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European CIO Cloud Survey 2011

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Colt’s annual European CIO Cloud Survey looks at the cloud sentiment and deployment in European enterprises in 2011. This year’s research finds that while awareness of cloud computing continues to …

Colt’s annual European CIO Cloud Survey looks at the cloud sentiment and deployment in European enterprises in 2011. This year’s research finds that while awareness of cloud computing continues to increase, the cloud agenda has shifted beyond concerns about security to a wider view of risk. The survey was conducted amongst over 500 IT decision makers in companies across Europe with some level of familiarity with cloud computing.

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  • 1. European CIO Cloud Survey Addressing security, risk and transition April 2011V18.0
  • 2. Executive Summary Cloud computing is one of the fastest growing, and potentially most exciting IT innovations in a generation. Cloud computing is a major step-change in the evolution of IT, providing the means through which services ranging from computing power, storage and networks to software, applications and business processes can be delivered as and when needed. Cloud computing, however, is not without Professional services controversy with vague definitions of what’s “in the cloud” and heated debate regarding the best Other 22% Public sector & 14% deployment model. education Chemicals & 21% petroleum manufacturing Following on from previous surveys in 2009 and 2010, Colt, a leading provider of integrated managed 2% IT and networking solutions, again has commissioned industry research amongst CIOs to explore Media Services current attitudes and adoption levels of cloud computing. The aim being to provide an evidence- 3% based view of cloud sentiment and deployment in European enterprises in 2011. The results of the Consumer products Colt European CIO Cloud Survey are based on more than 500 interviews with IT decision makers in manufacturing a cross-section of organisations with some level of familiarity with cloud computing. At least 100 4% High tech products interviews were conducted in each of the UK, France, Germany, Spain and Benelux. Online manufacturing retail / wholesale 16% Financial services 5% The research finds that although still in early adopter territory, with relatively few company-wide Industrial products 9% manufacturing cloud implementations, the cloud agenda has shifted beyond concerns about security to a wider 7% view of risk. It also highlights various challenges associated with supplier lock-in and transition. Despite such concerns, cloud services look set to dominate the IT landscape in next couple of yearsFig. A: Sample breakdown – Industry sector and those enterprises taking a more holistic view of the benefits, drawbacks and various models of cloud seem best placed to make informed choices to deliver a more agile operating model and sustainable ROI.V18.0Page 2 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 3. Some highlights of the research include: Cloud watching • 60% of enterprises think cloud will be their most significant IT operating method by 2014 • Few companies have company-wide cloud implementations showing we are still in early Not evaluated at all adopter territory but adoption levels in parts of the organisation are encouraging 10% • The key challenges for cloud adoption are ease of transition (58%), quality assurance (55%), Not thought about it Evaluated but decided 5% not to go ahead cost justification (55%) and regulation on security and control of customer data (54%) 5% • The top five cloud applications deployed company-wide are website hosting (24%), email Already adopted hosting (23%), database hosting (22%), servers (22%) and storage (20%) Evaluating options 16% 24% Security sticking points • Security still remains the biggest identified barrier to adoption (63%), followed by integration issues (57%) and performance / reliability concerns (55%) although these are all far less pressing concerns than last year Currently implementing Planning to adopt in • Security is deemed an ongoing issue that goes beyond cloud (74%) but is certainly a priority 24% next 12 months in evaluating and managing IT delivered via cloud (80%) 16% • 43% say it will not prevent them adopting more cloud services Fig. B: Sample breakdown – Cloud adoption Cloud and risk • 63% see business risks in the transition to the cloud but 42% think they are not in a position to fully assess the risks associated with cloud services • The key risks are considered to be compromises in security (45%) and worry that a major cloud performance or security incident could damage the brand (42%) • Perhaps reflecting this inability to quantify risk, the preferred cloud deployment in 2011 is via private cloud (53%), up significantly since 2010 (27%).V18.0Page 3 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 4. Cloud supply • As in 2010 the key requirement of a cloud supplier is that they provide data security and privacy (73%) – having strong business continuity and disaster recovery processes has grown in importance (70%), whilst providing performance SLAs (67%) remains the third biggest consideration • Most prefer to use a mix of cloud suppliers (71%) rather than relying on a single serviceMethodology overview provider (25%)The Colt CIO Cloud Survey was conducted by Loudhouse, 2011 is a year that will define cloud adoption across Europe. Whilst awareness and definitions ofan independent marketing research consultancy based in cloud models preoccupied end-user businesses (and the IT industry) in 2009 / 2010, there is a tangiblethe UK. The survey comprised more than 500 online change in 2011. Real world cloud usage today is characterised by email hosting and data storageinterviews IT decision makers in companies with a turnover services – extensions of hosted services and the high volume / low risk components of IT infrastructure.of at least €100K and some level of familiarity with cloud Web services, such as e-commerce, are firmly placed in the next phase of cloud adoption, benefittingcomputing. The research was conducted in January 2011. from domain expertise and a raft of wrap-around services that deliver convincing ROI for margin-At least 100 interviews were conducted in each of the UK, hungry retailers. Whilst these deployments contribute to the established use of cloud services, the keyFrance, Germany, Spain and Benelux. enterprise applications deployment marches on at a slower pace.V18.0Page 4 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 5. What does this all mean? Whilst the absolute deployment of cloud services is very difficult to establish, the trend is clear: Companies are evaluating and deploying cloud services at a higher rate year-on-year, fuelled by the need to be more agile and responsive in today’s business climate and the market is transitioning to a more ‘mature’ phase. The key developments in this trend, as defined by the Colt European CIO Cloud Survey, are: Security factors prevail Risk evaluation of cloud Data privacy and contract issues Quality assurance and transition management Infrastructure and service provider business Security factors prevail as cloud adoption grows Security is not a simple case of considering ‘if’ cloud computing is secure. Moreover, adoption- levels show that a healthy regard for security is an integral part of cloud usage, not a barrier. However, businesses are now asking ‘how’ the services are secured and ‘what’ the weak points are in the end-to-end service. Risk evaluation of cloud deployment is hard to find Whilst risk evaluation of any IT issue remains a complex matter, the absence of risk assessment in moving to cloud models is alarming. Some of this concern can be mitigated by the nature of cloud usage to date – smaller companies, low-level applications, deployments at departmental levels. However, in order toV18.0Page 5 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 6. Data privacy and contract issues are increasingly important for adoption Businesses are beginning to ask the seemingly mundane but critically important questions about cloud deployment. Even in a cloudy world, the demands from enterprises to know the location of data, to elicit meaningful service level obligations and the need for an integrated end-to-end service are indicators of cloud services moving out of the “playground”. Quality assurance and transition management are key enablers As shown by detailed adoption figures, businesses are taking a phased approach to cloud adoption. The nature of the delivery model makes this a relatively comfortable deployment path. However, there is always the concern that a phased approach will not embrace the new services model inherent in cloud computing and lead to internal politics and conservatism compromising momentum. Infrastructure and service provider business will drive enterprise cloud adoption With the metaphor of “electricity utility’ still at large, it is not surprising that enterprises initially viewed cloud services as simply a question of largest scale and lowest cost, driven by service providers who owned internet-scale data centres or were traditional enterprise software and systems houses. The issue of service market understanding and the ability to understand and meet specific European customer needs in order to accommodate cloud transitions will define the success in the nascent ‘enterprise’ phase of cloud adoption that 2011 promises in Europe.V18.0Page 6 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 7. Charts and commentary Cloud watching There is much discussion about the drivers and benefits of cloud computing. In the current economic climate, a key starting point of cloud adoption is substantially reduced or no capital spending for a given application in favour of a flexible, on-demand model helping enterprises to better adapt to market needs. The key enablers of this process, as highlighted in Figure 1 are ease of transition (58%), quality assurance (55%), addressing cost saving pressures (55%) and regulations on the security and control of customer data (54%). Making the transition from legacy operating environments to the cloud or integrating cloud alongside legacy infrastructure is a daunting prospect for many companies. It is encouraging to see that many cloud providers are now focusing on easing this transition process. The fact that ease of transition has now emerged as the most significant enabler of cloud adoption, up from third place in 2010, reveals a more mature marketplace where the realities of implementation are now coming to the fore. As in 2010, companies continue to think that quality assurance is vital to the wider adoption of cloud computing – assurances of uptime helping to allay any reliability and performance concerns. Security regulations and control of data are another sought after feature for CIOs (54%); their importance continually reinforced through high profile press horror stories of corporate and public sector dataFig.1: Key enablers of cloud adoption leaks. The high profile of cloud computing is also putting such outages under the microscope.V18.0Page 7 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 8. Ease of transition and quality assurance are rated consistently high by all countries in the survey. Costs saving pressures are particularly noted as a cloud enabler in the UK (63%) whilst Germany is more likely to cite the need for in-country government endorsement (45%) than other countries. Regulations on security and control of customer data both resonate more strongly as cloud enablers in Germany (66%) and the UK (65%). Figure 2 shows that the cloud operating model is most likely to become mainstream within the next two to three years, 60% of CIOs considering that it will become the most significant method of IT delivery by 2014. Spain and Italy appear more optimistic - where 52% and 51% of companies respectively believe cloud adoption will reach this level of penetration by 2013. Only time will tell exactly how much reliance the market will place on cloud services. Whilst predictions may vary, the emphasis on cloud being widely accepted sooner rather than later is a view that IT decision makers consistently hold. Only 6% remain sceptical.Fig.2: Cloud as most significant method of IT deliveryV18.0Page 8 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 9. Cloud choices The cloud computing marketplace is for convenience divided into three strata – Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). Figures 3, 4 and 5 show the relative levels of company-wide and partial adoption of cloud amongst specific applications / services. It becomes apparent that company-wide usage of cloud only occurs in a minority of cases, even in applications that are used extensively across the business, such as email, backup and desktop applications. Most cloud adopters are taking a measured approach with implementations only in part of the business. Looking across the three different strata, it is interesting that there appears to be similar levels of adoption of cloud amongst service users in each area – even though SaaS service revenues currently dominate the market figures. Typically, around 30% to 40% of other companies are using cloud in more of a piecemeal fashion. SaaS may be considered the oldest and most mature element of cloud computing, but it should be noted that there is a blurring of SaaS, PaaS and IaaS with the distinctions between these three prevailing service models unclear. PaaS, for example, speaks to a more generalised services platform concept and in many cases these models are seen as a continuum. Looking at the top five cloud applications across the entire business – with examples such as website hosting (24%), email hosting (23%), database hosting (22%), servers (22%), storage (20%) - it becomes clear that SaaS, PaaS and IaaS implementations can be comparative in adoption terms. The use of platform as a service as a “development cloud” really is in its infancy across Europe.Fig.3: SaaS adoption amongst application usersV18.0 45Page 9 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011 Compromises in security Major cloud performance/ security 42 incident could damage brand More complexity in managing 30
  • 10. One would expect that company-wide implementations will become more widespread as organisations experience the benefits that cloud brings and manage and mitigate any associated risks. Gartner, for example, is already reporting growth in both the number of businesses signing cloud deals and the size of those deals (Source: IT Pro, October 2010) – although one always has to be aware of “cloud washing” – companies claiming cloud implementations when they aren’t really. Many internal virtualisation projects can be magically renamed private cloud.Fig.4: PaaS adoption amongst application usersFig.5: IaaS adoption amongst application usersV18.0Page 10 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 11. Security sticking points As more information on individuals and companies is placed external to the organisation, concerns about security dominate discussions about cloud computing. Figure 6 shows that it remains the single biggest hurdle impacting cloud take up (63%) despite being less significant than in last year’s survey (71%). Security is a particular issue for companies in the UK (74%) and Germany (70%). However it is worth noting that other issues associated with a more mature marketplace are starting to emerge such as supplier lock-in (46%) and geographic location (31%). The key issue is that security concerns are not new. The changing nature of this “perennial” priority, however, is important. Organisations still clearly lack the certainty that they or their cloud provider can secure their data beyond their own four walls. It is worth noting, however, that most of what typically gets ascribed to security in the cloud boils down to data management and compliance issues. However, security must be recognised as a continual concern.Fig.6: Biggest barriers to adoption of cloud servicesV18.0Page 11 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 12. As shown in Figure 7, three quarters (74%) of CIOs think IT security is a concern whether IT systems and applications are delivered via the cloud or not. Against this backdrop, the fact that 80% see security issues as a priority when evaluating and managing IT via cloud services may in part be simply due diligence in coming to terms with a new approach. Concerns over cloud security are grounded in common sense. However, further detail on security shows it is not a wholesale obstacle to adoption, 35% saying they will become less concerned the more reliant their company become on cloud. Yet, for 43% these will not prevent their organisation from adopting more cloud services. The security agenda is likely to shift further still in the coming year as cloud stakeholders increase their understanding of cloud security issues, companies deploy more advanced security options and issues regarding security architecture, location, transition and contracts prevail. Fig.7: Attitudes to cloud securityV18.0Page 12 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 13. Cloud and risk It seems that although cloud is associated with risk, the nature of this risk is unclear. Almost two- thirds (63%) of CIOs think that there are business risks associated with the transition from in-house IT management to a cloud service. This is particularly the case in the UK where this figure stands at 81%. It seems, however, that companies are not applying the same risk-management and governance disciplines to the cloud environment as they do with their other IT initiatives. 42% claim they are not in a position to fully assess the risks associated with cloud services whilst one in four (25%) believe that their business has made errors in adopting cloud services without full consideration of the impact on the company. Risk can be defined as the potential that a chosen action or activity will lead to a loss or an undesirable outcome. For many companies, risk is synonymous with security, as shown in Figure 8 where compromises in security (45%) and brand damage as a result of performance issues or security incidents (42%) are pinpointed as specific business risks associated with adopting cloud services. Other risks relate to more internal concerns such as increased IT complexity (30%) and more pressure on IT staff (22%).Fig.8: Specific business risks of adopting cloud servicesV18.0Page 13 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 14. Figure 9 shows the preferred deployment of cloud. Private clouds are particularly popular as an Community Cloud option in Spain (58%), Germany (57%) and the UK (56%). Private clouds are somewhat contradictory 13% Public Cloud 8% as a notion of cloud “philosophy”. As a sentiment, private clouds overcome security concerns whilst compromising on scalability and cost savings. Enterprise clouds, defined as “a concoction of two Privacy Cloud or more cloud types (internal, community, or public) bound together to enable data and application 27% portability” are the preferred choice of one in five companies (21%) and their popularity is likely 2010 to grow further with increased awareness of the benefits that a hybrid approach can bring. As customers begin to untangle the options available to them in the market for deployment, preferences are certain to fluctuate. Enterprise Cloud 53% Community Cloud 9% Public Cloud 13% None of the above Enterprise Cloud 4% 21% 2011 Private Cloud 53%Fig.9: Preferred deployment of cloudV18.0Page 14 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 15. Cloud supply Alongside the explosion of choice of cloud models and suppliers, buying organisations now seem more open to considering cloud services from a range of different supplier types, with network infrastructure and services providers (48%) and managed hosting companies (42%) most trusted to deliver cloud computing services. Figure 10 shows those factors that CIOs look for in cloud suppliers. Not surprisingly, given the consistent focus on security issues, providing data security and privacy (73%) emerges as the most important factor, followed by business continuity and disaster recovery processes (70%) and the provision of performance assurances / SLAs (67%). Data security and privacy was the key concern in 2010 although this year strong business continuity and disaster recovery has moved up from 5th place to 2nd place whilst taking end-to end responsibility for services has dropped from 2nd place to 4th place.Fig.10: Key requirements of cloud suppliers Given organisations’ focus on risk reduction and security, it is not really surprising that CIOs are choosing not to put all of their cloud “eggs in one basket”. Figure 11 shows that only one in four Dont know One service provider will deliver a 3% range of application and network companies would opt for a single supplier, most instead opting to spread the risk by using more None of the services for the business above 25% than one supplier. Part of this will be due to the levels of supplier expertise in certain cloud models 4% and application areas, but given the relative immaturity of the sector, this is likely to also be a risk- reduction strategy by companies. A mix of services providers will A small number of service providers deliver services for specific will provide the majority of cloud aspects of IT use services for an organisation 33% 38%Fig.11: Future business use of cloud service providersV18.0Page 15 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 16. Conclusion The themes that define the 2011 Colt European CIO research, Security, Risk and Transition are likely to endure as they reflect corporate IT concerns. However, the priorities surrounding these issues, the way that organisations overcome their associated challenges and realise tangible business benefits is evolving as the market matures. Companies are now looking for service providers to mirror their need for agility and responsiveness through their cloud offerings whilst also providing the necessary geographical reach, integration expertise and security reassurances that the market demands. With such a range of cloud service providers now emerging, it is those that can stay ahead of these evolving customer needs who are best placed to succeed. Across Europe attitudes to cloud computing vary from the increased focus on security and control of customer data in the UK and Germany to the optimistic projections of cloud usage in Spain and Italy. As the hype around cloud computing gives way to a more solid market understanding, so a more mature service provider approach is emerging, offering tailored cloud services to meet diverse customer needs rather than expecting enterprises to re-design themselves to better align to the cloud model. The trend towards increased cloud use is apparent but, whilst the cloud model promises flexibility, it is clear that enterprise deployment remains multi-faceted. The technology-driven view of cloud computing is what has been flawed. Perhaps it is better for companies across Europe to look at cloud computing as a single philosophy comprising many different solutions.V18.0Page 16 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 17. Appendix:Country-specific data
  • 18. ContentsFigure 1: Key enablers of cloud adoptionFigure 2: Timeline when cloud will be the most significant IT operating methodFigure 3: Adoption of SaaSFigure 4: Adoption of PaaSFigure 5: Adoption of IaaSFigure 6: Biggest barriers to cloud adoptionFigure 7: Attitudes to cloud securityFigure 8: Specific risks of adopting cloud services Attitudes to cloud and riskFigure 9: Preferred deployment of cloudFigure 10: Key requirements of cloud suppliersFigure 11: Future business use of cloud service providers
  • 19. Figure 1: Key enablers of cloud adoption UK Germany Spain France Benelux Key enablers – Ease of transition 59% 56% 57% 51% 51% Key enablers – Quality of assurance 60% 63% 59% 57% 53% Key enablers – Cost saving pressures 63% 50% 49% 56% 55% Key enablers – Regulations on security / control of customer data 65% 66% 48% 56% 53% Key enablers – In country government endorsement 40% 45% 40% 38% 31% Figure 2: Cloud will be most significant IT operating method UK Germany Spain France Benelux By 2012 9% 4% 18% 16% 6% By 2013 29% 24% 34% 35% 18% By 2014 19% 33% 15% 17% 22% By 2016 18% 16% 15% 11% 29% Beyond 2016 15% 12% 7% 8% 13% Never 6% 8% 1% 5% 7% Don’t know 4% 4% 10% 8% 5%V18.0Page 19 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 20. Figure 3: SaaS adoption UK Germany Spain France Benelux Email hosting Co.wide: 11% Co.wide: 25% Co.wide: 28% Co.wide: 27% Co.wide: 25% Partial: 25% Partial: 36% Partial: 28% Partial: 42% Partial: 21% Backup Co.wide: 11% Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 24% Co.wide: 24% Co.wide: 25% Partial: 20% Partial: 38% Partial: 32% Partial: 41% Partial: 23% Desktop applications Co.wide: 6% Co.wide: 21% Co.wide: 16% Co.wide: 18% Co.wide: 16% Partial: 22% Partial: 37% Partial: 44% Partial: 42% Partial: 23% Collaboration Co.wide: 10% Co.wide: 19% Co.wide: 15% Co.wide: 24% Co.wide: 14% Partial: 29% Partial: 43% Partial: 44% Partial: 48% Partial: 28% HR Co.wide: 11% Co.wide: 15% Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 18% Co.wide: 9% Partial: 22% Partial: 35% Partial: 42% Partial: 38% Partial: 35% Payroll / finance Co.wide: 9% Co.wide: 9% Co.wide: 19% Co.wide: 15% Co.wide: 14% Partial: 22% Partial: 41% Partial: 37% Partial: 49% Partial: 30% CRM Co.wide: 12% Co.wide: 12% Co.wide: 12% Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 18% Partial: 22% Partial: 42% Partial: 46% Partial: 44% Partial: 27% Business intelligence Co.wide: 5% Co.wide: 14% Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 12% Partial: 29% Partial: 41% Partial: 39% Partial: 51% Partial: 33% ERP Co.wide: 9% Co.wide: 11% Co.wide: 10% Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 10% Partial: 28% Partial: 44% Partial: 47% Partial: 43% Partial: 27% Supply chain Co.wide: 9% Co.wide: 7% Co.wide: 15% Co.wide: 18% Co.wide: 6% Partial: 29% Partial: 46% Partial: 40% Partial: 47% Partial: 26%V18.0Page 20 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 21. Figure 4: PaaS adoption UK Germany Spain France Benelux Website hosting Co.wide: 26% Co.wide: 22% Co.wide: 24% Co.wide: 28% Co.wide: 18% Partial: 33% Partial: 45% Partial: 42% Partial: 43% Partial: 35% Database hosting Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 23% Co.wide: 22% Co.wide: 28% Co.wide: 20% Partial: 23% Partial: 44% Partial: 40% Partial: 38% Partial: 27% Application hosting Co.wide: 12% Co.wide: 24% Co.wide: 20% Co.wide: 25% Co.wide: 16% Partial: 27% Partial: 41% Partial:41% Partial: 47% Partial: 27% Integration services Co.wide: 14% Co.wide: 20% Co.wide: 18% Co.wide: 21% Co.wide: 13% Partial: 20% Partial: 38% Partial: 44% Partial: 46% Partial: 36% Applications development Co.wide: 13% Co.wide: 16% Co.wide: 19% Co.wide: 19% Co.wide: 13% Partial: 22% Partial: 44% Partial: 45% Partial: 49% Partial: 29% Figure 5: IaaS adoption UK Germany Spain France Benelux Servers Co.wide: 14% Co.wide: 29% Co.wide: 19% Co.wide: 26% Co.wide: 22% Partial: 19% Partial: 33% Partial: 37% Partial: 44% Partial: 25% Storage Co.wide:15% Co.wide: 26% Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 23% Co.wide: 19% Partial: 22% Partial: 34% Partial: 41% Partial: 49% Partial: 26% Security Co.wide: 10% Co.wide: 25% Co.wide: 20% Co.wide: 25% Co.wide: 22% Partial: 24% Partial: 28% Partial: 37% Partial: 36% Partial: 25% Computing Co.wide: 14% Co.wide: 21% Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 20% Co.wide: 20% Partial: 22% Partial: 38% Partial: 45% Partial: 51% Partial: 26% Disaster recovery Co.wide: 11% Co.wide: 23% Co.wide: 3% Co.wide: 23% Co.wide: 14% Partial: 22% Partial: 34% Partial: 38% Partial: 49% Partial: 25% Application testing Co.wide: 10% Co.wide: 15% Co.wide: 12% Co.wide: 17% Co.wide: 10% Partial: 25% Partial: 48% Partial: 44% Partial: 46% Partial: 28%V18.0Page 21 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 22. Figure 6: Biggest barriers to cloud adoption UK Germany Spain France Benelux Barriers – security 74% 70% 57% 56% 56% Barriers – integration with IT applications 60% 59% 50% 60% 55% Barriers – performance / reliability 59% 65% 51% 50% 48% Barriers – regulatory and compliance 61% 44% 44% 46% 39% Barriers – lock in 52% 47% 59% 50% 27% Barriers – transparency of costs 47% 46% 38% 50% 37% Barriers – geographic location 29% 34% 37% 33% 22% Figure 7: Attitudes to cloud security UK Germany Spain France Benelux % thinking that business managers are not even aware of the security is- 62% 43% 50% 59% 41% sues associated with cloud services % thinking IT security is a concern whether IT systems and applications are 85% 78% 60% 71% 72% delivered via the cloud or not % saying the more reliant their company becomes on cloud services, the 26% 37% 43% 39% 29% less concerned they become about security issues % saying security concerns will not prevent their organisation adopting 33% 43% 52% 48% 41% more cloud servicesV18.0Page 22 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 23. Figure 8: Specific business risks of adopting cloud services UK Germany Spain France Benelux Predicted return on investment is not achieved 31% 14% 18% 22% 17% Service delivery compromises end user / staff experience 39% 26% 8% 20% 12% More staff pressure on internal IT teams 25% 28% 19% 18% 21% Compromises in security 57% 64% 37% 25% 41% More complexity in managing mixed environments 38% 21% 23% 31% 34% Service delivery compromised customer service / business operations 41% 25% 13% 25% 17% Major cloud performance / security incident could damage brand 55% 36% 32% 46% 35% There would be no business risks 2% 11% 7% 4% 2% Attitudes to cloud and risk UK Germany Spain France Benelux % thinking there are business risks associated with the transition from in- 81% 68% 53% 55% 53% house IT management to a cloud service % saying they are not in a position to fully assess the risks associated with 43% 36% 38% 51% 40% cloud delivery % believing that their business has made errors in adopting cloud services 19% 27% 23% 33% 24% without full consideration of the impact on the company Figure 9: Preferred deployment of cloud UK Germany Spain France Benelux Public cloud 12% 12% 7% 18% 17% Private cloud 56% 57% 58% 51% 42% Community cloud 10% 7% 5% 9% 13% Enterprise cloud 18% 16% 28% 20% 23% None of the above 4% 7% 2% 2% 5%V18.0Page 23 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011
  • 24. Figure 10: Key requirements of cloud suppliers UK Germany Spain France Benelux Provides data security and privacy 84% 77% 68% 69% 65% Strong business continuity and disaster recovery processes 84% 74% 57% 66% 63% Provides performance assurances (SLAs) 82% 74% 49% 61% 64% Takes end to end responsibility for services 74% 71% 57% 62% 57% Provides competitive pricing 77% 54% 54% 67% 59% Adheres to local compliance requirements 74% 58% 54% 54% 54% Figure 11: Future business use of cloud service providers UK Germany Spain France Benelux One service provider will deliver a range of services 17% 17% 32% 31% 27% A small number of providers will provide the majority of services 43% 48% 29% 37% 33% A mix of providers will deliver services for specific aspects of IT use 35% 32% 33% 28% 35%V18.0Page 24 CIO Cloud Survey March 2011