Technical Report                         Mineral Resource Estimation                       Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                                          ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                                          ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                                          ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                                          ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                         Page 6 1­ EXECUTI...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                                          ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                         Page 8 2­ INTRODU...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                   Page 9 2.3 Units and Cu...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                        Page 10           ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                     Page 11 4­ PROPERTY D...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                     Page 12 4.2 Property ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit    Page 13                            Fig...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                      Page 14 4.3 Royaltie...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                                          ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                         Page 16  5.4 Loca...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                       Page 17 The  Eldor ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                             Page 18 core....
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                   Page 19 consisting of m...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit    Page 20                               ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                         Page 21 7.2 Prope...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit    Page 22                               ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                         Page 23 8­ DEPOSI...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                     Page 24              ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                            Page 25 The kn...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                           Page 26     In ...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                           Page 27 From th...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                    Page 28      Figure 10...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                           Page 29 The  Co...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                       Page 30 logging  an...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                        Page 31 12.2 Quali...
Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit                                          ...
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit

1,031 views
919 views

Published on

Published in: Investor Relations
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,031
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
25
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Technical Report for Ashram Rare Earth Deposit

  1. 1. Technical Report  Mineral Resource Estimation  Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Nunavik, Quebec  Commerce Resources Corporation    Respectfully submitted to:  Commerce Resources Corporation    By:  André Laferrière M.Sc. P.Geo.  SGS Canada Inc. – Geostat    Date:  April 15, 2011  Geostat 10 boul. de la Seigneurie Est, Suite 203, Blainville, Québec CanadaSGS Canada Inc. t (450) 433 1050 f (450) 433 1048 www.geostat.com www.met.sgs.com Member of SGS Group (SGS SA)
  2. 2. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................ ii List of Tables ................................................................................................................................. iv List of Figures ................................................................................................................................ iv 1- Executive Summary .....................................................................................................................6 2- Introduction and Terms of Reference ..........................................................................................8  2.1 General ................................................................................................................................................ 8  2.2 Terms of Reference ............................................................................................................................. 8  2.3 Units and Currency.............................................................................................................................. 9  2.4 Disclaimer ......................................................................................................................................... 10 3- Reliance on Other Experts .........................................................................................................10 4- Property Description and Location ............................................................................................11  4.1 Location ............................................................................................................................................. 11  4.2 Property Ownership and Agreements................................................................................................ 12  4.3 Royalties Obligations ........................................................................................................................ 14  4.4 Permits and Environmental Liabilities .............................................................................................. 14  4.5 Mineralisation.................................................................................................................................... 14 5- Accessibility, Physiography, Climate, Local Resources and Infrastructure..............................15  5.1 Accessibility ...................................................................................................................................... 15  5.2 Physiography ..................................................................................................................................... 15  5.3 Climate .............................................................................................................................................. 15  5.4 Local Resources and Infrastructures ................................................................................................. 16 6- History .......................................................................................................................................16  6.1 Regional Government Surveys .......................................................................................................... 16  6.2 Mineral Exploration Work ................................................................................................................ 16 7- Geological Setting .....................................................................................................................18  7.1 Regional Geology .............................................................................................................................. 18  7.2 Property Geology .............................................................................................................................. 21 8- Deposit Model ...........................................................................................................................23 9- Mineralisation ............................................................................................................................25 10- Exploration and Drilling ..........................................................................................................26 11- Sampling Method and Approach .............................................................................................28 12- Sample Preparation, Analysis and Security .............................................................................30  12.1 Sample Preparation and Analyses ................................................................................................... 30  12.2 Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedure ......................................................................... 31  12.2.1 Analytical Standards ................................................................................................................. 31  12.2.2 Analytical Blanks...................................................................................................................... 35  12.2.3 Drill Core Duplicates ................................................................................................................ 35  12.2.4 Pulp Duplicates ......................................................................................................................... 38  12.2.5 QA/QC Conclusion ................................................................................................................... 44  12.3 Specific Gravity............................................................................................................................... 45  12.4 Conclusions ..................................................................................................................................... 47 13- Data Verification .....................................................................................................................47 14- Adjacent Properties..................................................................................................................58 15- Mineral Processing and Metallurgical Testing ........................................................................59 16- Mineral Resource and Mineral Reserve Estimates ..................................................................60  16.1 Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 60  16.2 Exploratory Data Analysis .............................................................................................................. 60  16.2.1 Analytical Data ......................................................................................................................... 60  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  3. 3. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page iii  16.2.2 Composite Data ........................................................................................................................ 63  16.2.3 Specific Gravity ........................................................................................................................ 65  16.3 Geological Interpretation ................................................................................................................. 65  16.4 Spatial Analysis ............................................................................................................................... 67  16.5 Resource Block Modeling ............................................................................................................... 68  16.6 Grade Interpolation Methodology ................................................................................................... 69  16.7 Mineral Resource Classification ..................................................................................................... 71  16.8 Mineral Resource Estimation .......................................................................................................... 71  16.9 Mineral Resource Validation........................................................................................................... 73  16.10 Comments about the Mineral Resource Estimate ......................................................................... 73 17- Other Relevant Data and Information .....................................................................................74 18- Interpretation and Conclusions ................................................................................................74 19- Recommendations ...................................................................................................................76 20- References ...............................................................................................................................78 21- Signature Page .........................................................................................................................80 22- Certificate of Qualification ......................................................................................................81     SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  4. 4. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page iv LIST OF TABLES Table 2.1 – List of Abbreviations ................................................................................................................. 9 Table 2.2 – Conversion Factors .................................................................................................................. 10 Table 4.1 – Summary of Mineralisation Occurring on the Eldor Property ................................................. 15 Table 10.1 – Summary of Drilling Completed at Eldor by Commerce ...................................................... 27 Table 12.1 – Expected Values and QA/QC Ranges of SX18-01 and SX18-05 Analytical Standards for Y, La, Ce, Nd and Nb2O5 .......................................................................................................................... 32 Table 12.2 - Summary Statistics of SX18-01 and SX18-05 Analytical Standards for Y, La, Ce, Nd and Nb2O5 ................................................................................................................................................... 32 Table 12.3 – Comparative Statistics for the Drill Core Duplicates............................................................. 36 Table 12.4 –Statistics for the Pulp Duplicates (Act Labs vs. Inspectorate) ................................................ 39 Table 12.5 –Specific Gravity Statistics from Independent Check Sampling Program ............................... 45 Table 12.6 –Specific Gravity Statistics from Commerce 2010 Exploration Program ................................ 46 Table 13.1 –Statistics for the Independent Check Samples (Act Labs vs. SGS Minerals) ......................... 48 Table 13.2 –Statistics for the Independent Check Samples (Act Labs vs. ALS Chemex) .......................... 53 Table 13.3 – Final Drill Hole Database ...................................................................................................... 58 Table 16.1 – Summary Statistics of Analytical Data Used in the Mineral Resource Estimate................... 61 Table 16.2 – Summary Statistics for the 3 metre Composites .................................................................... 64 Table 16.3 – Variogram Model of TREO Grade for 3 m Composite ......................................................... 67 Table 16.4 – Resource Block Model Parameters ........................................................................................ 69 Table 16.5 – Eldor Property Mineral Resource Estimate ........................................................................... 72 Table 16.6 – Eldor Property Mineral Resource Estimate with Individual REO Values ............................. 73 Table 16.7 – Comparative Statistics of the Composite and Block Model Datasets .................................... 73 Table 18.1 – Final Mineral Resources for the Eldor Property .................................................................... 75 Table 19.1 – Proposed Budget for Recommended Exploration Work at Eldor .......................................... 77 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 4.1 – General Location Map ............................................................................................................ 11 Figure 4.2 – Map of the Property Mineral Titles ........................................................................................ 13 Figure 7.1 – Regional Geology Map ........................................................................................................... 20 Figure 7.2 – Local Geological Map ............................................................................................................ 22 Figure 8.1 – Schematic Representation of St-Honore Carbonatite ............................................................. 24 Figure 9.1 – Drill Core from Hole EC10-028 Showing the A, B, BD and Contact Zones ......................... 26 Figure 10.1 – Plan View of the Drilling in the Ashram REE zone at the Eldor Property........................... 28 Figure 12.1 - Variation of Reported Values with Time for Analytical Standard SX18-01 ........................ 33 Figure 12.2 - Variation of Reported Values with Time for Analytical Standard SX18-05 ........................ 34 Figure 12.3 – Correlation Plot of the Drill Core Duplicates for TREE+Y ................................................. 37 Figure 12.4 – Correlation Plot of the Drill Core Duplicates for Nb2O5 ...................................................... 37 Figure 12.5 – Correlation Plot of the Drill Core Duplicates for F .............................................................. 38 Figure 12.6 - Correlation Plot of the Pulp Duplicates for TREE+Y, Y, La and Ce (ActLabs vs. Inspectorate) ........................................................................................................................................ 40 Figure 12.7 - Correlation Plot of the Pulp Duplicates for Pr, Nd, Sm and Eu (ActLabs vs. Inspectorate) . 41 Figure 12.8 - Correlation Plot of the Pulp Duplicates for Gd, Tb, Dy and Ho (ActLabs vs. Inspectorate) 42 Figure 12.9 - Correlation Plot of the Pulp Duplicates for Er, Tm, Yb and Lu (ActLabs vs. Inspectorate). 43 Figure 12.10 – Histogram of Specific Gravity Measurements by Commerce at Ashram........................... 46 Figure 13.1 - Correlation Plot of the Independent Checks Samples for TREE+Y, Y, La and Ce (ActLabs vs. SGS Minerals) ................................................................................................................................ 49 Figure 13.2 - Correlation Plot of the Independent Checks Samples for Pr, Nd, Sm and Eu (ActLabs vs. SGS Minerals) ..................................................................................................................................... 50  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  5. 5. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page v Figure 13.3 - Correlation Plot of the Independent Checks Samples for Gd, Tb, Dy and Ho (ActLabs vs. SGS Minerals) ..................................................................................................................................... 51 Figure 13.4 - Correlation Plot of the Independent Checks Samples for Er. Tm, Yb and Lu (ActLabs vs. SGS Minerals) ..................................................................................................................................... 52 Figure 13.5 - Correlation Plot of the Independent Checks Samples for TREE+Y, Y, La and Ce (ActLabs vs. ALS Chemex)................................................................................................................................. 54 Figure 13.6 - Correlation Plot of the Independent Checks Samples for Pr, Nd, Sm and Eu (ActLabs vs. ALS Chemex) ...................................................................................................................................... 55 Figure 13.7 - Correlation Plot of the Independent Checks Samples for Gd, Tb, Dy and Ho (ActLabs vs. ALS Chemex) ...................................................................................................................................... 56 Figure 13.8 - Correlation Plot of the Independent Checks Samples for Er. Tm, Yb and Lu (ActLabs vs. ALS Chemex) ...................................................................................................................................... 57 Figure 14.1 – Map of Adjacent Properties in the Vicinity of Eldor Property ............................................. 59 Figure 16.1 – Histogram of Samples Length from Ashram Database ........................................................ 61 Figure 16.2 – Plan View of the Drill Holes at Ashram ............................................................................... 62 Figure 16.3 – Longitudinal View of the Drill Holes at Ashram (looking north) ........................................ 63 Figure 16.4 - Plan View Showing the Spatial Distribution of the Composites ........................................... 64 Figure 16.5 – Longitudinal View Showing the Distribution of the Composites (looking north) ............... 65 Figure 16.6 – Modeled 3D Wireframe Envelope in Plan View .................................................................. 66 Figure 16.7 – Modeled 3D Wireframe Envelope in Longitudinal View (looking south) ........................... 67 Figure 16.8 – Variograms of TREO Grade of 3 metre Composite ............................................................. 68 Figure 16.9 –Different Search Ellipsoids Used for the Interpolation Process in Plan View ...................... 70 Figure 16.10 – Plan View Showing Block Model Interpolation Results .................................................... 70 Figure 16.11 – Longitudinal View Showing Block Model Interpolation Results (looking south) ............. 71 Figure 19.1 – Plan View Showing Proposed Drilling Area ........................................................................ 77  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  6. 6. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 6 1­ EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SGS Canada Inc. – Geostat (“SGS Geostat”) was commissioned by Commerce Resources Corporation (“Commerce”) on September 28, 2010 to prepare an independent estimate of the mineral resources of the Ashram rare earth deposit for an open pit mining perspective. The mineral resource estimate was  completed  by  SGS  Geostat  based  on  data  available  from  recent  drilling  data  collected  by Commerce  during  the  2010  exploration  program.  The  mineral  resource  estimate  was  done  in accordance with National Instrument 43‐101 Standards and Disclosure for Mineral Projects. The  Eldor  Property  (“Property”)  is  located  in  the  Nunavik  Region  of  the  Province  of  Québec, approximately  130  km  south  of  the  community  of  Kuujjuaq  and,  due  to  it  remoteness,    is  only accessible  by  float  plane  or  helicopter.  The  Property  consists  in  one  block  totalling  404  claims covering 19,006.52 ha and extends 17.5 km in the east‐west direction and 24 km north‐south. From the  404  claims  comprising  the  Property,  8  claims  were  acquired  in  May  2007  by  a  purchase agreement  with  Virginia  Mines  Inc.  (“Virginia”),  and  396  claims  were  acquired  map  staking between May 2007 and October 2010. The  Eldor  Property  area  has  been  explored  since  in  the  1980’s  mainly  for  uranium  but mineralisation  in  niobium,  tantalum,  and  rare  earths  were  discovered  during  that  period.  The Property  was  re‐activated  in  2002  went  Virginia  acquired  8  claims  covering  the  main mineralisation occurrences then conducted a small reconnaissance  exploration program. In 2007, Commerce  acquired  the  claims  owned  by  Virginia  through  a  purchase  agreement  and  staked  an additional  357  claims.  Since  2008,  Commerce  conducted  exploration  programs  on  the  Property using  prospecting,  soil  geochemistry,  airborne  and  ground  geophysics,  trenching  and  diamond drilling. In 2009, significant rare earth mineralisation was discovered in the Ashram area followed, in  2010,  by  a  significant  exploration  program  centered  at  Ashram  consisting  of  mainly  diamond drilling. The  Property  is  situated  within  the  central  area  of  the  Proterozoic‐age  New  Quebec  Orogen, straddling  two  lithotectonic  zones  separated  by  a  major  thrust  fault.    The  eastern  portion  of  the Property comprises paraschist, paragneiss, and amphibolites. To the west are mainly volcanic and sedimentary  rocks  along  with  the  Eldor  carbonatite  intrusive  complex.  The  Eldor  carbonatite comprises  several  lithological  subdivisions  which  can  be  simplified  into  early,  mid  and  late  stage carbonatite. The mid stage carbonatite is most closely related to tantalum‐niobium mineralisation while the late stage carbonatite hosts the REE mineralisation observed at the Ashram zone. As part of the independent verification program, the author of the report validated the exploration methodology  which  includes  core  logging,  sampling,  analytical  procedures,  and  quality  analysis‐quality  control  protocol  implemented  by  Commerce.  SGS  Geostat  considers  the  samples representative and of good quality, and is confident that the system is appropriate for the collection of data suitable for the estimation of a NI 43‐101 compliant mineral resources.  The  author  visited  the  Property  between  October  4  and  6,  2010  and  conducted  an  independent sampling  of  mineralised  core  from  the  2010  exploration  program.  SGS  Geostat  also  completed  a verification  of  the  drill  hole  database  as  part  of  the  verification  program.  The  author  and  SGS Geostat are in the opinion that the data quality is acceptable and that the final drill hole database is adequate to support a mineral resource estimate.  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  7. 7. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 7 The mineral resource block model is derived from the geological interpretation and modeling of the mineralised carbonatite at Ashram. The resource model is defined by blocks 10 m (east‐west) by 10 m  (north‐south)  by  10  m  (elevation)  in  size,  located  below  the  bedrock/overburden  interface. Interpolation of the block grade was performed using ordinary kriging from composited analytical data  in  multiple  successive  passes  using  anisotropic  search  ellipsoids  increasing  is  size  from  one pass to another. Finally, a mineral resource was estimate based on the results of the block model interpolation.  All  the  mineral  resources  were  classified  inferred  resource  categories.  An  average bulk density of 3.0 t/m3 was used to calculate the final tonnage of the mineral resources based on the volumetric estimates of the block model. The  final  mineral  resource  estimate  for  the  Eldor  Property  at  a  base  case  cut‐off  grade  of  1.25% TREO  totals  117,340,000  tonnes  grading  1.740%  TREO  and  5.56%  CaF2  in  the  inferred  resource category. The final mineral resources for the Eldor Property are presented in the table below.   Mineral Resources Estimate ‐ Eldor Property ‐ Ashram REE Deposit Cut‐off Grade  Resources  Tonnes* TREO (%)** LREO (%)** IREO (%)** HREO (%)** Y2O3 (%)** CaF2 (%)*** TREO (%) Categories 1.25% Inferred 117,340,000 1.740 1.612 0.069 0.019 0.040 5.56 Mineral resources are not mineral reserves and do not have demonstrated economic viability.  Effective date March 1, 2011. Bulk density of 3.0 t/m3 used.  TREO includes La2O3, Ce2O3, Pr2O3 and Nd2O3, SM2O3, Eu2O3 and Gd2O3, Tb2O3, Dy2O3, Ho2O3, Er2O3, Tm2O3, Yb2O3 and Lu2O3, and Y2O3.  LREO includes La2O3, Ce2O3, Pr2O3 and Nd2O3.  IREO includes SM2O3, Eu2O3 and Gd2O3.  HREO includes Tb2O3, Dy2O3, Ho2O3, Er2O3, Tm2O3, Yb2O3 and Lu2O3. * Rounded to nearest 10,000. ** Rounded to nearest 0.001. *** Rounded to nearest 0.01    SGS  Geostat  is  in  the  opinion  that  the  Company  successfully  confirmed  the  mineral  resource potential of the Ashram deposit located on the Eldor Property based on 2010 exploration program and considers the Project to be sufficiently robust to warrant the following work:    Additional  drilling  to  a)  confirm  the  western  and  eastern  extent  of  the  mineralisation,  b)   test  the  northern,  southern,  and  depth  extensions  of  the  mineralised  carbonatite,  and  c)  confirm the existing inferred resources and upgrade the current resources to the indicated  category;   Proceed  to  preliminary  metallurgical  study  to  better  characterise  the  rare  earth  mineralisation processing parameters;   Complete a preliminary economic evaluation of the Project for a potential open pit mining  operation. In  addition  to  the  work  recommendation  listed  above,  the  author  recommends  to  carry  out  a baseline  environmental  study  of  the  Property  and  to  conduct  discussions  with  the  communities neighbouring the Eldor project about the impact of a potential open pit mining operation.  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  8. 8. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 8 2­ INTRODUCTION AND TERMS OF REFERENCE 2.1 General This  technical  report  was  prepared  by  SGS  Canada  Inc.  –  Geostat  (“SGS  Geostat”)  for  Commerce Resources Corporation (“Commerce” or “Company”) to support the disclosure of mineral resources for the Eldor Property (“Property” or “Project”).  The report describes the basis and methodology used for modeling and estimation of the Ashram REE  deposit  located  on  the  Property  from  recent  holes  drilled  by  Commerce  during  the  2010 exploration  program.  The  report  also  presents  a  full  review  of  the  history,  geology,  sample preparation  and  analysis,  and  data  verification  of  the  Project.  The  report  also  provides recommendations for future work. SGS  Geostat  was  commissioned  by  Commerce  on  September  28,  2010 to  prepare  an  independent estimate  of  the  mineral  resources  of  the  Ashram  deposit  for  an  open  pit  mining  perspective. Commerce supplied electronic format data from which SGS Geostat generate and validated a final database.  2.2 Terms of Reference This  report  on  the  mineral  resource  estimation  at  the  Eldor  Property  was  prepared  by  André Laferrière M.Sc. P.Geo. The author, André Laferrière M.Sc. P.Geo, is responsible for all sections of the report. This  technical  report  was  prepared  according  to  the  guidelines  set  under  “Form  43‐101F1 Technical  Report”  of  National  Instrument  43‐101  Standards  and  Disclosure  for  Mineral  Projects. The  certificate  of  qualification  for  the  Qualified  Person  responsible  for  this  technical  report  has been supplied to the Company as a separate document and can also be found in section 22 of the report. The  author  visited  the  Property  between  October  4  and  6,  2010,  for  a  review  of  exploration methodology,  sampling  procedures  and  to  conduct  an  independent  check  sampling  of  selected mineralised drill intervals. Information  in  this  report  is  based  on  critical  review  of  the  documents,  information  and  maps provided  by  personnel  of  Commerce  and  Dahrouge  Geological  Consulting  Ltd  (“Dahrouge”),  in particular  Mr.  Darren  Smith,  M.Sc.  P.Geol.,  Project  Geologist  and  Mr.  Wayne  McGuire,  Senior  GIS Technician. A complete list of the reports available to the author is found in the References section of this report.     SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  9. 9. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 9 2.3 Units and Currency All measurements in this report are presented in Système International d’Unités (SI) metric units, including  metric  tonnes  (tonnes)  or  grams  (g)  for  weight,  metres  (m)  or  kilometres  (km)  for distance,  hectare  (ha)  for  area,  and  cubic  metres  (m3)  for  volume.  All  currency  amounts  are Canadian Dollars (C$) unless otherwise stated. Abbreviations used in this report are listed in Table 2.1.   Table 2.1 – List of Abbreviations  tonnes or t  Metric tonnes  kg  Kilograms  g  Grams  km  Kilometres  m  Metres  µm  Micrometres  ha  Hectares  m3  Cubic metres  km/h  Kilometre per hour  %  Percent sign  t/m3  Tonne per cubic metre  $  Dollar sign  °  Degree  °C  Degree Celcius  NSR  Net smelter return  NPI  Net Profit Interest  pH  Potential of hydrogen (acidity scale)  ppm  Parts per million  NQ  Drill core size (4.8 cm in diameter)  SG  Specific Gravity  NTS  National Topographic System  UTM  Universal Transverse Mercator  NAD  North America Datum  Ga  Billion years  REE  Rare Earth Elements  REO  Rare Earth Oxides   SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  10. 10. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 10  Table 2.2 – Conversion Factors  Conversion Factor Name Element Oxide/Carbonate Definitions (Element to Oxide/Carbonate) Lanthanum La 1.17276 La2O3 Cerium Ce 1.17127 Ce2O3 LREO Praseodymium Pr 1.17031 Pr2O3 Neodymium Nd 1.16638 Nd2O3 Samarium Sm 1.15961 Sm2O3 MREO Europium Eu 1.15793 Eu2O3 (or IREO) Gadolinium Gd 1.15261 Gd2O3 Terbium Tb 1.15100 Tb2O3 TREO Dysprosium Dy 1.14768 Dy2O3 Holmium Ho 1.14551 Ho2O3 Erbium Er 1.14348 Er2O3 HREO Thulium Tm 1.14206 Tm2O3 Ytterbium Yb 1.13868 Yb2O3 Lutetium Lu 1.13716 Lu2O3 Yttrium Y 1.26993 Y2O3 Niobium Nb 1.43050 Nb2O5 Fluorine F 2.05490 CaF2   2.4 Disclaimer It  should  be  understood  that  the  mineral  resources  which  are  not  mineral  reserves  do  not  have demonstrated  economic  viability.  The  mineral  resources  presented  in  this  Technical  Report  are estimates based on available sampling and on assumptions and parameters available to the author. The  comments  in  this  Technical  Report  reflect  the  author’s  and  SGS  Canada  Inc.  –  Geostat  best judgement in light of the information available.  3­ RELIANCE ON OTHER EXPERTS The author of this Technical Report, Mr. André Laferrière, M.Sc. P.Geo, is not qualified to comment on  issues  related  legal  agreements,  royalties,  permitting,  and  environmental  matters.  The  author has  relied  upon  the  representations  and  documentations  supplied  by  the  Company  management. The  author  has  reviewed  the  mining  titles,  their  status,  the  legal  agreement  and  technical  data supplied by Commerce, and any public sources of relevant technical information. Sections  4  to  6  of  this  report  has  been  modified  from  the  assessment  report  “2008  and  2009 Exploration of the Eldor Property, Northern Quebec” by Dahrouge for Commerce and dated June 23, 2010  (Smith  and  Peter‐Rennich,  2010)  and  includes  additional  information  from  the  recent exploration programs completed by Commerce on the Property.   SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  11. 11. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 11 4­ PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND LOCATION 4.1 Location The Eldor Property is located in the Nunavik Region of the Province of Québec, approximately 130 km  south  of  the  community  of  Kuujjuaq  (Figure  4.1).  The  Property  is  situated  about  longitude 68°24’0”  west  and  latitude  56°56’0”  north  at  its  center  and  covers  portion  of  NTS  sheet  24C15, 24C16 and 24F01. The Property is only accessible by float plane or helicopter.   Figure 4.1 – General Location Map       SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  12. 12. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 12 4.2 Property Ownership and Agreements As of April 2011, the Property consists in one block totalling 404 claims covering 19,006.52 ha. The Property  area  extends  are  17.5  km  in  the  east‐west  direction  and  24  km  north‐south.  Figure  4.2 shows the claim map of the Property and a detailed listing of the Eldor Property claims is included in Appendix A. From the 404 claims comprising the Property, 8 claims were acquired in May 2007 by a purchase agreement  with  Virginia  Mines  Inc  (“Virginia”).  The  other  396  claims  were  acquired  map  staking between May 2007 and October 2010.   SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  13. 13. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 13  Figure 4.2 – Map of the Property Mineral Titles    SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  14. 14. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 14 4.3 Royalties Obligations The original 8 claims acquired from Virginia are subject to a 1% NSR royalty in favour of Virginia and a 5% NPI royalty in favour of two individuals. Commerce has the right to buy back the 5% NPI royalty in consideration of $500,000.  4.4 Permits and Environmental Liabilities Commerce is conducting exploration work under valid permits and authorisations delivered by the provincial  Ministère  des  Ressources  Naturelles  et  de  la  Faune  (“MRNF”)  and  the  Ministère  du Développement  Durable,  de  l’Environnement  et  des  Parcs  (“MDDEP”).  On  March  19,  2011,  the Company confirmed having the following work permits in good standing:   Intervention permit (by the MRNF);   Camp authorisation (by the MDDEP);   Certificate of authorisation (by the MDDEP);   Attestation of exemption (by the MDDEP). There  are  no  environmental  liabilities  pertaining  to  the  Property,  according  to  the  Company management.  4.5 Mineralisation Different  type  of  mineralisation  related  to  the  carbonatite  intrusive  complex  occurs  at  the  Eldor Property.  The  main  commodities  include  rare  earth  elements  and  fluorine  discovered  at  Ashram zone  but  also  outlined  in  other  areas  on  the  property,  and  niobium,  tantalum  and  phosphate uncovered  mainly  at  Star  Trench,  Southeast  and  Northwest  areas.  Table  4.1  summarises  the mineralisation occurring on the Property.   SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  15. 15. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 15  Table 4.1 – Summary of Mineralisation Occurring on the Eldor Property  Location Area Name Commodities Significant Results Sampling Type UTM East UTM North DDH EC10‐045: 1.99% TREO over 309.18 m, including 2.30% TREO  536300 6312100 Ashram REEs, F Drill Core over 172.89 m. DDH EC‐10‐032: 0.43% Nb2O5 over 155.95 m; DDH EC10‐033:  0.58% Nb2O5 and 8.91% P2O5 over 74.25 m and 12.70% F over  Nb, Ta, F,  Drill Core, Rocks,  538000 6311000 Southeast 32.42 m; DDH EC08‐015: 9.96% P2O5 over 13.45 m and 3552 ppm  phosphate Soils Nb over 18.72 m and 353 ppm Ta over 5.73 m; 1.07% REE+Y in soils;  0.51% REE+Y in rocks Ta, Nb, U,  DDH EC10‐034: 6.90% P2O5 over 6.13 m; DDH EC10‐035: 4.37%  537300 6310100 Star Trench Drill Core, Rocks phosphate P2O5 and 396 ppm U over 5.34 m; 1.03% Nb2O5 in rocks 541400 6311700 MC Exposure REEs, F DDH EC10‐037: 1.73% TREO over 7.87 m; 2.32% TREO in rocks Drill Core, Rocks 537400 6313000 REEs, phosphate 15.9% P2O5 in rocks;  1.06% TREO in soils Rocks, Soils Miranna 537800 6313500 Triple‐D REEs 2.44% TREO in rocks; 0.68% TREO in soils Rocks, Soils DDH EC08‐008: 3189 ppm Nb over 46.88 m; 1.69% REE+Y in rocks;  Drill Core, Rocks,  535900 6312700 Northwest Nb, phosphate 2.11% REE+Y in soils Soils   5­ ACCESSIBILITY, PHYSIOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, LOCAL RESOURCES AND INFRASTRUCTURE 5.1 Accessibility Due to its remoteness, the Property is only accessible by float plane or helicopter.  5.2 Physiography The  Property  is  characterised  by  a  rolling  hill  topography  generally  created  by  the  underlying glacial drumlins and eskers. Glacial sediments, mostly till, cover most of the Project area and can be up to ten metres thick. Outcrops are rare but boulders are abundant. The elevation above sea level ranges from 200 m to 320 m. Drainage in the area, typical of the transitional taiga to tundra regions, is northward toward Ungava Bay using small creeks and local poorly drained swampy area connecting to larger lakes and major rivers. The vegetation is generally forest‐covered in the central portion of the Property, populated mainly  by  black  spruce  and  tamarack  trees,  with  generally  barren  areas  occurring  in  the  more elevated southern area. Willow and alder shrubs, often densely populated, also occur in low‐lying areas throughout the Property.  5.3 Climate The climate is sub‐arctic continental with average temperatures ranging from ‐25°C in February to +11°C in July for the nearest community of Kuujjuaq. The average annual precipitation for the last 10  years  in  the  region  is  41  cm  of  rain  and  174  cm  of  snow  (weatherbase  website  2011).  Lakes freeze‐up  generally  begins  in  early  October  and  ice  break‐up  usually  occurs  around  end  of  May‐early June.  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  16. 16. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 16  5.4 Local Resources and Infrastructures The regional resources regarding labour force, supplies and equipment are challenging due to the remoteness  of  the  Project.  The  nearest  communities  are  Kuujjuaq  located  130  km  north  with  a population of more than 2,000 citizens and Schefferville (including the nearby native community) situated  approximately  275  km  southeast  with  a  population  of  just  above  800  citizens  (2006 census). Both communities are serviced by a regional airport and a float plane base. Kuujjuaq has a small  sea  port  and  Schefferville  is  the  northern  terminus  of  the  Tshiuetin  railway  (formerly operated by the Quebec North Shore & Labrador) which connects to Labrador City then Sept‐Iles to the south. Exploration work on the Property is done from a temporary base camp located nearby the Ashram REE  deposit.  The  camp  can  be  open  year‐round  and  has  the  capacity  to  accommodate  up  to  20 persons.  The  camp  is  equipped  with  core  logging  and  sampling  facilities,  and  hosts  the  drill  core archive of the Project. No permanent access road has been built on the Property.  6­ HISTORY 6.1 Regional Government Surveys Several regional surveys have been conducted in the area of the Property by the Geological Survey of  Canada  (“GSC”)  and  the  MRNF.  Between  the  1950’s  and  the  1970’s,  different  authors  from  the GSC and the MRNF conducted regional geological surveys in New Quebec Orogen at scale varying from 4 miles per inch (1:253,440) and 1 mile per inch (1:63,360). In 1979, Dressler and Ciesielski completed  a  geological  compilation  of  the  different  geological  surveys  conducted  in  the  area (Dressler  and  Ciesielski,  1979).  Since  the  end  of  the  1970’s,  just  few  localised  geological  surveys collecting new information at more detailed scale were completed by the MRNF. The geological synthesises reported by the MRNF for the area since the 1990’s include a 1:250,000 scale  map  of  the  mineral  occurrences  of  the  New  Quebec  Orogen  (Avramtchez  et  al.,  1990),  a preliminary  lithotectonic  and  metallogical  synthesis  at  1:500,000  scale  (Bandyayera  et  al.,  2002), and  more  recently  a  complete  lithological  and  metallogical  synthesis  of  the  New  Quebec  Orogen (Clark and Wares, 2005). In addition to regional geological surveys, a stream sediment geochemical survey was done in 1974 in  the  area  (Dressler,  1974)  followed  in  1987  by  a  regional  lake  sediment  geochemical  survey (Baumier 1987).  6.2 Mineral Exploration Work The information reported in this section includes mainly mineral exploration work conducted for the mineralisation related to the carbonatite intrusive complex occurring on the Property.  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  17. 17. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 17 The  Eldor  carbonatite  intrusive  complex  was  first  discovered  in  1981  by  Eldor  Resources  Ltd (“Eldor  Res.”)  following  a  regional  lake  water  and  sediment  sampling  program  completed  in  the northern  part  of  the  Labrador  Trough  for  uranium  exploration.  Carbonatitic  units  were  outlined during a follow‐up of the geochemical uranium anomalies outlined by the survey.  In  1982,  after  the  acquisition  of  an  exploration  permit  in  the  area  of  the  Property,  Eldor  Res. completed  a  982  line‐km  airborne  radiometric  survey  which  outlined  several  radiometric anomalies in the area. In  1983,  Eldor  Res.  followed  up  the  airborne  anomalies  with  a  prospecting  program.  During  the program,  many  of  the  anomalies  were  explained  using  a  scintillometer  in  dug  pits  or  trenches  by radioactive carbonatite  outcrops or boulders. The samples collected returned anomalous thorium values  and  some  of  the  samples  returned  up  to  7%  Nb,  0.18%  Ta  and  4%  total  lanthanides.  A reconnaissance geological mapping survey was also conducted in the area of the newly discovered carbonatite (Meusy et al., 1984, Lafontaine, 1984). In 1985, Unocal Canada Ltd carried out a five day field program consisting of magnetic/radiometric geophysical and soil geochemical orientation surveys with prospecting. Samples were collected for geochemical analysis and petrographic study and confirmed the historical results by Eldor Res. and additional Nb‐Ta occurrences were outlined in the area (Knox, 1986). The  Eldor  carbonatite  was  staked  in  April  2002  by  Virginia  Gold  Mines  Ltd  (now  Virginia  Mines Inc.) based on the historical Ta values reported by Eldor Res. They conducted a small program with the  re‐sampled  the  historical  Nb‐Ta  showings  and  confirmed  the  historical  results.  No  additional work was performed in the area by Virginia. In April 2007, Commerce concluded a purchase agreement with Virgina on the 8 original claims and subsequently  acquired  an  additional  357  claims  covering  the  carbonatite  and  immediate  vicinity. During  the  summer,  the  Company  mandated  Dahrouge  Geological  Consulting  Ltd  to  conduct  an exploration  program  consisting  of  prospecting  and  rock  sampling,  soil  sampling,  and  ground radiometric  (scintillometer)  and  magnetic  surveys.  In  addition  to  the  field  program,  an  airborne magnetic‐electromagnetic‐radiometric survey was flown over the Property.  During  2008,  Commerce  conducted  an  exploration  program  on  the  Property  consisting  of prospecting,  soil  sampling,  ground  geophysics,  trenching,  and  diamond  drilling.  A  total  of  5,482 metres of drilling was completed over 26 holes in three different areas of the Property. From these holes, 3,025 samples totalling 3,538 metres were collected and analysed. The best results returned the following: Star Trench area, 4.37 m grading 597 ppm Ta2O5, 3,058 ppm Nb2O5, 736 ppm U3O8, and 16.6% P2O5 (hole EC08‐025); Northwest area, 46.88 m grading 4,562 ppm Nb2O5 (hole EC08‐008);  Southeast  area,  26.10  m  grading  5,466  ppm  Nb2O5  (hole  EC08‐015).  Fifteen  (15)  trenches were  documented  on  the  Property  with  71  samples  collected  from  them.  The  ground  geophysics consisted of magnetic and scintillometer surveys. The soil sampling program returned 685 samples collected at 50 m intervals along 1 km‐spaced lines. The prospecting work totalled 270 observation points and returned a total of 93 rock samples. In 2009, the Company completed a relatively small exploration program due to the negative global market  conditions.  The  field  work  consisted  of  prospecting  and  additional  sampling  of  2008  drill  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  18. 18. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 18 core.  Additional  work  was  done  in  the  office  which  consisted  of  air‐photo  interpretation  and  re‐analysis of the airborne geophysical survey. The most significant result from the 2009 exploration program  was  the  discovery  of  REE  mineralisation  in  outcrop  on  the  Ashram  peninsula  which highlighted  the  exploration  potential  for  rare  earth  elements  on  the  Property.  From  the  70  grab samples collected in the Ashram area, more than half returned TREE greater than 1% with the best sample grading 2.74% TREE.  7­ GEOLOGICAL SETTING 7.1 Regional Geology The  Eldor  property  is  located  in  the  Paleoroterozoic‐age  New  Quebec  Orogen  (also  known  as  the Labrador  Trough)  which  is  interpreted  to  be  the  western  margin  of  the  Southeastern  Churchill Province  (“SECP”).  The  New  Quebec  Orogen  is  bounded  to  the  west  the  Archean‐age  Superior Province,  by  the  Proterozoic‐age  Grenville  Province  to  the  south,  and  extent  as  far  as  the  Ungava Bay to the north. To the east, the New Quebec Orogen is in contact with a composite terrane of the SECP named the Core Zone, composed of Archean and Paleoproterozoic‐age lithologies (James et al. 2003, Clark and Wares, 2005). The New Quebec Orogen is interpreted as an early Proterozoic‐age (Aphebian) fold and thrust belt with  and  geologic  age  ranging  between  2.17  and  1.87  Ga.  The  older  stratigraphic  and  structural subdivision  of  the  New  Quebec  Orogen  outlined  three  supracrustal  belts  defined  as  1)  a  western foreland, parauthochthonous to allochthonous “miogeosynclinal” belt composed mainly of platform sediment  rocks;  2)  a  central  foreland,  allochthonous  “eugeosynclinal”  belt  composed  mainly  of greenschist facies, deep‐water, volcano‐sedimentary rocks intruded by numerous gabbro sills; and 3)  an  eastern  allochthonous  belt  marking  the  beginning  of  the  hinterland  and  composed  of amphibolitic facies rocks. The  recent  interpretation  defines  the  New  Quebec  Orogen  by  three  cycles  of  sedimentation  and volcanism,  which  make  up  the  Kaniupiskau  Supergroup.  The  cycles  thicken  eastwards  and  are separated  from  each  other  by  erosional  unconformities.  The  first  two  cycles  are  volcano‐sedimentary  in  nature  with  emplacement  age  from  U‐Pb  dating  between  2.17  and  2.14  Ga  and between  1.88  and  1.87  Ga  respectively.  Overlying  this  sequence  is  a  syn‐orogenic  suite  of metasedimentary  rocks  forming  the  third  cycle.  The  belt  is  later  subdivided  into  eleven lithotectonic zones separated by major thrust faults. The  first  cycle  of  the  belt  was  prompted  by  continental  rifting,  followed  by  passive  continental margin  development,  then  additional  rifting,  and  finally  the  re‐establishment  of  the  platform.  A period of approximately 175 Ma characterised by relatively little tectonic activity followed the first cycle  of  the  orogen.  The  second  cycle  is  characterised  by  a  transgressive  sequence  composed  of platform sediments (sandstones and iron formations) and turbidites (sandstones and mudstones) later  intruded  in  the  central  part  of  the  belt  by  several  ultramafic  sills,  tholeiitic  in  composition, known  as  the  Montagnais  Sills.  Near  the  end  of  the  second  cycle,  the  Le  Moyne  intrusion  (Eldor Carbonatite)  was  emplaced  within  basaltic  to  rhyolitic  volcanic  units.  Finally,  the  third  cycle  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  19. 19. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 19 consisting of molasse type sedimentation at the margin of the Superior Province occurred between 1.82 and 1.77 Ga. Generally, the metamorphic grade increases from west to east across the New Quebec Orogen. The foreland  changes  from  sub‐greenschist  to  upper  greenschist  facies  and  the  hinterland  goes  from upper  greenschist  to  amphibolitic/granulite  facies.  The  Eldor  Carbonatitic  suite  of  rocks  has thought  to  have  undergone  greenschist  facies  metamorphism  and  was  deformed,  along  with  the surrounding rocks, during the Hudsonian Orogen.   SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  20. 20. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 20  Figure 7.1 – Regional Geology Map     SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  21. 21. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 21 7.2 Property Geology The  Property  is  situated  within  the  central  area  of  the  New  Quebec  Orogen,  straddling  two lithotectonic  zones  separated  by  a  major  thrust  fault.    To  the  east  is  the  SC  Zone,  comprised  of Proterozoic paraschist, paragneiss, and amphibolites; to the west is the Gerido Zone, comprised of the Le Moyne Group, Doublet Group and the Le Moyne Intrusion (Eldor Carbonatite). The  older  Doublet  Group  rocks  underlay  the  Le  Moyne  Group  rocks  and  consist  of  mafic pyroclastics,  basalts,  dolomites,  and  gabbros.    The  Le  Moyne  Group  consists  of  volcanic  and sedimentary rocks of the Douay Formation (rhyolites, rhyodacites, felsic tuffs, dolomites, shales and pelites),  and  the  sedimentary  Aulneau  Formation  (conglomerate,  mudstones,  dolomite,  and dolomite tuff) which includes mafic pyroclastics coeval with the Le Moyne Intrusion.  Finally, a sub‐volcanic carbonatite intrusion (Le Moyne Intrusion or Eldor Carbonatite) was emplaced within the Le  Moyne  Group.    Local  structure  and  geology  indicate  the  volcanism  was  violent  and  may  have occurred in a shallow water environment. The  carbonatite  complex  has  been  mapped  by  Clark  and  Wares  (2005)  as  intrusive  (massive  and brecciated  ultramafic)  with  marginal  extrusive  equivalents  interpreted  to  be  a  possible  volcanic apron.  This notion of extrusive carbonatite components is still a matter of debate. Historic  exploration  of  the  Eldor  Carbonatite  has  shown  it  to  have  an  elliptical  shape  with approximate  dimensions  of  7.3  km  long  by  3  km  wide  (Sherer,  1984).    More  recently  Clark  and Wares  (2005)  suggest  a  carbonatite  extent  of  almost  double  at  15  km  long  by  4  km  wide.  Emplacement occurred near the end of the second cycle of the belts formation, approximately 1.88 ‐ 1.87 Ga (U ‐ Pb dating).  Multiple  carbonatite  intrusive  events  are  believed  to  have  occurred  during  emplacement  of  the Eldor  Complex  with  both  calco‐carbonatite  and  magnesio‐carbonatite  present  (Sherer,  1984  and Wright et al., 1998). The  Eldor  Carbonatite  geology  is  very  complex  with  several  lithological  subdivisions proposed/identified  (Wright  et  al.,  1998)  and  separate  eruptive  centres  postulated  (Demers  and Blanchet,  2002).    Simplistically,  the  Eldor  Complex  can  be  separated  into  three  major  divisions; early, mid and late stage carbonatite. The mid stage carbonatite is most closely related to tantalum‐niobium  mineralization  (pyrochlore).    The  late  stage  carbonatite  crosscuts  all  earlier  phases  and hosts the REE mineralisation observed at the Ashram zone.   SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  22. 22. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 22  Figure 7.2 – Local Geological Map     SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  23. 23. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 23 8­ DEPOSIT MODEL The deposit model at the Eldor Property is the carbonatite‐hosted REE‐Nb‐Ta deposit. Carbonatites are by definition igneous rocks, intrusive and extrusive, which contain more than 50% by volume of carbonate minerals like calcite, dolomite, ankerite and less often siderite and magnesite. Intrusive carbonatites  occur  commonly  within  alkalic  complexes  or  as  isolated  intrusions  (sills,  dikes, breccias  or  small  plugs)  that  may  not  be  genetically  related  with  other  alkaline  intrusions. Carbonatites can also be volcanic‐related and occur as flow or pyroclastic rocks like the well known active Oldoinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania. Carbonatites are generally related to large‐scale, intra‐plate  fractures,  grabens  or  rifts  that  correlate  with  periods  of  extension,  typically  Precambrian  to recent in age. Carbonatite‐hosted  deposits  occur  almost  exclusively  in  intrusive  carbonatite  and  are  subdivided into magmatic, replacement/veins, and residual sub‐type. The Eldor carbonatite can be classified as a  magmatic  sub‐type,  which  is  the  same  category  as  the  St‐Honore  deposit  in  Quebec,  Canada (Niobec  niobium  mine,  Iamgold),  the  Mountain  Pass  deposit  in  California,  U.S.A.  (REE)  and  the Palabora deposit in South Africa (apatite). The pipe‐like carbonatites typically occur as sub‐circular or elliptical shape and can be up to 3‐4 km in diametre. Magmatic mineralisation within pipe‐like carbonatites  is  commonly  found  in  crescent‐shape,  steeply  dipping  zones.  Metasomatic mineralisation  occurs  as  irregular  forms,  breccias  or  veins.  Figure  8.1  illustrates  the  concentric, steeply dipping features of a pipe‐like shapes of the St‐Honore carbonatite. The  major  mineral  constituents  are  calcite,  dolomite,  siderite,  ferroan  calcite,  ankerite  as carbonates,  and  hematite,  biotite,  titanite,  olivine  and  quartz.  Economic  minerals  include  fluorite (F),  apatite  (P),  pyrochlore  (Nb),  anatase  (Ti),  columbite  (Nb‐Ta),  monazite  (REE),  bastnaesite (REE),  parisite  (REE),  zircon  (Zr),  and  magnesite  (Mg),  among  others.  Mineralisation  within carbonatites  is  typically  syn‐  to  post‐intrusion.  The  mineralisation  is  controlled  primarily  by fractional crystallisation within the intrusion with tectonic and local structures influence the form of  metasomatic  mineralisation  which  occurs  as  veins  and  breccia  textures  (Woolley  and  Kempe, 1989, Richardson and Birkett, 1996, Birkett and Simandl, 1999).   SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  24. 24. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 24  Figure 8.1 – Schematic Representation of St­Honore Carbonatite     Image from IAMGOLD website – March 2011  In  addition  to  the  carbonatite  deposit  model  mineralised  in  REE‐Nb‐Ta,  other  deposit  types  with known mineralised occurrences are located in the vicinity of the Property. The other deposit types includes  magmatic  Cu‐Ni  (Co‐PGE)  sulfides  in  mafic  and  ultramafic  intrusive  units  and  vein‐type Au‐Cu (Ag) mineralisation hosted in fractured mafic intrusive. Known  occurrences  of  magmatic  Cu‐Ni  (Co‐PGE)  mineralisation  are  located  approximately  5  km west of the Property. The most significant occurrences include: Island deposit (historical resources of 1.09 Mt @ 2.02% Cu and 0.45% Ni), Lepage deposit (historical resources of 0.79 Mt @ 2.76% Cu and 0.66% Ni), Redcliff deposit (historical resources of 1.07 Mt @ 2.09% Cu and 0.51% Ni), and the Marymac II deposit (historical resources of 0.93 Mt @ 1.60% Cu and 0.43% Ni).  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  25. 25. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 25 The known occurrences for the vein‐type Au‐Cu (Ag) mineralisation, located between 10 km and 15 km west of the Property, include the Lac Terre Rouge showing (grab sample with 24.75 g/t Au), the Lac Daubancourt showing (grab sample with 14.3 g/t Au), and the Lac Deitrich‐Sud showing (grab sample with 1.86 g/t Au) (Clark and Wares, 2005).  9­ MINERALISATION This section summarises the observations made during the site visit and information provided by the  Company  in  particular  two  internal  reports  on  the  mineralogy  of  the  Ashram  lithologies completed  in  March  2010  and  March  2011  by  Patrik  Schmidt  and  Roger  H.  Mitchell  respectively, both consultant petrologists. The  preliminary  macroscopic  and  microscopic  observations  made  of  the  F‐REE  mineralisation  at the Ashram deposit suggests that three significantly complex zones of mineralisation intersected in drill  holes  occurs  in  the  carbonatite:  A‐Zone,  B‐Zone  and  BD‐Zone.  Figure  9.1  shows  a  picture  of representative  samples  of  the  different  mineralisation  zones  from  hole  EC10‐028  selected  by  the author  including  the  interpreted  non‐carbonatite  contact  unit  (an  amphibole  and  phlogopite‐rich lithology). The different zones have been described by the Company consultants as follow.  A‐Zone carbonatite is the most mineralised unit  of the Ashram area (with the  B‐Zone) and share  similarities  in  composition  and  textures  with  the  B‐Zone.  The  units  observed  in  this  zone  are  typically  light  to  dark  olive‐grey  and  composed  of  clasts  of  breunnerite  (Mg‐siderite),  fluorite  or  fluorite plus monazite set in a complex matrix of several generations of ferrodolomite. The unit has  been  geochemically  classified  as  magnesio‐  to  ferro‐carbonatite.  The  rocks  shows  textures  described as cataclastic through‐fluorite “schlieren breccias” (referred as mafic minerals, typically  apatite/biotite/REE  minerals,  having  a  preferential  orientation  creating  bands  during  crystallisation  of  magma).  Colloform  textures  are  also  present.  The  breccias  which  occurred  in  more  than  one  stage  (potentially  due  to  deformation  or  hydrothermal  events)  are  typically  composed of fluorite, late stage Fe‐rich coarse‐grained carbonates, and quartz. The most significant  economic  minerals  observed  in  the  A‐Zone  and  are  monazite  (La‐Ce),  REE‐F‐carbonates  (bastnaesite‐La‐Ce),  REE‐phosphates  (xenotime‐Y‐Dy),  apatite,  fluorite,  pyrite  and  sphalerite.  Accessory  minerals  are  niobium  minerals  (ferrocolumbite,  niobian  ilmenite  and  rutile),  barite,  magnetite and galena, among others.  B‐Zone carbonatite shows similar mineralogy as the A‐Zone but with fewer clasts of fluorite plus  monazite and less tectonic and hydrothermal‐related textures. The units are cream‐yellow to grey‐ yellow  in  colour.  The  presence  of  patches  or  pools  of  quartz‐phlogopite  is  common  and  appear  distinct  from  the  A‐Zone  material.  The  unit  has  been  geochemically  classified  as  a  magnesio‐ carbonatite.  BD‐Zone  carbonatite  occurs  between  the  B‐Zone  and  a  poorly  understood  contact  lithology  best  described  as  an  albite‐amphibole‐phlogopite‐rich  unit.  The  BD‐Zone  units  are  typically  cream  to  white in colour with red‐orange pervasive shades from parisite‐baesnesite mineralisation. The BD‐ Zone  shows  a  relatively  consistent  composition  but  significant  variation  in  texture  is  observed  from one sample to another. The unit has been geochemically classified as a magnesio‐carbonatite.  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  26. 26. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 26  In  general,  the  BD‐Zone  is  less  mineralised  than  the  A‐Zone  and  B‐Zone  but  contains  a  greater  variety  of  REE‐F‐carbonates  consisting  of  intergrowths  of  bastnaesite  and  parisite  with  minor  synchisite. A particularity of the BD‐Zone is the presence of microcline feldspar occurring as a late  stage  anhedral  crystals.  Quartz  is  also  commonly  observed.  The  BD‐Zone  is  observed  in  contact  with  a  relatively  un‐mineralised  unit  whose  origin  is  enigmatic.  The  lithology  is  non‐carbonatite  and  is  best  described  as  an  albite  amphibole  phlogopitite  interpreted  to  be  a  metasomatised  megaxenolith or a discrete intrusion genetically‐related to the Eldor carbonatite complex.   Figure 9.1 – Drill Core from Hole EC10­028 Showing the A, B, BD and Contact Zones    10­ EXPLORATION AND DRILLING In 2010, the Company completed exploration work on the Property consisting of diamond drilling, trenching, prospecting, ground geophysics and additional sampling of the 2008 drill core. The areas of the Property that received exploration work in 2010 were Southeast, Star Trench, MC Exposure but specifically Ashram where significant REE mineralisation was discovered in 2009. In addition, other periphery targets received initial ground evaluations. The BTW size diamond drilling completed on the Property during 2010 totals 5,390 m with 4 holes drilled  at  Southeast,  3  at  Star  Trench,  2  at  MC  Exposure  and  finally  12  holes  in  the  Ashram  area.  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  27. 27. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 27 From the drilling completed, a total of 5,882 samples were collected for analysis from which 3297 were sampled in the Ashram drill core. Table 10.1 summarises the drilling completed at Eldor by Commerce since 2008. Figure 10.1 shows a plan view of the drilling completed at Ashram in 2010.   Table 10.1 – Summary of Drilling Completed at Eldor by Commerce  Year Area of the Property Number of Holes Total Metres Drilled Northwest 12 2466 Southeast 13 2846 2008 Star Trench 1 170 Total (2008) 26 5482 Southeast 4 1392 Star Trench 3 494 2010 MC Exposure 2 192 Ashram  12 3313 Total (2010) 21 5390 Grand‐Total 47 10872    SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  28. 28. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 28  Figure 10.1 – Plan View of the Drilling in the Ashram REE zone at the Eldor Property    In  addition  to  the  diamond  drilling,  the  Company  conducted  additional  core  sampling  from  the 2008 drilling (469 samples for 479.96 m), ground magnetic surveying in the Star Trench area (<1.5 km  area),  trenching  (1  trench  near  Ashram  area,  2  trenches  near  Star  Trench  area  and  3  sub‐parallel trenches at Miranna), and prospecting. The 2010 Data regarding trenches, ground magnetic surveys, and prospecting samples is still being compiled and remains unvetted.  Therefore, the total number  of  samples  collected  from  trenches  and  prospecting  is  not  confirmed  as  several  samples were also collected from trenches excavated in 2008.  11­ SAMPLING METHOD AND APPROACH This  section  is  based  on  information  supplied  by  Commerce  and  observations  made  during  the independent  verification  program  conducted  at  the  Project  site  by  the  author  between  October  4 and 6, 2010.  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  29. 29. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 29 The  Company  contracted  Dahrouge  Geological  Consulting  Ltd  for  the  management  of  the exploration work for the Eldor Property. Exploration work at the Property is managed from a field camp which provides the office, core logging and core storage facilities for the Project. The evaluation of the  geological setting and mineralisation on the Property includes observations and sampling from surface (through mapping, grab samples, and trenches) but is principally based on  information  and  sampling  from  diamond  drilling.  The  drill  core  logging  and  sampling  was conducted  at  the  Property.  All  samples  collected  by  Commerce  during  the  course  of  the  2010 exploration program were sent to Activation Laboratories Ltd (“Act Labs”) in Ancaster, Ontario, for preparation  and  analysis.  The  remaining  drill  core  is  currently  stored  at  the  storage  facilities located at the Eldor main camp. All  drill  core  handling  was  done  on  site  with  logging  and  sampling  processes  conducted  by employees  and  contractors  of  Commerce  or  Dahrouge.  The  observations  of  lithology,  structure, mineralisation, sample number and location were recorded by the geologists and geotechnicians in hard copy then compiled in MS Excel. Copies of the database are stored on external hard drive for security. Drill core of BTW size was placed in a wooden core boxes and collected twice a day at the drill site then  transported  to  the  core  logging  facilities.  The  drill  core  was  first  aligned  and  measured  by  a technician  for  core  recovery.  After  a  summary  review  of  the  core,  it  was  logged  and  sampling intervals were defined by a geologist. Before sampling, the core was photographed using a digital camera in natural light and UV light (black light) to outline the florescent minerals. The core boxes were identified with Box Number, Hole ID, From and To using aluminum tags. Sampling intervals were determined by the geologist, marked and tagged based on observations of the  lithology  and  mineralisation.  The  geologists  also  use  a  portable  XRF  analyser,  a  handheld magnetic susceptibility/conductivity probe, a handheld gamma‐ray scintillometer, and a handheld spectrometer  to  help  identify  the  lithologies  and  define  the  mineralised  intervals.  The  typical sampling  length  is  1  m  but  can  vary  according  to  lithological  variation  within  the  mineralised carbonatite. The drill core samples were split in two halves with one half placed in a new plastic bag along with the sample tag; the other half was replaced in the core box. The author noted that the Company is not placing a duplicate sample tag in the core box. It has been recommended to change the procedure in order to place a sample tag in the core box for reference. The remaining duplicate sample tag was archived with the Project documents. The samples were then catalogued and placed in  sealed  pails  for  shipping.  The  sample  shipment  forms  were  prepared  on  site  with  one  copy inserted  in  one  of  the  shipment  bags  and  one  copy  kept  for  reference.  The  samples  were transported  on  a  regular  basis  by  Commerce  or  Dahrouge  employees  or  contractors  using  two preferred routes. The first shipping route consisted in sending the samples on chartered float plane to Kuujjuaq, using First Air Cargo to Montreal then ground transportation to Act Labs at Ancaster, Ontario.    The  second  route  was  through  Schefferville  using  float  plane,  by  train  to  Sept‐Iles  then ground  transportation  to  Ancaster.  The  remaining  core  samples  kept  for  reference  are  stored  in wooden racks or cross piled at the main camp. SGS Geostat validated the exploration processes and core sampling procedures used by Commerce as part of an independent verification program. SGS Geostat concluded that the drill core handling,  SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  30. 30. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 30 logging  and  sampling  protocols  are  at  conventional  industry  standard  and  conform  to  generally accepted best practices. The author considers that the samples quality is good and that the samples are generally representative. Finally, SGS Geostat is confident that the system is appropriate for the collection of data suitable for the estimation of a NI 43‐101 compliant mineral resource estimate. 12­ SAMPLE PREPARATION, ANALYSIS AND SECURITY 12.1 Sample Preparation and Analyses Drill  core  samples  collected  during  the  2010  exploration  program  are  transported  by  Commerce representatives  and  contracted  consultants  or  companies  to  Act  Labs  laboratory  facilities  in Ancaster, Ontario for sample preparation and analysis. All samples received at Act Labs are inventoried then weighted. Drying is done to samples having excess humidity. Sample material is crushed in a jaw and/or roll crusher to 70% passing 2 mm then split with a rifle splitter to obtain a sub‐sample which is then pulverised to 95% passing 200 mesh using  a  single  component  (flying  disk)  or  a  two  components  (ring  and  puck)  ring  mills.  The  pulp material  is  then  analysed  using  lithium  metaborate/tetraborate  fusion  followed  by  Inductively Coupled Plasma (“ICP”) for the major oxides and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (“ICP‐MS”)  for  a  series  of  45  elements  which  include  the  REE  (Act  Labs  code  8‐REE  package  by fusion  ICP  and  ICP/MS).  When  the  value  of  the  Nb2O5  returned  higher  than  0.3%,  the  samples  is analysed by fusion X‐ray fluorescence (“XRF”). The element F is analysed using fusion ion selective electrode (“ISE”) (Act Labs code 4‐F‐ISE). Act Labs is an accredited laboratory under ISO/IEC 17025 standards. The re‐analysis of the pulp materials were conducted at Inspectorate Exploration & Mining Services Ltd  –  Analytical  Division  Facilities  (“Inspectorate”)  in  Richmond,  B.C.  and  ALS  Canada  Ltd laboratories  in  North  Vancouver,  B.C.  (“ALS  Chemex”),  although  none  of  the  analytical  results returned from ALS Chemex were compiled and available at the time of writing the report. The pulp samples sent to Inspectorate were directly analysed by lithium metaborate fusion followed by ICP‐MS.  Inspectorate  is  an  accredited  laboratory  under  ISO  9001:2008  and  is  in  the  process  of  being accredited for ISO/IEC 17025. The  independent  check  samples  were  analysed  at  the  SGS  Canada  Inc.  –  Minerals  Services laboratory  located  in  Toronto,  Ontario  (“SGS  Minerals”).  The  samples  were  crushed,  split  riffled then  pulverised  to  200  mesh.  The  pulps  are  then  analysed  using  lithium  metaborate  followed  by ICP‐MS (SGS Minerals code IMS95A). SGS Minerals is an accredited laboratory under ISO/IEC 17025 standards.  The  pulps  of  the  independent  check  samples  were  re‐analysed  at  ALS  Chemex laboratories  in  North  Vancouver,  B.C.  (“ALS  Chemex”).  The  pulps  were  analysed  using  lithium metaborate fusion followed by ICP‐MS (ALS Chemex code ME‐MS81). ALS Chemex is an accredited laboratory under ISO/IEC 17025 standards. The  analytical  protocols  for  Act  Labs,  Inspectorate,  SGS  Minerals  and  ALS  Chemex  are  detailed  in Appendix D.   SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  31. 31. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 31 12.2 Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedure Above the laboratory quality assurance quality control protocol (“QA/QC”) routinely conducted by Act  Labs  using  pulp  duplicate  analysis,  Commerce  implemented  an  internal  QA/QC  protocol consisting  in  the  insertion  of  reference  material,  analytical  standards  and  blanks,  and  core duplicates on a systematic basis with the samples shipped to Act Labs. The company also sent pulps from selected mineralised intersection to Inspectorate for re‐analysis. SGS Geostat did not visit the Act Labs facilities, or conduct an audit of the laboratories.  12.2.1 Analytical Standards The  Company  used  two  different  certified  analytical  standards  in  their  internal  QA/QC  protocol. The  analytical  standards  are  certified  reference  materials  number  SX18‐01  and  SX18‐05  from Dillinger  Hutte  Laboratory,  Germany.  The  standards  are  inserted  in  the  sample  series  at  a  rate  of one for every 25 samples. Expected values are provided with each certified reference materials. Unfortunately, the expected variance,  also  known  as  performance  gates,  is  not  readily  available  with  the  certified  reference materials and the information could not be retrieved from the manufacturer or reseller at the time of writing the report. In order to evaluate the results of the two analytical standards of the Project, the  QA/QC  warning  threshold  has  been  set  to  plus  or  minus  10%  difference  from  the  expected values  and  the  QA/QC  failure  to  plus  or  minus  15%  difference  from  the  expected  values.  The selected  QA/QC  warning  and  failure  thresholds  could  be  considered  conservative  based  on comparison  with  other  similar  certified  reference  materials  available  from  Ore  Research  & Exploration Pty Ltd, Australia. For the OREAS certified reference materials 101A, 101B, and 100A, which included the element Y, La, Ce, Nd of comparable quantities, the reported performance gates for  2  standard  deviation  (QA/QC  warning)  ranges  between  8%  and  20%  and  for  3  standard deviation (QA/QC failure) ranges between 12% and 30%. Table 12.1 shows the expected values and QA/QC  failure  and  warning  thresholds  and  Table  12.2  summarises  the  reported  results  for  each analytical  standards.  Figures  12.1  and  12.2  are  graphs  showing  the  variation  of  the  reported analytical results with time for analytical standards SX18‐01 and SX18‐05 respectively.   SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat
  32. 32. Technical Report – Mineral Resource Estimation – Eldor Property – Ashram Deposit  Page 32  Table 12.1 – Expected Values and QA/QC Ranges of SX18­01 and SX18­05 Analytical  Standards for Y, La, Ce, Nd and Nb2O5  Expected Values and QAQC Ranges Standard Element Failure (-15%) Warning (-10%) Mean Warning (+10%) Failure (+15%) Y (ppm) 114 120 134 147 154 La (ppm) 304 322 358 394 412 SX18-01 Ce (ppm) 689 730 811 892 933 Nd (ppm) 372 394 437 481 503 Nb2O5 (%) 0.591 0.626 0.695 0.765 0.799 Y (ppm) 197 209 232 256 267 La (ppm) 426 451 501 552 577 SX18-05 Ce (ppm) 929 984 1093 1202 1257 Nd (ppm) 434 460 511 562 588 Nb2O5 (%) 0.827 0.876 0.973 1.070 1.119    Table 12.2 ­ Summary Statistics of SX18­01 and SX18­05 Analytical Standards for Y, La, Ce,  Nd and Nb2O5  Period Observed QAQC Warning Range QAQC Failure Range Standard Element Count From To Mean Std Dev Min Max Count % Count % Y (ppm) 94 124 5 106 136 21 22% 1 1% La (ppm) 94 364 16 332 407 7 7% 0 0% SX18-01 27-Jul-10 17-Jan-11 Ce (ppm) 94 800 26 729 868 1 1% 0 0% Nd (ppm) 94 393 15 354 425 43 46% 6 6% Nb2O5 (%) 71 0.685 0.017 0.639 0.731 0 0% 0 0% Y (ppm) 89 232 9 208 249 1 1% 0 0% La (ppm) 89 468 16 430 508 14 16% 0 0% SX18-05 27-Jul-10 17-Jan-11 Ce (ppm) 89 993 33 890 1090 30 34% 2 2% Nd (ppm) 89 460 18 426 518 42 47% 5 6% Nb2O5 (%) 65 0.973 0.011 0.94 0.997 0 0% 0 0%    SGS Canada Inc. - Geostat

×