Unicef Zambia Briefing December 2010

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A briefing for UNICEF Zambia

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  • My name is Simon Berry and I am here to talk to you about colalife. So what is ColaLife?
  • ColaLife is based on 3 facts: FACT 1 : You can buy a Coca-Cola virtually anywhere you go even in the most remote areas of developing countries
  • FACT 2 : 1 in 5 children in these areas die before their 5 th birthday from preventable causes like dehydration from diarrhoea. Around 4,000 young children die everyday in Africa alone.
  • FACT 3 : The third fact is that these figures haven’t changed significantly over the last 25 years.
  • These are UNICEF figures and as we can see diarrhoea is a significant killer and kills more under fives than Malaria, HIV/AIDS and Measles combined.
  • So why is there a wave of interest in child mortality at this moment in time. It is because time is running out and we are going to miss the MDG for child mortality by a mile. We will not achieve this by on-going incremental improvement which is has only delivered an annual improvement of 1.8%, a step change is required which will only be delivered through INNOVATION. [Almost 9 million children still die before reaching their fifth birthday. In sub-Saharan Africa, one in 7 children still die before reaching their fifth birthday]
  • Quotes from this month’s WHO/UNICEF report
  • This picture was taken recently in Uganda. It is the drug store room of a rural clinic. As you can see it lacks all the very basic medicines. A recent study by WHO and Health Action Internatoional indicated that rural clinics in sub-Saharan Africa operated on a 38% availability of the most basic drugs. What that means in practical terms is that if you walk to your local clinic - a walk that might talk many hours - the odds are that it will NOT have the drugs you need to help you.
  • More to the private sector though and you see a radically different picture. Availability of consumer products might not be 100% but it approaches that and will be significant higher in most areas that the availability of medicines in the local clinic. So why the contrast? How does Coca-Cola get to the most remote shops and kiosks while we struggle to get basic medicines to remote, rural clinics?
  • The answer is that we don’t really know. We know the Coca-Cola leaves the bottling plant on big lorries. But these lorries only go so far and after that a whole network of entrepreneurs get it to the really remote areas.
  • People like this. On bicycles, buses, motor bikes, horses and mules. It is the ‘pull of the brand’ that gets the Coca-Cola to the most remote places in the world and there is money to be made it getting it there by everyone involved.
  • One thing we do know though is that wherever a crate of Coca-Cola goes, this unused space between the bottles goes too. What a waste! ColaLife wants to use this space to get simple medicines, and other social products, to the same places that Coca-Cola gets. That is, most places.
  • To do this we’ve come up with a wedge-shaped container, like this, which clips between the necks of Coca-Cola bottles in crates. The working name for this container is the ‘AidPod’.
  • The AidPod makes use of unused space in crated bottles.
  • So where have we got to? Well it’s taken us a while given that I first had the ideas behind ColaLife when I work in Zambia back in the 1980s. However, in those days, it was very difficult to share ideas. There was no postal service and we had no telephone or fax. All we had was a telex machine - hardly a mass communication device! In April 2008 I decided to have another go at covening people around the idea and started up a Facebook group and I started participating in discussion forums online including those on the BBC’s website. The BBC took up the idea and got Coca-Cola’s attention. In April 2009 the following interview was broadcast on Radio 4. This is an extract of the broadcast interview in which you will hear the voices of Chris Vallance of the BBC and Euan Wilmshurst of Coca-Cola. In June this year my partner Jane and I decided to dedicate ourselves full-time to move ColaLife from a campaign to an implementation phase. In September two ColaLife supporters and I cycled across France to raise money for a field trip to Zambia. After initiating discussions with the relevant stakeholders in Zambia, we visited Zambia last month to meet with stakeholders and start discussion on the co-design of a pilot of the ColaLife concept.
  • We met 45 people while in Zambia from 15 different organisations in the public, private and NGO sectors and in week 2 of our visit we pulled key players together to consider what a trial might look like. This is what we came up with.
  • We plan to run a pilot of the ColaLife concept in Zambia in 2011 and we have already visited the country to talk to the key stakeholders there. We met with 45 people and 15 organisations and together came up with the following business model. It was agreed that a pilot should focus on getting WHO-recommended diarrhoea treatment kits to new mothers and that we should do this through the ecxisting private sector network. The same network that gets Coca-Cola to the most remote areas of Zambia. It was agreed that we would embed private sector motivations into the distribution of these mother kits. The same motivators that get commodities such as cooking oil, salt, washing powder, talk-time and Coca-Cola to remote areas in Zambia. The Mother’s Kits, or AidPods, would be inserted into Coca-Cola crates at Wholesaler level in the distribution chain thereby increasing the profitability contained within a crate - profit will be made from the Coca-Cola AND the Mother’s Kits. The retail price of the kits will be based on mothers’ ability to pay. Based on this, and the margins that need to be made by the distributors, wholesalers and retailers, the level of subsidy will be determined and injected at the start of the distribution chain. Crucial to success will be a social marketing campaign aimed at turning ‘need’ into ‘demand’ for diarrhoea treatment kits by mothers. This will consist of awareness raising activities by Community Health Workers; communication and education campaigns using radio, community drama, posters and leaflets. Key to this design is that the only new element is the AidPod in the crate. All the other elements already exist in one form or other in other recent activities - it is just a question of putting the elements together in a different way and helping an unlikely alliance of partners work successfully together.
  • So lets spend a few minutes looking at the AidPod MOTHER’s Kit and the AidPod TRAVELLER’s Kit would contain Explain . . .
  • This is how the AidPod would be used: 1 The contents of the Mother’s Kit would be removed 2 It would be filled with the cleanest water available 3 The AidPod would be resealed and placed in a sunny spot 4 For six hours 5 The ORS sachet would be emptied into the AidPod - note that the size of the sachet would match the volume of water in the AidPod 6 The young child would be given the ORS solution
  • ColaLife is based on 3 facts: FACT 1 : You can buy a Coca-Cola virtually anywhere you go even in the most remote areas of developing countries
  • ColaLife is based on 3 facts: FACT 1 : You can buy a Coca-Cola virtually anywhere you go even in the most remote areas of developing countries
  • So where have we got to? Well it’s taken us a while given that I first had the ideas behind ColaLife when I work in Zambia back in the 1980s. However, in those days, it was very difficult to share ideas. There was no postal service and we had no telephone or fax. All we had was a telex machine - hardly a mass communication device! In April 2008 I decided to have another go at covening people around the idea and started up a Facebook group and I started participating in discussion forums online including those on the BBC’s website. The BBC took up the idea and got Coca-Cola’s attention. In April 2009 the following interview was broadcast on Radio 4. This is an extract of the broadcast interview in which you will hear the voices of Chris Vallance of the BBC and Euan Wilmshurst of Coca-Cola. In June this year my partner Jane and I decided to dedicate ourselves full-time to move ColaLife from a campaign to an implementation phase. In September two ColaLife supporters and I cycled across France to raise money for a field trip to Zambia. After initiating discussions with the relevant stakeholders in Zambia, we visited Zambia last month to meet with stakeholders and start discussion on the co-design of a pilot of the ColaLife concept.
  • So where have we got to? Well it’s taken us a while given that I first had the ideas behind ColaLife when I work in Zambia back in the 1980s. However, in those days, it was very difficult to share ideas. There was no postal service and we had no telephone or fax. All we had was a telex machine - hardly a mass communication device! In April 2008 I decided to have another go at covening people around the idea and started up a Facebook group and I started participating in discussion forums online including those on the BBC’s website. The BBC took up the idea and got Coca-Cola’s attention. In April 2009 the following interview was broadcast on Radio 4. This is an extract of the broadcast interview in which you will hear the voices of Chris Vallance of the BBC and Euan Wilmshurst of Coca-Cola. In June this year my partner Jane and I decided to dedicate ourselves full-time to move ColaLife from a campaign to an implementation phase. In September two ColaLife supporters and I cycled across France to raise money for a field trip to Zambia. After initiating discussions with the relevant stakeholders in Zambia, we visited Zambia last month to meet with stakeholders and start discussion on the co-design of a pilot of the ColaLife concept.
  • To be continued – watch this space
  • Unicef Zambia Briefing December 2010

    1. 1. Simon Berry [email_address] December 2010 cola life An introduction for UNICEF Zambia
    2. 2. Fact 1: You can buy a Coca-Cola virtually anywhere in the World. Even in developing countries.
    3. 3. Fact 2: 1 in 7 children in developing countries die before their 5th birthday.
    4. 4. There have only been small incremental improvements in the last 25 years Fact 3:
    5. 5. Diarrhea-Related Dehydration Still a Top-Killer of Children in Developing World Over 1 million children still dying from diarrhea-related death each year More children die from diarrhea related illness than Malaria, HIV/AIDS and Measles combined
    6. 6. Why the Emphasis on ORS? MDG # 4 - Time is Running Out! Millenium Development Goal #4: Reduce by two-thirds, between 1990 and 2015, the mortality rate of children under 5 Mortality dropped 1.8% per year (1990-2008) Mortality must decrease 10.5% per year 2008-2015 to reach goal SOURCE: “We Can End Poverty,” MDG Summit, 20-22 September 2010 1990 2008 2015 innovation needed incremental improvement
    7. 7. ” “ Strengthened distribution systems and new delivery strategies Diarrhoea treatment kits for all new mothers New communication strategies Market-based solutions are often the most effective way to deliver key diarrhoea control commodities UNICEF call to action - October 2009
    8. 8. Clinics in sub-Saharan Africa work on an availability of basic medicines 38%
    9. 9. Availability of consumable items is much higher than 38% So how does Coca-Cola etc get here?
    10. 10. Coca-Cola leaves the bottling factory in lorries but it is not these lorries that gets to remote rural communities…
    11. 11. Where the lorry leaves off an army of entrepreneurs takes over and gets to remote rural communities…
    12. 12. Wherever the crates and bottles go, this space goes too
    13. 13. Introducing the AidPod
    14. 14. The AidPod makes use of the unused space…
    15. 15. Key milestones <ul><li>~1988 The idea was born in NE Zambia </li></ul><ul><li>2008 Idea published online </li></ul><ul><li>2008-2010 Featured on BBC Radio 4 times </li></ul><ul><li>2008 Coca-Cola engaged </li></ul><ul><li>2010 >15,000 supporters online </li></ul><ul><li>2010 25+ global experts engaged </li></ul><ul><li>2010 200+ volunteers from 21 countries </li></ul><ul><li>It’s a very mature idea - no one has said it’s not worth piloting </li></ul><ul><li>Oct 2008 Field trip to Zambia - SABMiller engagement </li></ul>
    16. 16. Pilot design - Lusaka Workshop - Oct 2010
    17. 17. <ul><li>Delivery through the private sector </li></ul>Social marketing <ul><li>Niche application - AidPods are mother’s kits </li></ul><ul><li>Margins are made at every step </li></ul><ul><li>Subsidy determined by ability/willingness to pay </li></ul><ul><li>Social marketing/sensitisation </li></ul><ul><li>crucial to turn ‘need’ into ‘demand’ </li></ul><ul><li>The AidPod is the only thing that </li></ul><ul><li>is new - all other elements of the </li></ul><ul><li>model have tried and tested </li></ul><ul><li>elsewhere </li></ul><ul><li>Subsidy injected at distributor level </li></ul>Pilot features : <ul><li>AidPods introduced into crates at the Wholesaler </li></ul>Use vouchers initially to pump-prime demand pull? Distributor Wholesaler Assess ability to pay Inject subsidy here
    18. 18. <ul><li>AidPod Mother’s Kit for the pilot </li></ul><ul><li>ORS </li></ul><ul><li>Zinc </li></ul><ul><li>SODIS Bag </li></ul><ul><li>Soap </li></ul><ul><li>Educational materials </li></ul>
    19. 19. In the longer term the AidPod may be a SODIS device in its own right…
    20. 20. Design of the proposed pilot is underway
    21. 21. Implementation phase The Pilot SODIS research and development Social marketing Packing Distribution Monitoring and evaluation Dissemination Replication planning ColaLife Pilot | Zambia ‘ Willingness To Pay’ study AidPod Mother’s Kit prototyping Set-up phase Design and test EIC materials Baseline study Governance & project management
    22. 22. ColaLife Pilot | Zambia ‘ Willingness To Pay’ study Assess what mothers/carers would consider to be attractive in an AidPod Mother’s Kit Set-up phase Confirm the margins that would be expected in the distribution chain Confirm the transport premium to remote rural communities Assess the financing/credit requirements of wholesalers/retailers (if any) If required: Look at options for the management of a voucher system Assess the willingness and ability of mothers/carers to pay Assess the need for vouchers to pump-prime the ‘pull’ of AidPods into communities (if any) Determine the level of subsidy required
    23. 23. ColaLife Pilot | Zambia AidPod Mother’s Kit prototyping Draw up a specification for the AidPod to be used in the pilot Set-up phase Carry out field tests Modify as required Assess options for manufacture Manufacture Produce ‘fit for purpose’ AidPods in the quantities required for pilot
    24. 24. ColaLife Pilot | Zambia Design and test EIC materials Develop prototype EIC materials Set-up phase Test with sample communities within the pilot area(s) Refine as required Produce the EIC materials in the formats and quantities required for the pilot
    25. 25. ColaLife Pilot | Zambia Baseline study Collect baseline data in control and pilot districts Set-up phase Design data collection methods in control and pilot districts for implementation phase Baseline report plus methodology for the collection of baseline/control data during pilot
    26. 26. ColaLife Pilot | Zambia Parallel study If possible, draw up specification and research manufacturing options Assess other options for the promotion and uptake of SODIS in remote rural areas A report on the SODIS options for the post-pilot roll-out phases SODIS research and development Assess the feasibility of producing a SODIS enabled AidPod for post pilot roll-out phases If not possible, look at other options including refining the SODIS bag
    27. 27. We met 45 people from 15 organisations during our October 2010 visit. We now need to agree the partnership for the pilot. We given some initial thought to this…
    28. 28. Draft partnership grid. Not yet circulated widely…
    29. 29. Our ethos and approach <ul><li>ColaLife is a facilitator organisation </li></ul><ul><li>We bring a mature innovative idea and 2.5 years of relationship development to this project </li></ul><ul><li>We do not want to grow ColaLife to take on the roles required to implement the pilot </li></ul><ul><li>Instead, ColaLife wants to resource existing organisations in Zambia to increase their capacity to undertake the different roles </li></ul><ul><li>ColaLife is leading on the development of the pilot plan </li></ul><ul><li>ColaLife will lead on fundraising for the pilot </li></ul><ul><li>ColaLife wishes to have a role in the overall project management of the pilot </li></ul>
    30. 30. Next steps <ul><li>Finalise the partnership and roles </li></ul><ul><li>Finalise plan structure </li></ul><ul><li>Tweak logical framework </li></ul><ul><li>Write plan </li></ul><ul><li>Seek funding </li></ul><ul><li>Implement pilot </li></ul><ul><li>Publish results/issues as we go so others can learn </li></ul><ul><li>Final evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Publish evaluation </li></ul>
    31. 31. Any questions? <ul><li>Contact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Simon Berry | simon@colalife.org | ++44 7932 107109 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Website: www.colalife.org </li></ul><ul><li>Blog: www.colalife.org/blog </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook page: www.facebook.com/colalife </li></ul>
    32. 32. to be continued . . . . Text PLEASE join us on Facebook *AND* invite your friends

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