Disaster BroadcastingThe Role of Broadcasters in aPandemicDr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
The Broadcasters Role in Disasters• News– Independent– Immediate– Without fear or favour– Accurate– Many perspectives– Usi...
Types of DisastersWhat can we prepare for?• Natural– Typhoons, tornadoes, storms, earthquakes,tsunamis, volcanoes, fires, ...
Ongoing Responsibility• Before– BCP in place– Disaster Plan– Agencyrelationships– Monitoring– Collaborations– Ability to a...
Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
• Critics of social media often complain they encouragefrivolous recordings of what people are eating forlunch or where th...
Information Sources• Discussion: How is information gathered – live andrecorded, from the field, from agencies, from exper...
Information Sources• Discussion: Who to trust, how to sift information andsources, when is it fact, how to treat unsubstan...
Are we prepared for a crisis?• Discussion: Operating under severe stress and limitedresources – how to maintain effectiven...
the best policy for limiting infectious disease outbreaks is to get thenews out loud and quickly …….. but…………. media repor...
Disaster Broadcasting - Pandemic• Discussion: How we should prepare ourselves for apandemic? – what to do? – using the inf...
Who Pandemic Guidelines –Communications - Objective 3Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
Who Pandemic GuidelinesCommunications – relevant actionsWHO Actions1. Provide information to facilitate riskcommunication ...
WHO Outbreak Communication GuidelinesTrust; Announce Early; Transparency; Public; Planning• Review and discuss: Look at WH...
Pandemic Issues for Broadcasters• Discuss a couple of challenges:– Providing information to save lives is essential, but o...
Pandemic Issues for Broadcasters• Discuss a couple more challenges:– Which teams?– news teams of course for news, butfor c...
• Review of discussions:– What do we need to do to be really prepared for apandemic or other disasters?Dr Mike McCluskeyIn...
Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
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Disaster Broadcasting – Dr Mike McCluskey

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For more information see http://www.cba.org.uk/featured/pandemic-training-helps-bridge-the-gap-between-broadcasters-and-health-sector/

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Transcript of "Disaster Broadcasting – Dr Mike McCluskey"

  1. 1. Disaster BroadcastingThe Role of Broadcasters in aPandemicDr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  2. 2. The Broadcasters Role in Disasters• News– Independent– Immediate– Without fear or favour– Accurate– Many perspectives– Using the audiences• Public Interest– Partnerships with agenciesbut always independent– Information to save life andproperty– Immediate– May be repetitive– Telling real stories– Collaborating with thecommunity– Assisting agenciesDr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  3. 3. Types of DisastersWhat can we prepare for?• Natural– Typhoons, tornadoes, storms, earthquakes,tsunamis, volcanoes, fires, floods, droughts,pandemics,• Manmade– Wars, strikes, famines, terrorism, economicdepressions, crashes (flight, train and road),shipping, nuclear and chemical (accident orterrorism)Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  4. 4. Ongoing Responsibility• Before– BCP in place– Disaster Plan– Agencyrelationships– Monitoring– Collaborations– Ability to adapt– Not sensationalized• During– Keep me informed– Use trusted sources– Calm the public– Be useful– Accessible– Multiplatforminclude Socialmedia– Stay on air– Maintain interestand energy– Don’t scare usDr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant• After– Rebuilding– Clean up– Mourning and grief– Financial loss– Mental health– Good stories toinspire– Prolonged– Help coping withfear
  5. 5. Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  6. 6. • Critics of social media often complain they encouragefrivolous recordings of what people are eating forlunch or where theyre having drinks afterwork………….But……… what if social media could helpdetect and track global disease outbreaks weeks earlierthan traditional surveillance methods, allowing officialsto introduce treatment and reduce the spread of apotential pandemic?• From the Globe and Mail http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/social-media-could-help-detect-pandemics-md-says/article584757/Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  7. 7. Information Sources• Discussion: How is information gathered – live andrecorded, from the field, from agencies, from experts, fromgovernments, from the public, from social media, from othermedia organisations?– Consider:• Keeping reporters safe• Over reliance on experts and officials• Media can be faster than agencies with vital information• The media feeding frenzy - the dangers of following• Real stories matter• The public can provide information that saves livesDr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  8. 8. Information Sources• Discussion: Who to trust, how to sift information andsources, when is it fact, how to treat unsubstantiatedinformation, rumours and hearsay, how to differentiatebetween fact and fiction.– Consider• Very few people in disasters maliciously misinform• How trustworthy is social media and citizen reporting?• Who do we need in our newsrooms and program controlrooms?• Do we have enough people editorially capable?• How practiced are we at good editorial judgement in crisis?Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  9. 9. Are we prepared for a crisis?• Discussion: Operating under severe stress and limitedresources – how to maintain effectiveness, accuracy, trustand still serve the community well.• Consider– What we broadcast is vital and may savemany lives.– Do we have disaster plans? Have we practiced or simulated disaster?– Can we call in extra resourcesimmediately?– What contingency do we have if ourtransmission fails?– How well have we performedin disasters?Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  10. 10. the best policy for limiting infectious disease outbreaks is to get thenews out loud and quickly …….. but…………. media reports of rumoursthat turn out to be untrue could make future outbreaks more severe• From: How Media Reports Influence Pandemics, MIT Technology Review http://www.technologyreview.com/view/419652/how-media-reports-influence-pandemics/And another perspective:“The media has gone into full gear with little analysis and review of theevidence……..• the global outbreak is imminent…• The worst health crisis facing the world in 90 years…”From Global Research, Centre for Research on Globalizationhttp://www.globalresearch.ca/political-lies-and-media-disinformation-regarding-the-swine-flu-pandemic/13433Political Lies and Media Disinformation regarding the Swine Flu PandemicBy Prof Michel ChossudovskyDr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  11. 11. Disaster Broadcasting - Pandemic• Discussion: How we should prepare ourselves for apandemic? – what to do? – using the information we have heardand discussed in the morning sessions– Consider• Plans• Preparedness• Collaborations in place• Advanced notice?• Nature of broadcasts• When is a pandemic a disaster?• When does a disaster require rolling public servicecoverage?Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  12. 12. Who Pandemic Guidelines –Communications - Objective 3Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  13. 13. Who Pandemic GuidelinesCommunications – relevant actionsWHO Actions1. Provide information to facilitate riskcommunication related to influenza.2. Plan and test capacity for meetingcurrent and expected futureinternational information demands,among others by maintaining a website.5. Increase the familiarity of newsmedia with WHO activities, operationsand decision-making related toinfluenza and other epidemicdiseases.7. Develop feedback mechanisms toidentify emerging public concerns,address rumours, and correctmisinformation.National Actions1. Establish phased national communicationsstrategy or pandemic influenza.3. Plan and test capacity for meeting expecteddomestic information demands for diverseaudiences, including professional/technicalgroups, the news media and general public.4. Ensure communications infrastructure isadequate for pandemic needs.5. Establish and maintain a web site with relevantinformation.8. Familiarize news media with national plans,preparedness activities and decision-makingrelated to seasonal and pandemic influenza.10. Develop feedback mechanisms to identifypublic level of knowledge about pandemicinfluenza and emerging public concerns. Addressrumours proactively, and correct misinformation.Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  14. 14. WHO Outbreak Communication GuidelinesTrust; Announce Early; Transparency; Public; Planning• Review and discuss: Look at WHO OutbreakCommunication Guidelines – how do they fit in with our own BCPand Disaster Broadcasting Plans? – how do they fit in with ourneed to serve the community but remain independent?– Reflect on:• News coverage begins with a potential pandemic unfolding, butwhen does emergency response broadcasting and BCP begin?• What sort of coverage is needed? What is essential?• Just news? Some break ins with community information?• Rolling 24 hour coverage? Maintain over days, weeks or months?• Are we well enough prepared for a pandemic?• How long will it last.• Is possible for us to fulfil all our obligations to our communities?• What steps do we need to take to ensure coverage continuesthroughout the Pandemic?Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  15. 15. Pandemic Issues for Broadcasters• Discuss a couple of challenges:– Providing information to save lives is essential, but over-telling ofpandemic tragedies can add to the trauma in people’s lives, how dowe provide the right balance?– From our previous discussion about sources and maintaining trustand accuracy, what systems, safeguards and guidelines do we needto provide out teams from before the pandemic starts.Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  16. 16. Pandemic Issues for Broadcasters• Discuss a couple more challenges:– Which teams?– news teams of course for news, butfor community service rolling coverage, maintainingtrust means to have the best and most trustedbroadcasters on air – how do we maintain that overweeks or longer? Staff may need to be, or becomeblocked from travelling home to families so how dowe maintain staff welfare balanced with ouressential service?– Our need to cover news, stories and issues from apandemic will never finish, but when does our rolefor disaster response community service come to anend?Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  17. 17. • Review of discussions:– What do we need to do to be really prepared for apandemic or other disasters?Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant
  18. 18. Dr Mike McCluskeyInternational Media and Broadcast Consultant

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