AMEC Site Visit - July 2010 (Part 2 of 2)

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In July 2010, AMEC conducted a property site visit at the Blue River Tantalum-Niobium Project as part of their geology and data verification.

In July 2010, AMEC conducted a property site visit at the Blue River Tantalum-Niobium Project as part of their geology and data verification.

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  • 1. Commerce Blue River Ta-Nb Project July 11-16, 2010 AMEC Site Visit: Geology and Data Verification (Part 2 of 2)
  • 2. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Structural Geology Folding Indicators T Left: Upper road outcrop exposure. Hanging wall meta-sediments with flat lying folds (view eastward). Right: More open upright folds. Note the sub-horizontal fault plane striations in the upper left of the figure. Structural geologist J. Kraft for scale (~ 6.0 ft tall) 2
  • 3. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Structural Geology Folding Indicators West East (A) F08-150: 121.8m to 129.8m. Indications of folding include asymmetric parasitic folds with short and long limbs bracketed by sub- horizontal compositional layering. Tigmatic folds are also noted . (A) (B) F08-150: 143.5 m and 147.0 m, (B) high and low angle layering indicating possible fold closures. (C) (C) F08-151: 204.0 m to 204.5 m Indications of folding include transition from a repetition of carbonatite to biotite-quartz gneiss and back into carbonatite. Upper carbonatite has a contact at a high angle to core axis indicating that it is a flat lying contact. Middle gneiss has trend of compositional layering with high - to low - to high angles Note: Next three slides show core photos for (A), (B) and (C). relative to core axis. bulls-eye appearance to the layering. 3
  • 4. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Structural Geology Folding Indicators (Location A on cross-section) CL: Sub-vertical drill hole with sub-horizontal T compositional layering at a high angle to core axis P Left: hole F08-150: 121.8m to 129.8m. HQ diameter diamond drill core. Hole was drill vertical. Compositional layering of biotite-quartz gneiss is typically at a high angle to the core axis indicating a sub-horizontal attitude when related to the sub-vertical dip of the drill hole. Top of hole is towards the top left of photo. Right: F08-150: 125m. Indications of folding include asymmetric parasitic folds with short and long limbs (P) bracketed by sub-horizontal compositional layering. Tigmatic folds (T) are also noted . 4
  • 5. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Structural Geology Folding Indicators (Location B on cross-section) Note: Indications of folding include high and low angle layering indicating possible fold closures. Top of hole is towards the top left of photos. Left: F08-150: 143.5 m. Right: F08-150: 147.0 m 5
  • 6. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Structural Geology Folding Indicators (Location C on cross-section) Towards top of hole Carbonatite Carbonatite Towards bottom of hole Note: F08-151: 204.0 m to 204.5 m (top to bottom) Indications of folding include transition from a repetition of carbonatite to biotite-quartz gneiss and back into carbonatite. Upper carbonatite has a contact at a high angle to core axis indicating that it is a flat lying contact. Middle gneiss has trend of compositional layering with high - to low - to high angles relative to core axis (dashed lines). Black box highlights a possible fold closure which gives a characteristic bulls-eye appearance to the layering. Top of hole is towards the top left of photo. 6
  • 7. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Structural Geology Folding Indicators CF0612: Left: 31.7 m; Right: 179.0 m Note: Indications of folding include transition from high -to low -to high angle layering indicating possible folding. Dashed lines inserted to highlight the layering. Top of hole is towards the top left of both photos. 7
  • 8. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Carbonatite textures Note: Carbonatite rocks with increasing deformation from left to right. Note the ferro-columbite minerals in figure second from the right (samples courtesy of T. Chuddy) Note 2: Aggregates of ferro-columbite +/- pyrochlore can reach up to 5 mm in size. 8
  • 9. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Ta – Nb mineralization within carbonatite Note: F08-150 162.0 m. Carbonatite host rock with dark red-brown opaque mineral ferro-columbite intergrown with semi-transparent yellowish mineral pyrochlore which has a vitreous lustre. The dark green mineral is an amphibole named richterite. Ferro-columbite at the Project is a non-radioactive iron-niobium-tantalum-rich mineral with the chemical formula (Fe, Mn) (Nb, Ta)2 O6 and pyrochlore is a niobium-rich mineral with the chemical formula (Ca, Na, U)2 (Nb, Ti, Ta)2 O6 (OH,F) (pers. Comm.., T. Chuddy) Left: Aggregates of ferro-columbite +/- pyrochlore can reach up to 5 mm in size. 9
  • 10. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Ta – Nb mineralization within carbonatite Note: CF0612 - 137.0 m. Carbonatite host rock with dark red-brown opaque mineral ferro-columbite. The dark green mineral is an amphibole named richterite. Magnetite (Mt) is commonly noted associated with calcio-carbonatite. Magnetite and pyrhhotite are magnetic minerals within the rocks at the Project that should be considered for down-hole surveying readings and instrumentation. The circled mineral labeled with “AP” is apatite. 10
  • 11. Geology and Data Verification (July 2010) Ta – Nb mineralization within carbonatite The End 11