach based on benchmarking a pat experience with mini brand games RB developed:
    7.000 fans and 200.000 game plays
    - Fun and popular current leisure activity
    - Very low barrier to participation
    - Friend-get-friend capability
    - 28% of university students play games
    - Like to beat others and win at games
    - Like to win prizes
    - Like to see how clever or business-savvy they are
    - Like to brag
    - Zynga: 246 million unique users per month (44% of all online games producers, more than half of Facebook’s total population)... 30% net margin on $50 Million in revenue a month... or $15 million in profit per month
    - Farmville; 100M users/month, Cafe World: 10M users in 1 week.
    - 1-2% of significant audience are paying customers.
    Not about trying to “Win” but an ongoing experience that doesn’t end... people play with each other and others outside of the game play can follow along.
  • Drew to talk about the journey developing the game, our challenges and the big idea behind poweRBrands
    Tough timelines: Launch mid July as fixed date. Viral effect as key component.
    Reflect RB values in a fun way.
    “poweRBrands™ is part of a serious initiative to make learning about industry and marketing both relevant and fun. It is not a direct recruitment tool, but is a great way to introduce students and early careers sales people and marketers to our culture – and we hope that some of them may look further at our website and other career information.  Facebook is a natural home for poweRBrands™ – it is the fastest growing social network site and, like RB, a truly global phenomenon.  We hope that the lure of fun challenges, tasks and the competitive element of playing with your friends and colleagues will prove a real draw.”
  • And the results are so far fantastic – within 3 months we delivered on our initial targets……
  • Thank You and over to questions!
  • Transcript

    • 1. Engaging GenY Raising Corporate Brand Awareness with a Facebook game Social Media in a Corporate Context conference Manchester 19th October 2010
    • 2. Reckitt ….. Who?
    • 3. 5 Welcome to Generation Y Source: Wooimg Generation Y, Cable Daniel Dreyfuss (WPP Atticus Award Winner 2008)
    • 4. Who are Generation Y?
    • 5. So what characterises them? Constantly connected Self expressive Brand aware Socially conscious 83% sleep with their phone on or next to their bed 28% think a smartphone is necessary to have a good social life 68% keep track of what friends are doing on social networking sites Source: Pew Research centre 2010, Mintel 2010, eMarketers 2009 ‘Frequent social networking site activities’, L2 Brand ranking survey 2010, PWC 2008 71% say that being unique individuals within a group is important 42% say that appearing clever on sites like Facebook is important 26% are publishing their own blog 62% consider themselves brand conscious. Only 2% do not. 1 in 5 are a fan of a brand on Facebook and 1 of 10 follow a brand on twitter 72% said they would have to feel happy with their employer’s ethical record before agreeing to work for them 86% would consider leaving an employer whose behaviours no longer met their CSR expectations
    • 6. Drive awareness whilst target in ‘play’ mode • Actively pursuing a role or not, the company provides a level of engagement that the target wants to be involved & a part of Learn Play Search Awareness modes Drive awareness whilst target in ‘search’ mode • Actively pursuing a job, and RB needs to ensure they are top of mind by having a continuous quality presence Drive awareness whilst target in ‘learn’ mode • Not actively pursuing a role / company however learning about the industry & credibility within will drive positive association
    • 7. LearnPlay Search Campus Brand Manager
    • 8. http://apps.facebook.com/powerbrands
    • 9. 13 Listen 13
    • 10. 14 Listen 13
    • 11. 15 Invite them in http://www.reckittbenckiser.jobs (no longer live) 14
    • 12. 16 Spread the news Note: This case study is an example of Best Practice, it was not produced by Blackbridge Communications 15
    • 13. 17 Content Strategy Note: This case study is an example of Best Practice, it was not produced by Blackbridge Communications 16
    • 14. 18 Content Strategy Note: This case study is an example of Best Practice, it was not produced by Blackbridge Communications 16
    • 15. 19 Content Strategy Note: This case study is an example of Best Practice, it was not produced by Blackbridge Communications 16
    • 16. 20 Content Strategy Note: This case study is an example of Best Practice, it was not produced by Blackbridge Communications 16
    • 17. 21 Content Strategy Note: This case study is an example of Best Practice, it was not produced by Blackbridge Communications 16
    • 18. 22 Content Strategy Note: This case study is an example of Best Practice, it was not produced by Blackbridge Communications 16
    • 19. 23 Invite them back 17
    • 20. 24 Invite them back 17
    • 21. 25 Invite them back 17
    • 22. 26 Invite them back 17
    • 23. 27 Invite them back 17
    • 24. 28 Invite them back 17
    • 25. 29 Invite them back 17
    • 26. 30 Invite them back 17
    • 27. 31 Results so far … fans/likes on Facebook monthly active users In Top Ranking of >89,000 facebook games mentions online of players are in target audience, 20% younger
    • 28. Thank You Find out more about us on: