Overheated common areas in residential buildings: what can you
do?
The quest for energy efficiency has led to very good
in...
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Overheated common areas in residential buildings what can you do?

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The quest for energy efficiency has led to very good insulation in residential buildings and an increase in district heating schemes. While this is generally good for the environment and energy bills, it is having unintended consequences for stair lobbies, corridors and entrance halls, which tend to overheat. This results in unpleasant conditions for residents and possible issues maintaining cold water supply temperatures.

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Overheated common areas in residential buildings what can you do?

  1. 1. Overheated common areas in residential buildings: what can you do? The quest for energy efficiency has led to very good insulation in residential buildings and an increase in district heating schemes. While this is generally good for the environment and energy bills, it is having unintended consequences for stair lobbies, corridors and entrance halls, which tend to overheat. This results in unpleasant conditions for residents and possible issues maintaining cold water supply temperatures. Q: What can you do to avoid heat building up in these common areas? A: Use the existing smoke control system for day-to-day ventilation The simple solution is to use the ventilation equipment which is already providing smoke control to these areas. Automatic Opening Vents (AOVs) and shafts are typically positioned for smoke ventilation in such a way that will also provide effective cross ventilation, so that potentially they can also be used to extract excess heat and stale air. More complex smoke control solutions have mechanical shafts serving multiple levels – ideal for ventilation of multiple floors. Q: Will you require additional equipment or modifications? A: It depends. If your building has a multiple shaft smoke control system, it can readily be configured to provide dayto-day ventilation with minimal additions. If, on the other hand, the building has a single shaft system, you will need inlet air. You could provide it from the stair, using a weathered roof smoke vent. In this case, you will need fire rated smoke dampers between the stair and the corridor. You should also consider attenuation for the fans, as they will be running more often to provide day-to-day ventilation. © 2013 Colt International Licensing Ltd.

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