Paula Vandergert - Raising awareness in sustainable renovation - UK experiences

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This PowerPoint presentation was used by paula Vandergert, fellow researcher at the East London University, during a conference given in Brussels. The conference's theme was Public awareness in …

This PowerPoint presentation was used by paula Vandergert, fellow researcher at the East London University, during a conference given in Brussels. The conference's theme was Public awareness in sustainable renovation, and was organized by the Ecobuild Cluster and the Greenov European project during the European Sustainable Energy Week on the25th of June, 2013..

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  • Sustainability research fellow in the Sustainability Research Institute at the University of East LondonParticular focus on community; built environment; sustainable supply chainPrevious experience:Senior sustainable design advisor at CABE – the government advisor for architecture, urban design and public space, where I managed the development and delivery of their sustainable cities programme, working with eight English Core Cities.Ecohomes and Code for Sustainable Homes assessment trainedSpaceShaper facilitatorDirector of Resilient Communities – SIA, community shops, older people; working with IIED, Plunkett Foundation, Durham UniversityAdvisor to adaptation, mitigation and sustainable energy research programmes funded by UK research councils
  • 28 partners in 10 countries. Universities, local and regional governments and businesses.
  • Aim of the particular work package I’m involved with is bringing together sustainable and local economic development objectives...Sustainable refurbishment provides an ideal sector for opportunities to develop provide social value whilst delivering sustainable neighbourhood improvements. Will be explored further with local authority and community groups going forwards.
  • This chart shows the scale of the challenge posed by the domestic sector in the UK. Other is made up of agriculture, public admin and commerce
  • A combination of fabric and behaviour change required to increase energy efficiency, decrease energy use. Fabric is a large part. Given increasing efficiency of gas boilers, these are being replaced naturally by more efficient ones. Lighting and appliances are also becoming more energy efficient so natural replacement is helping. However, increasing numbers of electronic gadgets counters gains made. Space heating though will largely be brought down by fabric measures.
  • Again largest use is associated with domestic use – so indicates that strategic sustainable transport planning as well has individual behaviour change is required to make significant decreases to energy levels. Excludes minimal electric vehicle, biofuels.
  • Being able to visit actual refurbishment properties and read detailed case studies is a very valuable way of spreading the message. British people love to visit real homes and have a look round. Not only single dwellings are important but also examples of what actual communities are doing and have achieved is educational and interesting for people. Here are some examples. Gathering good practice
  • SuperHomes are older properties renovated by their owners to reduce carbon emissions by at least 60%. These include Georgian, Victorian, Edwardian and more modern properties. All have been transformed in terms of their energy efficiency,  so they are warm, comfortable and have enviably low energy bills.
  • Transition Streets is a network of local community behaviour change projects, which started in Totnes, home of Transition Towns network. Research has been done on effectiveness of communication methods, with articles in the local papers and word of mouth by friends and family being influential on awareness and behaviour change.
  • Low Energy Buildings Database provides data on demonstration refurbishment projects throughout the country, including those supported by the government’s Technology Strategy Board Retrofit for the Future programme. Again, these kinds of online information banks are important for the public and professionals, to understand the process and also performance. In this example, we have the previous, forecast and measured CO2 and energy figures for a refurbished 100+ year old town house to passivhaus standards.
  • The award winning Kirklees Warm Zone scheme ran between 2007 and 2010 and was one of the largest scale home energy improvement programmes in the UK. The Warm Zone adopted an area based approach which is now recognised by The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), The Local Government Association (LGA) and energy companies as a cost effective efficient means of delivering significant home improvements, green skills, job creation and reductions in fuel poverty.On a house by house, ward by ward basis, Warm Zone contacted every householder to give them the opportunity to make their home warmer and more comfortable and more energy efficient.Key outputs from the scheme included:165,686 households visited.133,746 energy assessments carried out.111,394 homes referred to the insulation contractor for a technical survey.42,999 properties have had loft insulation installed and 21,473 have had cavity wall installed and in total 51,155 households had measures installed.26,453 fire safety referrals were made and 129,986 carbon monoxide detectors were distributed.16,111 households were referred to benefit and debt advice teams with estimated annual benefit gains of £1,648,115.  Confirmed benefit gains where resident was re-contactable and they had made the benefit claim totalled £732,669.
  • Efforts made to keep customers happy and capture customer satisfaction Partnership approaches to marketing of the scheme, and consistent branding of the local Warm Zone programme The universal and unique service offer to local residents The scheme’s impact on the national reputation of organisations involved in its delivery.
  • One of the challenges identified was in identifying reasons for non-take-up.the need to better understand non-take-up of the scheme (e.g. the demographic profile, household types, motivations, characteristics and socio-economic profile of those that did not take-up the scheme, which some partners speculated may include already vulnerable and socially excluded residents).
  • Typical interventions recommended are:Wall and roof insulationImproving heating controlsNew energy efficient boilerDraft proofingDouble glazingRenewable energy
  • When participants were shown examples of the packages of measures which could be delivered through the Green Deal and the financing of these (see Figure 2) almost all felt the scheme only offered limited annual cost savings on their energy bills. For instance, participants highlighted the £5 annual overall saving for external solid wall insulation as little incentive to invest their time and effort in engaging with the process. This was particularly the case for those in older properties who had to trade off the likely disruption from solid wall insulation against any benefits in terms of thermal comfort and lower bills. Although initially participants found the lack of upfront cost offered by the Green Deal appealing, this was outweighed by their perception that the annual cost savings were too low to make the likely disruption and effort of navigating the scheme worthwhile.
  • Incorporporating energy efficiency measures combined with other key decisions and interventions regarding a property are likely to be most effective
  • Consumer confidence in any scheme will be absolutely critical to uptake. A consumer focus survey shows that confidence in the people giving advice and installing measures has to be in place
  • As well as market research, academic researchers are starting to build a picture of the effectiveness of interventions and community attitudes and decision-making behaviour. Two research projects funded by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council under the Adaptation and Resilience in a Changing Climate Programme have highlighted the need to understand the interactions between climate mitigation and adaptation measures and the effectiveness and likelihood of their uptake.
  • Retrofit advice toolMid (1st) Floor FlatThis tool is a useful guide to effectiveness of measures for overheating taking into account energy efficiency. It’s important to note the differences based on occupancy. In both cases certain wall insulation measures (such as those promoted by the Green Deal) can exacerbate overheating.The results are based on modelling the effects of adaptations when applied to base case (unadapted) dwellings during the August 2003 heat wave, where London temperatures exceeded 37°C and over 2,000 people died from heat related health problems.
  • Residents’ likelihood to implement mitigation measures
  • Residents’ likelihood to implement ‘summer’ adaptation measures
  • Residents’ likelihood to implement ‘winter’ adaptation measures
  • Demonstrating to homeowners that investing in sustainable refurbishment measures will increase the value of their property – in the same way that other home improvements do – will be a clear incentive to undertake these measures and overcome one of the major perceived barriers.
  • Another positive benefit at the local level is in opportunities to deliver social value by increased job opportunities, supply chain and upskilling opportunities for local businesses. Some of these are being promoted alongside campaigns to engage homeowners in sustainable refurbishment. They often involve the third sector.
  • Severn Wye energy agency are an independent charity and not-for-profit company which aims to promote sustainable energy and affordable warmth through partnership, awareness-raising, innovation and strategic action.We use our practical expertise to help individuals, groups, businesses and other organisations become more energy efficient and sustainable, and to help people out of fuel poverty. We do this by working from the strategic level through to practical action on the ground, developing projects and solutions, offering impartial advice and technical support, and providing training and education for people of all ages and backgrounds.
  • BFG is the awarding body for the Birmingham Energy Savers (BES) contract worth up to £35m. The contract is currently for the provision of PV (Photovoltaic solar panels) supplies and installations. West Midlands reach – by bringing public sector procurers together achieve economies. Increasing social value in a cost-neutral way. Really important for local authorities in these budget-constrained times. Also stimulates innovation.
  • This is a new initiative seeking to support SME green innovation and job creation. This kind of initiative can help with capturing social value and can link to sustainable refurbishment schemes.

Transcript

  • 1. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY Raising public awareness in sustainable renovation – UK experiences Dr Paula Vandergert Sustainability Research Institute University of East London
  • 2. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY - TURAS TURAS brings urban communities and businesses together with local authorities and researchers to collaborate on developing practical new solutions for more sustainable and resilient European cities. Issues addressed include climate change adaptation and mitigation, natural resource shortage, urban sprawl, green infrastructure, short-circuit economies and community participation in areas such as temporary usage of derelict sites and buildings.
  • 3. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY DIAGNOSTIC TOOL Creative industries Green business models Urban agriculture PSS Eco- design Clean Tech SustainableLocal Ec Env Soc Other sustainable businesses Urban communities identify need Sustainable solutions identified that bring local social, environmental and economic value SHORT CIRCUIT ECONOMIES
  • 4. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY SUSTAINABLE REFURBISHMENT – STIMULATING DEMAND AND SUPPLY STRATEGIC APPROACH DELIVERY ON THE GROUND DEMAND SUPPLY CHAIN GOOD PRACTICE EXAMPLES
  • 5. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY KEY FACTS ABOUT UK ENERGY AND HOMES First country to introduce a legal carbon reduction target – 80% reduction by 2050 (on 1990 levels)  26 million homes in the UK 80% of housing stock is in private ownership, 70% are owner- occupiers  Only 20% of housing stock was built after 1976, 20% before 1919  Very slow replacement rate – aiming to build 100,000 new homes a year  This means that by 2050 at least 70% of homes will be those that are already built now Main fuel type used in homes is natural gas Increasing numbers of families are falling into fuel poverty (at least 10% of net income is spent on domestic energy)  Pre-1976 homes in particular leak energy  A large percentage of homes are hard to treat – no cavity wall, leak heat through roofs, walls, windows, planning restrictions etc
  • 6. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY SECTOR IN THE UK 2011 industry 20% transport 40% domestic 28% other 12%
  • 7. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY DOMESTIC ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY USE 2011 space heating 60%water 18% cooking 3% lighting and appliances 19%
  • 8. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY TRANSPORT ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY USE 2011 rail 2% road - passenger 47% road - freight 24% air 24% water 3%
  • 9. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY KEY THEMES Whole life / whole house Financial incentives to encourage private tenures to act Work at spatial scale that will deliver most effective change Sustainability beyond energy and carbon Design principles to embed from start Behaviour change needs to be understood Measurement and post occupancy evaluation is key to demonstration projects Case studies provide learning and spread interest Adaptation as well as mitigation Skills required and opportunities for local development Social justice – tackle poor quality housing and fuel poverty
  • 10. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY ENGAGING LOCAL COMMUNITIES AND HOUSEHOLDS Superhomes network - physical fabric Transition Streets – public engagement and behaviour change Low Energy Buildings database / TSB Retrofit for the Future Kirklees Warm Zone scheme The importance of networks and case studies
  • 11. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY ENGAGING LOCAL COMMUNITIES AND HOUSEHOLDS
  • 12. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY ENGAGING LOCAL COMMUNITIES AND HOUSEHOLDS
  • 13. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY
  • 14. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY
  • 15. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY
  • 16. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY
  • 17. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY 1. Get an assessment of your property to see what improvements you can make and how much you could save on your energy bills. 2. Choose a Green Deal provider to carry out the work. You discuss with them what work you want done and whether the Green Deal is right for you. 3. If you go ahead with the improvements you must sign your Green Deal Plan - this is a contract between you and the provider stating what work will be done and how much it will cost. The provider will then arrange for a Green Deal installer to do the work. 4. Once the work is done, you’ll pay off the money in instalments through your electricity bill. GREEN DEAL
  • 18. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY „GREEN DEAL „GOLDEN RULE‟ . You‟ll pay the money back through your electricity bill. Amount you pay back should equal the amount you save through reduced energy use over 25 years. Loan plus interest (7%). Debt stays with the property.
  • 19. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH INTO MOTIVATIONS What are the triggers to engage people in sustainable refurbishment? What are the reasons for not wanting to do it? We’re starting to build a picture based on consumer research carried out for the government, academic research and project evaluations.
  • 20. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY GREEN DEAL – PUBLIC APPETITE MARKET RESEARCH “My major concern is value for money. ..the people who use this scheme will pay a far greater price than householders who have the means to pay the upfront cost.” Homeowner, no dependents, low income, detached/ semi-detached 1919-1980 property, Bridgend “My God that‟s a lot of work for such a little saving.” Homeowner, pre-family, low income, detached/semi- detached post-1980 property, Morpeth Source: Consumer Needs and Wants for the Green Deal, Ipsos Mori, 2011 for DECC
  • 21. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY GREEN DEAL – PUBLIC APPETITE MARKET RESEARCH Source: Consumer Needs and Wants for the Green Deal, Ipsos Mori, 2011 for DECC Participants mentioned the following events as key moments at which they would be most interested in the Green Deal: o the point of purchase of a new property, particularly a long-term investment; o a major renovation or refurbishment of a property; o the replacement of a boiler or heating system; or o the period moving towards retirement and a fixed income.
  • 22. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH INTO MOTIVATIONS Source: Green deal or no deal Building customer confidence in energy efficiency services, Liz Lainé for Consumer Focus, 2011
  • 23. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY COMMUNITY RESILIENCE TO EXTREME WEATHER (CREW) Community Resilience to Extreme Weather (CREW) was an Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)- funded research project undertaken by a consortium of 14 universities. It’s aim was to develop a set of tools for improving the capacity for resilience of local communities to the impacts of current and future extreme weather events. A retrofit web tool was developed by researchers at De Montfort University that offers guidance when choosing retrofit adaptations to reduce dwelling overheating during heat wave periods, whilst also considering the effect on annual heating energy use and cost.
  • 24. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY COMMUNITY RESILIENCE TO EXTREME WEATHER (CREW) Source: Adapting Dwellings to Climate Change retrofit advice tool. Porritt et al, 2011. Web-based tool available at http://www.iesd.dmu.ac.uk/crew
  • 25. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY SUBURBAN NEIGHBOURHOOD ADAPTATION FOR A CHANGING CLIMATE (SNACC) Led by University of the West of England, Oxford Brookes University and Heriot Watt University Researched effective adaptation measures in 6 suburban neighbourhoods in 3 cities in England Aim was to identify successful climate adaptation and mitigation measures: those that perform well technically (i.e. they protect people and property from climate change impacts and mitigate against further climate change) and those that are the most practical and acceptable for people to implement
  • 26. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY SUBURBAN NEIGHBOURHOOD ADAPTATION FOR A CHANGING CLIMATE (SNACC) Source: Williams et al, 2012. Suburban Neighbourhood Adaptation for a Changing Climate (SNACC) Final Report, University of the West of England, Oxford Brookes University and Heriot-Watt University
  • 27. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY Source: Williams et al, 2012. Suburban Neighbourhood Adaptation for a Changing Climate (SNACC) Final Report, University of the West of England, Oxford Brookes University and Heriot-Watt University
  • 28. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY Source: Williams et al, 2012. Suburban Neighbourhood Adaptation for a Changing Climate (SNACC) Final Report, University of the West of England, Oxford Brookes University and Heriot-Watt University
  • 29. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY SUBURBAN NEIGHBOURHOOD ADAPTATION FOR A CHANGING CLIMATE (SNACC) Reasons for being likely to choose an adaptation measure • Inexpensive • Convenient to install (i.e. DIY) • Looks attractive • Lifestyle benefits (enjoyable, reduces noise) • Provides energy cost-savings • Environmentally friendly (reduces carbon emissions) • Improves current climate comfort • Is more efficient • Potential for financial support (grants and subsidies) • Could be done easily with other home renovations Reasons for being less likely to choose an adaptation measure • Too expensive as initial cost • Major building works required • Bulky and unattractive • Potential damage to property from measure • Loss of house space • Inappropriate housing orientation for measure • Lack of space or sunlight required for measure • Simpler behavioural alternative • Requiring external approval Source: Williams et al, 2012. Suburban Neighbourhood Adaptation for a Changing Climate (SNACC) Final Report, University of the West of England, Oxford Brookes University and Heriot-Watt University
  • 30. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY REALITY OF MOTIVATING PUBLIC oBuilt around 1910 oSolid wall brick oSingle glazing oLeasehold flats
  • 31. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY DEMONSTRATING BENEFITS A new report for DECC indicates that making energy saving improvements to a property could increase its value by 14 per cent on average - and up to 38 per cent in some parts of England. Source: Final Project Report An investigation of the effect of EPC ratings on house prices, Fuerst et al, 2013
  • 32. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY SUPPORTING LOCAL DELIVERY Examples Severn Wye Energy Agency – charity BuyforGood – social enterprise GreenBridge – funding for business development
  • 33. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY
  • 34. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY
  • 35. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY Buy For Good (BFG) awards contracts that have a positive impact on the local economy by: • Creating jobs and training opportunities in target communities, • Reducing Co2 and the effects of climate change, • Minimising environmental impacts • Supporting the Third Sector • Stimulating Innovation • Creating funding streams that are re-invested locally The advantage of using BFG to purchasing authorities is: • Pooled purchasing, leading to better terms with suppliers • Provision of expert purchasing resource, relieving pressure on internal resources • Creating jobs in the locality of the works or supplies • Creating training activity in the locality of the works or supplies • Supporting the third sector • A complimentary suite of contracts with reduced contract management effort
  • 36. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY
  • 37. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN PRINCIPLES Long life loose fit low energy Insulation Air-tightness Ventilation Whole life costs Whole house evaluation User focused Reduce energy demand Fabric first, then kit
  • 38. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY ENERGY EFFICIENCY …PLUS Important to understand broader impact and opportunities of energy saving measures:  Opportunities to deliver multiple benefits to residents and local areas – more likely to engage  Beware unintended consequences  Importance of whole house / neighbourhood scale interventions  Trusted delivery and engagement – intensive but can provide social and economic value as well as environmental benefit
  • 39. TRANSITIONING TOWARDS URBAN RESILIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY THANK YOU www.turas-cities.eu Dr Paula Vandergert Sustainability Research Fellow p.vandergert@uel.ac.uk