State Of U V3
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State Of U V3

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State Of U V3 State Of U V3 Presentation Transcript

  •  
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  • Stigma
    • What is stigma?
    • What is normal?
    • How do we view people who are different than us?
    • People judge those with mental illness.
    • How does TV portray those with mental illness?
    • Rejections, exclusions, hurt feelings arise from stigma. What else?
    • Stigma creates feelings of not wanting to seek help because fear of what people think.
    This is the actual clip art that appears when you search for “crazy”
  • Watch Video I here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  • Video I: Discussion
    • What do you see?
    • How does he see himself?
    • What stigma is going on here?
    • Other things?
  •  
  • Mental Health vs. Mental Illness
    • Mental Health
    • Mental Illness
    • “ Normal”
    • Wellness
    • Sane
    • Independent
    • What Else?
    • What does a mentally healthy person look like?
    • “ Abnormal”
    • Sickness
    • Crazy
    • Needs Help
    • What Else?
    • What does a person with a mental illness look like?
  •  
  •  
  • Society dictates what is deemed crazy - “Crazy” is a social construction
  • Thinking Feeling Acting
  • Watch Video II here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  • Video II: Discussion
    • What do you see?
    • What is he thinking?
    • How is he feeling?
    • What are his behaviors?
    • How does he see himself?
    • What stigma is going on here?
    • Other things?
  •  
  • The Domino Effect
  • Create Your Own
  • Watch Video III here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  • Video III: Discussion
    • What do you see?
    • What are the areas of her life that are being affected?
      • In what ways?
    • What stigma is going on here?
    • Other things?
  •  
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • I should be able to handle my mental health issues.
    • What is the fact?
    • Some mental health problems (e.g., mild anxiety, depression, etc.) can be addressed with self-help, living a wellness lifestyle, etc.
    • However, if mental health concerns become more frequent, persistent, or profound, professional help should be sought.
    Contents modified from the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) website located at www.nami.org
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • Mental illness…
      • Makes me weak
      • Is something I created
      • Is all my fault
    • What is the fact?
    • Similar to medical conditions, mental illness is not one’s fault!
    • People do not choose to have a mental illness.
    • People should not be embarrassed or shameful of their mental illness, just like they should not have such feelings resulting from any other medical condition.
    Contents modified from the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) website located at www.nami.org
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • People will think I am crazy if I get the help of a professional.
    • What is the fact?
    • Just like a medical condition, people need to seek treatment in order to get better.
    • The earlier the treatment, the better!
    • Seeking help is a sign of strength – not weakness.
    Contents modified from the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) website located at www.nami.org
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • I can tell if someone has a mental illness – they look like they do.
    • What is the fact?
    • Many individuals live with a mental illness without anyone knowing it.
    • Many people with a mental illness lead productive lives.
    Contents modified from the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) website located at www.nami.org
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • People think I am dangerous or violent because of my mental illness.
    • What is the fact?
    • The rate of violence and dangerous behaviors among those with mental illness is not much different from the general population.
    Contents modified from the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) website located at www.nami.org
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • People think that just because I have a mental illness that I have been hospitalized, put in an insane asylum, or am homeless.
    • What is the fact?
    • Over two-thirds of Americans with a mental illness live independent lives, in communities, and are productive contributors to society.
    • Only a small portion of people with mental illness are hospitalized; those who are typically are there for a short period of time.
    Contents modified from the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) website located at www.nami.org
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • I was told that if I try hard enough, my mental illness will go away. I am just too weak to help myself.
    • What is the fact?
    • Most mental illnesses cannot be willed away; no matter how hard one tries.
    Contents modified from the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) website located at www.nami.org
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • Some problems are just a part of growing up. Depression, anxiety, etc. in children and adolescents is not a mental illness – it is just growing up.
    • What is the fact?
    • 1 in 10 children and adolescents have a mental illness in the USA.
    Contents modified from the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) website located at www.nami.org
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • People who talk about killing themselves rarely commit suicide.
    • What is the fact?
    • Most people who commit suicide have given some verbal clue or warning of their intentions.
    Contents modified from McGlothlin, J. (2008). Developing clinical skills in suicide assessment, prevention, and treatment, Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Assoc.
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • I don’t want to ask someone if they are suicidal, that might just put the thought into their head.
    • What is the fact?
    • Actually, the opposite is true. Asking someone directly about suicidal intent will often lower anxiety and act as a deterrent to suicidal behavior.
    Contents modified from McGlothlin, J. (2008). Developing clinical skills in suicide assessment, prevention, and treatment, Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Assoc.
  • Myths of Mental Illness
    • Myth
    • Fact
    • Mental illness can’t affect me.
    • What is the fact?
    • Mental illness is very common. Almost every family in the USA has been affected by mental illness.
    Contents modified from McGlothlin, J. (2008). Developing clinical skills in suicide assessment, prevention, and treatment, Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Assoc.
  • How to Get Better – the road to recovery is unique to everyone!
  • Watch Video IV here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  • Video IV: Discussion
    • What do you see?
    • What is she thinking?
    • How is she feeling?
    • What are her behaviors?
    • How does she see herself?
    • What about suicide?
    • How is she taking care of herself?
    • Other things?
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • What do I do to Help?
    • Become involved in their tone of voice and expression of feelings.
    • Be non-judgmental.
    • Allow them to talk and fully express their feelings.
    • Avoid raising false hopes.
    • Let them make and take responsibility for their own decisions, actions and feelings.
    • Be empathic!
    Contents modified from McGlothlin, J. (2008). Developing clinical skills in suicide assessment, prevention, and treatment, Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Assoc.
  • What do I do to Help?
    • Divide problems into parts so that the overall problem is not overwhelming.
    • Find out how they dealt with problems in the past.
    • Focus on the present.
    • Take appropriate action.
    • Follow up!
    Contents modified from McGlothlin, J. (2008). Developing clinical skills in suicide assessment, prevention, and treatment, Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Assoc.
  • What might be some helpful…
    • … ways to approach someone initially?
    • … words to say?
    • … behaviors?
    • … actions?
  • Watch Video V here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  • Video V: Discussion
    • What do you see?
    • What is she thinking?
    • How is she feeling?
    • What are her behaviors?
    • How is she getting help?
    • How could you help her?
      • How would you approach her?
    • Other things?
  •  
  • Who Can Help: Informal Help How Can These Folks Help? How Can Each Provide Different Help Compared to the Others?
  • Who Can Help: Hotline Help How Can These Help? How Can Each Provide Different Help Compared to the Others?
  • Who Can Help: Professional Help How Can These Folks Help? How Can Each Provide Different Help Compared to the Others?
  • Where to Get Help How Can These Folks Help? How Can Each Provide Different Help Compared to the Others?
  • Where Can You Find Help? When would you go to each?
  • Creating a Resource Tree
    • Internal Resources: 5 Things you can do on your own with out anyone’s help
      • Prioritize this list
      • Be creative
      • Personalize it
    • External Resources: 5 People to contact
      • Prioritize this list
      • People are list appropriate for the situation
    • You can have multiple trees
  • Situation: ______________________________________________________________
  • Watch Video VI here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  • Video VI: Discussion
    • What do you see?
    • What is she thinking?
    • How is she feeling?
    • What are her behaviors?
    • Informal Help?
    • Hotlines?
    • Professional Help?
    • Campus Help?
    • Other things?
  • What if you heard…
    • “ Man, I just need to get drunk out of my mind.”
  • What if you heard…
    • “ I can’t get out of bed today, just let me sleep.”
  • What if you heard…
    • “ I’m sick and tired of all the crap I have to do. This sucks.”
  • What if you heard…
    • “ I really can’t go on anymore.”
  • What if you heard…
    • “ All I do is worry about making good grades.”
  • Credits….
    • Note: Actors are used in this curriculum to portray individuals with varying degrees of mental health issues. Such actors have training and experience in the mental health profession.
    • Curriculum Developer: Jason McGlothlin, Ph.D., PCC-S, Associate Professor,
    • Kent State University
    • Actor in Video I: Nyema Bedell
    • Actor in Video II: Chad Yates
    • Actor in Video III: Terra Howell
    • Actor in Video IV: LeAnn Motley
    • Actor in Video V: Nicole Bradley
    • Actor in Video VI: Kelsey George
  • The End Please fill out this brief survey.