CEGEP JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE  MISSION AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
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ABOUT JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE ...

ABOUT JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE
Named after Sir John Abbott, Canada's third prime minister, the College primarily serves Montreal's
West Island community, although you can also meet students here from other parts of Quebec and
Canada. Located in historic Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, on the western tip of the Island of Montreal, John
Abbott’s distinctive red brick buildings and magnificent campus were originally deeded to McGill
University in 1906 by wealthy industrialist Sir William Macdonald.
Established in 1971, John Abbott offers five pre-university and eleven career programs, including
Quebec’s only English-language CEGEP training in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care, Dental Hygiene,
Information and Library Technologies, Engineering Technologies, Police Technology, and Youth and
Adult Correctional Intervention. Over 5000 students are enrolled in the Day Division and another 2000
in Continuing Education. Only a half hour drive from downtown Montreal, the College is easily
accessible by city bus or commuter train

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CEGEP JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE MISSION AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE Document Transcript

  • 1. 1 ABOUT JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE Named after Sir John Abbott, Canada's third prime minister, the College primarily serves Montreal's West Island community, although you can also meet students here from other parts of Quebec and Canada. Located in historic Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, on the western tip of the Island of Montreal, John Abbott’s distinctive red brick buildings and magnificent campus were originally deeded to McGill University in 1906 by wealthy industrialist Sir William Macdonald. Established in 1971, John Abbott offers five pre-university and eleven career programs, including Quebec’s only English-language CEGEP training in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care, Dental Hygiene, Information and Library Technologies, Engineering Technologies, Police Technology, and Youth and Adult Correctional Intervention. Over 5000 students are enrolled in the Day Division and another 2000 in Continuing Education. Only a half hour drive from downtown Montreal, the College is easily accessible by city bus or commuter train. CEGEP JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE MISSION AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE WE ARE COMMITTED TO: Learning • Foster in our students the ability to make and articulate informed intellectual, aesthetic and ethical decisions, while demonstrating skills needed for success in modern society. • Cultivate a love of learning, autonomy and responsible citizenship in our students, both in the classroom and through socio-cultural, leadership, recreational and sports activities. • Respect and learn from diverse world views and international perspectives, as reflected in our programs, our approach and our community. Quality • Provide well-rounded and balanced pre-university and career programs that meet high standards of quality and ethical consciousness, and respond to the requirements of universities, employers and society. • Value excellence in teaching and learning as dynamic and interactive processes. • Promote lifelong learning and continuous improvement in the College community, with a commitment to innovative pedagogy, effective administration and quality support services. • Deliver leading-edge training, tailored to the needs of business, industry and other sectors, through our continuing education services and specialized programs. Students • Cultivate a safe, caring and challenging learning environment that bolsters self-esteem and promotes a sense of belonging and purpose, mutual respect, and healthy lifestyles, leading students to attain academic, professional and personal success. • Ensure governance that reflects the active engagement of students, staff and faculty, and places student learning at the centre of our decisions and actions. • Establish effective partnerships with academic, professional and social communities, to maximize our students’ success and continued growth.
  • 2. 2 Publication: Communications and Admissions Office Production: John Abbott College Press Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Québec Dépôt Légal: Bibliothèque nationale du Québec National Library of Canada May 2009 ISSN: 1710-3622
  • 3. 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Certificates of Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 8 Programs Offered and Entrance Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 10 Preparatory Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Pre-University Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Career Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 General Education Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Complementary Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Fees and Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Library and Audiovisual Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Bursaries and Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167 Centre for Continuing Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Institutional Policy On The Evaluation of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Student Achievement (IPESA) General Policies and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Department Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 ABOUT THIS COURSE CALENDAR This Calendar provides general information on admission policies, programs and courses as well as on student services and activities. But, it is only an introduction. To learn more about John Abbott College’s many academic programs, prospective students and their parents are invited to call the College, talk to faculty and attend events such as our open houses which are held every February and October. Individual and school tours of John Abbott College are available and may be arranged through the Admissions Office. Students and parents are also invited to visit John Abbott College’s website at: www.johnabbott.qc.ca and discover the many links to Admissions, Registrar, Student Services and individual departments. For further information about our academic programs and student services, please contact high school guidance counsellors or: John Abbott College’s Admissions Office 514-457-6610, local 5355, 5361 or 5358 Come visit us, e-mail us, ask as many questions as you like and discover how you can get the most from your education at John Abbott College. The College reserves the right to make changes without prior notice to the information contained in this publication, including the alteration of various fees, schedules and the revision or cancellation of particular courses.
  • 4. 4
  • 5. 5 ADMISSIONS GENERAL ADMISSIONS POLICY John Abbott College accepts applicants who meet the minimum admission requirements as defined by the Ministry of Education and who, in the College's opinion, have a reasonable chance of succeeding in the program to which they apply. Permanent Quebec residents receive consideration over non-residents. Fulfillment of the minimum academic requirements does not guarantee acceptance. Program Selection Committees are responsible for admissions decisions and reserve the right to defer or refuse admission to any applicant whose qualifications are inappropriate to the demands of the program. A personal interview, audition, and/or portfolio may be required for admission to specific programs. The qualifications of applicants educated outside Quebec will be assessed on an individual basis by the appropriate selection committee. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Quebec High School Students To be admissible in a program leading to a Diploma of College Studies, applicants must have: a Secondary School Diploma which includes the following subjects: (1) Secondary V Language of Instruction; (2) Secondary V Second Language; (3) Secondary IV Mathematics; (4) Secondary IV Physical Science; and (5) Secondary IV History of Québec and Canada OORR A Secondary School Vocational Diploma which includes the following subjects: (1) Secondary V Language of Instruction; (2) Secondary V Second Language; and (3) Secondary IV Mathematics. Out-of-Province Applicants Applicants with Canadian secondary school certificates other than the Quebec Secondary V Diploma are required to have completed an equivalent high school diploma from their province. Non-Québec residents are subject to out of province fees of $990.00 per semester (fees subject to change). Advanced Standing Students who have accumulated credits from other post-secondary institutions – i.e., CEGEPs, community colleges or universities – may request that these credits be transferred to their program of study at John Abbott. All requests must be made through Academic Advising in the Student Services Department. Mature Students Applicants who obtained their high school diploma more than five years ago and have not attended any post-secondary institution, should contact the Admissions Office prior to applying. International Applicants Please contact the International Programs Office should you have any questions about the SRAM online application process. ee--mmaaiill: international@johnabbott.qc.ca or pphhoonnee: local 5469 The College will consider applicants who have attended school systems outside Canada if their certificates are equivalent to the Quebec Secondary V Diploma. Specific program prerequisites and all other requirements particular to John Abbott College must be met. Applicants whose language of instruction is not English must submit the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with their application. Information about TOEFL may be obtained at Consulates, Cultural Affairs Offices or, by visiting their website at: www.ets.org. All international students must submit their online application at: sram-international.omnivox.ca . Applications sent directly to the College will not be processed. You may contact the International Programs Office should you encounter difficulties with the online submission via SRAM. If your test TOEFL results are not available at the time of the SRAM application, please inform the International Programs Office accordingly. ADMISSIONS
  • 6. 6 International applicants may apply for the fall and winter semester. Note: Winter admissions are not always possible due to time restrictions. Those requesting admission from outside the country must submit a French or English translation of their academic grades for the last two years of study and diplomas obtained (legible copies certified by the school). Equivalences will be processed through SRAM. International students must pay a non- refundable application fee of $75.00. All international applicants are advised of admission decisions by mail. Once notified of acceptance into a program, the applicant must confirm his/her decision by returning the confirmation form along with a confirmation fee payable to John Abbott College. The student is responsible for following immigration procedures to obtain a Quebec Certificate of Acceptance (CAQ - issued by the government of Quebec), a Study Permit (issued by the Government of Canada) and, if applicable, a student visa (issued by the Canadian embassy in the country of residence). The student must show proof of his/her immigration documents upon arrival. These documents must be presented to the Registrar’s office. If the student fails to do so, he/she will be prohibited from studying at John Abbott College. Information on procedures to follow may be obtained from the Canadian Embassy, Consulate or the Service d’immigration du Québec. Students should consult the websites below for application procedures for a CAQ and study permit. International students must pay tuition fees in addition to health and accident insurance before they register. Please note that John Abbott College is part of a mandatory group insurance plan for international students. Students must purchase health insurance through John Abbott College. The College does not accept any health insurance bought through other insurance providers. The insurance card will be distributed by the International Programs Office (Herzberg 416) upon arrival at John Abbott College. Please refer to the FEES AND FINANCIAL AID section of the Calendar for specific information on tuition fees and health insurance. Applicants with Foreign Certificates Applicants currently living in Canada who have completed high school leaving certificates in a foreign country must also submit a French or English translation of their academic grades and diplomas obtained (certified copies). SRAM will then proceed to a study of equivalence for which candidates must add an additional $45.00 to the admission fee (total $75.00). IMPORTANT WEB SITES FOR INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS Important information for international students can be found on the following web sites. Students should consult these prior to submitting their application: Government of Quebec: www.immigration-quebec.gouv.qc.ca/en/index.asp click on international students Government of Canada: www.cic.gc.ca/english click on to study APPLICATIONS TO JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE John Abbott College is affiliated with le Service régional d'admission du Montréal métropolitain (SRAM), which processes student applications. Applications to the College must be submitted to SRAM by March 1st for the Fall semester and November 1st for the Winter semester. The application fee of $30.00 payable to SRAM is non-refundable. Applications must be submitted online at http://sram.omnivox.ca. Students can print a copy of the Admissions Guide directly from this site or they may obtain one from the Admissions Office, or high school guidance departments. International students must submit their online application at: http://sram-international.omnivox.ca APPLICATIONS TO THE HONOURS PROGRAMS John Abbott College offers different honours or enriched programs. They are Honours Science, Honours Social Science and Honours Commerce. Admission into these programs requires students to complete a separate applica- tion. Contrary to their application to the College which must be sent to SRAM, applications to the honours pro- grams accompanied by the required documents, must be submitted directly to the College. For further information about the honours programs, or on how to access the application forms, please refer to the Pre-University Programs section of this Calendar or contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5358 or 5361. APPLICATION PROCEDURES
  • 7. 7 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES Over the last fifty years the environment has increasingly become important to all sectors of society. Pollution, species extinctions, climate change, resource depletion, and a host of other environmental problems touch every- one now more than ever. Our basic life-support system is maintained by all the species that make-up the biosphere—from the smallest to the largest. The survival of these species are interconnect- ed and dependent on each other. The actual processes that take place between species and the environment are extremely complex and fragile. If humanity causes the extinction of one species—it inevitably means the extinc- tion of numerous species and the decline of our life-sup- port system for future generations and us. Unfortunately, our current economic models have neg- lected to factor into the equation the tremendous bene- fits nature provides. However, when economists and environmental scientists have tried to estimate in dollars what it would cost us to accomplish the services nature provides the results are staggering. Using multiple data- bases, they estimate that nature provides $33 trillion dol- lars worth of services every year—that's nearly twice the annual Gross National Product or GNP of all the coun- tries in the world combined. For example, forests pre- vent soil erosion, landslides, and flooding; maintain the purity of the air and water; affect local and global rainfall; temper climatic fluctuations; and promote watersheds and biodiversity. Other ecosystems like bogs, wetlands, grasslands, deserts, oceans, coral reefs, tundra-arctic regions, and so on similarly provide unique benefits. Learning to live in harmony with the natural environment and thinking critically about environmental issues requires an interdisciplinary approach. The Environmental Studies Certificate Option is an inter- disciplinary curriculum that seeks to improve the stu- dent’s understanding of key scientific, economic, and political issues that underlie environmental problems and their management. Students can address environmental issues from a variety of perspectives drawn from the natural sci- ences, the social sciences, physical education, the humanities, and the arts. Students in the certificate choose from a variety of courses that best suit their own personal approach to environmental studies. Perhaps the best reason for pursuing an environmental studies certificate is a student's own personal interest in learning more about the environment. In some cases, earning a certificate can also make a graduate more attractive to employers and to gaining entry into university programs. Problems encountered in the "real-world" often require understanding beyond that of a single academic discipline. For this reason, more and more employers seek people with interdisciplinary training. The Environmental Studies Certificate Option exposes students to a broad range of knowledge. It helps put other courses into perspective. The Environmental Studies Certificate is evidence to university departments and employers that the student has acquired not only depth in the major field, but breadth beyond that field—an out- standing combination. Students within any of the college's programs can receive an Environmental Studies Certificate. To achieve the Certificate students must take at least six courses designated as Environmental Studies courses, and complete a "Special Project", involving a self-designated assignment, in one of those courses. A list of eligible courses can be found semester by semester in the Schedule of Courses or on the John Abbott College web- site. Such courses can be taken as the student's General Education requirements, as well as within their program of study. The Certificate will be granted upon graduation. For more information, please contact Doris Miller, Coordinator of Environmental Studies, local 5167, or email: envirostudies@johnabbott.qc.ca CERTIFICATES Certificates can be earned with any regular DEC, without extra courses or workload. They allow students to focus on and explore topics of interest to them within “clusters” of courses. Certificates are the most self-directed learning option a student can register for at John Abbott, and they are accompanied by extra-curricular opportunities as well as academic rewards. CERTIFICATES
  • 8. 8 PEACE STUDIES Peace is multi-layered and multi-faceted. It is non-vio- lence in thought, word and act; it is radical and reac- tionary, personal and political. It is urgent. As we attend to ourselves and personal interactions we reflect global problems. The Peace Studies Certificate brings together college courses which inform students about world issues and their impacts on our personal lives. It works to empower them to take action on their own, to allow them to state clearly, “Peace matters.” We are all involved in the exploitation and distribution of resources and services, and need to be aware of what our choices as consumers and civilians entail. The potential for widespread conflict is great in the interplay of global trade, consumption and aid. War is one of the least sus- tainable activities on earth, yet conflicts of ideology can result in violent confrontations bringing incalculable immediate and long-term human tragedy. Absolutism, the belief in the superiority of one set of ideas over all others, often the refuge of the powerless and sometimes the smokescreen of the powerful, charts a course towards conflict and interference in the autonomy of others. Charters, Conventions, pressure groups, individuals and international institutions attempt to define peace. The UN and the International Court of Justice are key institu- tions. Organizations of civil society struggle to help achieve goals of social and economic justice, human rights, education, health, environmental responsibility and peace, while others work in the opposite direction toward maximum exploitation and consumption. In Canada there is a project to develop a federal Department of Peace, and many initiatives responding to the UN millennium call for a culture of peace through peace education. John Abbott is a pioneer in peace teaching: the Peace Certificate is over 30 years old, the oldest in the country. The Peace Studies Certificate helps individuals to unfold their own courses toward peace and deal with the reper- cussions of others’ violence. Students can learn to identi- fy models which promote peace, and move in that direc- tion. To complete the Certificate, register with the cer- tificate co-ordinator, take at least six Peace Studies courses from the Schedule of Classes course list, and undertake a special project, which is a self-designated assignment in one of those courses. The list of eligible courses can also be found on the JAC website: www.johnabbott.qc.ca/student_zone/departments/ peacestudiescertificate/courseofferings These courses can be chosen among the student’s General Education requirements as well as within their program of study. If you wish to learn more about Peace Studies or wish to register as a Peace Studies student, please contact the Peace Studies Coordinator, local 5448, who will help you register for Peace Studies at any time of the year before your final term, and build ideas for your special project. Peacestudies@johnabbott.qc.ca WOMEN’S STUDIES AND GENDER RELATIONS Students involved in deciding upon a career, creating or maintaining a relationship, functioning in a work place, attending classes, or simply receiving messages of the vari- ous mass media can benefit from the awareness that seemingly personal feelings, actions, decisions and prob- lems are subtly influenced by society’s concepts of male and female. The Certificate in Women’s Studies and Gender Relations helps students attain this understanding, work carefully through its implications for their own lives, and thus increase their personal freedom, power, and ful- fillment. By providing a dynamic and comprehensive study of gender issues and women’s accomplishments placed within psychological, social, political, and historical contexts, the courses help students achieve personal growth and they promote their awareness of and partici- pation in social issues and change. Women’s Studies and Gender Relations courses span a wide variety of disciplines and include such offerings as Gender and Communication, Male/Female, Women in Film, Women and Literature, Human Relations, La Condition Féminine, Sociology and Philosophy of Sexuality, Physical Education, and Sociology of Women. Many courses are available for Women’s Studies and Gender Relations credit. This certificate is offered to both female and male students. Students choose a minimum of five specially designated courses. These courses fulfill the requirements of both the student’s diploma and the Women’s Studies and Gender Relations Certificate at the same time, and may also meet the requirements of the Environmental Studies Certificate, and/or the Peace Studies Certificate. For specific course offerings, please consult the Women’s Studies and Gender Relations Certificate course listing in the Schedule of Classes. For more information, please contact the Co-ordinator for Women’s Studies and Gender Relations, at feminism@johnabbott.qc.ca .
  • 9. 9 PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS / OPTIONS and PROFILES PROGRAM NAMES SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES PROGRAMS OFFERED AND ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 200.12 Science and Social Science – Double-DEC Math 536 70% Physics 534 70% Chemistry 534 70% 700.B0 Liberal Arts No specific prerequisites 510.A0 Fine Arts No specific prerequisites 500.67 Creative Arts Literature & Languages Theatre Profile No specific prerequisites 500.48 Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Arts and Culture with Languages Profile No specific prerequisites 500.57 Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Languages Option No specific prerequisites 500.47 Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Arts and Culture Profile No specific prerequisites 500.27 Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Media Arts Profile No specific prerequisites 300.A2 Commerce Profile Math 526 or 536 300.A1 Social Science with Math Profile Math 526 or 536 300.A0 Social Science No specific prerequisites 200.B0 Science Math 536 70% Physics 534 70% Chemistry 534 70% PROGRAMSOFFEREDANDENTRANCEREQUIREMENTS 700.A0 Arts and Sciences Math 536 70% Physics 534 70% Chemistry 534 70% PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS and OPTIONS CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
  • 10. 10 TRANSITION PROGRAM 081.03 The Transition Program is a one-semester program designed to give students an opportunity to pick up missing prerequisites to enter a selected program. New students may begin their studies in the Transition program in their second semester if their selected program is not available. Returning students should discuss their plans with an Academic Advisor, and submit a change of program request to the Admissions Office. To be eligible for the Transition program, students must be transitioning to another cegep program. Students can only be in Transition for one semester unless the program they are heading to is not offered in the Winter semester. PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS and OPTIONS PROGRAM NAMES SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES 561.C0 Professional Theatre (Acting) No specific prerequisites - Audition 561.A0 Professional Theatre (Production and Design Options) No specific prerequisites - Interview 420.A0 Computer Science Technology Math 526 412.A0 Publication Design & Hypermedia Technology No specific prerequisites 410.B0 Business Administration Math 436 or 526 *393.A0 Information & Library Technologies No specific prerequisites 310.B0 Youth and Adult Correctional Intervention No specific prerequisites 244.A1 Engineering Technologies Photonics Option Physics 534, Math 526 244.A2 Engineering Technologies Energy Management Profile Physics 534, Math 526 offered to students in 3rd year of 244.A1 *180.A0 Nursing Physical Science 436 Chemistry 534 Math 436 highly recommended 111.A0 Dental Hygiene Chemistry 534 Math 536 highly recommended *310.A0 Police Technology Math 514 Candidates must have a minimum of a proba- tionary drivers’s license at the March 1st application deadline. They must also pass pre-admission testing and once conditionally accepted, a medical exam, and be a Canadian citizen or landed immigrant. 181.A0 Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Candidates must have a minimum of a proba- tionary drivers’s license at the March 1st application deadline. They must also pass pre-admission testing and once conditionally accepted, a medical exam, and be a Canadian citizen or landed immigrant. PROGRAMS OFFERED AND ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS cont’d * Program also offered in a 2-year intensive format for students who have completed all of their CEGEP general education courses and the program prerequisites.
  • 11. 11 PATHWAYS PROGRAMS PREPARATORY PROGRAMS John Abbott College offers a variety of programs for high school students whose preparation for CEGEP studies may not be complete. The aim of these one- or two-semester programs is to equip students with the skills required to be successful in their studies and to help them acquire any missing prerequisite courses for entrance into a particular program of study. Each program is individually designed to meet each student’s specific needs and combines a mix of regular program courses, general education courses, make-up and/or introductory courses, and a compulsory course in Learning Techniques or Career Explorations. Please note: 1) To be eligible for any of the Pathways programs, students must have a Quebec Secondary School Diploma and meet CEGEP entrance requirements or have an equivalent high school diploma. 2) Students must be applying directly from high school OR may never have attended CEGEP before. Students who successfully complete their Pathways Program will be eligible to apply to their intended program of study. Students will be required to submit a change of program request to the Admissions Office by the deadline: March 1st for the Fall semester and November 1st for the Winter semester. For further information about any of these programs, and their entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358, or the Pathways Coordinator, pathways@johnabbott.qc.ca. PATHWAYSPROGRAMSPROGRAMSOFFEREDANDENTRANCEREQUIREMENTS
  • 12. 12 PATHWAYS TO SCIENCE (200.14) This one- or two-semester program is designed for stu- dents who wish to pursue a diploma in the Sciences, but who lack one or more of the Science prerequisites (Math 536, Chemistry 534 and Physics 534), or who have a grade of 60 - 69% in their Science prerequisites and require some improvement in their basic foundation in Science. In their first semester, students will take a science Learning Techniques course, along with regular Science courses, and any missing prerequisite course(s) and/or introductory courses in their weak Science subject(s). Successful completion of the Learning Techniques course and their missing prerequisite/introductory courses is a requirement to remain in Pathways to Science in their sec- ond semester, and/or for entrance into the Science pro- gram. (Note: “introductory” courses are make-up courses for students who have passed the prerequisite in high school or CEGEP, but who did not obtain a minimum grade of 70%.) Notes: 1) Students who are failing a Science prerequisite at the time of application will be refused admission to the program. 2) Admission to the Pathways to Science Program will be cancelled if a student fails a Science prerequisite at the end of the school year or during the summer. Should this be the case, students will be allowed to select another program of study at the College pending availability of space in the chosen program. PATHWAYS TO SCIENCE (200.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2005 AND LATER FIRST SEMESTER 2 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH (according to your placement test) ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 CONCENTRATION COURSES CHOSEN FROM: ___-___ 201-NYA or 912-015 Mathematics or *201-007 or *201-009 ___-___ 202-NYB or 912-016 Chemistry or *202-006 ___-___ 203-NYA or 912-017 Physics or *203-006 ___-___ 982-021 Physical Science * Students normally will be permitted to take no more than two Make-up or introductory courses per semester * Students must obtain a grade of 70% or greater to be eligible for science courses. 1 LEARNING TECHNIQUES COURSE ___-___ 360-902-85 Learning Techniques (for Sciences) Successful completion of this course, and the science prerequisite course(s) are required to either remain in Pathways to Science in the second semester, or to transfer into the regular Science Program. 6 = Regular Course Load Students will be pre-registered in their missing prerequisite and/or introductory courses and in their Learning Techniques course. PATHWAYS TO SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FIRST SEMESTER 3 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH (according to your placement test) ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 CONCENTRATION COURSES ___-___ 350-102-AB Psychology (co-requisite with Learning Techniques) OR ___-___ 330-910-AB History (co-requisite with Learning Techniques) ___-___ ___-___ PLUS ONE LEVEL 1 Social Science Course 1 LEARNING TECHNIQUES COURSE ___-___ 360-902-85 Learning Techniques (for Social Science) Successful completion of this course is a requirement for students to enrol in the regular Social Science Program in their second semester. 6 = Regular Course Load Students will be pre-registered in their Psychology or History course and in their Learning Techniques course. PATHWAYS TO SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.14) This one-semester program is designed to ease the transition into CEGEP for Social Science students with marginal Secondary V grades. The program concentrates on providing students with the necessary skills required to succeed in the Social Science program. In their first semester, students take a Learning Techniques course along with a reduced load of regular Social Science courses. Successful completion of the Learning Techniques course is a requirement for entrance into the Social Science program in the student’s second semester.
  • 13. PATHWAYS TO POLICE TECHNOLOGY (310.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2007 AND LATER FIRST SEMESTER 4 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH (according to your placement test) ___-___ FRENCH ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Police section) 1 CONCENTRATION COURSE 310-112-AB Criminology & Judicial Process 1 CAREER EXPLORATIONS COURSE 360-103-AB Career Explorations plus Introduction to Driving Seminar (Theory) SECOND SEMESTER 3 OR 4 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH ___-___ FRENCH ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ Complementary Course 310-111-AB First Responder 310-610-AB Private Law A 7th course may be selected in consultation with an Academic Advisor This Pathways stream is designed exclusively for high school students to provide the opportunity to explore their career goals in policing, experience Cegep level courses, participate in physical fitness, and extra-curricular activities. Students will follow regu- lar application procedures for Police Technology as follows: 1. Pass the pre-admission testing. 2. Apply to SRAM by March 1st.. 3. Students accepted to Pathways will be waived out of the medical exam for one year. 4. Students will only be required to have a learner’s driving permit for the Pathways program. 5. Students will be required to sign a letter of understanding. 6. Students will be required to request a change of program by March 1st of the fol- lowing year, at which time they must present a probationary driver’s license. There is no guarantee of admission to the Police Technology program after the Pathways program is completed, as the admission process is competitive. If the stu- dent is given a conditional acceptance to the Police Technology program, a med- ical exam will be required. Students will be required to redo the pre-admission testing at a reduced fee of $35.00. Bilingualism (English/French) and computer lit- eracy are necessary. 13 PATHWAYS TO POLICE TECHNOLOGY (310.14) The Pathways to Police Technology is a two-semester inte- gration program for students wishing to enter into the Police Technology program at John Abbott College, but who may not meet all the requirements for immediate entrance. In their first semester students will take General Education courses, a sample of first year Police Technology courses, and a Career Explorations course. The aim of this last course is to help students explore their career interests and to improve upon their academic skills. Successful completion of the Career Explorations course is a requirement to remain in the Pathways to Police Technology Program in their second semester. PATHWAYS TO THE CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (C.A.L.L.) PROGRAM (500.14) This one-semester program provides a first semester integration into the general C.A.L.L. program. It is designed to ease the transition into CEGEP for C.A.L.L. students with marginal Secondary V grades. The pro- gram concentrates on providing students with the neces- sary skills required to succeed in the C.A.L.L program. In their first semester, students will take a Career Explorations course, along with a reduced load of regu- lar C.A.L.L. program courses. Successful completion of this course is a requirement for entrance into the C.A.L.L. program in the student’s second semester. PATHWAYS TO THE CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (C.A.L.L.) PROGRAM (500.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FIRST SEMESTER 3 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 CONCENTRATION COURSES ___-___ 502-DCA-03 Exploring the Universe of the Arts and Letters PLUS ___-___ ___-___ ONE COURSE CHOSEN FROM THE LIST OF CREATIVE ARTS CONCENTRATION COURSES (see list below) 1 CAREER EXPLORATIONS COURSE ___-___ 360-103-AB Career Explorations Successful completion of this course is a requirement for students to enrol in the regular C.A.L.L. in their second semester. 6 = Regular Course Load Students will be pre-registered in their Career Explorations and Exploring the Universe of the Arts & Letters Course. CREATIVE ARTS CONCENTRATION COURSES: Painting and Drawing I Filmmaking I Darkroom Photography I Video Production I Radio I Animation I Journalism I Theatre Workshop:Techniques Theatre Workshop: Production I CREATIVE ARTS - LANGUAGES PROFILE COURSES Spanish I & II (607-SP1/607-SP2) Italian I & II (608-TL1/608-TL2) German I & II (609-GR1/609-GR2) PROGRAMSOFFEREDANDENTRANCEREQUIREMENTS
  • 14. 14 PATHWAYS TO A CAREER PROGRAM (800.14) The Pathways to a Career Program is a one or two semester integration program for students wishing to enter into a Career program at John Abbott College. The program concentrates on preparing students for entrance into the Career program of their choice, and teaches stu- dents the necessary skills required to be successful. Students who are undecided about which Career program is right for them have the opportunity to explore a variety of Career programs before they make a choice. Students can also obtain missing prerequisites or improve their aca- demic record in order to meet entrance requirements for a particular Career program. In their first semester students will take General Education courses, a sample of first year Career program courses, any missing prerequisite courses, and a Career Explorations course. The aim of this last course is to help students explore their career interests and to improve upon their academic skills. Successful completion of the Career Explorations course is a requirement to remain in the Pathways to a Career Program in their second semester. For further information about any of these programs, and their entrance requirements or prerequisites, please con- tact the Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358, or the Pathways Coordinator, pathways@johnabbott.qc.ca. CAREER PROGRAM COURSE OFFERINGS FALL SEMESTER PROGRAM COURSE COURSE TITLE Business Administration 410-125-AB Global Vision Computer Science 420-126-AB Introduction to Computers Dental Hygiene 111-103-AB Introduction to the Profession Engineering Technologies No courses offered Information & Library 393-DCA-03 Profession of Documentation Technician Nursing 350-803-AB Developmental Psychology Publication Design & 412-100-AB Web Design 1 (HTML) Hypermedia Theatre 560-DCA-03 Introduction to Theatre – Techniques Youth & Adult 310-100-AB Analysis of the Profession Correctional Intervention CAREER PROGRAM COURSE OFFERINGS WINTER SEMESTER PROGRAM COURSE COURSE TITLE PRE-REQ Business Administration 410-235-AB Marketing Computer Science 420-226-AB Technical Support 420-126-AB Dental Hygiene 350-203-AB Communication & Teamwork Engineering TechnologiesNo courses offered Information & Library 393-DDJ-03 Communcation 393-DCA-03 and Teamwork Nursing 387-803-AB Sociology of Diverse Families &Communities Publication Design 412-202-AB OR Web Design II (Dreamweaver) & Hypermedia 412-203-AB Digital Photo Processing Theatre 560-DCC-03 Introduction to Theatre – Scenes Youth & Adult 310-200-AB Communication Techniques Correctional Intervention PATHWAYS TO A CAREER PROGRAM (800.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2004 AND LATER FIRST SEMESTER 3 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION PREREQUISITE COURSE(S) Courses depend on choice of career program and which prerequisites the stu- dent is missing: in most cases this will include Math or Science courses. CAREER PROGRAM COURSE(S) Courses depend on the career program; students may explore more than one career program, as their schedule allows. 1 CAREER EXPLORATIONS COURSE ___-___ 360-103-AB Career Explorations Successful completion of Career Explorations is a requirement for students to continue in Pathways in their SECOND SEMESTER. 5 or 6 = regular course load Students will be pre-registered in their prerequisite, career program & Career Explorations courses. SECOND SEMESTER 3 OR 4 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ HUMANITIES OR ___-___ FRENCH PREREQUISITE COURSE(S) Courses depend on choice of career program and which prerequisites the stu- dent is still missing after one semester in Pathways; in most cases this will include Math or Science courses. CAREER PROGRAM COURSE(S) Courses depend on choice of career program and the availability of SECOND SEMESTER career courses. OPTIONAL COURSES Students are encouraged to explore courses from other programs at the College, as their schedule allows. Students are encouraged to consult an Academic Advisor in the Student Services Department for help with these choices. STUDENTS MUST TAKE A MINIMUM OF 5 COURSES
  • 15. 15 PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS John Abbott College offers six pre-university programs in: Science, Social Science (including Commerce), Creative Arts, Literature and Languages, Fine Arts and Liberal Arts double - DEC in Science and Social Science, and an DEC in Arts and Sciences. PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAM STRUCTURE Each pre-university program is made up of two components: GENERAL EDUCATION and CONCENTRATION courses. (Note: The Liberal Arts Program and Arts and Sciences does not have any complementary courses.) Please refer to the Diploma Requirement charts on the following pages to determine the diploma requirements for your program. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS GENERAL EDUCATION The compulsory subjects common to all CEGEP programs are English, French, Humanities, Physical Education and complementary. These subjects are referred to as GENERAL EDUCATION courses. General Education requirements are as follows: English (four courses); French (two courses); Humanities (three courses); Physical Education (three courses). The courses and requirements are listed in the course description section of the Calendar. Complementary courses, which also make up a part of the General Education requirements, provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration. For example, Science students may choose a Film course. CONCENTRATION COURSES Concentration courses are those courses which are directly related to your field of study. In the Science, Social Science, Creative Arts, Literature and Languages and Liberal Arts programs, the concentration component of the program is made up of both compulsory and optional credits. The Fine Arts Program is composed of compulsory concentration courses only. Please refer to the Diploma Requirement charts on the following pages for more details. COURSE TITLES AND NUMBERS Every course in the Course Description section of the Calendar is identified with a number, title and ponderation. For example: PONDERATION Ponderation specifies the weekly learning activities of the course. In the above example, ponderation is listed as: HOW TO CALCULATE CREDIT VALUE A credit is equal to three hours of learning activities (teaching, laboratory, stage or workshop and homework) per week. Credits for every course are determined by adding the total number of hours in the ponderation and dividing by three. For example: 2 + 2 + 4 = 8 hours ÷ 3 = 2-2/3 credits Understanding the pre-university program structure while trying to choose courses can be confusing. Academic Advisors are available throughout the year to provide assistance with course selection and diploma requirements. Make an appointment well before registration by dropping in to Herzberg, Room 148 or by calling, local 5290. IINNTTRROODDUUCCTTIIOONN TTOO CCOOLLLLEEGGEE EENNGGLLIISSHH ((CCoouurrssee TTiittllee)) 660033--110011--0044 ((22..22..44)) ponderation year number or number of contact hours identifies course content English - subject discipline code 2 . 2 . 4 homework hours laboratory, workshop hours teaching hours PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 16. 16 n Does not count towards a diploma N Required Math courses for Science students. Students are advised to take the required courses first. * This course is a prerequisite for BA Psychology programs at universities in Quebec and requires 360-300-RE Quantitative Methods as a prerequisite. Mathematics/Academic Advising Departments SPRING 2006 PRE-UNIVERSITY MATHEMATICS SEQUENCE CHART 201-103-RE CALCULUS I (NON-SCIENCE) 201-DDB-05 CALCULUS III (SCIENCE) 201-DDC-05 LINEAR ALGEBRA II FOR SCIENCE STUDENTS HIGH SCHOOL COURSES PASSED GRADE JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE MATH COURSE YOU MAY REGISTER IN JAC MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 514, 574 LEVEL 2 426, 436, 526 LEVEL 4 534, 536 LEVEL 5 534, 536 201-NYA - 05 N CALCULUS I (SCIENCE) LEVEL 6 201-DDD-05 STATISTICS NO LEVEL 201-009-50 n ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY 201-007-50 n INTRO TO ALGEBRA 60% MIN 60% MIN 60% - 69% 70% OR HIGHER 201-NYB-05 N CALCULUS II (SCIENCE) 201-NYC-05 N LINEAR ALGEBRA I (SCIENCE) NO LEVEL FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE & COMMERCE STUDENTS HIGH SCHOOL COURSES PASSED GRADE JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE MATH COURSE YOU MAY REGISTER IN JAC MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 514, 574 LEVEL 2 426, 436 LEVEL 4 526, 534, 536 LEVEL 6 201-105-RE LINEAR ALGEBRA (NON SCIENCE) NO LEVEL 201-009-50 n ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY 201-007-50 n INTRO TO ALGEBRA 60% MIN 60% MIN 60% MIN 201-203-RE CALCULUS II (NON SCIENCE) 201-301-RE * ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE METHODS 912-015-94 n INTRO TO COLLEGE MATH 60% - 69% 70% OR HIGHER
  • 17. 17 SCIENCE (200.BO) The Science Program is a pre-university program of the Ministry of Education intended to provide students with a balanced education, which integrates the basic components of a rigorous scientific and general education. The Science Program at John Abbott College provides a solid grounding in mathematics, chemistry, physics, biology and geology. The approach is competency-based and interdisciplinary, emphasizing the ways in which scientific problem-solving techniques can be applied to many other disciplines. It prepares students for a number of university science and professional programs. Students select their option courses according to their intention to enter either a Pure and Applied or Health Science program at university. Admission into the program requires a strong overall average and a minimum of 70% in the prerequisite courses, Math 536, Chemistry 534 and Physics 534. The John Abbott College Science Program graduate masters the knowledge and skills of a basic general education as detailed in the objectives of the General Education courses. The goals of general education are to provide students with a common cultural core, to help them acquire and develop generic skills and to foster desirable attitudes. As well, gradu- ates master the knowledge and skills of a basic scientific education as listed in the outcomes below. The program is organized according to objectives to be attained in each course. The following is a list of the Ministerial program objectives linked with Science courses. • To analyze the organization, functioning and diversity of living beings. • To analyze chemical and physical changes in matter using concepts associated with the structure of atoms and mole- cules. • To analyze the properties of solutions and reactions in solutions. • To apply the methods of differential calculus to the study of functions and problem solving. • To apply the methods of integral calculus to the study of functions and problem solving. • To apply the methods of linear algebra and vector geometry to problem solving. • To analyze various situations and phenomena in physics using the basic principles of classical mechanics. • To analyze various situations and phenomena in physics using the basic laws of electricity and magnetism. • To analyze various situations or phenomena associated with waves, optics and modern physics using basic principles. • To apply acquired knowledge to one or more subjects in the sciences. • To apply the experimental method in a scientific field. • (Optional) To analyze the structure and functioning of multi-celled organisms in terms of homeostasis and from an evolutionary perspective. • (Optional) To solve simple problems in organic chemistry. Agriculture Architecture Astronomy Biology Biochemistry Chemistry Computer Science Dentistry Dietetics Education Engineering Environmental Science Forestry Geology Mathematics Medicine Nursing Nutrition Occupational Therapy Optometry Pharmacy Physical Education Physics Physiotherapy Veterinary Medicine Graduates from the Science Program may pursue further studies at university in: PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 18. 18 COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT AND INTEGRATION IN THE SCIENCE PROGRAM The Ministry of Education requires every student to pass a “program comprehensive assessment” and a program “inte- grating activity” (Exit Profile Competency 14: “to apply what has been learned to new situations” and Ministry objective 00UU: “To apply acquired knowledge to one or more sub- jects in the sciences”). The Ministry introduced these requirements because it recognized the importance of con- necting the various components within each program. Rather than impose a major exam or paper at the end of the program, or requiring a single course to fulfill these requirements, John Abbott College has integrated them into the ‘option’ courses taken late in the program. These cours- es have been designed so that by passing any three option courses a student will have met the above requirements of the program. The various competencies taught and assessed in the Science Program are outlined in the outcomes and stan- dards of the Science Program Exit Profile and listed below. They are divided into two groups: those competencies that are taught and assessed in virtually every course in the pro- gram, and those that will be the primary focus of the option courses. It is recognized, of course, that many of the former will also be included in the option courses. The following competencies are taught and assessed in most courses of the program: 3. To Apply (the) a scientific method. 4. To Apply a systematic approach to problem solving. 5. To Use appropriate data processing techniques. 6. To reason with rigour, i.e. with precision. 8. To learn in an autonomous manner. 13. To display attitudes and behaviour compatible with the scientific spirit and method. The following competencies will be the special focus of the option courses of the program: 7. To communicate effectively. 9. To work as a member of a team. 10. To recognize the links between science, technology and the evolution of society. 11. To develop a personal system of values. 12. To put into context the emergence and development of scientific concepts. 14. To apply what has been learned to new situations. Most, though not all, of these six competencies will be addressed in each option course. The requirement is that a combination of any three option courses will address them all. It is the responsibility of the Science Program that this requirement be met. Each option course will clearly state in its course outline which competencies are to be taught and how they are to be assessed. To prepare the student for formal assessment of the compe- tencies assigned to the option courses, these competencies will be introduced in the compulsory courses of the program according to the following grid: GRID OF COMPETENCIES TAUGHT AND ASSESSED IN COMPULSORY COURSES NNoottee:: 7a Written communication (reading/writing scientific material) 7b Oral communication of scientific material In these courses, the assigned competencies will be taught and assessed a grade as part of the course grade, but this grade will not be part of the formal assessment of the com- petency. The course outline for each of these courses will clearly outline how the competency is to be taught and assessed. HONOURS SCIENCE (200.16) The Honours Science Certificate program is designed for students interested in pursuing science-related careers and it focuses on interdisciplinary learning and student develop- ment. In their first year, Honours students take their required science courses as a group and share a common meeting time for science-related field trips and invited speakers. They also work on individual and team projects. To be considered for Honours Science, students must graduate from high school with an overall grade average of 85% or higher, and minimum marks of 80% in chemistry, mathematics and physics. In addition to the SRAM application, students must also submit a separate written application to Honours Science. For further information about John Abbott’s Honours Science program, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Honours Science Coordinator at: honours.science@johnab- bott.qc.ca. CCoommppeetteennccyy 77..aa 77..bb 99 1100 1111 1122 TTeerrmm aanndd CCoouurrssee FIRST SEMESTER Chemistry 202-NYB Math 201-NYA Physics 203-NYA X SECOND/THRID SEMESTER Biology 101-NYA X Chemistry 202-NYA X Math 201-NYB X X Physics 203-NYB X THRID/FOURTH SEMESTER Math 201-NYC Physics 203-NYC
  • 19. 19 SCIENCE (200.BO) FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION _____-_____ Complementary Course AND 201-NYA-05 Calculus I 202-NYB-05 Chemistry of Solutions 203-NYA-05 Mechanics SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND THREE OF THE FOLLOWING: 101-NYA-05 General Biology I 201-NYB-05 Calculus II 202-NYA-05 General Chemistry 203-NYB-05 Electricity & Magnetism SCIENCE 200.B0 PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 1999 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ONE OF THE FOLLOWING NOT TAKEN IN THE SECOND SEMESTER 101-NYA-05 General Biology I 202-NYA-05 General Chemistry 201-NYB-05 Calculus II 203-NYB-05 Electricity & Magnetism AND TWO OF THE FOLLOWING: 201-NYC-05 Linear Algebra I or 203-NYC-05 Waves Optics & Modern Physics or _____-_____ Science Option course* FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH _____-_____ Complementary Course AND Remaining 3 Science Courses _____-_____ Science Option course* _____-_____ Science Option course* _____-_____ Remaining Science Option or required course Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses. Students will be required to pass an English Exit Exam and a Program Comprehensive Assessment. PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS * Refer to Science Option Chart for choices
  • 20. SCIENCES PLACEMENT CHART FALL 2007 or later For SCIENCE (200.B0) and PATHWAYS TO SCIENCE (200.14) STUDENTS Pathways to Career (800.14) Students should consult with an Academic Advisor regarding their program course selection/prerequisites. High School / Cegep course passed John Abbott College science course you may register in. 101 - BIOLOGY Biology recommended 101-NYA General Biology 202 - CHEMISTRY Final grade of 70% or higher in High School Chemistry 534 or 584 or Cegep Chemistry 202-006. Level 3 202-NYB Chemistry of Solutions Final grade of 60% - 69% in High School Chemistry 534 or 584 or Cegep Chemistry 202-006 Level 2 912-016 Introduction to College Chemistry * Physical Science 430, 436 Level 1 202-006 Make-up Chemistry * 201 - MATHEMATICS See Pre-University Mathematics Sequence Chart 982 - PHYSICAL SCIENCE No pre-requisite or Physical Science 416 982-021 Introduction to Physical Science* 203 - PHYSICS Final grade of 70% or higher in High School Physics 534 or 584 or Cegep Physics 203-006 and also have a Final Grade of 70% in Math 536. Level 3 203-NYA Mechanics Final grade of 60%-69% in High School Physics 534 or 584 or Cegep Physics 203-006. (Students must also have passed Math 536 or Cegep Math 009). Level 2 912-017 Introduction to College Physics* Math 536 passed or Cegep Math 201-009 in progress. Level 1 203-006 Make-up Physics Course* * Course does not count towards a College Diploma Questions – Please see an Academic Advisor for clarification. February, 2008 20
  • 21. 21 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 22. 22 LIST OF SCIENCE OPTION COURSES Science students need 3 (2.66 credit) science option courses to meet the minimum 8 credit optional science component. CHECK UNIVERSITY ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND DISCUSS YOUR EDUCATIONAL PLANS WITH AN ACADEMIC ADVISOR BEFORE YOU REGISTER Note: Not all courses are offered every semester BIOLOGY (101) 101-DCN-05 GENERAL BIOLOGY II 101-DDB-05 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 101-DDM-05 HUMAN GENETICS CHEMISTRY (202) 202-DCP-05 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 202-DDB-05 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 202-DDN-05 CHEMISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT 202-DDP-05 FORENSIC CHEMISTRY EARTH/OCEAN SCIENCE (205) 205-DDP-AB EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE 205-DDM-05 UNDERSTANDING PLANET EARTH 205-DDN-AB INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS (201) 201-DDB-05 CALCULUS III 201-DDC-05 LINEAR ALGEBRA II 201-DDD-05 STATISTICAL METHODS PHYSICS (203) 203-DDB-05 PHYSICS FOR ENGINEERS 203-DDC-05 ASTROPHYSICS 203-DDM-05 ASTRONOMY 203-DDN-05 PHYSICS OF SPORTS
  • 23. BIOLOGY Biology courses provide students with an opportunity to develop an understanding and appreciation of important biological concepts. Students also develop an appre- ciation of the implications of technologi- cal developments on the biological world. All students should verify with Academic Advising which of the following Biology courses are required for admission to specif- ic university programs. GENERAL BIOLOGY I 101-NYA-05 (3.2.3) General Biology I is an introductory level course compulsory for all sci- ence students and is a prerequisite for all other Biology courses offered in the Science Program. This course offers students an intro- duction to the life sciences focusing on the organization, functioning and diversity of life forms . Upon comple- tion of General Biology I students will be able to: 1. Recognize the relationship between structure and function at different levels of organization; 2. Understand cell division and the genetic mechanisms important in inheritance; 3. Appreciate the mechanisms of evo- lution and understand how life forms adapt to their environment; 4. Develop a basic understanding of the principles of ecology and some of the environmental issues facing man. GENERAL BIOLOGY II 101-DCN-05 (3.2.3) General Biology II is the second level course in College Biology for students in the Science Program. This course is required for individuals planning to enter the Biological or Health Sciences (including Medicine) at university. This course builds upon the concepts introduced in General Biology I by analyzing how the structure and func- tioning of organisms at the chemical and cellular levels work to maintain homeostasis. Upon completion of General Biology II students will be able to: 1. Recognize the relationship between structure and function at different levels of organization; 2. Understand membrane transport systems; 3. Describe the transformation of mat- ter and energy that occurs during cell respiration and photosynthesis; 4. Explain how the regulation of gene expression occurs; 5. Understand and apply various techniques used in biotechnology; 6. Explain the contribution of various systems to the maintenance of homeostasis in plants and animals. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 101-DDB-05 (3.2.3) This is a science option course useful to students planning to enter the Biological or Health Sciences at university. This course may be taken before, concurrently with or after Biology DCN. Designed to introduce science stu- dents to the study of human anatomy and physiology, this course covers many of the human body systems by examining the anatomy of each sys- tem and studying how each system works to maintain the balanced func- tioning of the body. HUMAN GENETICS 101-DDM-05 (3.2.3) A Biology option course open to sci- ence students, this course is designed to present the principles of human genetics and to allow the student to understand some of the latest devel- opments in the field and how they are shaping and revolutionizing society. General course content includes: 1. The application of the laws of inher- itance to human characteristics; 2. The basic principles of molecular genetics and the significance of DNA; 3. Discussion of social and moral implications of genetic research on society; 4. Genetic counselling, genetic diseases, and the genetics of cancer 5. Modern DNA technology, cloning, reproductive technologies. After completing this course, students should have a basic knowledge of inheritance in humans and an aware- ness of modern developments in the field of genetics. CHEMISTRY PLACEMENT Students are placed in College Chemistry courses according to Secondary V provincial results. Please refer to the Science Placement Chart on page 20. Students should verify with Academic Advising which of the following Chemistry courses are required for admission to specific university programs. CHEMISTRY OF SOLUTIONS 202-NYB-05 (3.2.3) P: SEE SCIENCE PLACEMENT CHART Oriented towards understanding con- cepts, this course examines numerous macroscopic properties of solutions and chemical reactions. Major topics in this physical chemistry course include colligative properties, reac- tions, equilibrium (both general and solution equilibria), electrochemistry, kinetics, and acids and bases. GENERAL CHEMISTRY 202-NYA-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYB-05 This course introduces atomic and molecular structures. Topics covered include development of modern atomic theory; chemical bonding and its effect on the chemical and physical properties of matter. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 202-DCP-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYA-05 An introduction to the chemistry of organic molecules including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatic systems and their derivatives, this course employs a mechanistic approach to the under- standing of typical organic reactions. Laboratory work is an important part of the course. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 202-DDB-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-DCP-05 A continuation of 202-DCP, this course extends the study of mecha- nism, structure and synthesis in organ- ic chemistry. The methods introduced in 202-DCP are reviewed by applica- tion to the study of aromatic and car- bonyl compounds. The use of spectropic techniques for determining 23 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 24. molecular structure is emphasized. Practical laboratory work, including the use of chemical instrumentation, is emphasized. FORENSIC CHEMISTRY 202-DDP-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYA-05 Is that blood on your hands? Did the urbane Claus von Bulow attempt to murder his rich socialite wife by sur- reptitiously injecting insulin into her medication? Remember the famous ‘Acid Experiments’ of the 1960’s con- ducted in our back yard at McGill University and secretly funded by the CIA? What role does a chemist play in the mysterious death of a woman - a death later uncovered as murder due to arsenic poisoning? From sensational high-tech cases like the O.J. Simpson trial to less well- known crimes, intriguing details are revealed in the course appropriately subtitled Arsenic Milkshake. In this course, which gives students a behind-the-scenes look at what moti- vates today’s new scientific sleuths, you’ll get a chance to play forensic detective, learn how to analyze gun- shot residues, detect fingerprints, check Breathalyzer test results, identi- fy different blood types and analyse drug poisonings. CHEMISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT: CHEMICALS AROUND US 202-DDN-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYA This course is designed for science students who want to learn more about the chemistry of a healthy envi- ronment, and techniques of assessing environmental uses and abuses. This course deals with: 1. environmental pollutants in water, air and soil; 2. their sources, effects on plants and humans and; 3. controls to minimize pollutants. Topics include acid rain, nuclear waste, radiation hazards, oil pollu- tion, effects of smoking on humans, toxic waste, pesticides, smog, nutrition, environment and physical fitness. EARTH & OCEAN SCIENCE EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE 205-DDP-AB (3.2.3) P: 202-NYB-05 & 203-NYA You probably already know that a feedback occurs when a guitar gets too close to an amp, but did you know that feedbacks also occur in Earth Systems? The geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and bios- phere on Earth are functioning sys- tems in and of themselves that also interact in complex ways with each other, creating the weather, rocks, ecosystems, and climate. What hap- pens when humans tinker with com- plex Earth systems that have been in place for millions of years? Learn the science behind the climate change headlines and examine the evidence for potential significant change in our lifetimes from a global geo-historic perspective. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY: 205-DDN-AB (3.2.3) P: 202-NYB-05 & 203-NYA Oceanography is truly an interdiscipli- nary science incorporating aspects of geology, chemistry, physics, and biolo- gy to study the present and past of the world ocean. Learn about the generation of tsunamis and tidal waves (not the same thing!), beaches and tides, surface ocean currents and global thermohaline ocean circula- tion. Learn why oceans exist in the first place, how their shapes are con- stantly changing, and explore the chemosynthetic communities of organisms that live at the birthplaces of oceans. Human impacts on the oceans and the potential resulting cli- mate changes will also be explored. UNDERSTANDING PLANET EARTH: 205-DDM-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYB-05 & 203-NYA Have you ever wondered why volca- noes erupt in Hawaii, but not in Quebec? Did you know that Montreal is moving away from Paris at about the same rate that your finger- nails grow? Why are mountain chains where they are? What makes earth- quakes tick? Follow the history of Earth from magma ocean to giant ice- ball; through super-continents and mountain-building episodes to ancient seas; from recent glaciation to modern-day global warming. Learn how geoscientists uncover Earth's 4- billion-year-story and decipher the deep-Earth and surface processes that continue to shape our home: it's all in the rocks. MATHEMATICS All students are placed into Mathematics courses according to their Secondary V Provincial results. Refer to the Math Sequence chart for Pre-University students on page 16. All students planning course selection to meet university entrance requirements should consult an Academic Advisor. CALCULUS I 201-NYA-05 (3.2.3) P: SEE MATH SEQUENCE CHART This course includes a review of algebra, functions, limits, continuity; differentiation of algebraic, trigono- metric, exponential and logarithmic functions; related rates, curve sketching, optimization, including word problems, antiderivatives, definite integrals and areas CALCULUS II 201-NYB-05 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYA This course covers inverse trigonomet- ric functions: graphs, differentiation, integrals involving inverse trigonomet- ric functions; integration techniques: substitutions, powers of trig functions, trig substitution, partial fractions, inte- gration by parts; physical applications of integration, areas between curves, volumes of solids of revolution, L’Hopital’s Rule and indeterminate forms, improper integrals, sequences, infinite series, power series, tests for convergence, plus the Maclaurin and Taylor series and applications. LINEAR ALGEBRA I 201-NYC-05 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYA This course covers the solution of sys- tems of linear equations, matrices, determinants; vectors in 2-space and 3-space, dot product, cross product, lines and planes, introduction to con- cepts of linear combinations, spans, subspaces, linear dependence and independence, basis, dimension, row space, column space, null space and applications. 24
  • 25. CALCULUS III 201-DDB-O5 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYB WITH AT LEAST 65%. This course is strongly recommended for students who intend to study Engineering, Physics, or Mathematics at university. Among the topics dis- cussed are power series and Taylor series, parametric equations, graphs using polar co-ordinates, vector-valued functions, limits, continuity and graphs of multivariate functions, partial deriva- tives, optimization problems, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, cylindri- cal and spherical co-ordinates. LINEAR ALGEBRA II 201-DDC-O5 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYC Recommended for students who intend to pursue Engineering, Physics, or Mathematics in university, this course includes general vector spaces and subspaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization and selected applications (linear differen- tial equations, quadric surfaces, linear programming). STATISTICAL METHODS 201-DDD-05 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYA This introductory statistics course is especially recommended for all Science students. Topics covered include frequency distributions, prob- ability distributions of a discrete ran- dom variable, probability distributions of a continuous random variable using calculus, mathematical expecta- tions including moment generating functions, sampling and sampling dis- tributions, linear models, point and interval estimation and hypothesis testing of one and two parameters. PHYSICS PHYSICS PLACEMENT Students are placed in Physics courses according to their Secondary V provincial results. Please refer to the Science Placement Chart on p. 20. MECHANICS 203-NYA-05 (3.2.3) Topics covered in this basic mechan- ics course include linear and rotation- al kinematics, trajectories, Newton’s laws of motion, work, energy and momentum. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and laboratory work. Many laboratory exercises involve using computers for data acquisition, and stu- dents are encouraged to use computers to analyze data and plot graphs. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 203-NYB-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYA This course emphasizes the basic physical principles of electricity and magnetism, with calculus being intro- duced where necessary. Topics include Coulomb’s Law, electric field, electric potential, motion of charged particles in electric fields, capacitors, DC circuits, Kirchhoff’s Laws, RC cir- cuits, Biot-Savart Law, magnetic fields, motion of charged particles in mag- netic fields, torque on a current loop and Faraday’s Law. WAVES, OPTICS AND MODERN PHYSICS 203-NYC-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYA & 201-NYA C: 203-NYB (PASSED OR IN PROGRESS) Wave behaviour is fundamental to an astonishing list of physical phenomena. The student in this course will learn how to analyze waves in both a quali- tative and quantitative manner, and will come face-to-face with some of the bizarre and counterintuitive impli- cations of modern physics. Topics include simple harmonic motion, waves and sound, interference and diffraction of light, quantum mechan- ics, and special relativity. Students entering the course will be expected to have solid physics, math and labo- ratory skills. PHYSICS FOR ENGINEERS 203-DDB-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYC OR 203-NYB & 201-NYA Open to all science students, this course is primarily designed for stu- dents planning to study engineering or applied science at university and helps bridge the gap between CEGEP Physics and university engineering courses. Topics include data analysis using spreadsheets, simple electronic circuits, AC circuit theory, rotational motion and static equilibrium. Laboratory work includes projects which could include such things as building radios, popsicle bridges, small-scale robots, a fully functional wind turbine, and elec- tric soap-box go-cart, or something along those lines. ASTRONOMY 203-DDM-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYA This course is designed for science students as a general introduction to the fascinating world of Astronomy. We begin with the historical roots of the subject: the forecast of seasons for farmers; the desire to predict the future by astrologers; the many and varied religious beliefs; and finally the birth of modern science. Topics include: understanding the night sky, the evolution of the solar system, planetary motions and composition, the structure of the sun, the birth, life and death of stars, the origin of galax- ies, the “big bang” and the future evolution of the universe. There will be observation nights and students will be introduced to the use of tele- scopes. We plan trips to the Planetarium if time permits. ASTROPHYSICS 203-DDC-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYA Designed for science students, this course attempts to help the student understand why the universe is the way it is. Topics include: orbital theo- ry and Kepler’s laws, Newton’s Universal Law of Gravity, conservation of energy, the ideal gas law, black- body radiation, the solar system, plan- etary evolution, the minor bodies in the solar system such as comets and asteroids, stellar structure and lives including white dwarf stars, neutron stars and black holes, the “big bang” and the formation of galaxies and var- ious cosmological theories. There will be observation nights and, if time per- mits, a field trip to the Planetarium or other facility is a possibility. SCIENCE MAKE-UP COURSES BRIDGING For Pathways to Science students and students in the Transition Program. INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE MATHEMATICS 912-015-94 (3.2.3) P: SEE MATH SEQUENCE CHART This course is designed for students lacking a solid background in high school level math. Topics covered are: basic algebraic functions, factoriza- tion, equations, functional notation, 25 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 26. inverse of a function, trigonometric functions, identities, trigonometric equations, sine law, cosine law, graphs of trigonometric functions. INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE CHEMISTRY 912-016-94 (3.2.3) The material covered in this course provides basic chemistry and prepares students with poor grades in Secondary V Chemistry for subse- quent chemistry courses. Emphasis is placed on nomenclature, types of bonding, meaning and inter- pretation of chemical equations, stoi- chiometry, concentration terminology, dilution, solution stoichiometry, titra- tion and pH. Laboratory work is included. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS 912-017-94 (3.2.3) P: MATH 526, 536 OR 201-009 This course, which provides the nec- essary background to students with poor Secondary V grades in Physics, considers fundamental concepts in electricity and motion. In dealing with these topics emphasis is placed on improving problem solving skills, col- lection and interpretation of data and use of graphs in the representation and interpretation of data. CHEMISTRY CHEMISTRY 202-006-06 (3.3.4) Equivalent to Secondary V Chemistry (051-534), this course is intended for students who wish to pursue science or technology programs and have passed Secondary IV Physical Science, or its equivalent (982-021-06), but lack Secondary V Chemistry. This course provides sufficient chemistry for entry into many technology pro- grams (such as Dental Hygiene) and subsequent Chemistry courses. MATHEMATICS INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA 201-007-06 (4.2.4) P: SEE MATH SEQUENCE CHART In this course, students learn expo- nents, polynomials, factoring, opera- tions with rational expressions, roots, products, quotients, adding, subtract- ing, rationalizing and simplifying, solv- ing linear equations, linear systems in two variables and quadratic equa- tions, trig ratios, law of sines and cosines. ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY 201-009-05 (3.2.3) P: SEE MATH SEQUENCE CHART In this course students learn algebra, radicals, polynomials, rational expres- sions, factoring, equations and inequalities, functions, graphs, com- position of functions, inverses, poly- nomials, multiplication, long division, rational functions, parabolas, expo- nential and logarithmic functions, properties, solving equations, applica- tions, trigonometry, angles, triangle trig, trig functions of any angle, identi- ties, evaluate inverse trig functions and applications. PHYSICAL SCIENCE PHYSICAL SCIENCE 982-021-06 (4.2.3) Equivalent to Secondary IV Physical Science (056-436), this course is intended for students who wish to pursue science or technology pro- grams, but lack the necessary Physical Science prerequisite. The course will provide sufficient chemistry to pre- pare students for the Secondary V equivalent, 202-006-06. PHYSICS PHYSICS 203-006-06 (4.2.4) P OR C: MATH 526, 536 OR 201-009 Designed for students with no previ- ous background in physics, this course is equivalent to Secondary V high school physics (534). It introduces kinematics (emphasizing graphing techniques), vector analysis, and Newton’s laws of motion. 26
  • 27. SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.A0) Graduates of the John Abbott Social Science program will be prepared to enter university studies in fields related to social science, including law, education, and administration. This preparation will comprise both a general education and an education in the knowledge and skills specific to the various disciplines within Social Science. Students will have developed the following: • A scholarly respect for, and a foundation knowledge of, the large body of evidence and theory as it is evolving in social sciences • A critical, scientific style of thinking as it applies to social science • An understanding of basic research methods • Appropriate strategies for finding and evaluating reliable sources, including information technology • An appreciation of the moral and ethical dimensions of social science • A sense of informed, concerned, and active citizenship in the local, national and world community. • A transdisciplinary integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes throughout the program. • A commitment to ongoing personal development and an enthusiasm to know more. PPrreerreeqquuiissiitteess :: SSeeccoonnddaarryy VV CCeerrttiiffiiccaattee oorr eeqquuiivvaalleenntt For further information about the Social Science program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358. NNOOTTEE:: Students are advised to consult with an Academic Advisor to learn how to build university entrance requirements into their program of study. 27 Socia l Science Paths to Your Car eer CriminalJustice Law Advertising Labour Relations Management MarketingBroadcasting PublicRelations Journalism Anthropology Communication Economics Geography History Accounting Political SciencePhilosophy Psychology Sociology Counselling EducationGeriatrics Recreation SocialWork NN..BB.. Graduates from any of the Social Science profiles will receive a diploma in Social Science regardless of the profile chosen. PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 28. 28 SOCIAL SCIENCE - PSYCHOLOGY PROFILE (300.A3) The Psychology profile is designed for students interested in preparing for psychology studies at university. Students in this profile must take Advanced Quantitative Methods, Human Biology and two level 2 psychology courses. Students select this option in their third semester by com- pleting a Change of Program request available in the Registrar’s Office. Prerequisite: 360-300-RE Quantitative Methods FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 330-910 Western Civilization 350-102 Introduction to Psychology ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 360-300 Quantitative Methods 383-920 Macroeconomics ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course PSYCHOLOGY PROFILE 300.A3 SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.A0) Social Science is the study of all aspects of human life from many different perspectives. In addition to the compulsory courses in economics, history, methodology and psychology, students in John Abbott College’s Social Science program can choose courses in fields such as anthropology, business, classics, geography, mathematics, philosophy, political sci- ence, religion and sociology. The program’s greatest advan- tage lies in the depth and breadth of knowledge and understanding students acquire. Graduates gain invaluable university skills in methods of research, writing, analysis and the presentation of ideas. FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 330-910 Western Civilization 350-102 Introduction to Psychology ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 360-300 Quantitative Methods 383-920 Macroeconomics ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SOCIAL SCIENCE 300.A0 SOCIAL SCIENCE WITH MATHEMATICS PROFILE (300.A1) The Social Science with Mathematics profile is designed for students who enjoy Mathematics yet wish to select from a variety of Social Science subjects. Students in this profile must take Calculus I, Calculus II and Linear Algebra in their first three semesters in addition to the regular Social Science compulsory courses. Prerequisite: Math 526 or 536. FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-103 Calculus I 330-910 Western Civilization 383-920 Macroeconomics ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-203 Calculus II 350-102 Introduction to Psychology 360-300 Quantitative Methods ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SOCIAL SCIENCE WITH MATHEMATICS PROFILE 300.A1 SOCIAL SCIENCE - COMMERCE PROFILE (300.A2) The Commerce profile is primarily designed for students interested in preparing for business studies at university, however it also prepares graduates for a variety of other university programs. To complete the Commerce profile, students must pass Calculus I, Linear Algebra, Basics of Business, Microeconomics plus one additional business course or Money and Banking course in addition to the regular Social Science compulsory courses. Prerequisite: Math 526 or 536. FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-103 Calculus I 383-920 Macroeconomics 401-100 Introduction to Business ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-203 Calculus II 330-910 Western Civilization 350-102 Introduction to Psychology 360-300 Quantitative Methods COMMERCE PROFILE 300.A2
  • 29. HONOURS SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.A5) AND HONOURS SOCIAL SCIENCE WITH MATH (300.A6) AND HONOURS COMMERCE (300.A7) Honours Social Science students may follow the General Social Science profile, the Social Science with Mathematics profile or the Commerce profile. Students follow the same program and courses offered to all Social Science students with the following enhancements: • Over their four semesters at John Abbott, Honours students take common classes in Economics, History, Mathematics, Psychology and Social Science research courses. • Common meeting times to help promote peer support • Informal social activities, guest speakers, and field trips • Early registration privileges • Assistance with career exploration and university applications How to apply to Honours? • Apply to JAC on the SRAM application into: 300.30 Social Sciences 300.31 Social Sciences with Mathematics 300.32 Social Sciences - Commerce AANNDD • Apply to Honours Social Science by filling out the “John Abbott College Application for Honours Social Science”. The form is avail- able in high school guidance counsellor offices or by calling the John Abbott College Admissions Office, or on the John Abbott College web site. Students will receive an acceptance letter to John Abbott College based on their SRAM application and a letter regarding acceptance into the Honours Program. For further information about John Abbott’s Honours Social Science, Social Science with Math, and Commerce programs, please contact the Honours Social Science Coordinator, local 5717; or honours.socialscience@johnabbott.qc.ca; or the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358. 29 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 30. LEVEL 2 COURSES PONDERATION: 3.0.3 OR 2.1.3 CREDITS: 2.00 HOURS: 45 30 Not all courses are offered every semester. Consult the Schedule of Classes. SOCIAL SCIENCE LIST OF COURSES COMPULSORY COURSES LEVEL 1 COURSES 330-910-AB History of Western Civilization 350-102-AB Introduction to Psychology 383-920-AB Macroeconomics METHODOLOGY COURSES 300-300-AB Social Science Research Methods 300-301-AB Integration in the Social Sciences 360-300-RE Quantitative Methods in Social Sciences UNIVERSITY PREREQUISITES Level 201-103-RE Calculus I 1 101-901-RE Human Biology 2 201-203-RE Calculus II 2 201-105-RE Linear Algebra 2 201-301-RE Advanced Quantitative Methods 2 LEVEL 1 COURSES PONDERATION: 3.0.3 OR 2.1.3 CREDITS: 2.00 HOURS: 45 320-100-AB Introduction to Geography 332-100-AB Introduction to Classics 340-101-AB Philosophical Questions 370-100-AB World Religions 381-100-AB Introduction to Anthropology 385-100-AB Introduction to Political Science 387-100-AB Introduction to Sociology 401-100-AB Introduction to Business ANTHROPOLOGY 381-250-AB First Civilizations 381-251-AB Peoples of the World 381-252-AB Human Evolution 381-253-AB Race & Racism 381-254-AB Amerindians 381-255-AB Anthropology & Contemporary Issues BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 401-251-AB Marketing 401-253-AB Business Law 401-254-AB Introduction to Accounting 401-255-AB International Business 401-256-AB e-Business & Strategic Management GEOGRAPHY 320-256-AB Geography of Tourism 320-257-AB The Middle East: A Regional Geography 320-258-AB Geography of the World Economy 320-259-AB Geographical Information Systems 320-260-AB Cities & Urbanization 320-261-AB A Global Crisis? 320-262-AB Environmental Geography 320-263-AB People, Places, Nations ECONOMICS 383-250-AB Microeconomics 383-251-AB Money & Banking 383-253-AB Economy of Quebec & Canada HISTORY 330-250-AB History of Canada & the World 330-251-AB History of the United States 330-252-AB Modern History 330-253-AB History of the Developing World 330-254-AB Lost Civilizations 330-255-AB Ancient Greece 330-256-AB Ancient Rome 330-257-AB History of Russia and the USSR PHILOSOPHY 340-252-AB Philosophy of Education 340-253-AB Social and Political Philosophy 340-254-AB Philosophy and the Crisis of Modernity 340-255-AB Environmental Philosophy POLITICAL SCIENCE 385-250-AB Modern Political Ideas 385-251-AB Introduction to International Politics 385-252-AB Political Ideologies & Regimes 385-253-AB Canadian Politics PSYCHOLOGY 350-250-AB Child Psychology 350-251-AB Interaction & Communication 350-252-AB Psychology of Mental Health 350-253-AB Social Psychology PSYCHOLOGY cont’d 350-257-AB The Human Brain 350-258-AB Psychology of the Paranormal 350-260-AB Evolutionary Psychology 350-261-AB Psychology of Learning & Memory 350-262-AB Psychology of Sport 350-263-AB Psychology Applied to Modern Life 350-264-AB Psychology of Sensation and Perception RELIGION 370-252-AB The Problem of Evil 370-253-AB Ritual and Tradition 370-254-AB New Spiritual Movements 370-255-AB Religion, Body and Myth SOCIOLOGY 387-251-AB Mass Media & Popular Culture 387-252-AB Love, Relationships & Family 387-253-AB Sociology of Sexual Relations/Gender Relations 387-254-AB Sociology of Education 387-255-AB Race, Ethnicity & Structured Inequality 387-257-AB Environmental Sociology 387-258-AB Crime & Social Control 387-259-AB Social Problems 387-260-AB Sociology of Cyberspace
  • 31. SOCIAL SCIENCE PROGRAM CERTIFICATE IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CERTIFICATE Social Science students are offered a study option leading to a Certificate in International Studies. This option is open to all general Social Science students and is intended for those students who wish to enhance their Social Science Diploma (D.E.C.) with an international program of study. The International Studies Certificate combines cultural and multi-disciplinary learning with the option of choosing language acquisition via the complementary courses. International Studies Profile To receive a Certificate in International Studies the student must take at least six Social Science courses from the following list of eligible courses: Students in the International Profile are also encouraged to take courses in General Education which reflect the profile. They however, ddoo nnoott ccoouunntt towards the compulsory six Social Sciences courses. There are suitable courses in English and Humanities as well as complementary courses including foreign language courses. Please see the Coordinator of International Studies before starting the profile: Jim Vanstone, Hochelaga 131, local 5486, e-mail: international.studies@johnabbott.qc.ca The following five compulsory Social Science courses, required of every social science student, many not be counted as one of the six profile courses. However, both HHiissttoorryy ooff WWeesstteerrnn CCiivviilliizzaattiioonn ((333300--991100--RREE)) and MMaaccrrooeeccoonnoommiiccss ((338833--992200--RREE)) provide valuable information for the profile. All students learn essential research skills in the required courses QQuuaannttiittaattiivvee MMeetthhooddss ((336600--330000--RREE)) and RReesseeaarrcchh MMeetthhooddss ((330000--330000--9911)).. Profile students are expected to do their research project in the compulsory course Integration in the Social Sciences (300- 301-94) on a topic relevant to their chosen profile. 31 DDIISSCCIIPPLLIINNEE CCOOUURRSSEE NNUUMMBBEERR CCOOUURRSSEE TTIITTLLEE AAnntthhrrooppoollooggyy 381-251-AB Peoples of the World 381-253-AB Race and Racism BBuussiinneessss 401-255-AB International Business GGeeooggrraapphhyy 320-256-AB Geography of Tourism 320-257-AB The Middle East: A Regional Geography 320-258-AB Geography of the World Economy 320-261-AB A Global Crisis? 320-263-AB People, Places, Nations HHiissttoorryy 330-250-AB History of Canada and the World 330-251-AB History of the United States 330-252-AB Modern History: 20th Century International relations 330-253-AB History of the Developing World 330-257-AB History of Russia and USSR PPhhiilloossoopphhyy 340-101-AB Philosophical Questions PPoolliittiiccaall SScciieennccee 385-100-AB Introduction to Political Science 385-250-AB Modern Political Ideas: An Introduction 385-251-AB Introduction to International Politics 385-252-AB Political Ideologies & Regimes RReelliiggiioonn 370-100-AB World Religions SSoocciioollooggyy 387-100-AB Introduction to Sociology PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 32. ANTHROPOLOGY INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 381-100-AB (3.0.3) Anthropology is the study of all aspects of human life from the distant past to the present and throughout all areas of the world. In this course you will be introduced to the methods and concepts of physical anthropolo- gy, archaeology, and cultural anthro- pology. Through lectures and labs you will learn about human evolution, the prehistory and history of ancient civi- lizations, and the diversity of cultures in the world today. This introductory course will provide you with general knowledge of anthropology as well as prepare you for more specialized courses in the field. FIRST CIVILIZATIONS 381-250-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Archaeology as a sub-dis- cipline of Anthropology and will learn about the transition from hunting- gathering to food production. The development of early civilizations in both the Old and New Worlds will be examined through a variety of case studies from Mesopotamia, Asia, Africa, Mesoamerica, and South America. Topics to be covered in this course will include the economic bases of early civilizations, the role of religion in early civilizations, the development of social stratification, and monumental architecture and art. PEOPLES OF THE WORLD 381-251-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Cultural Anthropology and of the diversity of cultures in the world. Studying others encourages us to look more critically at ourselves. In this way, cultures come to serve as mirrors in which we can perceive our own images, past and present. This, in turn, should foster critical thinking and a broader understanding of our- selves and the world we live in. Selected cultures from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and elsewhere will be used as case studies illustrating field- work techniques, aspects of culture, and adaptation. Topics to be covered in the course will include adaptation, exchange and economic systems, domestic life, gender, anthropology and the modern world, and selected aspects of culture theory. HUMAN EVOLUTION 381-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Physical Anthropology as a sub-discipline of Anthropology and will learn about human evolution from the early Primates through to modern Homo sapiens as well as about contemporary human biologi- cal diversity. Topics to be covered include mechanisms of evolution, Primates and Primate behaviour, the Australopithecines, Homo habilis, Homo erectus, the Neanderthals, early modern Homo sapiens, contem- porary human diversity, and the con- cept of race. RACE AND RACISM 381-253-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Anthropology as these address the concept of race and the sociocultural phenomenon of racism. We will look at the history and usage of the concept of race since it first came to prominence in the 18th cen- tury and how it is linked to the devel- opment of systems of racial stratification. The course has a theo- retical as well as a vital personal dimension: as we seek to understand the social meaning of race and racism we want to continually examine and reassess our own beliefs. Topics to be considered in this course include the Anthropological perspective on race relations, the contemporary Anthropological critique of traditional racial classifications, explanations of contemporary variation, case studies (including South Africa under Apartheid, Nazi Germany and Canada) to help explain the historical, social, economic, and political forces that create and sustain racism, and concepts of ethnicity, prejudice, stereotype, discrimination, and the multiple forms that racism takes. AMERINDIANS 381-254-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Cultural Anthropology and Archaeology in the study of Native Americans. This course will give students a better understanding of the history and contemporary sta- tus of aboriginal cultures. Topics to considered include the earliest peo- pling of the Americas, the cultural prehistory of North America, the diversity of cultures during the colo- nial period, the effects of coloniza- tion, and the contemporary issues facing Canadian Indians and Inuit. ANTHROPOLOGY AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES 381-255-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Anthropology in the study of a variety of contemporary issues. The course may address a different issue whenever it is offered. Topics which may be considered in this course include human sexuality in cross-cultural perspective, the anthro- pology of war and peace, and com- parative religion, among others. The specific description of the course will be available from the department each time the course is scheduled. NNoottee:: Some Anthropology courses are offered as complimentary courses. Consult the complimentary course section of the course calendar for a list of available courses. BIOLOGY HUMAN BIOLOGY 101-901-RE (2.1.3) Human Biology is a concentration course for Social Science students in the psychology profile. Focusing on cell physiology, human reproduction genetics and on the regulation of homeostasis by the nervous and endocrine systems, this course offers an opportunity to develop an under- standing of the biological concepts which play an important role in human behaviour. 32
  • 33. BUSINESS The following courses - up to a maximum of three - may be taken by SOCIAL SCI- ENCE students. COMMERCE students are required to take Introduction to Business, one level two Business Administration course or Money and Banking (econom- ics). Accounting is recommended for stu- dents pursuing business at university. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 401-100-AB (3.0.3) This course introduces students to the primary functional areas of business study, including management, market- ing, accounting, finance, and law. Students acquire an extensive knowl- edge of business terms and concepts as well as an understanding of the role of business in society. MARKETING 401-251-AB (3.0.3) P: 401-100-AB This course introduces students to basic marketing concepts and phe- nomena. It focuses on the social impact of marketing practices, and defines marketing as the process of creating, distributing, promoting and pricing goods services and ideas to facilitate satisfying exchange relation- ships in a dynamic environment. INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING 401-254-AB (3.0.3) P: 401-100-AB This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and proce- dures of the “double-entry” book- keeping system as well as the vocabulary found in business docu- ments. Students learn correct meth- ods of recording and reporting financial data. The importance of cor- rect reporting of financial information for decision makers and its impact on society is stressed. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 401-255-AB (3.0.3) P: 401-100-AB This course focuses on the impact of International Business from the per- spective of the various stakeholders including business, consumers, gov- ernment, employees and the physical, social, and cultural environments in the trend toward a more integrated global economic system. Students learn about how business, consumer, and political objectives are played out in the global marketplace and how they impact on each other. E-BUSINESS 401-256-AB (3.0.3) P: 401-100-AB This course explores strategic manage- ment issues while simultaneously examining the rapidly developing area of business conduct on the Internet, referred to as e-business (e-commerce). Internet technology and globalization are only two social environmental forces that are greatly influencing strategic management decision-mak- ing. By examining these and other forces, students will better appreciate the strategic thinking that goes on within a variety of organizations. ECONOMICS IMPORTANT INFORMATION: Some universities require successful completion of both Macroeconomics and Microeconomics for entry into their Commerce programs. At some universi- ties students may receive an exemption for Microeconomics and Macroeconomics if their grade is 75% or more. Please check with an Academic Advisor to verify admission requirements. MACROECONOMICS 383-920-AB (3.0.3) This course familiarizes students with important concepts such as the deter- mination of gross domestic product, unemployment rate, consumer price index, business cycles, creation of money and balance of payments. Fiscal and monetary policies are examined within the context of the Canadian economy. Topics dealing with international trade and finance in relation to the Canadian experi- ence are also discussed. MICROECONOMICS 383-250-AB (3.0.3) P:383-920-AB This course acquaints students with the basic principles of microeconom- ics such as consumer theory, demand and supply, elasticity, production and costs, market structure and behavior, and the determination of factor incomes. Contemporary topics such as the environment, urban issues and government intervention in the mar- ket are discussed. Required course for the Commerce profile. MONEY AND BANKING 383-251-AB (3.0.3) P: 383-920-AB A continuation of Macroeconomics, Money & Banking involves a more detailed analysis of the money supply, commercial banking system, non- bank financial intermediaries and the functions and operations of the Bank of Canada. A more advanced Macroeconomic model is developed to give students greater insight into the workings of the Canadian econo- my. Economic policy is discussed in relation to current developments in Canadian and world economies. This course fulfills the additional Commerce level 2 course requirements. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS 383-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 383-920-AB This advanced course permits stu- dents to apply economic principles to a specific field of study. The pure the- ory of international trade, terms of trade, theory and applications of tar- iffs, balance of payments and exchange rates are discussed within the context of Canada’s substantial relation to other economies. The nature and effects of international economic institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund are also examined. Although Macroeconomics (383-920- RE) is the only prerequisite, students will find this course more rewarding if they have already taken both Macroeconomics and Microeconomics. GEOGRAPHY INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY 320-100-AB (2.1.3) This course introduces students to the main concepts, themes and methods of geography. It looks at the major subdisciplines of human and physical geography, including population, cul- tural and urban geography, climate, earth and water resources, as well as how maps can convey geographical information. The relationship between humans and their environments is stressed throughout the course. 33 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 34. GEOGRAPHY OF TOURISM 320-256-AB (2.1.3) P: 320-100-AB This course familiarizes students with the geography of travel and tourism. Particular attention is placed on the development of tourism as it depends upon and impacts on a region’s physi- cal and cultural environments. International, regional and local aspects are examined from perspec- tives such as how, why and when people travel. THE MIDDLE EAST: A REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY 320-257-AB (2.1.3) P: 320-100-AB The course presents students with an overview of the regional geography of the “Middle East”. The region’s physi- cal environment is discussed, fol- lowed by a survey of the human geography of the region. In the sec- ond half of the course, case studies of different issues are presented, such as the Arab-Israeli conflict, Islamic fun- damentalism, and resource conflicts over water and oil. An emphasis is placed throughout the course on the cultural, economic, geopolitical, and environmental roots of the issues pre- sented. GEOGRAPHY OF THE WORLD ECONOMY 320-258-AB (2.1.3) P: 320-100-AB The objective of this course is to place the subject of economic geography within the framework of world events and to illustrate the growing interde- pendence among regions with respect to economic theory, development and trade. The roots of the disparities that exist at the world scale will be examined as well as their impact on future economic development. Alternatives to the present world eco- nomic system will be discussed. GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS 320-259-AB (1.2.3) Take a new view of the world with the aid of one of the fastest growing computer technologies – Geographic Information Systems (GIS)! Students will build on the skills introduced in their Introduction to Geography course, and use state of the art GIS software to explore a variety of cur- rent issues in Geography and the Social Sciences. Through extensive use of computer labs and a coopera- tive learning environment, students will gain valuable skills that can be employed in all of their courses across the academic curriculum. Please note: Extensive computer skills are not required in order to be successful in this course. CITIES & URBANIZATION 320-260-AB (2.1.3) P: 320-100-AB This course explores the urbanization process and its role in producing geo- graphical differences among cities around the world. World urbanization patterns and the historical develop- ment of different types of cities are used to highlight a range of contem- porary urban problems and planning issues, including social inequality, the provision of housing and employ- ment, transportation planning and environmental concerns. A GLOBAL CRISIS? 320-261-AB (2.1.3) P: 320-100-AB The aim of this course is to help stu- dents formulate their positions on globalization, poverty and develop- ment, arguably some of the most important processes in the modern world. The course will begin with an analysis of poverty and how it is defined. The focus will then shift to a discussion of specific issues and the application of geographical tech- niques in the study of globalization, poverty and development; topics include: defining globalization, the major players, population and gender, the roots of hunger, and poverty and the environment. ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY: 320-262-AB (2.1.3) P: 320-100-AB This course provides students with the opportunity to analyze and apply the concepts and theories of environmen- tal geography to case studies such as water resources, smog and acid rain. A simulation of an International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) conference where students assume the roles of different participants (countries, non- governmental organizations, scientists, and sceptics) is the major focus of the second half of this course. PEOPLES, PLACES, NATIONS 320-263-AB (2.1.3) P: 320-100-AB This course challenges students to ana- lyze and apply concepts related to the study of cultural, social and political geographies. It examines the interplay between place, space and identities in the formation of social, cultural and political territories and the resulting conflicts between groups. The major themes in the course include: land- scape and the environment, the geog- raphies of language and religion, global and local cultures, community and ter- ritoriality, state and sub-state national- ism, and inter-ethnic conflict. HISTORY AND CLASSICS HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION 330-910-AB (3.0.3) The roots of western civilization in Mesopotamia and Egypt are exam- ined. Our Greek and Roman heritage, Christianity, barbarian invasions, the fall of the Roman Empire and the first great, uniquely European civilization which took shape during the Middle Ages are also covered. The course emphasizes the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Age of Discovery, Enlightenment, French Revolution, Industrialization, Nationalism and the Age of Imperialism. HISTORY OF CANADA AND THE WORLD 330-250-AB (3.0.3) P: 330-910-AB This course will allow the student to better understand their world through an examination of Canadian history and Canada’s relationship to the rest of the world. We will examine facets of the social, cultural, economic and political history of Canada from the period of the first European explorers up to the end of the twentieth centu- ry. Within this time period we will study Canada’s role in a rapidly changing world. The following topics will be covered: early European exploration, colonialisation, native American society and early relations with the Europeans, New France, British North America, Confederation, building a Nation, World War One, the Winnipeg General Strike, the Great Depression, World War Two, 34
  • 35. Canada and the Cold War, the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, Quebec Separatism, Canada’s role in International Affairs, and American- Canadian relations. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 330-251-AB (3.0.3) P: 330-910-AB This course covers the colonization of America and the founding of the American republic. The following top- ics are examined: development of American institutions, slavery, Civil War, reconstruction, western expan- sion, World War I, “Return to Normalcy”, the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War, civil rights and Vietnam. MODERN HISTORY: 20TH CENTURY INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 330-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 330-910-AB This course covers the following top- ics: World War I and the Treaty of Versailles; post-war tensions and eco- nomic problems in the l920’s; Stalinism in Communist Russia; failure of the Weimar Republic in Germany; the Great Depression and the rise of Totalitarianism; Mussolini and Fascism in Italy; Hitler and Nazism in Germany; failure of the League of Nations and outbreak of World War II; aftermath of World War II; the Cold War, United Nations and the superpowers; emergence of the Third World and Communist China; threats to world peace and the nuclear age – Korea, Vietnam, the Middle East and the breakup of the Communist world. HISTORY OF THE DEVELOPING WORLD: THE THIRD WORLD 330-253-AB (3.0.3) P: 330-910-AB This course explores definitions such as Third World, colonies, colonialism, imperialism, under-development, development, neo-colonialism, unequal trade, North-South relations, European expansion from the 15th to 20th centuries and division of the world. Case studies on Latin America, India, Africa, Asia and the Middle East are used to look at the rise of nation- alism, independence and liberation. Ideas, movements and leaders are also course themes. LOST CIVILIZATIONS 330-254-AB (3.0.3) P: 330-910-AB OR 332-100-AB This course is a survey of basic tech- niques used by archaeologists to uncov- er information about ancient societies. The course surveys several such soci- eties (Classical Mayan, Mesopotamia, Bronze Age Crete and Ancient Egypt) from the point of view of archaeology; what is known; how was the knowl- edge derived; what are the issues still unknown or in contention. ANCIENT GREECE FROM TROY TO ALEXANDER 330-255-AB (3.0.3) P: 330-910-AB OR 332-100-AB Centring on Athens and Sparta, we shall study the history of the peoples of ancient Greece from their legendary origins until the absorption of the Hellenistic kingdoms into the Roman Empire in the first century BC. The course will involve the examination of the historical events that shaped Greece, however a more in-depth study of Greek civilisation from the standpoints of economics, literature, women, religion and mythology will augment the historical background not only of this course, but of the Introduction to Classics module as well. ROME FROM REPUBLIC TO EMPIRE 330-256-AB (3.0.3) P: 330-910-AB OR 332-100-AB A detailed study of the key issues in the cultural and political life of Rome between the age of the kings in the eighth century BC until the fall of the Empire in AD 476. The course aims to discuss the formation of the Roman Empire and how this affected Rome, Italy, and the Mediterranean, both culturally and politically. The rise of the Republic and the conquest of Italy and the Mediterranean are examined against the background of an emerg- ing Roman identity and the influx of Greek culture into Rome. In addi- tion, the transition from Republic to monarchy under the emperors is analysed. The eventual downfall of the Empire and its juxtaposition with the rise and eventual triumph of Christianity closes the historical com- ponent of the course. Also, the class features a more in-depth study of Roman civilisation from the stand- points of the military, economics, liter- ature, women, religion and mythology; this will augment the his- torical background not only of this course, but of the Introduction to Classics module as well. A HISTORY OF RUSSIA AND THE USSR 330-257-AB (3.0.3) P: 330-910-AB The main events in Russian and Soviet History will be examined through a chronological framework. The course covers the time period from Kievan Rus’ to the collapse of the Soviet Union. Political, economic, social, cultural and military questions will be addressed. A study of Russian/Soviet history will provide the students with an understanding of a civilisation which spanned Europe and Asia. The following topics will be covered: Kievan Rus, the Mongol conquest, the rise of Muscovy, Imperial Russia, the Russian Revolutions of 1917, the Civil War, the New Economic Policy, Stalinism, the Great Patriotic War, the Cold War, the Khrushchev era, the era of Stagnation, the era of Glasnost and Perestroika and the collapse of the Soviet Union. CLASSICS Classics provides an excellent introduc- tion to the origins of modern civilization, while presenting societies refreshingly dif- ferent from those you may have already encountered. Second level Classics has university equiv- alencies, at both McGill and Concordia. Students who achieve a 75% (Concordia), 80% (McGill), or higher in 330-255-AB and 330-256-AB may pass straight to the 300 level in the History and Classics department of these universities. )N.B. These are equivalencies only and students will not receive university credit for college level courses). INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICS 332-100-AB (3.0.3) This course primarily deals with the history of the Classical Age in the Mediterranean world, and the civiliza- tion of the Greek and Roman worlds between 500 BC and 500 AD. Background will be given of aspects of the Paleolithic and Neolithic Ages which were essential to the rise of civ- ilized societies and important pre- Greek civilizations (Sumeria, Egypt, Minoans, et al.) of the Bronze and early Iron Ages. This course meets the first level com- pulsory course requirement for Social Science. There are no second level courses offered. 35 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 36. MATHEMATICS All students are placed into Mathematics courses according to their Secondary V Provincial results. Refer to the Math Sequence chart for Pre-University students on page 16. All students planning course selection to meet university entrance requirements should consult an Academic Advisor. CALCULUS I 201-103-RE (3.2.3) P: SEE MATH SEQUENCE CHART This course includes a review of alge- bra, functions, limits, continuity, dif- ferentiation, the derivative with business and other applications; curve sketching, optimization; derivatives using exponential, trigonometric and logarithmic functions. Required course for Commerce and Social Science with Math profiles. LINEAR ALGEBRA 201-105-RE (3.2.3) P: 201-103-RE This course covers linear systems and matrices; row operations, Gaussian elimination, Gauss-Jordan elimination, Euclidian 3-space, matrix operations, inverse of a matrix, determinants; vector spaces, span, linear depend- ence and independence, basis, linear programming, geometric interpreta- tion and simplex algorithm. Required course for Commerce and Social Science with Math profiles. CALCULUS II 201-203-RE (3.2.3) P: 201-103-RE In this course students learn about indefinite and definite integrals with applications (area, consumer’s and producer’s surplus), integration tech- niques, partial fractions, integration by parts, use of integration tables, differ- ential equations (first order separable) limits using l’Hôpital’s rule, improper integrals, sequences, series and con- vergence of series. Recommended course for Commerce profile but required for Social Science with Math profile. ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE METHODS 201-301-RE (2.1.3) P: 360-300-RE This course reviews topics covered in Quantitative Methods (360-300) and extends these topics with the following statistical concepts: probability, empiri- cal probability, axioms and fundamen- tal theorems, conditional probability, independent events, probability distri- butions, statistical inference, random sampling, estimates of mean and pro- portion, confidence intervals, tests of hypothesis, tests of the population proportion and population mean, test of fit (Chi Square). Students wishing to enter certain university programs in Psychology may require this course as a prerequi- site. Recommended course for Social Science students. METHODOLOGY QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH 360-300-RE (2.2.2) Quantitative information forms an essential aspect of Social Science research and a major part of the information we receive about the contemporary world through newspa- pers and other media. This course introduces students to the use and abuse of numbers in social research and reporting. Students learn where numbers come from, what to do with them, and what can be learned from them. The proper uses of basic descriptive statistics and statistical inference are explored through exam- ples from all the Social Sciences. In addition to lectures, students experi- ment with a variety of quantitative methods using a statistical software package in a weekly laboratory. SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH METHODS 300-300-AB (2.2.3) P: 360-300-RE Whereas Quantitative Methods focused on building numeracy skills for social science students, this course focuses on the qualitative elements of social science research across the dis- ciplines. A number of qualitative research and sampling methods are explored through exercises and research reports. Substantial time is also devoted to effective library search techniques and to reading, summarizing and writing assorted and complex texts. INTEGRATION OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 300-301-AB (1.2.4) P: 300-300-AB This is the final course for graduating Social Science students. The course draws on previous learning across level one, level two, and general education courses. Each student designs and car- ries out an independent research proj- ect, and reflects on college learning. This project includes interpretation, synthesis and evaluation of their own evolved research problem to theories and topics encountered in prior col- lege learning. This is accomplished in close coordination with a faculty mem- ber and student peers throughout the course of the semester. The final research project, presentation, and program reflection serve as the com- prehensive assessment for the Social Science Program. TThhiiss iiss aa rreeqquuiirreedd ccoouurrssee ffoorr tthhee SSoocciiaall SScciieennccee pprrooggrraamm aanndd iiss ttaakkeenn iinn tthhee ssttuuddeenntt’’ss ggrraadduuaattiinngg sseemmeesstteerr.. PHILOSOPHY Being philosophical entails exploring such fundamental questions as: What can we know, and how? What is the good life? Can we achieve it? Are we free, or is every act caused? Is beauty just in the eye of the beholder or out there in beautiful things? Do we have immaterial minds or souls as well as material bodies? Is the universe orderly or chaotic? Are there correct rules of thinking? Philosophy is a systematic attempt to understand the world and our experience. Philosophy questions basic principles, assumptions, and prejudices. Philosophy courses will encourage stu- dents to seek their own answers to the Great Questions systematically and criti- cally, in the context of the thoughts of previous seekers from around the world. Philosophy courses are also offered by the Liberal Arts and Creative Arts, Literature and Languages programs. PHILOSOPHICAL QUESTIONS 340-101-AB (3.0.3) Note: Students who have com- pleted 340-100-AB may not take this course Philosophy is the love of wisdom. It is the pursuit of understanding. It arises out of consciousness, self-conscious- ness, memory and imagination. It is generated by curiosity, wonder and inquisitiveness about the universe and about our place in it. It is the search to know what is, what could be, and what should be done. This course introduces students to some of the basic philosophical questions by examining works across time and space, diverse cultures and traditions. 36
  • 37. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 340-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 340-100-AB OR 340-101-AB Note: Students who have complet- ed 340-251-AB may not take this course What is the point of education? What is worth learning? Where should learning take place? A philosophy of education critically examines how knowledge is organized and transmit- ted. Can reality ever be represented "objectively"? How do the presupposi- tions that operate in different societies end up in the curriculum? Are we educating the next generation so that they may participate meaningfully in collective life or are we instructing them in alienation and apathy? SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 340-253-AB (3.0.3) P: 340-100-AB OR 340-101-AB Social and political philosophy exam- ines notions of power and authority within large groups (communities, societies, states). The key questions are age-old: What is the purpose of government? What is the best form of government? Are humans fundamen- tally equal or unequal? What are our rights and obligations to others? Is war an acceptable way to solve disagree- ments? Answers to such questions will vary according to historical context. Ancient civilization endorsed slavery. The Christian era equalized all humans before God, but did not sup- port social mobility. Modern political theory grants natural rights to all, opening the door to market-based progress. Critical theory of today shows the paradoxical loss of freedom in the era of mass society. This course may explore both Western and non- Western traditions. PHILOSOPHY AND THE CRISIS OF MODERNITY 340-254-AB (3.0.3) P: 340-100-AB OR 340-101-AB This course investigates the philo- sophical dilemmas raised by the apparent successes of the modern world: scientific and technological development, the recognition of human rights, the growth of democra- cies and mass markets, the separation of Church and state. Can modernity truly realize its ideals of happiness, social justice, and human dignity? Is the modern citizen condemned to anguish, loneliness and loss of mean- ing in a fast-paced world that erodes traditions and pursues unending material progress? Answers to these questions are provided by various crit- ical and radical theorists. ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY 340-255-AB (3.0.3) P: 340-100-AB OR 340-101-AB This course examines human relation- ships to the environment and whether we have obligations to future genera- tions and other species. How can we approach our interconnectedness with all life forms residing in the natu- ral world? What resources (poetic, epistemological, philosophical, moral, spiritual, political, scientific, and so on) can we draw upon for tentative answers to these enduring questions? What are, for example, the practical implications of various philosophical theories and positions for deforesta- tion, pollution, climate change, habi- tat destruction, species extinction, and nuclear energy? POLITICAL SCIENCE INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 385-100-AB (3.0.3) This course introduces students to political science and how politics, government and political systems work around the world. It provides the concepts, theories and methods that can be used to understand the political events and controversies in many countries such as Canada, United States, Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia and Japan. Topics include the modern state, form of government, political culture, con- temporary ideologies, political parties, elections and voting behaviour. MODERN POLITICAL IDEAS: AN INTRODUCTION 385-250-AB (3.0.3) P: 385-100-AB This course provides a basic introduction to the political ideologies of the left, center and right – from communism, socialism, liberalism and conservatism to fascism. It also examines the origins and development of these ideologies, focusing on how these ideologies inspire political movements such as antiglobalism and environmentalism. INTERNATIONAL POLITICS: AN INTRODUCTION 385-251-AB (3.0.3) P: 385-100-AB This course introduces students to the world of international politics. Topics include the methods of studying glob- al politics, war, conflict management, diplomacy, international law, interna- tional terrorism, human rights, global ecopolitics and international organiza- tions such as the United Nations, NATO and the International Court of Justice. POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES AND REGIMES: AN INTRODUCTION 385-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 385-100-AB This introductory course in compara- tive politics examines the basic theo- ries and methods that are used to understand the diverse political sys- tems that exist in the 21st century. It includes a framework for the compar- ison of the political structures, processes and ideological background of states around the world such as Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia, China and Japan. CANADIAN POLITICS 385-253-AB (3.0.3) P: 385-100-AB This course introduces students to the political challenges that determine the dynamics of Quebec and Canadian politics, focusing on Canadian federal- ism: the tug of war between federal and provincial governments. Topics include Quebec nationalism, the par- liamentary system of government, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the judicial system and other aspects of the political process, including politi- cal parties, elections, interest groups, political leadership and ideologies. PSYCHOLOGY Psychology is the study of the mind and the behaviour of humans and other ani- mals. It employs the scientific method as much as possible. The study is made on many levels, from the biological workings of the brain to relationships between people. Psychology courses help students understand what they and others do, think and feel, from infancy to old age. 37 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 38. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 350-102-AB (3.0.3) This course introduces students to the scientific study of specific aspects of human behaviour and mental processes including: (1) the evolution of psychological thought and the identification of major psychological perspectives; (2) research methods in the study of Psychology; (3) the bio- logical basis of behaviour, including the structure and function of the brain and nervous systems; (4) cognitive and emotional processes and, (5) learning and human adaptation. Students acquire the basic concepts and processes associated with the study of human behaviour. Further emphasis is placed on the understanding of how this knowledge and these abilities may relate to our lives and how they may apply in varying cultures. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 350-250-AB (3.0.3) P: 350-102-AB We all share the human experiences of birth, growth, and change. This course examines the physical, cogni- tive, and social development that occurs from prenatal development to adolescence. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the interaction of nature and nurture, and how devel- opment occurs within contexts and cultures. By studying the theories and research on human development the student will become more sensitive to the complexities and ambiguities inherent in understanding child psychology. INTERACTION AND COMMUNICATION 350-251-AB (3.0.3) P: 350-102-AB Communication makes us human: whether at school, work or play we are constantly absorbing information, ask- ing questions and trying to make sense of and share our discoveries. We often take this feature of our experience for granted, not realizing that social inter- action and communication are skills which can be studied and improved upon to enhance the quality of our lives. This course exposes students to the patterns of communication and social interaction and helps them appreciate the potential for personal development that may follow. Topics covered in this course include: relevant components of the processes of human interaction and communi- cation; self image, self confidence, and their characteristics; interpersonal perception; verbal and nonverbal communication; obstacles and sug- gestions for enhancement; decision making and problem solving; work groups; leadership and membership; assertive and compliant behaviors and their consequences. PSYCHOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH 350-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 350-102-AB This course is designed as an intro- duction to abnormal behaviour. Topics include anxiety disorders, mood disorders, eating disorders, schizophrenia and other syndromes. Course content includes the classifica- tion of disorders, various theoretical perspectives on etiology and therapy, and relevant research. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 350-253-AB (3.0.3) P: 350-102-AB This course explores the behaviour of people in groups. It examines the individual’s reaction in the group as well as the process of group interaction. Major topics include the formation and functioning of groups, attitudes, roles, leadership, prejudice and aggression. The impact of interperson- al relationships will also be explained. THE HUMAN BRAIN 350-257-AB (3.0.3) P: 350-102-AB This course is intended for anyone interested in the “mind-body prob- lem” or how a biological organ, the brain, can give rise to what we call “the mind”. Topics include the biolog- ical basis of perception, sleep and dreams, language, thinking, emotion, and memory. The study of these top- ics will be undertaken on many levels, from the identification of the major brain areas involved to the under- standing of basic biological processes occurring at the level of neurons or nerve cells. Students will also be intro- duced to the basic research methods used to study the brain. Special atten- tion will be given to brain dysfunc- tions and what they reveal about the mind and brain connection. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING AND MEMORY 350-261-AB (3.0.3) P: 350-102-AB This course provides students with an introduction to the basic processes and principles of learning and memo- ry. Topics include the nature-nurture debate, the basic learning paradigms (classical conditioning, operant condi- tioning, and observational learning), the nature of memory and how it works. The underlying biological basis of learning and memory within the nervous system as well as factors which strengthen learning and memo- ry will also be emphasized. Special attention will be given to practical applications to everyday life. PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT 350-262-AB (3.0.3) P: 350-102-AB Fascination with sport has reached new heights. This course examines sport behavior within the current mod- els and perspectives of psychology. Topics include the social psychological dimensions, personality assessment, aggression and sport violence, anxiety and stress management, and leader- ship in sport, drug abuse, and athletic motivation. Within these topics con- sideration will be given to children and adolescents in sport, high-risk athletes, minorities, the female sport experi- ence, and the role of the coach in sport. Further analyses include the nature of the sport psychologist and the applications of mental preparation for the elite and professional athlete. SENSATION AND PERCEPTION 350-264-AB (3.0.3) P: 350-102-AB This course will introduce the student to the scientific study of sensation and perception. The central theme is the illustration of how our senses do not function as a digital camera, taking an exact picture of our environment. On the contrary, our senses detect information from our environment like viewing pieces of a puzzle, and actively builds an internal representa- tion or final percept (puts the pieces together to form a complete picture), be it visual, tactile, olfactory, or gusta- tory, of the outside world. Students will examine the role of both physio- logical (sensory pathways) and psy- chological (experience, memory and cognitive) factors in these fundamen- tal processes. They will illustrate how 38
  • 39. the nature nurture struggle applies to even these basic sensory capabilities. It will be shown how our percept is typically an accurate representation of the environment but is not immune to perceptual errors (illusions). The question remains, are these errors or are they the by-products of efficient rule-governed and experience-based systems. Visual topics include bright- ness, object perception, attention, color, depth, size and motion process- ing. Other sensory systems, including hearing, touch, smell and taste, will also be explored. RELIGION Religious Studies attempt to analyze and understand the variety and nature of human faith/belief systems and their impact on all aspects of personal, social, economic and political life. Religion continues to be a major force for both unity and division in our world and religious beliefs and practices inform, shape and transform the human story every day. Religious studies, by examining and illuminating these belief systems, explore the variety and richness of the human response to questions of cosmolo- gy, fate, purpose, destiny, the unknown and the unknowable. Religion courses are also offered in the Liberal Arts and Creative Arts, Literature and Languages programs. WORLD RELIGIONS 370-100-AB (3.0.3) From a world full of spirits to a world without spirit (animism to modern atheism), humans the world over have dealt with issues of belief in a vast vari- ety of manners. This course will intro- duce students to the basic questions that religious studies and religions try to answer as well as the nature of the beliefs and practices of several differ- ent types of faith systems. Students will develop the vocabulary and tools needed to explore religious phenome- na and communicate respectfully with others about their discoveries. THE PROBLEM OF EVIL 370-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 370-100-AB Where do the notions of heaven and hell come from? Do communities share beliefs about heaven and hell? This course investigates some of the origins, development and significance of these ideas, as well as the concept of an afterlife. We also explore the history of personified evil in the person of Satan or the devil. We will explore how the concepts of Heaven and Hell can be used to justify a merciful God despite the existence of evil in the world, and how they are used to justify suffering and violence in this world. RITUAL AND TRADITION 370-253-AB (3.0.3) P: 370-100-AB What is the relationship between ritu- al practice and transcendence? How do myths provide practitioners with “models of and for reality” and a lan- guage for spiritual experiences? By what ritual means can one deepen spiritual understanding and create a meaningful reality? Through an exam- ination of these and other questions, this course will focus on the day-to- day practice of religious communities both contemporary and historical. NEW SPIRITUAL MOVEMENTS 370-254-AB (3.0.3) P: 370-100-AB How do new spiritual movements worldwide challenge or complement traditional religions? In this course we will discuss new possibilities explored by individuals and groups dissatisfied with religion. These will include a selection of pre-Christian practices, New Age movements and reinterpre- tations of ancient traditions. We will examine how these attempt to create a spiritual journey which resonates with contemporary reality. RELIGION, BODY AND MYTH 370-255-AB (3.0.3) P: 370-100-AB Bodies! Everyone has one. Religious traditions and spiritual communities have generated energy, anxiety, excitement, anguish, joy and love over what to do with them. Is the body to be denied, overcome, embraced, trained? May we modify, mutilate, reject, tattoo or terminate our bodies? Love, decorate or praise them? Are gender norms and sexual practices part of religion, or are they socio-cultural expressions? The body is seen as an obstacle to leading a good or spiritual existence and is also celebrated as a gift that can lead to understanding the divine. SOCIOLOGY Sociology is the scientific study of society and an integral discipline of the Social Science program. Sociology courses give students valuable employment skills: • a critical understanding of the impact of social context • the ability to analyze information • the ability to communicate clearly and persuasively • the ability to do sociological research Sociology prepares you for a fascinating range of careers from television producer, social worker, journalist, lawyer, educator, and survey researcher. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY I 387-100-AB (3.0.3) Sociology is the study of how individ- uals connect to groups and institu- tions, and how these connections help us understand the causes and consequences of human behavior. In this course you will look at everything from globalization in the developing world to the self-esteem of individu- als; from the changing Canadian fami- ly to the divisions of race, gender, and class; from corporate wealth and power to homelessness and street kids. Sociology is the broadest of all the social science disciplines, We will learn using lectures and discussions, multi-media presentations. MASS MEDIA AND POPULAR CULTURE 387-251-AB (3.0.3) This course applies the ‘sociological imagination’ to understanding the media and its influence on our every- day lives. We discuss the historical, social and economic forces that explain the content of the media and whose reality is actually being portrayed. We analyze the differences in the represen- tations of the “haves” and “have nots” in the media and how different races, classes and genders are portrayed. How does limited media ownership influence our media and who benefits from the content of our media? LOVE, RELATIONSHIPS AND FAMILY 387-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 387-100-AB While love, relationships and family are by no means dying or withering away, they are currently experiencing 39 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 40. many profound and extensive changes. This course examines histori- cal changes the family and intimate relationships are undergoing and the implications these changes have on our everyday lives. Topics include premarital and extramarital sex; cul- tural definitions of romance and love; domestic violence and intimate ter- rorism; cultural intermarriage, and the impact of reproductive technologies. SOCIOLOGY OF SEXUAL RELATIONS/GENDER RELATIONS 387-253-AB (3.0.3) P: 387-100-AB If our society is so ‘sexually liberated’, why are people still paying money to have others take their clothes off? Do you ever wonder whether sex has just become another consumer activity, with more spectators than partici- pants? With all this talk about ‘equali- ty’ why do women earn approximately 70% of what men earn, and why are they still afraid to walk alone at night for fear of being sexually assaulted? Why is the school dropout rate higher for boys and why do they feel they must maintain a ‘tough guise’? Questions such as these provide the focus of the course, designed to examine sexual and gen- der concerns we all face in our daily lives. SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION 387-254-AB (3.0.3) Education is the social institution responsible for the systematic trans- mission of knowledge, skills, and cul- tural values within a formally organized structure. This course examines many issues that arise with regards to education in Canadian society including who is to decide what should be taught in public school and the purpose of education. In addition, students will learn about the history of schooling, residential schools, public and private schools, the rise of the meritocracy and cre- dentialism, technology in schools, global perspectives in education and home schooling as a social phenome- na. Sociological theories and per- spectives will allow the student to explore race, class and gender as areas of concern. Students are encouraged to examine their own educational experiences and to envi- sion what the future of school and education will be like. CURRENT SOCIAL ISSUES 387-256-AB (3.0.3) Sociology helps us gain a better understanding of our social world and of ourselves. It enables us to see how behaviour is largely shaped by the groups to which we belong and the society in which we live. This course allows the individual instructor to choose a topic of study that is most relevant in each semester. Every topic is examined from a sociological per- spective enabling the student to understand social phenomena in depth and to understand the place of the individual within a social setting. Topics may include; terrorism, diversi- ty, social change, digital media, or any other current, important issues in society today. ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY: THE GREEN REVOLUTION GAME 387-257-AB (3.0.3) P: 387-100-AB Environmental issues and the system of globalization affect us daily in terms of how we perceive reality, define ourselves and perceive others. In order to understand the social phe- nomena of the Environment we need to understand how the Environment relates to other parts of society. We analyze the broader impacts of the Environment on society’s process of global industrialization and the posi- tive and negative associations that various social institutions such as fam- ily, religion, labour and education have with the Environment. The underlying theme of the course and the social simulation The Green Revolution Game enables us to devel- op a deeper understanding of how society and the environment interact. Consideration of how various issues within the agri-business, industrial complex and Western urban society contribute to various forms of envi- ronmental exploitation in terms of individuals and nations. We shall develop a broader worldview and have a deeper understanding of how the global system works. CRIME & SOCIAL CONTROL 387-258-AB (3.0.3) P: 387-100-AB What exactly is a ‘crime’? Has society entered a period of escalating or decreasing violence and public disor- der? What should be done to calm a public’s growing sense of insecurity and vulnerability? Do different cultures vary greatly in their attitudes toward crime prevention? Can we expect our criminal justice system to be both fair and effective? To approach questions like these, the course examines the nature of crime (i.e. murder, sexual assault, prostitution, drug abuse, organ- ized crime and business crime) and the various means, from policing and imprisonment to prevention, commu- nity safety and restorative justice, which have been designed to control and respond to crimes. This course is suggested for students who are consid- ering careers in Criminology, Police Sciences, Law, Social Work and other related fields of study. SOCIAL PROBLEMS 387-259-AB (3.0.3) P: 387-100-AB Learning about social problems can be a highly rewarding experience for the students. Although we live in diffi- cult and challenging times, a social problems course can provide a way to develop critical thinking and teach the student how to apply sociological concepts and perspectives to analyze specific social problems such as vio- lence, abuse, drug addictions, crime, terrorism, war, and other pressing social problems. To the students tak- ing this course, welcome to an inno- vative examination of social problems, their impact on our society and our everyday lives - one of the most stim- ulating and interesting fields of study in sociology. SOCIOLOGY OF CYBERSPACE 387-260-AB (3.0.3) P: 387-100-AB Sociologists have long been interested in the ways in which culture and media impact social life. This course focuses on one aspect of the media: Cyberspace. Students will examine Cyberspace and the Internet from a Sociological perspective while explor- ing the social implications of this tech- nology. This exploration will lead to many areas of interest including iden- tity and community; online gaming; pornography; hate online; journalism and blogging; censorship and privacy. Throughout these explorations we shall bring with us our inquiring minds and our sociological perspective. 40
  • 41. 41 SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SCIENCE PROGRAM PLANNER 3 YEAR PROGRAM FALL 2007 OR LATER FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-NYA-05 Mathematics: Calculus I 202-NYB-05 Chemistry of Solutions 330-910-AB Western Civilization ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 201-NYB-05 Mathematics: Calculus II 202-NYA-05 General Chemistry 350-102-AB Introduction to Psychology ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 201-NYC-05 Mathematics: Linear Algebra 203-NYA-05 Physics: Mechanics 383-920-AB Macroeconomics ___-___ Level 2 Social Science course FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 101-NYA-05 Biology: General Biology I 203-NYB-05 Physics: Electricity & Magnetism 360-300-RE Quantitative Methods in Social Science DOUBLE DEC (200.12) SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SCIENCE This new, 3-year program is for the mature student who enjoys both the Sciences and Social Sciences. Rather than having to choose between the two, it allows the student to study a broad base of subjects from math and chemistry to history and psychology. The courses offered are the same as in the regular programs so they are no more difficult. But the student has the benefit of having to take only 6 courses per semester instead of 7 or 8. Admission Requirements/Conditions: Mathematics 536* Chemistry 534* Physics 534* Students considering transferring into this program in the second semester should consult an Academic Advisor. *Student must achieve a 70% average. University Prospects: Most universities encourage a diverse study background and therefore look favourably on this program. Students who complete the Double Dec will have the necessary pre-requisites for university. For information on course selection and diploma requirements, please see the individual Science and Social Science program brochures and course listings in this Calendar. FIFTH SEMESTER 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 203-NYC-05 Physics: Waves Optics & Modern Physics 300-300-AB Social Science Research Methods ___-___ Science Option Course ___-___ Level 2 Social Science course SIXTH SEMESTER 345- HUMANITIES 300-301-AB Integration in the Social Sciences ___-___ Science Option Course ___-___ Science Option Course ___-___ Level 2 Social Science course PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 42. CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES PROGRAM PATHS TO YOUR CAREER CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES PROGRAM (500.A1) C.A.L.L. Graduates of the John Abbott Creative Arts, Literature and Languages Program will be prepared to enter university studies in fields related to the arts, including education, humanities, law, and liberal arts. This preparation will comprise both a general education and knowledge and skills specific to various disciplines within the Creative Arts, Literature and Languages Program. 42 Students will have developed the following: • A scholarly respect for, and a foundation knowledge of creative human enterprise • A critical and analytical approach to knowing about the arts and/ or the learning of foreign languages • An understanding of cultural institutions and their place in society • Experience in the creative use of various tools and techniques of production in the arts and/or languages • An understanding and appreciation of the socio-cultural implications of the arts and /or languages • A sense of the historical and contemporary role of the arts and/ or languages in the local, national and world communities • An multidisciplinary integration of the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program • An orderly work method in research and in the presentation of ideas • A commitment to ongoing personal development and an enthusiasm to know and learn more For further information about the Creative Arts, Literature and Languages Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admission Office, local 5355, 5361, 5358. Paths to Your Edu cation Native American Studies C.A.L.L. Creative Arts, Literature and Languages Art History Liberal Arts Philosophy Journalism Creative Writing Communication Religious Studies History Woman Studies Law Media ArtsCinema Broadcasting Visual Arts Art Education Political Science Comparative Literature EducationEnglish Foreign Languages Public Relations
  • 43. Languages Media Arts Theatre Arts Arts and Culture Arts and Culture with Languages Universe of the Arts I, II, III Integrating Seminar 43 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS NN..BB..:: Graduates from any of the Creative Arts, Literature and Languages profiles will receive a diploma in Creative Arts, Literature and Languages regardless of the profile chosen. NNOOTTEE:: Students are advised to consult with an Academic Advisor to learn how to build university entrance requirements into their program of study. The Creative Arts Literature and Languages Program at John Abbott College is the study of all aspects of human creativi- ty from many different perspectives. In addition to the com- pulsory foundation courses in the Universe of the Arts 1, 2, and 3 and the concluding Integrating Seminar, students choose production courses in fields such as animation, filmmaking, digital media, darkroom and digital photography, radio and television, video production, creative writing, journalism, foreign languages, painting and drawing, and theatre. Students in this option choose cultural studies courses from disciplines such as art history, dramaturgy, film studies, literature, media studies, philosophy, and religion, history of languages. This program’s greatest advantage is the breadth and depth of skills, knowledge and experience students acquire. Graduates gain invaluable skills for university in critical analysis and understanding of the arts, in research and pro- duction of creative projects and in the cohesive presenta- tion of ideas. There are five profiles in the Creative Arts, Literature and Languages (C.A.L.L.) program. ARTS AND CULTURE (500.47) The Arts and Culture profile gives students the opportunity to continue their studies in the arts begun in the Universe of the Arts courses. Students in this profile can choose ANY of the courses offered in the cultural studies and production courses. ARTS AND CULTURE WITH LANGUAGES (500.48) This profile is for the students who want to learn a foreign language and pursue the study of the arts with the same flexibility of choice as in the Arts and Culture profile. MEDIA ARTS (500.27) This Media profile is designed for those students who want to focus their studies on learning the practical skills of differ- ent media and to explore their own creativity. Students in this profile must take 2 of their cultural studies course in Film Studies and/or Media Studies and six of their produc- tion courses in Media: animation, filmmaking, digital media, darkroom and digital photography, radio and televi- sion and video production. THEATRE ARTS (500.67) The Theatre Arts profile is for students who wish to focus on studies in Theatre while also taking other production courses. Students in this profile will focus on developing and cultivating theatre skills through practical application in the form of an audience attended production in weeks 9 and 10 of each semester. Students in Theatre will be asked to stay late at least one night a week for rehearsal and upwards of six nights during the production period (since the shows are at night). LANGUAGES (500.57) The Languages profile offers students new ways of under- standing the world through the study of other languages, cultures and literature. In addition to the compulsory foun- dation courses in the Universe of the Arts 1, 2, and 3, which all students in the Creative Arts, Literature and Languages Program take together, students in the Languages profile focus on the intensive study of two foreign languages chosen from German, Italian and Spanish. Students will also take a bilingual course in linguistics / history of lan- guages, and a course in French on art and culture that builds upon the knowledge attained in the Universe of the Arts courses. Students in Languages will conclude with a bilingual course in Integrating Seminar. Graduates from the Languages profile have developed the four basic skills invaluable for success in university, speak- ing, listening, reading and writing as well as a critical analy- sis and understanding of languages as the fundamental vehicle of all human experience.
  • 44. 44 MEDIA ARTS (500.27), ARTS & CULTURE (500.47), AND THEATRE (500.67) PROFILES FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 502-UA1 Universe of the Arts I ___-___ Cultural Studies Course ___-____ Production Course ___-____ Production Course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 502-UA2 Universe of the Arts II ___-___ Cultural Studies Course ___-___ Production Course ___-___ Production Course THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 502-UA3 Universe of the Arts III ___-___ Production Course ___-___ Production Course FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course ___-___ Integrating Seminar (Profile) ___-___ Cultural Studies Course ___-___ Production Course ___-___ Production Course ARTS & CULTURE (WITH LANGUAGES) PROFILE (500.48) FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 502-UA1 Universe of the Arts I ___-___ Cultural Studies Course ___-___ Language Course I (Introductory) ___-___ Language Course II (Introductory) or ___-____ Production Course ___-____ Production Course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 502-UA2 Universe of the Arts II ___-___ Cultural Studies Course ___-___ Language Course III (Advanced) ___-___ Language Course IV (Advanced) or ___-___ Production Course ___-___ Production Course THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 502-UA3 Universe of the Arts III ___-___ Language Course I (Introductory) ___-___ Language Course II (Introductory) or ___-___ Production Course ___-___ Production Course FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course ___-___ Cultural Studies Course ___-___ Integrating Seminar (Profile) ___-___ Language Course III (Advanced) ___-___ Language Course IV (Advanced) or ___-___ Production Course ___-___ Production Course CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES PLANNER
  • 45. 45 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS ARTS & CULTURE PROFILE (500.47) To graduate with an Arts & Culture profile, students can take any combination of elective courses, ending with the Arts & Culture Integrating Seminar (502-CAG-AB) ARTS & CULTURE (WITH LANGUAGES) PROFILE (500.48) Students in the Arts & Culture with Languages profile may choose Language I & II in their 11sstt oorr 33rrdd sseemmeesstteerr OR may choose Language III & IV in their 22nndd oorr 44tthh sseemmeesstteerr (providing the student has been exempted from the Language I & II courses). All language courses are offered in an intensive format and students may ONLY choose one of the groupings (German, Italian, or Spanish) at levels I & II. Students who enter the program with previous knowledge of a foreign language mmaayy be allowed to begin at a higher level (levels III & IV). Please contact an Academic Advisor or Chair of the Foreign Languages Department for evaluation. MEDIA ARTS PROFILE (500.27) To graduate with a Media Arts profile, students must take 2 cultural studies courses from the Media Arts list and 6 pro- duction courses from the Media Arts list. Students must take their Integrating Seminar in Media Arts (530-CAM-AB) THEATRE PROFILE (500.67) To graduate with an Theatre Arts profile, students must take 2 cultural studies courses from the Theatre Arts list and 5 production courses from the Theatre Arts list. Students must take their Integrating Seminar in Theatre Arts (530-CAT-AB) LANGUAGES PROFILE (500.57) Students who enter the program with previous knowledge of a foreign language mmaayy be allowed to begin at a higher level – please contact an Academic Advisor for evaluation. The Languages Profile (500.57) of the C.A.L.L. Program offers three foreign languages, German, Italian and Spanish taught in an intensive format. Students will take a double credit elementary course in their first foreign language in the first semester, followed by a double credit intermediate course in the second semester. This process will be repeated in the second year with a second foreign language. Students in their graduating semester must take the Languages Integrating Seminar (502-DCK-AB) The aim of the Foreign Languages courses is for the stu- dent to achieve a satisfactory command and appreciation of the studied language. LANGUAGES PROFILE (500.57) FALL 2007 OR LATER FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 502-UA1-AB Universe of the Arts I 602-DCA-04 Linguistics AND ONE OFTHE FOLLOWING 607-SP1/SP2-AB Spanish I & II 608-TL1/TL2-AB Italian I & II 609-GR1/GR2-AB German I & II SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 502-UA2-AB Universe of the Arts II AND ONE OFTHE FOLLOWING 607-SP3/SP4-AB Spanish III & IV 608-TL3/TL4-AB Italian III & IV 609-GR3/GR4-AB German III & IV THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 502-UA3-AB Universe of the Arts III 602-DCB-04 Research into Arts & Culture AND ONE OFTHE FOLLOWING 607-SP1/SP2-AB Spanish I & II 608-TL1/TL2-AB Italian I & II 609-GR1/GR2-AB German I & II FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 502-DCK-04 Integrating Seminar AND ONE OFTHE FOLLOWING 607-SP3/SP4-AB Spanish III & IV 608-TL3/TL4-AB Italian III & IV 609-GR3/GR4-AB German III & IV CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES PLANNER
  • 46. 46 COURSE LIST (CREATIVE ARTS, CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES) UNIVERSE OF THE ARTS (01D0/01D1) (COMPULSORY) 502-UA1 Universe of the Arts I 502-UA2 Universe of the Arts II 502-UA3 Universe of the Arts III INTEGRATING SEMINAR IN CREATIVE ARTS (01D2) (COMPULSORY) (CHOSEN ACCORDING TO PROFILE, SEE BELOW) 502-CAG Integrating Seminar in Arts & Culture 502-CAL Integrating Seminar in Arts & Culture (w/Languages) 502-DCK Integrating Seminar in Languages 530-CAM Integrating Seminar in Media Arts 560-CAT Integrating Seminar in Theatre Arts LIST 1 CULTURAL STUDIES COURSE LIST (CHOICE OF 3 ) ARTS & CULTURE 340-PHL Philosophy: Culture & the Construction of Reality 340-PHA Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics 340-PHC Philosophy of Communication 370-REL World Religions 520-AHA Art History: Modernism & Post Modernism 603-LTR Exploring Literature MEDIA ARTS 530-FSA Film as Art 530-FSB Advance Film Studies 530-MSA Media & Culture 530-MSB Advanced Media Studies THEATRE ARTS 560-TWD Theatre Workshop: Dramaturgy 560-TWG Theatre Workshop: Genres LANGUAGES 602-DCA Languages of the World/ Langues du Monde 602-DCB Recherche en Arts & Lettres * These courses are only for language students PROFILE LIST (W / REQUIREMENTS) PROFILE Arts & Culture Arts & Culture (w/ Languages) Media Arts Theatre Arts Languages REQUIRED COURSES (REMAINING COURSES CAN BE CHOSEN FREELY) Any combination of courses (excluding Languages) Any combination of courses + 1 grouped Language 2 Media courses from List 1 + 6 Media from List 2 2 Theatre courses from List 1 + 5 Theatre from List 2 2 Language courses from List 1* + 8 Languages from List 2 INTEGRATING SEMINAR 502-CAG 502-CAL 530-CAM 560-CAT 502-DCK LIST 2 PRODUCTION COURSE LIST (CHOICE OF 8) ARTS & CULTURE 340-PHQ Philosophical Questioning 510-PD1 Painting and Drawing I 510-PD2 Painting and Drawing II 603-CWA Creative Writing A 603-CWB Creative Writing B 603-JR1 Journalism I 603-JR2 Journalism II 603-SWA Script Writing 603-SGN Signs in Film, Fine Arts and Pop Culture MEDIA ARTS 530-DM1 Digital Media I 530-DM2 Digital Media II 530-AN1 Animation I 530-AN2 Animation II 530-FM1 Filmmaking I 530-FM2 Filmmaking II 585-DK1 Darkroom Photography I 585-DK2 Darkroom Photography II 585-DP1 Digital Photography I 585-DP2 Digital Photography II 585-RD1 Radio I 585-RD2 Radio II 585-VP1 Video Production I 585-VP2 Video Production II 585-WMA Screenwriting 585-WMB Writing for the Media THEATRE ARTS 560-TWT Theatre Workshop: Techniques 560-TW1 Theatre Workshop: Production I 560-TW2 Theatre Workshop: Production II 560-TW3 Theatre Workshop: Production III 560-TW4 Theatre Workshop: Production IV LANGUAGES * (see profile restrictions) 607-SP1/607-SP2 Spanish I & II 607-SP3/607-SP4 Spanish III & IV 608-TL1/608-TL2 Italian I & II 608-TL3/608-TL4 Italian III & IV 609-GR1/609-GR2 German I & II 609-GR3/609-GR4 German III & IV
  • 47. List 1 - Cultural Studies Courses Not all courses are offered each semester. Please consult the Schedule of Classes booklet. Cultural studies courses are about cul- ture and civilization, about mass media and contemporary visual culture, and about art and technology. ARTS & CULTURE PHILOSOPHY: CULTURE AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF REALITY 340-PHL-AB (3.0.3) Culture and civilization are to be understood as the contested and fluid realm of meaning expressed in the various ways human beings attempt to make sense of the world they inhabit. We’ll examine our collective and individual experience as symbol makers and symbol consumers. PHILOSOPHY OF ART & AESTHETICS 340-PHA-AB (3.0.3) Oscar Wilde observed that “we know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” And yet, people make and enjoy art and seek and respond to beauty. We will explore the chang- ing nature, value and meaning of art and beauty, by means of readings, outings, films and “show and tell.” PHILOSOPHY OF COMMUNICATIONS 340-PHC-AB (3.0.3) This course connects the student’s experience of the creative process with the presentation of the arts to an intended audience. Students will explore practices related to the dis- semination of a variety of contempo- rary art forms. The twentieth century began with the awareness that lan- guage is central to philosophy; it ended with an appreciation that the many media have added new com- plexities to the human project. WORLD RELIGIONS 370-REL-AB (3.0.3) From a world full of spirits to a world without spirit (animism and atheism) and everything in between, this course explores the myriad expres- sions of belief through the stories humans have told one another. These stories have always been a rich source of inspiration to the arts. ART HISTORY: MODERNISM TO POST MODERNISM 520-AHA-AB (3.0.3) Twentieth century was full of provoca- tive and challenging ideas about art. Are aesthetic value and meaning of art socially constructed or they are simply the product of a particular his- torical moment and culture? Why did artists want to destroy traditional notions about fine art? Class activity will focus on discussion of specific artists, movements, and artworks from a variety of viewpoints. EXPLORING LITERATURE 603-LTR-AB-01 (3.0.3) Dramatic Literature has always played a major role in culture and civiliza- tion. This course will look at the ways in which literature, especially the dra- matic arts, has been created, spread, and interpreted. How does it mean? What does it produce? What effect do plays, movies, entertainment, and especially the scripts that make them possible, have on us and our world? This course will emphasize engaged reading, polished writing, and dra- matic presentations. Reading about the link between the- atre and film and our world, as well as experiencing that world as per- formers, readers, and critics, are an integral part of the course. MEDIA ARTS INTRO TO FILM AS ART 530-FSA-AB (3.0.3) This course is an in depth study of film as an art form covering a number of critical approaches and films over a period of film history. 4747 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS UNIVERSE OF THE ARTS I, II, III The Universe of the Arts courses are required courses for both the Creative Arts and Languages Options. You must pass I & II to register for III. Universe of the Arts I, II, III is a three-semester introduction to the major artistic and literary currents in the world, over time. Universe also introduces students to cultural institutions. Courses will include lectures, audio-visual presentations, guest artists, and outings to cultural events. Some events will be on-campus while others will be off-campus and outside of class time. UNIVERSE OF THE ARTS I: FROM CAVE ART TO MICHELANGELO’S SISTINE CHAPEL 502-UA1-AB (3.0.3) TRAVEL FEE: $10 UNIVERSE OF THE ARTS II: FROM LUTHER AND COLUMBUS TO VAN GOGH 502-UA2-AB (3.0.3) TRAVEL FEE: $20 UNIVERSE OF THE ARTS III: THE 20TH CENTURY AND BEYOND 502-UA3-AB (3.0.3) TRAVEL FEE: $30
  • 48. ADVANCED TOPICS IN FILM (ASIAN CINEMA) 530 FSB-AB (3.0.3) This course focuses on one aspect of the world of film. This term we will be studying films from Hong Kong, mainland China, Korea and Japan. VISUAL CULTURE & COMMUNICATION 530-MSA-AB (3.0.3) This course examines the complex relationship between art, media, ide- ology, knowledge, and power. Skills of critical analysis will be developed by gaining an understanding of how vari- ous forms of media work formally and stylistically. The course will teach stu- dents to analyze various forms of media, understanding how television and the press shape public opinion, and how to locate various forms of media within their economic, social and cultural contexts. ADVANCED TOPICS IN MEDIA 530-MSB-AB (3.0.3) This course will examine the speed with which the twentieth century cre- ated an electronically linked planet. From community radio to blogs, stu- dents will be introduced to the prac- tices of New Media in art and society. THEATRE THEATRE WORKSHOP: DRAMATURGY 560-TWD-AB (3.0.3) “All the world’s a stage...” Truer words have never been uttered. In the Dramaturgy course students will embark on a journey of discovery through analysis and criticism of a chosen theatrical text. Students will uncover the secrets of the playwright and unleash them on an audience. There are no prerequisites for this course. THEATRE WORKSHOP: GENRES 560-TWG-AB (3.0.3) In the Genres course students will learn techniques of reading and understanding theatrical texts using different methods of discernment. These methods include (but are not limited to): analysis of themes and character archetypes, comparison to other theatrical texts of the same ilk and placing the text in an historical and cultural context. They will then transfer these insights into a practical expression of understanding. There are no prerequisites for this course. LANGUAGES These courses are only offered for students in Languages (500.57) LINGUISTICS: LANGUAGES OF THE WORLD LES LANGUES DU MONDE 602-DCA-03 (2.2.2) Ce cours bilingue vise l’acquisition de notions de base en linguistique telles que les différentes familles de langues, la phonétique, etc. ainsi que la connaissance de différentes langues du monde dans leur contexte géo- graphique et socio-culturel. Au cours de la session, après un survol de cer- taines notions linguistiques, les étudi- ants verront une dizaine de langues plus en profondeur. In this course, students will acquire basic ideas of linguistics, such as lan- guage groupings, phonetics, etc., as well as study basics of the various world languages seen from a geo- graphic and socio- cultural oint of view. Throughout the semester, after an overview of certain linguistic prin- ciples, students will be exposed in more depth to about ten different languages. RECHERCHE EN ARTS ET CULTURES 602-DCB-03 (2.2.2) Recherche en Arts et Cultures est un cours de 2e année offert en français aux étudiants du profil Langues. À partir d’éléments de culture(s) de diverses périodes, l’étudiant devra démontrer sa capacité de réflexion, d’analyse et de critique au moyen d’une recherche. Ce cours est donné en français mais les travaux peuvent être rédigés en français ou en anglais. List 2 – Production Courses Not all courses are offered each semester. Please consult the Schedule of Classes booklet. Please note that all level II courses have prerequisites UNLESS OTHER- WISE INDICATED. The production courses are ‘hands- on’ courses. Students learn the tools and techniques of various mediums and creatively produce projects that express their ideas. Attention is placed on the relationship between the language of the medium and its significance. ARTS & CULTURE PHILOSOPHICAL QUESTIONING 340-PHQ-AB (1.2.2) Philosophy questions basic principles, assumptions, and prejudices. Why are we here? Is there a God? What is the good life? Students are encouraged to seek their own answers to the big questions in the context of familiarity with thoughts of previous seekers. Accordingly, students learn the tech- niques of sound thinking and argu- mentation and produce philosophical work based on these techniques. PAINTING AND DRAWING I 510-PD1-AB (1.2.2) This is a hands-on introductory studio course directed towards the creative process and visual thinking. We will be producing work every class and developing an understanding of how visual artists work. In direct relation to creating your own work, we will also focus on how we see, how we are influenced by what we see and how this experience can be transformed into a pictorial organization. PAINTING AND DRAWING II 510-PD2-AB (1.2.2) This advanced course is a continua- tion of the skills and ideas acquired in Painting and Drawing I. CREATIVE WRITING A: THE ART & CRAFT OF WRITING 603-CWA-AB (1.2.2) The course introduces students to the art and craft and tools of creative writing. The course will introduce stu- dents to the different genres: poetry, prose, and creative-non-fiction and the different aspects of these genres. A workshop format is used to give each student ample opportunity to critique and be critiqued. Guest writ- ers will talk about their work and process and lead workshops. CREATIVE WRITING B VISIONS AND REVISIONS 603-CWB-AB (1.2.2) This course builds on skills acquired in Introduction to Creative Writing and hones them. Emphasis will be on writing and the creation and or com- 48
  • 49. 49 pletion of a manuscript. A workshop format is used to give each student ample opportunity to critique and be critiqued. Guest writers will talk about their work and process and lead workshops. There are no prerequisites for this course. JOURNALISM I 603-JR1-AB (1.2.2) Introduction to Print Journalism: Who? What? Where? When? Why? This course introduces students to the challenging world of journalism. Students will look at the techniques of journalism: from interviewing, to fact checking, to writing. S/he will also be introduced ideas about journalism-the ethical, the legal and political aspects. JOURNALISM II: HOLD THE PRESSES 603-JR2-AB (1.2.2) This course builds on skills acquired in Introduction to Print Journalism and develops them. Publishing skills and techniques are introduced at this level. In groups, students will put a simulat- ed magazine/newspaper to bed. SCRIPT WRITING 603-SWA-AB (1.2.2) Although scriptwriting uses the same language as literary writing, it is dra- matically different. This course explores the basic craft of writing short scripts. In this course students will learn how to write a piece of dra- matic literature that is meant to be performed either on the stage or on the street. Through a mix of lecture, discussion, and writing exercises, stu- dents will be guided through the entire writing process from page to stage. MEDIA ARTS DIGITAL MEDIA I 530-DM1-AB (1.2.2) This course introduces students to the use of computers in the field of digital multimedia. Digital imaging (Photoshop), digital sound (Audacity), interactivity, web design and hyper- text (Dreamweaver) are among the topics and software that will be cov- ered during the course of the semester. This course is recommended for stu- dents who intend to take advanced media course in subsequent semesters. DIGITAL MEDIA 2 530-DM2-AB (1.2.2) This course will provide a further exploration of the tools and working methods previously introduced in Digital Media I. It is designed to teach the skills necessary to work with dif- ferent software and technical tools in conjunction in the production of digi- tal media projects. Students will produce a body of work integrating different media. They will experiment and further develop their knowledge of software applications specific to digital imaging (Photoshop CS3), digital sound (Audacity) and interactivity (Dreamweaver CS3). The emphasis will be on learning to recognize the nature of signs particular to digital media; its language, aesthetic forms, technical protocols and ways of work- ing (process). ANIMATION I 530-AN1-AB (1.2.2) This course helps students develop a sense of film animation using frame- by-frame exposure. A wide range of animation techniques is introduced including scratch film, sand anima- tion, pixilation, cell animation, clay animation, and flip books. Besides completing class exercises, students will produce one animated film based on one of the techniques introduced in class. ANIMATION II 530-AN2-AB (1.2.2) The course will build on the skills learned in Animation 1 as well as introduce new techniques of anima- tion. The use of the computer to cre- ate animations will be explored. FILMMAKING I 530-FM1-AB (1.2.2) This course in basic filmmaking tech- niques covers scripting, lighting, shooting and editing, using video as the production medium. Class meetings consist of lectures on the aesthetics of film form, demon- strations, screenings and practical exercises. Students are required to participate in group projects, prepare written film outlines and scripts, and complete two short films. FILMMAKING II 530-FM2-AB (1.2.2) This advanced film production course will build on the technical skills and the aesthetic ideas learned in Filmmaking 1. Students will explore the creative potential of film produc- tion techniques in making a work of art. We will consider different meth- ods of storytelling and communicating ideas, as well as traditional cinematic techniques (lighting, mise-en-scene, continuity, editing, etc.). DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY I 585-DK1-AB (1.2.2) This is a course in black and white 35mm.photography. In it students learn the tools and techniques of camera functions, film exposure and development and fine printing. They are introduced to the aesthetics of the black and white photographic tradi- tion as well as to contemporary issues addressed by artists using this medi- um. Students work on technical exer- cises and create a final portfolio that demonstrates technical proficiency and expresses the student’s develop- ing artistic vision. DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY II 585-DK2-AB (1.2.2) The purpose of this course is to provide a framework for students to pursue their photographic practice at an inter- mediate level. Through a brief written proposal, in which they are encouraged to explore aesthetic and theoretical concepts, students define a project that is content-driven. They are introduced to advanced and alternative technical components. They develop a photo- graphic language and learn from the work of other contemporary artists as well as that of their peers. Students must produce a final portfolio that is a coherent body of work. PPlleeaassee nnoottee:: Students registering for Darkroom Photography 1 and Darkroom Photography 2 must have a couple of hours available on either Wednesday or Friday between 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. to work in the dark- room on their assignments. Course cost is $100.00 for materials and $60.00 for camera rental. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY I 585-DP1-AB (1.2.2) In this course students will learn the basic techniques of digital photogra- phy, cameras and computer image manipulation. The tools, techniques 49 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 50. and aesthetics of digital photography as an art form in the 21st century are the focus of this course. Classes will be divided between lec- tures, photo sessions and hands on computer-lab work. Students are expected to work on technical exer- cises and produce a final portfolio that demonstrates technical proficien- cy and expresses the student’s devel- oping artistic vision. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY II 585-DP2-AB (1.2.2) This is a second level course for stu- dents who have already acquired the basic techniques of digital photogra- phy. The aim of this course is to fur- ther develop students’ technical skills through the realization of an individ- ual project. This will entail creating a proposal, evaluating the production requirements and developing the nec- essary technical knowledge. RADIO I 585-RD1-AB (1.2.2) This course examines radio as a form of verbal and cultural communication. Students prepare radio documen- taries, interviews, reviews and com- mentaries. RADIO II BROADCAST JOURNALISM 585-RD2-AB (1.2.2) This course is designed to teach stu- dents the skills of reporting, writing, and editing for Broadcast Media: Radio and Television. VIDEO PRODUCTION I 585-VP1-AB (1.2.2) An introduction to the principles and techniques of television production, this course familiarizes students with the operation of studio and on-loca- tion video equipment. Various video genres will be explored. Students will produce material containing inter- views, news, entertainment and sport- ing events. VIDEO PRODUCTION II 585-VP2-AB (1.2.2) This course will build on skills acquired in the Intro to Video pro- duction course by introducing stu- dents to pre- and post-production procedures used in news/documen- tary style production. Students will produce material using both studio and field techniques in the lab compo- nent of every class. The main emphasis of this course will be on the creation of a technically polished and interesting video news magazine broadcast. WRITING FOR FILM, RADIO, AND TELEVISION 585-WM1-AB (1.2.2) Although writing for the media uses the same language as literary writing, it is dramatically different. Writing for film focuses on the visual, for televi- sion, on the episodic and short for- mat, and for radio, on the aural. This course explores the basic craft of writ- ing short scripts for these media. THEATRE Students registering for these courses must be available on Thursday evenings and on weeknights as well as weekend during rehearsals and per- formances. THEATRE WORKSHOP: TECHNIQUES 560-TWT-AB (1.2.2) Theatre Workshop is designed prima- rily as an introduction to practical the- atre through participation in actual theatre productions. In this “tech- niques” course students will be intro- duced to the basic techniques of acting, stagecraft, costuming and pub- licity/box office that are appropriate to various types of theatre. THEATRE WORKSHOP: PRODUCTION I 560-TW1-AB (1.2.2) Theatre Workshop: Production courses focus on the acquisition of vital skills and aptitudes in the theatrical milieu. Through their participation in the cre- ation of a theatrical production (from auditions through final performance), students will become increasingly familiar with the world of theatre. THEATRE WORKSHOP: PRODUCTION 2 560-TW2-AB (1.2.2) Theatre Workshop: Production cours- es focus on the acquisition of vital skills and aptitudes in the theatrical milieu. Through their participation in the creation of a theatrical production (from auditions through final perform- ance), students will become increasing- ly familiar with the world of theatre. THEATRE WORKSHOP: PRODUCTION 3 560-TW3-AB (1.2.2) Theatre Workshop: Production courses focus on the acquisition of vital skills and aptitudes in the theatrical milieu. Through their participation in the cre- ation of a theatrical production (from auditions through final performance), students will become increasingly familiar with the world of theatre. THEATRE WORKSHOP: PRODUCTION 4 560-TW4-AB (1.2.2) Theatre Workshop: Production cours- es focus on the acquisition of vital skills and aptitudes in the theatrical milieu. Through their participation in the creation of a theatrical production (from auditions through final perform- ance), students will become increasing- ly familiar with the world of theatre. There are no prerequisites for this course. LANGUAGES Students in Arts & Culture with Languages(500.48) may enrol in any one of the following grouped languages. Students in Languages (500.57) enrol in any two elementary and intermediate grouped languages courses sequentially. PPlleeaassee nnoottee that these language courses may also be offered as separate com- plementary courses. Students may enroll in the course either for the first half of the semester or the second half. *For further information, please con- tact an Academic Advisor or the Chair of the Foreign Languages department SPANISH I AND II 607-SP1-AB (1.2.3) AND 607-SP2-AB (1.2.3) These courses are for students with little or no knowledge of Spanish. Beginners’ courses focus on the acquisition of the basic grammatical structures of the language while emphasizing the development of aural and reading comprehension as well as oral and written expression. Students will also acquire information about the geography, cultures and lin- guistics variations within the Spanish- speaking world. 50
  • 51. SPANISH III AND IV 607-SP3-AB (1.2.3) AND 607-SP4-AB (1.2.3) Intermediate courses emphasize the acquisition of a good overall sense and understanding of grammatical structures and the development of lin- guistic and communicative compe- tence through the integrated practice of aural and reading comprehension and oral and written expression. Students will also be introduced to the reading and understanding of short passages from selected literary authors in the Spanish language. NNBB:: these courses are only offered in the winter semester. ITALIAN I AND II 608-TL1-AB (1.2.3) AND 608-TL2-AB (1.2.3) These courses are for students with no knowledge of Italian. Beginners’ courses focus on the acquisition of the basic grammatical structures of the language and knowl- edge of its cultural component. ITALIAN III AND IV 608-TL3-AB (1.2.3) AND 608-TL4-AB (1.2.3) These courses are a continuation of Italian I and II. These intermediate courses will emphasize the acquisition of a good understanding of grammati- cal structures, development of linguis- tic and communication competence as well as thorough cultural knowledge. NNBB:: these courses are only offered in the winter semester. GERMAN I AND II 609-GR1-AB (1.2.3) AND 609-GR2-AB (1.2.3) These courses are for students with little or no knowledge of German. Beginners’ courses focus on the acquisition of the basic grammatical structures of the language while emphasizing the development of aural and reading comprehension as well as oral and written expression. Students will also acquire information about geography and cultures of the German-speaking countries. GERMAN III AND IV 609-GR3-AB (1.2.3) AND 609-GR4-AB (1.2.3) Intermediate courses emphasize the acquisition of an understanding of the grammatical structures and the devel- opment of linguistic and communica- tive competence through the integrat- ed practice of aural and reading comprehension and oral and written expression. Students will be presented with information on German culture. They will also be introduced to German literature through short liter- ary selections. NNBB:: these courses are only offered in the winter semester. INTEGRATING SEMINAR All graduating students will produce a project in which they will connect and apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in their studies. The topic of the project will be of the student’s choosing and it will be developed and produced with faculty guidance. The final form of projects might be writ- ten (scholarly or creative) or visual/aural (photography, painting, radio, video, installation, mixed media, sound, etc.) or some combination of the two. Students are expected to take part in an exhibition of the finished projects at the end of the semester. INTEGRATING SEMINAR IN ARTS AND CULTURE 502-CAG-AB (1.2.5) INTEGRATING SEMINAR IN ARTS AND CULTURE WITH LANGUAGES 502-CAL-AB (1.2.3) INTEGRATING SEMINAR IN MEDIA ARTS 530-CAM-AB (1.2.5) INTEGRATING SEMINAR IN THEATRE ARTS 560-CAT-AB (1.2.5) INTEGRATING SEMINAR IN LANGUAGES 502-DCK-04 (2.2.2) This course is only offered for students in languages (500.57) Students will be required to present a research paper of several modules consisting of a study of a time period through various aspects studied in the program, thereby demonstrating skills acquired in the different courses of the language profile. These various aspects are: the foreign languages studied, the study of the art and liter- ary currents, of some linguistic aspects of the foreign languages and an understanding of the socio-historical background of the time period cho- sen. Students will be required to show evidence of ability to do research including using the computer and research on the Internet as well as the use of an audio and/or visual element. The comprehensive assess- ment, which involves an oral presen- tation, will take place in this bilingual seminar. 51 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 52. FINE ARTS (510.A0) 52 The two-year Fine Arts program gives students a strong foundation in the visual arts and prepares them for further study in fine arts, art history or graphic design at uni- versity or art school. A DEC in Fine Arts is the first step towards a variety of exciting careers. The advent of computer technology has created virtually unlimited employment opportunities in the profession world-wide. As well as the traditional fields of professional artist and art teacher, Fine Arts graduates now work in areas such as industrial and graphic design, film and television animation, medical illustration, art therapy, museum admin- istration and art restoration. Some graduates combine careers as professional artists with freelance work in illustra- tion, writing about art or curating. Our faculty encourages a problem-solving approach to assignments, believing that experimentation with materials and techniques is fundamental to artistic expression. Studio work is grounded in the creative and technical exploration of drawing, painting, design, drafting, computer art, printmaking and wood, metal and plaster sculpture. Art history forms an integral part of the Fine Arts curriculum. Its connec- tion with the studio courses is reinforced by field trips to galleries and museums in Montreal and New York City. Students may be admitted to the Fine Arts Program in the Winter semester with permission from the Department. However, students should note that because of prerequi- sites on certain courses, an additional year will be required to complete the program. For further information about the Fine Arts Program, please contact the Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Fine Arts Program Chairperson, local 5792. FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 510-DCA-03 2D Studio Foundation 510-DCB-03 3D Studio Foundation 510-DCC-03 Introduction to Colour 510-DCE-03 Electronic Media (2D & 3D) 520-DCF-03 Art History (Ancient & Medieval) SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 510-DCD-03 Introduction to Print Media 510-DCG-03 2D Intermediate Studio Foundation (Painting & Drawing) 510-DCH-03 3D Studio Foundation II 520-DCK-03 Art History (Renaissance & Beyond) PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2001 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 510-DCJ-03 Intermedia Design 510-DCL-03 Advanced Painting 510-DCM-06 Intermedia Sculpture 510-DCQ-06 Advanced Projects in 2D 520-DCP-03 Art History (The Modern World) FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 510-DCN-06 Printmaking & Photographic Methods 510-DCR-03 Advanced Projects in 3D 510-DCS-06 Exhibition Project Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses.
  • 53. FINE ARTS FIRST SEMESTER 2-D STUDIO FOUNDATION 510-DCA-03 (1.2.1) This is a studio course. Its primary objectives are to expose the students to drawing materials, and concepts of rendering and composition. A variety of exercises will stimulate the stu- dents’ awareness of inter-media rela- tionships. 3-D STUDIO FOUNDATION 510-DCB-03 (1.2.1) This course is an introduction to stu- dio practice as it relates to the devel- opment of 3-dimensional form. Projects encourage an understanding of the relationship between material, process, and form. Projects will also introduce students to shop practice using machine and hand tools. INTRODUCTION TO COLOUR 510-DCC-03 (1.2.2) This is a studio course in which the students will be introduced to the theory of colour and the practice of painting. Students will study the prop- erties of colour in various media and techniques. ELECTRONIC MEDIA (2-D AND 3-D COMPUTER WORK) 510-DCE-03 (1.2.2) An introduction to the use of comput- er technology in the creation of 2-D, 3-D, and virtual art works, with emphasis on graphic design. ART HISTORY – THE ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL WORLD 520-DCF-03 (3.0.3) A survey of art from the ancient Greek world through the Middle Ages. The student will master artistic vocabulary and learn how to discuss and analyze artistic creation in archi- tecture, sculpture and painting. The importance of placing and under- standing art in an historical context will be the primary focus of the course. It will also involve linking Quebec expressions and institutions with the European foundations. SECOND SEMESTER INTRODUCTION TO PRINT MEDIA 510-DCD-03 (1.2.1) This preparatory course will touch upon the major aspects of printmak- ing processes. Students will integrate pictorial experiences in painting and drawing, and apply these various facilities to basic printmaking meth- ods. Emphasis will be on individual and practical use of media. Students will share their insights with others in a group setting. 2-D INTERMEDIATE STUDIO FOUNDATION (PAINTING & DRAWING) 510-DCG-03 (1.2.1) P: 510-DCA-03 & 510-DCC-03 This is a studio course in drawing and painting. Various materials and tech- niques will introduce the students to the interrelationship between painting media and drawing exercises. Teacher demonstrations and detailed explana- tions of techniques take place throughout the semester. 3-D STUDIO FOUNDATION II 510-DCH-03 (1.2.1) P: 510-DCB-03 This course is a continuation of proce- dures and materials explored in 3-D Studio Foundation. The course exam- ines the tools and procedures used in the working of wood and metal and the potential these materials hold for the articulation of 3-dimensional form. Students are introduced to artistic concepts and issues as they relate to 3-dimensional form. ART HISTORY – RENAISSANCE AND BEYOND 520-DCK-03 (3.0.3) A survey of art from the 14th through the 17th Century (Renaissance through the Baroque periods). This course will focus on the recognition of artistic styles, both National and European, and the various mediums of two and three-dimensional works. As a partial requirement in this course, the student will choose an artwork from this period and link it to the Quebec context. THIRD SEMESTER INTERMEDIA DESIGN 510-DCJ-03 (1.2.1) P: 510-DCD-03 Students will enjoy a wide range and depth of expression through the free- dom of silkscreen printmaking processes. Students will gain the basic technical skills needed to pro- duce a printed image. These meth- ods of printmaking will aid the student in interpretation, representa- tion and observation, of the visible world around them. ADVANCED PAINTING 510-DCL-03 (1.2.2) P: 510-DCG-03 Students will expand their knowledge of colour interaction and visual organization, but with more empha- sis placed on the development of a personal approach to assigned proj- ects. They will learn to critically ana- lyze how personal ideas and concepts on creativity may have developed during the first year in the program and how this knowledge can be further explored but also challenged in new work. Projects will be geared toward exploring the wide scope of possibilities in creative work in general but particularly in respect to working with colours. INTERMEDIA SCULPTURE 510-DCM-06 (2.4.3) P: 510-DCH-03 This course introduces the student to basic principles in sculpture and sculptural practices. Students will be exposed to basic sculptural tech- niques and a variety of media. Observational skills and insight into aesthetic and formal concerns will be emphasized. This course also intro- duces the student to the use of preparatory drawing techniques in the development of 3-dimensional form. ADVANCED PROJECTS IN 2D 510-DCQ-06 (2.4.1) P: 510-DCG-03 & 510-DCD-03 Advanced Projects in 2D concentrates on two-dimensional composition. Students participate in group critiques developing an “eye” or critical visual judgment through a sequence of stu- dio assignments that are self-initiated. Assignments are completed in draw- ing and intaglio printmaking. 53 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 54. ART HISTORY – THE MODERN WORLD 520-DCP-03 (3.0.3) This course focuses on Modern and Post-Modern art in Europe and North America. The student will be expect- ed to analyze and criticize contempo- rary art, and to extend this ability to her/his own works of art. Quebec art will be studied through a major proj- ect that will involve contemporary art- work represented in a Montreal collection. FOURTH SEMESTER PRINTMAKING AND PHOTOGRAPHIC METHODS 510-DCN-06 (2.4.3) P: 510-DCJ-03 & 510-DCQ-06 & 510-DCD-03 & 510-DCE-03 Students will work in the following media: silkscreen, intaglio, lithogra- phy, or relief printmaking using a pho- tographic process. Methods such as digital photographic manipulation, scanned images and the blending of traditional hand printmaking methods will be explored. ADVANCED PROJECTS IN 3D 510-DCR-03 (1.2.2) P: 510-DCM-06 This course extends the knowledge gained in Intermedia Sculpture. Students will explore 3-dimensional form as a mode of expression in a series of individual projects. Students are asked to develop a proposal out- lining an individual program of inves- tigation in consultation with the instructor. Emphasis is placed on individual expression and formal, material, and technical investigation. EXHIBITION PROJECT 510-DCS-06 (2.4.3) P: 510-DCJ-03 & 510-DCL-06 & 510-DCM-03 & 510-DCQ-03 Students will complete projects in both 2d and 3d areas that will pro- vide them with the opportunity to experiment and explore a wide range of advanced technical, conceptual and visual problems. Students will write a project proposal and then develop independently produced work. In the final segment of the course, students will participate in all levels of a juried group exhibition held in the school's exhibition space. In preparation for their exhibition, students will learn to critically assess their own work and to present it in a professional manner. 54
  • 55. 55 The Arts and Sciences Program is for students with a curiosi- ty and passion for disciplines in both the arts and the sci- ences. Students in the program keep their options for university wide-open. Graduates are eligible for admission to Law, Medicine, Dentistry, Architecture, Pure and Applied Science, and all other university programs in Quebec, except Music and Dance. Students interested in pursuing Fine Arts or Architecture at university need to pay special attention to putting together their portfolios. Unique among pre-university CÉGEP programs, Arts and Sciences is an enriched program that emphasizes the inte- gration of learning from its different disciplines. It combines a rigorous course of study in Mathematics, Science, and Social Science, and it incorporates courses in Fine Arts and Languages. Most notably, the program involves English and Humanities courses which integrate knowledge acquired in other Arts and Sciences courses in order to explore the rela- tionships between diverse fields of human understanding. Because of its comprehensiveness, universities look favourably on this program. Quebec universities grant a unique .5-point bonus on the R-scores of students graduat- ing from Arts and Sciences. John Abbott College is the only public English college to offer Arts and Sciences. Entrance requirements are the same as those for the Science Program. Students must have grades of 70% or higher in secondary school courses Mathematics 536, Chemistry 534, and Physics 534. Among those meeting the admission requirements, appli- cants are selected based on their aptitude for multi-discipli- nary studies and their academic profile. For further information about the Arts and Sciences Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358. PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS PPlleeaassee nnoottee:: sseeccoonndd aanndd tthhiirrdd sseemmeesstteerr ccoouurrsseess aarree iinn ddeevveellooppmmeenntt.. ARTS AND SCIENCES (700.A0) FIRST SEMESTER 603-101-04 ENGLISH 345-103-02 HUMANITIES 109-103/104-02 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-AS1-AB Differential Calculus 101-NYA-AB Biology I: General Biology 330-910-AB History 520-AS1-AB Art History SECOND SEMESTER 603-102 ENGLISH 602-10 FRENCH 109-103/104-02 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-AS2-AB Integral Calculus 202-AS1-AB Chemistry I 203-NYA-AB Physics I: Mechanics 387-AS1-AB Sociology I PROGRAM OF STUDY THIRD SEMESTER 603-103-04 ENGLISH 345-102-03 HUMANITIES 109-105-02 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 602-DB-___ FRENCH 201-AS3-AB Statistics 350-AS1-AB Psychology 510-AS1-AB Studio Art AND ONE OF THE FOLLOWING SCIENCE COURSES: 203-NYB-05 Physics 2: Electricity and Magnetism FOURTH SEMESTER 603-DBW-04 ENGLISH 345-DBV-03 HUMANITIES 383-AS1-AB Political Economy 201-AS4-AB Linear Algebra 200-AS3-AB Integrating Activity EITHER TWO OF THE FOLLOWING SCIENCE COURSES (in the 6-science version of the program): 101-DCN-05 General Biology II 202-DCP-05 Organic Chemistry I 203-NYC-05 Physics 3: Waves, Optics, and Modern Physics OR ONE OF THE ABOVE SCIENCE COURSES (in the 5-science version of the program), along with one of the following: A Social Science course or a Language course
  • 56. ARTS & SCIENCES FIRST SEMESTER ENGLISH INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 603-101-04 (2.2.4) The course surveys a representative selection of literary works from ancient to modern times. We will attempt to understand and enjoy the works studied as works of genius in their own right. In addition, the course emphasizes the ethical dimen- sions of each work, how each work reveals crucial aspects of its own cul- ture and period’s world-view, how each can be related to other fields of knowledge and human endeavour and other expressions of human self- awareness, and finally how each remains pertinent today. HUMANITIES KNOWLEDGE: THE QUEST FOR KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) What are some of the landmarks of the Western quest for knowledge? We will examine the struggles of several philosophers and scientists in their attempts to provide a reliable way of understanding our world and finding answers to our questions. Later in the term, we will study basic concepts of logic and critical thinking which we can use in order to minimize our own thinking errors. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS 201-AS1-AB (2.2.2) This course includes a review of alge- bra and functions; limits; continuity; differentiation of algebraic, trigono- metric, inverse trigonometric, expo- nential and logarithmic functions; l'Hospital's Rule and indeterminate forms; related rates; curve sketching; optimization problems. GENERAL BIOLOGY 101-NYA-AB (3.2.3) General Biology I is a compulsory Science Course for students in the Arts & Sciences Program (700.A0) and is a prerequisite for all other Biology Courses in the Program. This course offers students an introduction to the life sciences focusing on the organiza- tion, functioning and diversity of life. Upon completion of this course stu- dents will be able to: • Recognize the relationship between structure and function at different levels of organization. • Understand cell division and the genetic mechanisms important in inheritance. • Appreciate the mechanisms of evo- lution and understand how life forms adapt to their environment. • Develop a basic understanding of the principles of ecology and some of the environmental issues facing man. HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION 330-910-AB (3.0.3) The course will show the importance of historical heritage in the develop- ment of Western Civilization. It will describe the enduring economic, political, social, cultural and ideologi- cal components while situating these characteristic features of Western Civilization in time and space. There will be an emphasis on structures and ideologial characteristics which will illustrate the continuity and ruptures in Western Civilization. ART HISTORY: FROM PYRAMIDS TO POST-MODERNISM 520-AS1-AB (3.0.3) This course is designed to introduce students to outstanding achievements in the visual arts from antiquity to the end of the 20th century with an emphasis on key masters and their works in each period. The course will look at the connection between art and other disciplines and fields of human activity such as the sciences, philosophy, literature, and religion. SECOND SEMESTER ENGLISH LITERATURE, SCIENCE & THE WORLD 603-102-AB (2.2.3) This course continues the study of rep- resentative literary works. The course focuses on literature’s engagements with scientific ideas and on literary responses to developments in science and technology and the relationship of those developments to the world. INTEGRAL CALCULUS 201-AS2-AB (2.2.2) P: 201-AS1 This course covers antiderivatives; definite integrals and area; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; integration techniques: substitutions, trigonometric integrals, integration by parts, partial fractions; improper inte- grals; applications of integration: areas between curves, volumes; sequences, series and convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series. CHEMISTRY I 202-AS1-AB (3.2.3) Oriented towards the achievement of scientific and chemical literacy, this course examines physical reality through the eyes of a chemist, both at the particle and the macroscopic lev- els. Students will be trained in the analysis of a wide variety of chemical situations involving irreversible and equilibrium processes, touching on topics such as kinetics and thermody- namics, properties of solutions, and atomic and molecular structure. The final stage of the course will introduce organic chemistry. MECHANICS 203-NYA-AB (3.2.3) P: 70% IN H. S. PHYSICS 534, & 60 % IN H. S. MATH 536. Topics covered in this basic Mechanics course include linear and rotational kinematics, trajectories, Newton's Laws of Motion, work, energy and momentum. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and labo- ratory work. Many laboratory exercis- es involve using computers for data acquisition, and students use comput- ers to analyse data and plot graphs. SOCIOLOGY OF SCIENCE AND SOCIAL CHANGE 387-AS1-AB (3.0.3) The sociology of science involves the study of science as a social activity. This study is dual-focused in that it deals with both the social conditions within which science is “done” and the effects of science on society as well as the social structure of scientific activity and scientists. Students are invited to ask how science affects society and how social context affects the science that is done. A central fact about society is that it is always changing. Rapid advancements in science and technology result in such a rapid pace of change that society's value system must strain to keep up. This cultural lag is an important area of sociological research and forms an important element of student analysis. 56
  • 57. THIRD SEMESTER ENGLISH LITERATURE AND OTHER ARTS 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course continues the study of representative literary works. The course will seek to explore literature’s engagement with other arts and illu- minate the connections between liter- ature and other forms of human expression, such as the fine arts, music, architecture, film, and other media. HUMANITIES: LET US COMPARE COSMOLOGIES 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Meaning does not exist independent of the one who searches for it. In this course we will explore the concept of Cosmology, the study of the nature and order of the Universe, and then study different cosmologies with the goal of understanding how a society’s cosmology informs and guides other aspects of their culture. We will examine ways of understanding the universe that have traditionally been associated with the East, with the West, as well as those that originate from within Indigenous cultures. Finally, we will look at some examples of what happens when scientific ways of understanding the origin and nature of the universe are introduced to these societies. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 350-AS1-AB (3.0.3) The course introduces students to the scientific study of aspects of human behaviour and mental processes includ- ing 1) the evolution of psychological thought and the identification of major psychological perspectives; 2) research methods in the study of Psychology; 3) the biological basis of behavior, includ- ing the structure and function of the brain and nervous systems; 4) cognitive and emotional processes, and 5) learn- ing and human adaptation. Students acquire the basic concepts and processes associated with the study of human behavior. Further emphasis is placed on the under- standing of how this knowledge and these abilities may relate to our lives and how they may apply in varying cultures. STUDIO ART 510-AS1-AB (3.0.3) This is a studio course in the Fine Arts department. This course will take a problem-solving approach to artistic production. The course focuses on the interface between scientific pur- suit and artistic creation. Students will be presented with specific art projects that are inspired by or relate to scien- tific disciplines as well as the fields of architecture and design. Projects will require either a two-dimensional or three-dimensional solution, and stu- dents will learn basic skills associated with the Fine Arts. Independent research, analytical thinking, and cre- ative problem-solving and production are integral to the course. ELECTRICITY & MAGNETISM 203-NYB-AB (3.2.3) P: 203-NYA-AB This course emphasises the basic physical principles of electricity and magnetism, with calculus being intro- duced where necessary. Topics include Coulomb's Law, electric field, electric potential, motion of charged particles in electric fields, capacitors, DC circuits, Kirchhoff's Laws, RC cir- cuits, Biot-Savart Law, magnetic fields, torque on a current loop and Faraday's Law. STATISTICS 201-AS3-AB (2.2.2) P: 201-AS1 Topics covered in this course include frequency distributions, probability distributions of a discrete random variable, probability distributions of a continuous random variable using cal- culus, expected values including moment generating functions, sam- pling and sampling distributions, lin- ear models, point and interval estimation, and hypothesis testing of one and two parameters. FOURTH SEMESTER ENGLISH INTEGRATING B-BLOCK 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course continues the study of representative literary works, includ- ing non-fiction discursive prose. In addition to its literary explorations, the course includes a research com- ponent that is coordinated with other program courses in the fourth semes- ter and that will enhance the cross- disciplinary work done in the fourth semester Integrating Activity course. HUMANITIES ETHICS & THE WESTERN EXPERIENCE 345-DBV-03 (3.0.3) This course reviews key traditions of ethical thought in the West, using them as a foundation to analyze cur- rent moral issues. Varying emphasis on duty, utility, and virtue find com- mon ground in the ultimate pursuit of happiness. Applied to the contempo- rary context, ethics is increasingly construed as an expanded circle of moral consideration - from an elite form of anthropocentrism to, ulti- mately perhaps, a non-anthropocen- tric ethic. Selected case studies will investigate the treatment of groups at the margins of society, such as the unborn, the poor, serious offenders, and animals. Aspects of the course are coordinated with other program courses in the fourth semester to assist students in the meeting of the requirements of the Integrating Activity. POLITICAL ECONOMY 383-AS1-AB / 385-AS1-AB (3.0.2) On a daily basis there is something in the news regarding international rela- tions. Whether it be arms control treaties, economic summits, riots, militia-related deaths, war, or reports on man-made famine, there is never a shortage of exciting and trouble- some topics to review and analyze. Through readings, in-class discussions, and simulations, this course will take you through some of the major topics and event-filled crises facing our world today. Important aspects of the course work with other courses in the fourth semester to support and extend work done in the Integrating Activity. WAVES, OPTICS & MODERN PHYSICS 203-NYC-AB (3.2.3) P: 203-NYB-AB Wave behaviour is fundamental to an astonishing list of physical phenomena. The student in this course will learn how to analyse waves, in both a qual- itative and quantitative manner, and will come face-to-face with some 57 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 58. bizarre and counterintuitive implica- tions of modern physics. Topics include simple harmonic motion, waves and sound, interference and diffraction of light, quantum mechan- ics and special relativity. Students entering this course will be expected to have solid physics, math and labo- ratory skills. LINEAR ALGEBRA 201-AS4-AB (2.2.2) P: 201-AS1 Topics covered in this course include the solution of systems of linear equa- tions, matrices, determinants, vectors in two and three dimensions, dot and cross products, lines and planes, lin- ear combinations, spans, subspaces, linear dependence and independ- ence, basis, dimension, row space, column space, null space, and appli- cations. INTEGRATING ACTIVITY 300-AS3-AB 300-AS5-AB (0.3.0 / 0.5.0) The Integrating Activity is a cross-dis- ciplinary problem-solving and project- oriented lab course in which students will collaborate to demonstrate their ability to integrate knowledge from diverse disciplines covered in the course of their studies in the program. The course works in close coordina- tion with other fourth semester pro- gram courses. Depending on whether they opt to take five or six science courses, students will have either 45-hour or 75-hour versions of the Integrating Activity. All students take a 45-hour Integrating Activity together, but those in the 75-hour version will pursue further integrating activities which could include field trips, seminars, guest speakers, and lab activities and research. 58
  • 59. LIBERAL ARTS (700.B0) Students planning on university studies in law, education, languages, business, communications, social sciences and a broad range of other advanced studies (except science) will find Liberal Arts an excellent foundation. The Liberal Arts pre-university D.E.C. program offers a group of courses designed to take students on an intellectual journey of the study of humanity, beginning with pre-history and ending with the contemporary. In this journey, the courses draw upon many disciplines, especially history, philosophy, litera- ture, art, and religion. They also combine and cut across disciplines, to explore topics such as the history and methodology of science and principles of mathematics and logic. Liberal Arts helps students reach a clear understand- ing of the culture in which we live, and the many roles an individual can play in it. Equally important are the academ- ic skills which Liberal Arts develops over four semesters: analysis and critical thinking, personal responsibility, aesthet- ic response, and communication, both written and spoken. Liberal Arts courses are sequenced in order to build knowl- edge and academic skills. The Program of Study (above) indicates the sequence of required Liberal Arts courses in the program. For further information about the Liberal Arts Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Liberal Arts Coordinators, local 5178 or 5140. 59 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH: Mythology 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 332-100-AB Introduction to the Ancient World 340-910-AB Ancient Philosophy 370-121-AB Religion: Peoples and their Myths 381-101-AB Introduction to Anthropology SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH: Medieval & Renaissance Works 345- HUMANITIES: Medieval World Views 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 330-104-AB Post-Classical History 520-903-AB History of Art: Thematic Studies & Styles ___-___ One (1) Additional Concentration Course of Choice* PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2004 OR LATER See the General Education course section for English, French and Physical Education course descriptions. THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH: Enlightenment and Romanticism 345- HUMANITIES: Art & Knowledge 330-252-AB Modern History: 20th Century 340-912-AB Modern Philosophy 360-124-AB Principles of Mathematics & Logic ___-___ Two (2) Additional Concentration Courses of Choice* ___-___ FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH: Texts and Contexts 345- HUMANITIES: The Ethics of Westernism 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 360-127-AB Science: History & Methodology 360-126-AB Integrating Activity ___-___ Three (3) Additional Concentration Courses of Choice* ___-___ ___-___ * Course descriptions for additional concentration courses can be located under the course descriptions for the programs in Social Science; Creative Arts, Literature and Languages; and Science. PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 60. 60
  • 61. 61 PRE-UNIVERSITY COURSES AVAILABLE FOR LIBERAL ARTS STUDENTS Optional Courses - Total: 5 or 6 courses between 10.66 – 12 credits Not more than 3 Science or Social Science courses of 2.67 credits. Not more than 4 Creative Arts courses of 1.66 credits. SOCIAL SCIENCES: LEVEL I 101-901-AB Human Biology 2.00 201-301-RE Comp. Topics in Mathematics & QM 2.00 201-103-RE Calculus I 2.67 320-100-AB Introduction to Geography 2.00 340-101-AB Philosophical Questions 2.00 350-102-AB Introduction to Psychology 2.00 370-100-AB World Religions 2.00 383-920-AB Macroeconomics 2.00 385-100-AB Introduction to Political Science 2.00 387-100-AB Introduction to Sociology 2.00 401-100-AB Introduction to Business 2.00 SOCIAL SCIENCES: LEVEL II 201-105-RE Linear Algebra 2.67 201-203-RE Calculus II 2.67 320-256-AB Geography of Tourism 2.00 320-257-AB The Middle East: A Regional Geography 2.00 320-258-AB Geography of the World Economy 2.00 320-259-AB Geographical Information Systems 2.00 320-260-AB Cities & Urbanization 2.00 320-261-AB A Global Crisis? 2.00 320-262-AB Environmental Geography 2.00 320-263-AB People, Places, Nations 2.00 330-250-AB History of Canada and the World 2.00 330-251-AB History of the United States 2.00 330-253-AB History of the Developing World 2.00 330-254-AB Searching for Lost Civilizations 2.00 330-255-AB Ancient Greece 2.00 330-256-AB Rome from Republic to Empire 2.00 330-257-AB History of Russia & the USSR 2.00 340-252-AB Philosophy of Education 2.00 340-253-AB Social and Political Philosophy 2.00 340-254-AB Philosophy & Crisis of the Modernity 2.00 340-255-AB Environmental Philosophy 2.00 350-250-AB Child Psychology 2.00 350-251-AB Interaction and Communication 2.00 350-252-AB Mental Health 2.00 350-253-AB Social Psychology 2.00 350-257-AB The Human Brain 2.00 350-261-AB Psychology of Learning and Memory 2.00 350-262-AB Psychology of Sport 2.00 360-300-RE Quantitative Methods 2.00 370-252-AB The Problem of Evil 2.00 370-253-AB Ritual and Tradition 2.00 370-254-AB New Spiritual Movements 2.00 370-255-AB Religion, Body and Myth 2.00 381-251-AB Peoples of the World 2.00 381-250-AB First Civilizations 2.00 381-252-AB Human Evolution 2.00 381-253-AB Race and Racism 2.00 381-254-AB Amerindians 2.00 381-255-AB Anthropology & Contemporary Issues 2.00 383-250-AB Microeconomics 2.00 383-251-AB Money and Banking 2.00 383-252-AB International Economic Relations 2.00 383-253-AB Economy of Quebec and Canada 2.00 385-250-AB Modern Political Ideas 2.00 385-251-AB International Politics 2.00 385-252-AB Political Ideologies and Regimes 2.00 385-253-AB Canadian Politics 2.00 387-250-AB Introduction to Sociology II 2.00 387-251-AB Mass Media and Popular Culture 2.00 387-252-AB Love, Relationships and Family 2.00 387-253-AB Sociology of Sexual/Gender Rel'ns 2.00 387-254-AB Sociology of Education 2.00 387-256-AB Current Social Issues 2.00 387-257-AB Environmental Sociology: 2.00 The Green Revolution Game 387-258-AB Crime and Social Control 2.00 387-259-AB Social Problems 2.00 387-260-AB Sociology of Cyberspace 2.00 401-251-AB Marketing 2.00 401-254-AB Introduction to Accounting 2.00 401-255-AB International Business 2.00 401-256-AB E-Business 2.00 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 62. 62 CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (COURSES CHOSEN FROM LIST 1) 340-PHL-AB Philosophy: The Construction of Reality 2.00 340-PHA-AB Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics 2.00 340-PHC-AB Philosophy of Communication 2.00 370-REL-AB World Religions 2.00 520-AHA-AB Art History: Modernism & Post Modernism 2.00 560-TWD-AB Theatre Workshop: Dramaturgy 2.00 530-FSA-AB Film Studies A 2.00 530-FSB-AB Film Studies B 2.00 530-MSA-AB Media Studies A 2.00 530-MSB-AB Media Studies B 2.00 CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (COURSES CHOSEN FROM LIST 2) 340-PHQ-AB Philosophical Questioning 1.66 510-PD1-AB Painting and Drawing I 1.66 510-PD2-AB Painting and Drawing II 1.66 603-CWA-AB Creative Writing A 1.66 603-CWB-AB Creative Writing B 1.66 603-JR1-AB Journalism I 1.66 603-JR2-AB Journalism II 1.66 530-DM1-AB Digital Media I 1.66 530-DM2-AB Digital Media II 1.66 530-AN1-AB Animation I 1.66 530-AN2-AB Animation II 1.66 530-FM1-AB Filmmaking I 1.66 530-FM2-AB Filmmaking II 1.66 560-TWT-AB Theatre Workshop: Techniques 1.66 560-TW1-AB Theatre Workshop: Production I 1.66 585-DK1-AB Darkroom Photography I 1.66 585-DK2-AB Darkroom Photography II 1.66 585-DP1-AB Digital Photography I 1.66 585-DP2-AB Digital Photography II 1.66 585-RD1-AB Radio I 1.66 585-RD2-AB Radio II 1.66 585-VP1-AB Video Production I 1.66 585-VP2-AB Video Production II 1.66 CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES LANGUAGES OPTION 607-SP1/607-SP2 Spanish I & II 2.00 607-SP3/607-SP4 Spanish III & IV 2.00 608-TL1/608-TL2 Italian I & II 2.00 608-TL3/608-TL4 Italian III & IV 2.00 609-GR1/609-GR2 German I & II 2.00 609-GR3/609-GR4 German III & IV 2.00 SCIENCE LEVEL II: PREREQUISITES VARY – SEE SCIENCE CHART 101-DCN-05 General Biology II 2.67 101-DDB-05 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2.67 101-DDM-05 Human Genetics 2.67 201-NYB-AB Calculus II 2.67 201-NYC-AB Linear Algebra 2.67 201-DDD-05 Statistical Methods 2.67 202-NYB-AB Chemistry of Solutions 2.67 202-DDC-05 Physical Chemistry 2.67 202-DCP-05 Organic Chemistry I 2.67 202-DDP-05 Forensic Chemistry 2.67 202-DDN-05 Chemistry of the Environment 2.67 203-NYB-AB Electricity and Magnetism 2.67 203-DDM-05 Astronomy 2.67 203-DDN-05 Physics of Sports 2.67 205-DDN-05 Introduction to Oceanography 2.67 205-DDB-05 Earth's Dynamic Systems 2.67 MUSIC 550-DAA-03 A Historical Survey of 2.00 Western Art Music 550-DAB-03 Musical Literature: 2.00 A History of Afro-American Rock Music 550-DAC-AB Music of Our Time 2.00 SCIENCE LEVEL I 101-NYA-05 General Biology I 2.67 201-NYA-AB Calculus I 2.67 202-NYA-AB General Chemistry 2.67 203-NYA-AB Mechanics 2.67 205-DDM-05 Understanding Planet Earth 2.67
  • 63. LIBERAL ARTS FIRST SEMESTER ENGLISH MYTHOLOGY 603-101-04 (2.2.4) This course will introduce students to the study of mythology and its various components: its purpose, its methods, and its connections with other forms of literature, religion and cultural atti- tudes. Selections come from Native American, Hebrew, Greek and European cultures. Students will learn to use a variety of techniques to improve their comprehension of the text, to develop their analytic skills and to acquire and/or improve the skills needed to produce a research paper. INTRODUCTION TO THE ANCIENT WORLD 332-100-AB (3.0.3) This course primarily deals with the history of the Classical Age in the Mediterranean world, and the civiliza- tion of the Greek and Roman worlds between 500 BC and 500 AD. Background will be given of aspects of the Paleolithic and Neolithic Ages which were essential to the rise of civ- ilized societies and important pre- Greek civilizations (Sumeria, Egypt, Minoans, et al.) of the Bronze and early Iron Ages. ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY 340-910-AB (3.0.3) This course traces the development of classical philosophy from the pre- Socratics to Neo-Platonism. Students will be invited to ponder the work of thinkers that delineated the sphere of systematic reflection and formulated some of the perennial problems of philosophy: the origin of the world, the role of the divine element, the trustworthiness of our senses, the knowability of truth and moral axioms, the ideal type of government and the quest for human happiness. RELIGION PEOPLE AND THEIR MYTHS 370-121-AB (3.0.3) This course explores the answers to the great religious questions concern- ing meaning, appropriate relation- ships, guidelines for behavior and the nature of God as the three great ‘peo- ples of the Book’ and their respective traditions see them. We look at the historical beginnings and develop- ment of Judaism, Christianity and Islam and how particular sacred sto- ries inform each religious worldview as their respective histories unfold. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 381-101-AB (3.0.3) This course provides an introduction to the anthropological study of human evolution. Mechanisms of evolution are discussed, and the prin- cipal stages of human evolution, including Australopithecus, Homo erectus and Homo sapiens are pre- sented. Fossils and artifacts are stud- ied for each stage, and the course focuses on the biological and cultural nature of human evolution. SECOND SEMESTER ENGLISH MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE WORKS 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course will survey selected liter- ary works from over five hundred years of the most exciting and pro- foundly influential period of western culture: from medieval beginnings to the flowering of the renaissance in Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the literary aspects of the works as well as on the process of responding in the critical essay. HUMANITIES MEDIEVAL WORLD VIEWS 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course explores some important aspects of life in a period quite differ- ent from our own, and especially explores the attitudes of the people who lived during this period, towards issues which we also face: war, employment, government, education, love, beauty, the meaning of religion and forces beyond our control. It also explores the kinds of sources available for such an exploration, and the ways in which those sources can be used. HISTORY POST-CLASSICAL HISTORY 330-104-AB (3.1.3) This course enables the student to understand the basic content and structure of the History of Western Civilization from the Middle Ages to the eve of World War I. Students will also learn the methodology and con- cepts essential for producing research papers. They will acquire, in the process of meeting the requirements of this History course, the necessary skills to do research using both tradi- tional and electronic resources associ- ated with the Liberal Arts. Students will develop written and oral commu- nication skills, while exploring the geographic, religious, social, econom- ic, political and cultural factors that influenced Western history. HISTORY OF ART THEMATIC STUDIES & STYLES 520-903-AB (3.0.3) A history of art from the Ancient Greek world to the early Renaissance. This course focuses on the analysis of works of art within their historical and aesthetic context, leading to the abili- ty to think and write critically about artistic expression. THIRD SEMESTER ENGLISH ENLIGHTENMENT AND ROMANTICISM 603-103-04 (2.2.3) The emphasis in this course is on learning how to handle literature in its historical context. We will be dealing with selections which reflect the con- cerns and themes of two historical periods: the Neoclassical and the Romantic Period. This will involve a) learning how to use a variety of tech- niques to improve the basic compre- hension of the text b) developing those analytic skills needed to deal with specific pieces of literature, whether it be in terms of historical context, genre, thematic or philo- sophic content, or levels of meaning, and c) acquiring and/or improving the skills necessary to respond to those texts, especially in writing. HUMANITIES ART AND KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (2.2.2) Through an examination of art from the Renaissance to the present, in both European and non-European cultures, the student will acquire both a visceral knowledge of art and an understanding of visual expression as a form of knowledge. 63 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  • 64. HISTORY MODERN HISTORY: 20TH CENTURY 330-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 330-104-AB This course covers the following top- ics: World War I and the Treaty of Versailles; post-war tensions and eco- nomic problems in the 1920’s; Stalinism in Communist Russia; failure of the Weimar Republic in Germany; the Great Depression and the rise of Totalitarianism; Mussolini and Fascism in Italy; Hitler and Nazism in Germany; failure of the League of Nations and outbreak of World War II; aftermath of World War II; the Cold War, United Nations and the superpowers; emergence of the Third World and Communist China; threats to world peace and the nuclear age - Korea, Vietnam, the Middle East and the breakup of the Communist world. PHILOSOPHY MODERN PHILOSOPHY 340-912-78 (3.0.3) This course traces the development of modern thought from the 17th to the 19th centuries, emphasizing episte- mology, metaphysics and ethics. Topics include: rationalism and empiricism; Kant's Copernican revolu- tion; Hegel and the philosophy of his- tory; Schopenhauer and the will, and Nietzsche's critique of philosophy. PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS AND LOGIC 360-124-AB (3.2.3) This course examines the nature of formal reasoning in logic and mathe- matics. Central concepts explored are: validity, soundness, proof, axiom, postulate, theorem, consistency, and contradiction. Metamathematics and metalogic (the philosophy of mathe- matics and of logic) are explored; var- ious alternative logics are examined, as well as the limits of mathematics and logic. An example of the applica- tion of logical techniques and notions to a non-mathematical domain will be studied. FOURTH SEMESTER ENGLISH TEXTS AND CONTEXTS 603-DBV-04 (2.2.2) Texts and Contexts will familiarize stu- dents with the main contemporary approaches to literature. By describ- ing features shared by the most effec- tive critics, the course will attempt to give students a sound basis for their own writing. The approaches we examine will be applied to major writers of the 20th Century and stu- dents will be encouraged to apply these approaches to the literary texts they will be studying in their other Liberal Arts courses. HUMANITIES THE ETHICS OF WESTERNISM 345-DBZ-03 (3.0.3) Based on the study of the Great Books, the Liberal Arts program emphasizes the achievements of Western World. This course will examine the assumptions inherent in this project and how these have con- ditioned the West’s understanding and depiction of the other. The course will provide students with some of the appropriate models and frameworks with which to analyze the representation of both internal and external others in fields as diverse as science, literature, visual art and material culture. SCIENCE: HISTORY AND METHODOLOGY 360-127-AB (3.2.2) This course aims to convey a critical understanding and appreciation of the central ideas of the sciences by examining their development, the world view in which they are embed- ded, and the developing methodolo- gy that gave rise to them. INTEGRATING ACTIVITY 360-126-AB (1.2.3) This course draws together the vari- ous disciplines covered in the Liberal Arts Program, showing their interde- pendence and commonalities. The course will begin with an examination of several written works from various disciplines with the purpose of help- ing the students launch independent research projects. Students will use class presentations, discussions, writ- ten work, and especially their research project to demonstrate their ability to integrate program-related skills and knowledge. COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT 990-700-AB The comprehensive assessment in lib- eral arts takes place in the fourth semester. it consists of three modules, one each in the English, humanities, and integrative course. In the English course, students work in groups to choose, analyse, and teach a work of 20th century literature; in humanities, they work in groups and individually on a bibliographical project; and in the integrating course each student produces an interdisciplinary research essay. 64
  • 65. CAREER PROGRAMS All career programs include a general education component (English, French, Humanities, Physical Education and, complementary courses), as well as the specific content areas for each program. John Abbott’s three-year career programs are designed to provide the education and preparation needed for a variety of careers from Business Administration and Nursing to Computer Science and Theatre. Career programs combine practical and theoretical knowl- edge so students receive the best of both worlds. Most programs also include a period of work experience during the third year of study. In addition to starting new careers, some career program graduates continue on to university, either immediately after graduation or after several years in the work force. We recommend that students who may be interested in attending university discuss their plans with an academic advisor to ensure that they take the proper university prerequisites. Career opportunities for graduates of our Career Programs are excellent. Our students are in great demand by employers from the Montreal area and elsewhere. For specific information on program and career opportunities, please refer to the telephone numbers on the following pages or call the Admissions department Office at 514-457-6610, local 5355, 5361 or 5358. ACADEMIC PROGRAM STRUCTURE The program of study to be followed for each semester during a three-year career program is established according to the guidelines of the Ministry of Education. Students must comply with the specified number of courses required by the particular program. Deviations from the specified program for any semester may be made only under the direction of the Chairperson of that particular program. A planner of the courses, or dipoma requirements chart, for each career program is listed on the following pages. Please check with the program Chairperson if you have questions. REQUIREMENTS FOR A DIPLOMA After successfully completing all the specified courses in a career program, and passing the Ministerial Examination of College English and Comprehensive Program Assessment, students will receive a Diploma of Collegial Studies commonly called a DEC (diplôme d’études collégiales). 65 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 66. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (410.B0) The Business Administration program is designed to provide students with an exciting, contemporary education that will permit them to enter the workforce with ease and to pursue varied professional competencies immediately upon gradu- ation. Focused around a core of accounting courses (one per semester), and incorporating the latest information technol- ogy, business graduates will also acquire skills in a wide vari- ety of business areas including marketing, finance, and human resources. Up-to-date management information and computer courses are taught and fully integrated into many courses, and two Business Computer Laboratories are available to students. A sixth-semester, one-month stage in industry has now been expanded from the Montreal area to include possible work placements in the rest of North America or Europe. Students not only get to put into practice what they have learned in their courses, but also have the opportunity to learn about other cultures and work methods. For further information about the Business Administration program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Business Administration program Chairpersons, local 5052 or 5053. Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures section for specific admission requirements. 66 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602 FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 410-115-AB Accounting I 410-125-AB Business Software I 410-135-AB Global Vision SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 410-215-AB Accounting II 410-225-AB Business Software II 410-235-AB Marketing 410-245-AB Business Communications ACCOUNTING & MANAGEMENT OPTION PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2007 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 383-300-AB Economics for Business 410-315-AB Computerized Accounting 410-325-AB Cost Accounting 410-335-AB Project Management 410-345-AB Finance I FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES ___-___ Complementary Course 410-415-AB Management Accounting 410-425-AB Management 410-435-AB Finance II 410-445-AB International Business 410-455-AB Law in Business FIFTH SEMESTER 410-515-AB Accounting III Business 410-525-AB Computer Applications Business 410-535-AB Case Analysis Financial 410-545-AB Planning & Securities 410-555-AB Management Internal Control 410-565-AB Operations & Quality Management 410-575-AB Business Research Methods SIXTH SEMESTER 410-615-AB Tax 410-625-AB Supervision Human Resources 410-635-AB Small Business Project 410-645-AB Stage in Administration Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses.
  • 67. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FIRST SEMESTER ACCOUNTING I 410-115-AB (3.1.3) In this foundation course of the revised Business Administration Program, stu- dents learn how to collect and analyze accounting data, record all operations in the accounting cycle, classify sup- porting documents, adjust and close the accounts, and produce classified financial statements. Students com- plete a practice set which is included in their comprehensive portfolio. BUSINESS SOFTWARE 410-125-AB (2.2.1) This course provides an overview of general computer concepts and of the Windows operating system. Students are introduced to both the fundamen- tal concepts and the skills required to use a computer in a contemporary business environment. In addition, students will learn to prepare accounting worksheetsand develop management reports using Word. A combination of lectures and laborato- ry sessions will enable students to develop their computer skills using a hands-on approach. GLOBAL VISION 410-135-AB (4.0.3) In order to fully appreciate the place of business in society and use its resources, a precise understanding of the language of business is necessary. Global Vision introduces students to positions in the functional areas of mar- keting, finance, operations, law, man- agement and human resources. The course focuses on the interrelationships and the impact of national and interna- tional affairs, and explains the critical role of business in everyday social deci- sions. Using an array of learning strate- gies such as computer simulations, writ- ten projects and oral presentations, stu- dents develop the necessary skills need- ed to grasp the terms and concepts used in contemporary business. SECOND SEMESTER ACCOUNTING II 410-215-AB (3.1.3) P: 410-115-AB In this continuation of the Accounting I course, students learn the relevance and application of "fundamental accounting principles;" how to update the accounts when working with inventory, capital assets and long-term liabilities; how to modify the accounts when dealing with partnerships and corporations; and how to produce a cash-flow statement. Students com- plete a practice set which is included in their comprehensive portfolios. BUSINESS SOFTWARE 2 410-225-AB (2.2.2) P: 41 0-125-AB In this continuation of the Computer Software course, students learn the main features of Excel, PowerPoint and Access. As well, they are intro- duced to both intermediate and advanced concepts and skills required to use a computer in a contemporary business environment. The course combines lectures and laboratory ses- sions so that students develop their skills using a hands-on approach. MARKETING 410-235-AB (3.0.2) This course provides a general under- standing of the principles of market- ing, the basis of which are consumer behaviour and the marketing mix (product, price, promotion, distribu- tion). In addition, conventional mar- keting terms and definitions and the marketing manager's responsibilities are discussed. The course develops students' appreciation of the market- ing environment within a Canadian context and its relationship to market- ing problems and decisions. BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 410-245-AB (2.2.2) This course introduces students to the world of business communication, offering an overview of the wide range of communication skills, both oral and written, used by business people to present ideas clearly and persuasively. Students will be intro- duced to practical strategies for solving communication problems and learn to create well-crafted communication products in both English and French. THIRD SEMESTER FINANCE 1 410-345-AB (3.1.3) Students study the function of finance in business; practice using quantita- tive formulas associated with interest rates, present value and future value computations; use loan amortization tables. Students complete a finance project. COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING 410-315-AB (2.2.2) P: 410-115-AB After having learned in Accounting I how a manual system works, stu- dents’ now' progress to a computer- ized accounting system. Learning is achieved through hands-on practice in recording transactions for different types of businesses. After completing the course, students are able to set up a chart of accounts for a new busi- ness, record transactions, make adjusting and closing entries, and pre- pare financial statements. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 410-335-AB (2.2.1) This course provides a basic introduc- tion to some of the principles of proj- ect management. These include the planning, scheduling, and controlling of project activities to meet project objectives such as performance, cost, and time goals. Project management is a complex topic that includes issues of contracting, organizational struc- ture, project execution, and project administration. In many projects, these issues must be handled in a for- mal way according to company poli- cies, government regulations, and legal structures. ECONOMICS FOR BUSINESS 383-353-AB (3.0.2) This course provides an overview of how global economics affects a firm. It familiarizes students with important concepts such as the determination of gross domestic product, unemploy- ment rate, consumer price index, business cycles, and the creation of money. Fiscal and monetary policies is examined within the context of the Canadian economy. Students apply the theory using "a hands-on approach. COST ACCOUNTING 410-325-AB (1.2.3) P: 41O-115-AB Students learn about cost collection and reporting in job-order costing as well as process costing operations. Specifically, they will learn to calcu- late and break down costs, calculate and interpret variances, record the 67 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 68. transactions related to product costs, and present cost information in finan- cial statements and other financial reports. FORTH SEMESTER MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING 410-415-AB (2.2.3) P: 41O-325-AB This course introduces students to the contribution approach to statement presentation. Students develop oper- ating- budgets, cash budgets and fore- casted financial statements, They cal- culate and interpret budget variances and practice communicating budgets and relevant follow-up controls, as well as making proposals for action based on results. Students complete a budgeting project which is included in their comprehensive portfolio. MANAGEMENT 410-425-AB (2.2.1) This course introduces students to managerial practices in the areas of leadership, motivation, and problem solving. Students gain an understand- ing and appreciation of the power of group effort in achieving organizational goals. Management activities in planning, organizing, directing and controlling are experienced through classroom simulations and other experiences. FINANCE II 410-435-AB (3.1.3) P: 410-345-AB Students apply their skills to measur- ing risk and return, comparing plans for leasing versus purchasing an asset, carrying out analysis of an investment project, and doing a financial analysis of an organization's financial state- ments. Students complete a finance project that is included in their com- prehensive portfolio. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 410-445-AB (2.1.2) P: 410-135-AB The purpose of this course is to sur- vey the major environmental differ- ences that firms encounter when engaging in international business and how these differences influence the way business may be conducted from a legal, economic, political, cultural and technological perspective. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of international trade and investment and will be familiar- ized with the influential players in international business such as multi- national corporations, governments and international organizations. LAW IN BUSINESS 410-455-AB (3.0.2) This course introduces students to the legal environment of business, enabling them to become familiar with our society's legal structure and the function of law in the business community. Specific areas of study include the structure of the court sys- tem, court proceedings in a civil action, elements of contract law, legal forms of business and property own- ership, and business ownership. Students meet lawyers/ notaries and participate in a hands-on manner in the preparation of business registra- tions, partnership agreements, affi- davits, and other important business documents. FIFTH SEMESTER ACCOUNTING III 410-515-AB (2.1.2) P: 410-215-AB In this course students learn how to determine and record contingent lia- bilities as well as estimated liabilities such as product warranty costs. Preparation and interpretation of cash flow statements are further explored. Finally, considering the importance of governments and not for-profit-organ- izations as potential employers, recording and reporting of accounting information for these organizations is taught as well. BUSINESS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 410-525-AB (1.3.3) P: 410-225-AB The student will learn technical skills focusing on the proper management of information that enables then to respond with efficient strategies and effective business models. Using a hands-on approach, applications software will be used for problem solving so that business activities may be enhanced. BUSINESS CASE ANALYSIS 410-535-AB (2.2.3) P: 410-425-AB This course introduces the student to a professional methodology in solving business issues that involve economic assessment, risk analysis and protocol knowledge that are present in typical business organizations. Using a step- by-step approach towards analyzing problematic situations a clear identifi- cation of opportunities and benefits will be applied so that future perform- ance can be properly forecasted. INTERNAL CONTROL 410-555-AB (2.1.2) Internal control is a process which aids management in achieving its objectives to ensure effectiveness and efficiency of operations, reliability of financial reporting and compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Students learn to evaluate a compa- ny's internal control, propose and implement measures for internal auditing, carry out an internal audit and prepare an audit report. OPERATION AND QUALITY MANAGEMENT 410-565-AB (3.1.2) P: 410-215-AB Students are introduced to the follow- ing areas of operations management: acquisition of goods and services for an organization, warehouse manage- ment, inventory control, and shipping activities. These areas are dealt with in the context of an integrated supply chain system. The course also teach- es an integrated approach to quality called "Total Quality Management" (TQM). The focus is on serving cus- tomers, identifying the causes of poor quality and eliminating them, and building quality into product design and production processes. BUSINESS RESEARCH METHODS 410-575-AB (2.1.2) This course introduces students to the principles and methods of business research such as information gather- ing, sampling, data collection, types and errors of collected data, tabulat- ing and analyzing the information, interpreting the findings and stating the conclusions. Through a series of class projects, students will learn how' research techniques are applied to the solutions of business problems. FINANCIAL PLANNING & SECURITIES MANAGEMENT 410-545-AB (2.1.3) P: 410-345-AB This course provides the student with the necessary tools to examine the process involved in financial planning. 68
  • 69. The student is introduced to concepts of personal income tax planning, risk management, investment planning, retirement and estate planning as a means of obtaining desired future goals. Using a monthly budget, finances will be tracked by making income decisions in terms of spend- ing and saving so as to minimize debt and control expenses as a means of creating wealth. SIXTH SEMESTER TAXATION 410-615-AB (2.2.3) P: 410-345-AB This course introduces students to income taxation in Quebec and Canada. Students learn to process tax returns including employment, busi- ness, investment and rental income. The course implements a hands-on approach, emphasizing the use of government issued guides and forms to complete tax cases in a real-world context. Students also learn to com- plete tax cases in a computerized environment using specialized tax software. SUPERVISION HR 410-625-AB (2.2.2) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of human resources, including planning, selection, training, performance evaluation, compensa- tion, benefits, health and safety, and labor relations. In addition, it familiar- izes students with the legal aspects of human resources decision-making in a Canadian context. SMALL BUSINESS PROJECT 410-635-AB (2.2.3) P: 410-525-AB & 410-575-AB This course explores how small busi- ness people approach and think about the problems they face. Core management activities such as cre- ative problem-solving and the analysis of environmental influences on small business activities as they concern the strategic planning process are studied. Demonstration of successful under- standing of strategic business planning and other objectives for this course will be reflected in a student-pre- pared business plan for a small start- up business. STAGE IN ADMINISTRATION 410-645-AB (10.4.8) The objective of the Stage in Administration is to provide the stu- dent with the opportunity to apply the skills and abilities learned throughout the Business Administration Program. During the stage, the student will apply business administration concepts and work methods in the fields of accounting, finance, human resources manage- ment, marketing, and operations management. Their business skills and abilities and interpersonal skills will be tested as they integrate into the labour market where they will have the opportunity to compare and con- trast theories and practices in accounting, finance, human resources management, marketing and opera- tions management. The stage experi- ence will culminate with the prepara- tion and presentation of a summary report of the stage experience. 69 CAREERPROGRAMSCAREERPROGRAMS
  • 70. COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY (420.A0) Computer Science Technology is a three-year program of study designed to prepare graduates for work in the rapidly expanding world of computers. Students follow a curricu- lum that stresses theoretical and practical approaches, emphasizing computer programming, database design, mul- timedia and Internet programming, networking and techni- cal support. All third-year students are introduced to the job market through fieldwork, three days a week, in the sixth semester. Students are trained to be able to take full responsibility for small-scale development projects. Computer Science Technology graduates also have the option of continuing their studies at the university level, providing they have taken the appropriate prerequisites. For further information about the Computer Science Technology Program entrance requirements or prerequi- sites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Computer Science Technology Program Chairperson, local 5911. Refer to the Admission Policies and Procedures section for specific admission requirements. 70 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-803-AB Mathematics I 420-106-AB Programming I 420-126-AB Intro to Computer Technology SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 201-813-AB Mathematics II 420-206-AB Programming II 420-216-AB User Interfaces 420-226-AB Technical Support PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2007 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 401-803-AB Business Systems 420-306-AB Algorithmic Design 420-316-AB Database I 420-426-AB Multimedia & Internet FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 420-406-AB Data Structures 420-416-AB Database II 420-326-AB Operating Systems FIFTH SEMESTER 350-823-AB Human Relations 420-506-AB Web Programming 420-516-AB Integration Project 420-523-AB Telecommunications 420-543-AB UNIX Networking 420-616-AB Oracle Technologies SIXTH SEMESTER 420-536-AB Windows Networking 420-603-AB Object-Oriented Programming 420-659-AB Stage I 420-65B-AB Stage II Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses.
  • 71. COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FIRST SEMESTER PROGRAMMING I 420-106-AB (3.3.3) This course introduces structured and disciplined approaches to computer programming and problem solving. The C++ programming language forms the basis for the study and implementation of computer algo- rithms and the development of struc- tured programming techniques. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 420-126-AB (3.3.3) This course introduces the students to Computer Technology. Students learn to identify the components of a com- puter, how numbers and text are stored, how to research information, and the work functions of Computer Science professionals. The course top- ics include hardware characteristics, the Windows operating system, num- bering systems, the fundamentals of the Internet including web page development with HTML, word pro- cessing, spreadsheets and the tasks and tools of programmer/analysts. MATHEMATICS I 201-803-AB (2.1.2) Designed for students of Computer Science Technology, this course covers Boolean algebra, set theory and linear algebra. Topics include Boolean val- ued expressions, Boolean tables, truth tables, induction, set relationships, set operations, matrix operations, and solving systems of linear equations. SECOND SEMESTER PROGRAMMING II 420-206-AB (3.3.2) P: 420-106-AB & 420-126-AB In this course the student will learn how to build quality software. Topics include applying the principles of soft- ware engineering to build quality soft- ware, testing to detect errors, and debugging techniques. USER INTERFACES 420-216-AB (2.4.2) P: 420-106-AB & 420-126-AB In this course the students will learn to design and program user interfaces using the Visual Basic programming language. Students also learn to modi- fy user interfaces and to build online help. Topics include determining the requirements of a user interface, designing user interfaces that conform to GUI (graphics user interface) stan- dards, event-driven programming, programming with control and menus, making functional improve- ments to a program, and the design and building of online help. TECHNICAL SUPPORT 420-226-AB (2.4.2) P: 420-126-AB In this course, students will learn to install hardware and software and provide technical support and training to users. Topics include installing, configuring and the uninstalling of hardware devices and device drivers, setting up a local area network, installing and uninstalling system and application software, backing up and restoring software, hard disk partition- ing and formatting, help desk, user training, presentation graphics, and document management. MATHEMATICS II 201-813-AB (2.1.2) Designed for students of Computer Science Technology, this course covers probability and statistics. Students will learn to use a statistical package. Topics include permutations and combina- tions, binomial, normal and Poisson probability distributions, measurement scales and appropriate statistical meas- ures, interval estimation, and present- ing data with tables and graphs. THIRD SEMESTER ALGORITHM 420-306-AB (1.5.2) P: 420-206-AB & 420-216-AB In this course students will further develop their algorithmic thinking skills and improve their programming skills. There will be an emphasis on cultivat- ing an attitude and approach to solv- ing a problem as well as developing the organizational skills necessary to successfully complete a problem. The student will build algorithms to solve problems for various domains such as searching, sorting, matrix calculations, recursion, text processing, sequential file processing, encryption, compres- sion, and statistics. DATABASE I 420-316-AB (2.4.2) P: 420-206-AB & 420-216-AB In this course, students will learn how to create and use databases. Topics include designing a database, building the user interface, querying with Query by Example (QBE) and Structured Query Language (SQL), the Access object model, accessing data with DAO and ADO, building multi-user databases, and database security. OPERATING SYSTEMS 420-326-AB (2.4.2) P: 420-206-AB & 420-226-AB In this course the students learn about operating systems. Topics include the components and characteristics of operating systems, file systems, process management, memory man- agement, scripting, configuring an operating system, and system utilities. Examples will be based on industry standard operating systems such as Windows and Linux. BUSINESS SYSTEMS 401-803-AB (2.1.2) This course introduces the types and kinds of business enterprises and ownership forms. Students examine the principles and practices of busi- ness operations; including Management, Human resources, Production, Marketing, Accounting, Distribution, Operations, Legal envi- ronment and Finance. FOURTH SEMESTER DATA STRUCTURES 420-406-AB (3.3.2) P: 420-306-AB In this course the students learn to organize and use data in a computer. Topics include the logical organization and use of data in the primary memo- ry of the computer using stacks, queues, ordered linear lists, trees, and hash tables. The course also covers the logical organization and use of data on secondary support media using sequential, indexed-sequential, and direct file structures. DATABASE II 420-416-AB (3.3.2) P: 420-316-AB This course introduces students to the concepts, methods, techniques and tools of a database development proj- ect. Development involves a series of 71 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 72. models, based on drawings and moves through the levels of analysis, design and implementation. Specifically, the successful student will be able to: gather and diagram user requirements for a database; prepare process models; normalize a database to the third normal form; use SQL with an Oracle database server to cre- ate, manipulate and query the data- base structures and data. MULTIMEDIA AND INTERNET 420-426-AB (3.3.2) P: 420-216-AB This course provides the student with the tools and techniques required to deliver multimedia content over the Internet. Multimedia software and hardware for images, sounds, video and animation form the foundation for this course. For each type of media, the creation, manipulation, storage and delivery will be covered. Students will also learn how to inte- grate these different types of media within a website. FIFTH SEMESTER WEB PROGRAMMING 420-506-AB (3.3.3) P: 420-406-AB & 420-416-AB & 420-426-AB This course introduces the students to a variety of open source technologies used to design the components of a web application. The students will model the data of the application, produce a prototype, develop the application, and finally validate the application against the original model. INTEGRATION PROJECT 420-516-AB (2.4.3) P: 420-406-AB & 420-416-AB & 420-426-AB In this integration project the student will design and build a graphical application that integrates functionali- ty from database, graphical user inter- face, and Internet technologies. The project will be a sales transaction sys- tem covering typical business flow involving the management of sales, products, services, accounts receiv- able, customers, and suppliers. TELECOMMUNICATIONS 420-523-AB (2.1.3) P: 420-326-AB This course introduces the student to the role of telecommunications in the busi- ness environment. The concepts related to telecommunications and LAN/WAN networking will be covered. Students will be introduced to troubleshooting both hardware and software problems related to telecommunications, network- ing and the Internet. UNIX NETWORKING 420-543-AB (1.2.3) P: 420-326-AB Many services provided on the Internet today are delivered using computers running the Linux operat- ing system. In this course the students will use the Linux operating system to deliver a hypermedia application using Internet services. ORACLE TECHNOLOGIES 420-616-AB (1.5.3) P: 420-416-AB This course encompasses the analysis, design, implementation and installa- tion of a database project using Oracle technologies. Students are required to demonstrate the skills necessary to prototype, develop and install a multi-user database applica- tion using Oracle. HUMAN RELATIONS 350-823-AB (2.1.3) The Human Relations course for Computer Technology is designed to give the student training and experi- ence in listening skills, group prob- lem-solving, giving and receiving feedback, and other skills relating to interaction with others in the profes- sional workplace and personal life. The teaching methods for this course are mainly experiential lab work with classroom simulations and exercises designed to model real-life situations and challenges. SIXTH SEMESTER WINDOWS NETWORKING 420-536-AB (3.3.3) P: 420-326-AB This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to install, config- ure, and manage a Microsoft Windows network. OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING 420-603-AB (1.2.3) P: 420-406-AB This course presents a detailed study of the object-oriented programming paradigm. The students will learn how to apply an object-oriented approach to programming problems. Using the Java programming language, the stu- dents will define classes and apply the principles of encapsulation, inheri- tance and polymorphism. STAGE I 420-659-AB (0.9.3) P: 420-506-AB & 420-516-AB & 420-523-AB & 420-543-AB & 420-616-AB & 350-823-AB The stage enables students to apply their technical skills in a real work environment and changes the orienta- tion of the student’s activities from student/teacher to employee/ manag- er. While at the site, the student works on a project assigned by the site supervisor. The teacher (stage tutor) advises and manages these activities at John Abbott College during meetings with the student. It is as if the student works for the JAC Computer Consulting Ltd. and is sent to a client to work on a project. The student will be required to apply a client-based approach to various work situations. Planning and managing work activities is an integral part of this course. STAGE II 420-65B-AB (0.12.6) P: 420-506-AB & 420-516-AB & 420-523-AB & 420-543-AB & 420-616-AB & 350-823-AB The stage enables students to apply their technical skills in a real work environment and changes the orienta- tion of the student’s activities from stu- dent/teacher to employee/manager. While at the site, the student works on a project assigned by the site supervi- sor. The teacher (stage tutor) advises and manages these activities at John Abbott College during meetings with the student. It is as if the student works for the JAC Computer Consulting Ltd. and is sent to a client to work on a project. The student will be required to produce technical and administra- tive documents for both the company and the stage tutor. During this course, the student will complete the compo- nents of the Comprehensive Assessment by giving a presentation, and preparing a 750-word report. 72
  • 73. DENTAL HYGIENE (111.AO) Working under the supervision of a dentist, Dental Hygienists examine and chart oral conditions, scale and pol- ish teeth (periodontal debridement), apply cavity preventing agents to the teeth, take dental X-rays, insert and carve fill- ings. Dental Hygienists also teach proper oral self-care both to individuals and to groups. Job opportunities are excellent. Dental Hygiene graduates find employment in private dental practices, hospitals or CSSS’ (formerly known as CLSC’s community service cen- tres). After further education, they may be employed as educators of Dental Assistants or Dental Hygienists. In accordance with Quebec’s Official Language Act, gradu- ates must demonstrate a mastery of both oral and written French comprehension and expression before a permanent licence can be granted by l’Ordre des Hygiénistes Dentaires du Québec The John Abbott College Dental Hygiene program is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of Canada. Program Cost: • Students are required to purchase lab coats, uniforms, white shoes, safety glasses, instruments, textbooks and teacher- produced materials. The cost varies annually and may be a substantial amount in all three years of the program. • Students are responsible for replacement of instrument(s), supplies and materials as they are worn out, broken or lost. • Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from community activities and site visits. For further information about the Dental Hygiene Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Dental Hygiene Program Chairperson, local 5442. Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures section for specific admission requirements. 73 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 101-DCA-05 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 111-103-AB Introduction to the Profession 111-104-AB Dental Anatomy 111-113-AB Prevention I: Methods and Measures SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 101-214-AB Dental Microbiology 101-DCJ-05 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 111-203-AB Head and Neck Examination 111-204-AB Health and Safety 120-203-AB Nutrition: Oral Health 350-203-AB Communication and Teamwork PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2003 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 111-303-AB Health History 111-305-AB Prosthodontics 111-306-AB Periodontal Instrumentation 111-DCS-04 Detection of Oral Diseases FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 111-404-AB Prevention II: Educating the Client 111-406-AB Radiology 111-408-AB Clinic I 111-DDC-04 Restorative Dentistry FIFTH SEMESTER 345- HUMANITIES ___-___ Complementary Course 111-503-AB Advanced Periodontology 111-505-AB Community Dental Health 111-51B-AB Clinic II SIXTH SEMESTER 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 111-603-AB Integration into the Workplace 111-604-AB Community Fieldwork 111-614-AB Orthodontics 111-62B-AB Clinic III Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses. CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 74. DENTAL HYGIENE FIRST SEMESTER HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 101-DCA-05 (3.2.3) This course will prepare the student to apply their knowledge of systems of the body to the assessment of over- all health as well as the oral health of their client. In this course the student will be able to explain how the bal- anced functioning of the nervous, skeletal, endocrine and muscular sys- tems contributes to general body and oral health. The dental hygienist will use the information gathered during this course to develop the skills to implement a dental hygiene treat- ment plan. INTRODUCTION TO THE PROFESSION 111-103-AB (3.0.3) This course provides students with an introduction to the profession of den- tal hygiene and the structure of the three-year program. They will study the laws, regulations, standards and codes that govern the profession. They will be exposed to the variety of employment opportunities available to them upon graduation. They will learn about the 19 competencies that they will attain at the completion of the program. The students will learn the role of these competencies in the 10 delegated acts that a professional dental hygienist can perform in Quebec. DENTAL ANATOMY 111-104-AB (1.3.1) In this course the student will be able to examine the normal structures and functions of the dentition. The infor- mation gathered during this examina- tion will be used in order to formulate a dental hygiene treatment plan. The Dental Anatomy course will focus on the development of the skills and knowledge required to perform the intraoral exam, with special focus on the dentition. The student’s compe- tency to perform a thorough intraoral exam will be enhanced during the Head and Neck Examination course. PREVENTION I: MEASURES AND METHODS 111-113-AB (2.1.2) In this course the student will be able to explain the application of preven- tive measures and methods in relation to oral health. Since the beginning of the practice of dental hygiene, the emphasis has been on the promotion of oral health as well as the preven- tion of oral diseases. As an educator, the dental hygienist must have a thor- ough comprehension of the interac- tions needed in order to help provide for a client-centred preventive health care plan. This course provides the future dental hygienist with the knowledge and skills needed in order to successfully assist the client in oral self-care. SECOND SEMESTER HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 101-DCJ-05 (3.2.3) P: 101-DCA-05 & 111-103-AB 111-104-AB & 111-113-AB This course continues from Human Anatomy and Physiology I to study the organization and functioning of the human body and provide a basic understanding of genetics. The systems discussed include the digestive, cardio- vascular, respiratory, urinary reproduc- tive systems, and an introduction to human genetics. These systems are taught with an emphasis on homeosta- tic control mechanisms and their con- tribution to oral health. The dental hygienist will use the information gath- ered during this course to further develop the skills needed to imple- ment a dental hygiene treatment plan. DENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 101-214-AB (2.2.2) P: 101-DCA-05 & 111-103-AB 111-104-AB & 111-113-AB A sound working knowledge of microbiology and immunology is essential for safe practice in the clini- cal area. The Dental Microbiology course will focus on the skills and knowledge required to identify and minimize the risk of transmission of infectious diseases. The student will become competent in the principles and techniques of asepsis, disinfection and sterilization. In addition, the stu- dent will be introduced to the role of micro-organisms in the development of dental diseases. In this course the student will be able to examine con- nections between the modes of trans- mission of micro-organisms and protection measures, standard pre- cautions, health and safety measures, and preventive measures in relation to oral health. HEAD AND NECK EXAMINATION 111-203-AB (1.2.1) P: 101-DCA-05 & 111-103-AB 111-104-AB & 111-113-AB One of the roles of a dental hygienist is to perform a thorough examination of the head and neck for each client. This exam is composed of two major steps: the intraoral exam and the extraoral exam. Following the Dental Anatomy course in the previous semester, the student is able to exam- ine the dentition of the client. This skill will be incorporated with the ability to examine the soft tissues of the intraoral environment. The stu- dent will also learn the skills and knowledge required to perform the extraoral exam by studying the nor- mal structures and functions of the head and neck. HEALTH AND SAFETY 111-204-AB (2.2.2) P: 101-DCA-05 & 111-103-AB 111-104-AB & 111-113-AB The dental hygiene student will learn the clinical application of standard precautions, ergonomic techniques, regulations in the workplace, and the safe handling and maintenance of dental materials and equipment. Special emphasis will be given to the appropriate use of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation techniques (CPR) and emergency care procedures. In this course the student will be able to apply health and safety measures and apply standard precautions. NUTRITION AND ORAL HEALTH 120-203-AB (3.0.3) P: 101-DCA-05 & 111-103-AB 111-104-AB & 111-113-AB The promotion of oral health as well as the prevention of oral diseases is an important aspect of dental hygiene practice. An integral component of oral health, nutrition, provides future dental hygienists with the knowledge and skills needed in order to apply sound nutrition principles in assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluat- ing total care of clients. 74
  • 75. COMMUNICATION AND TEAMWORK 350-203-AB (3.0.3) P: 101-DCA-05 & 111-103-AB 111-104-AB & 111-113-AB This course explores the practical aspects of psychology. It has two main goals: 1) to provide knowledge about models of human growth and devel- opment; 2) to show how these princi- ples can be applied to promote one’s personal growth and adjustment skills such as the ability to see oneself real- istically, to manage time, weight, etc. to cope with stress, make ethical judgements and communicate effec- tively with others. THIRD SEMESTER HEALTH HISTORY 111-303-AB (3.0.3) P: 101-214-AB & 101-DCJ-AB & 111-203-AB & 111-204-AB & 120-203-AB & 350-203-AB This course will introduce the student to the science of pharmacology, where the effect of pharmaceutical products on preventive and curative treatments will be taught. The student will also learn the importance of gath- ering accurate personal, medical and dental information to complete the client’s health history. Epidemiological approach to health and illness will be discussed. The student will learn how to evaluate the precautions to be taken in the presence of systemic dis- eases. The student will acquire the ability to fully incorporate relevant health information into the client’s dental hygiene treatment plan. PROSTHODONTICS 111-305-AB (2.3.2) P: 101-214-AB & 101-DCJ-AB & 111-203-AB & 111-204-AB & 120-203-AB & 350-203-AB In this course the student will be able to perform procedures related to prosthodontics. The student will have the opportunity to learn the theory behind certain products used in den- tistry. Topics that will be discussed are the physical conditions of the oral environment, the physical properties of dental materials, gypsum products, impression materials, restorative and prosthodontic materials, cements, waxes, varnishes, preventive products, periodontal packs, abrasives including dentifrices, acrylic & plastics, and implants. There is also a significant practical component that allows for skill development in handling various materials. PERIODONTAL INSTRUMENTATION 111-306-AB (2.4.2) P: 101-214-AB & 101-DCJ-AB & 111-203-AB & 111-204-AB & 120-203-AB & 350-203-AB The student will develop the skill and knowledge in order to perform peri- odontal therapies and perform a selective polishing. The student will learn to select the appropriate instru- ments for the removal of calcified deposits while respecting tissue integrity. The student will also learn selective polishing. The student will work in a clinical setting on a manikin or a peer. DETECTION OF ORAL DISEASES 111-DCS-04 (4.0.4) P: 101-214-AB & 101-DCJ-AB & 111-203-AB & 111-204-AB & 120-203-AB & 350-203-AB One of the delegated acts of a dental hygienist is to perform a thorough examination of the head and neck for each client. During this course, the student will acquire the theoretical foundation to become competent in the ability to accurately distinguish normal from abnormal periodontal structures and conditions. Furthermore, each student will be able to recognize the significance of pathological conditions as they relate to dental hygiene procedures and client centered care plans. By the end of this course, the student will acquire the ability to identify oral disease. This ability will be used to fully chart the clients’ oral conditions when they are seen in Clinic I, II, III. This is an intermediate step towards the mastery of competency 00LC: detect oral diseases. FOURTH SEMESTER PREVENTION II: EDUCATING THE CLIENT 111-404-AB (2.2.2) P: 101-303-AB & 111-305-AB & 111-306-AB & 111-DCS-AB In order to prevent oral diseases, the client must be aware of and partici- pate in preventive oral health care interventions. This course will deal with the dental hygienist as an educa- tor/facilitator and will prepare the stu- dent to work with the clients in order to help them maintain their oral health. The student will learn to teach the client these interventions according to individual needs, in order that client compliance or adher- ence is maintained. RADIOLOGY 111-406-AB (3.3.3) P: 101-303-AB & 111-305-AB & 111-306-AB & 111-DCS-AB The student will develop the skills and knowledge required to take radi- ographs. Special emphasis will be placed on client management. Students practice taking radiographs on manikins then progress to clients. Students learn how to process and interpret the radiographs. The infor- mation gathered from the radiograph- ic survey will be used to formulate a client-centred care plan. The students will study the laws, regulations, stan- dards and codes that govern the prac- tice of radiology. CLINIC I 111-408-AB (2.6.2) P: 101-303-AB & 111-305-AB & 111-306-AB & 111-DCS-AB The theoretical aspect of this course deals with the development of a treat- ment plan. To do this, the student must assess the client’s needs and establish priorities as well as the rele- vance between client’s needs and the possible methods of treatment. This course also provides the students with their first experiences in providing dental hygiene care with clients in a clinical setting. RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY 111-DDC-04 (1.3.1) P: 101-303-AB & 111-305-AB & 111-306-AB & 111-DCS-AB This course will enable the dental hygiene student to gain the knowledge and laboratory experience required to perform restorative expanded func- tions. Lectures will provide the theory while laboratory sessions will ensure practical experience in the prescribed skills. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to correctly per- form procedures related to restorative dentistry; students will perform these tasks in a laboratory setting on a manikin. This is an intermediary step to the terminal competency: perform restorative dentistry 00LP, which will be fully acquired in Clinic III. 75 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 76. FIFTH SEMESTER ADVANCED PERIODONTOLOGY 111-503-AB (3.0.3) P: 111-404-AB & 111-406-AB & 111-408-AB & 111-DEC-AB In this course, the students will further develop their abilities in periodontal disease recognition. The students will be further sensitized to the impact of the overall general health on the peri- odontium and vice versa.Various sce- narios will be used to formulate and synthesize treatment plans specific to clients’ needs. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH 111-505-AB (2.3.2) P: 111-404-AB & 111-406-AB & 111-408-AB & 111-DEC-AB Community dental health is a specific field of the dental hygiene profession. This course is designed to introduce the dental hygiene student to the basic principles and concept theories of community health and their appli- cation to dental health in community health programs. This course will pro- vide experience that will prepare the student for the Community Fieldwork course in the sixth semester. CLINIC II 111-51B-AB (0.12.0) P: 111-404-AB & 111-406-AB & 111-408-AB & 111-DEC-AB This course allows the students to enhance their clinical abilities in pro- viding dental hygiene therapy includ- ing restorative procedures. Under the supervision of licensed dental hygien- ists and dentists, the student will assess the client’s dental hygiene needs, elaborate treatment plans based on individual needs, imple- ment preventive and restorative thera- py, and evaluate dental hygiene care for each client. SIXTH SEMESTER INTEGRATION INTO THE WORKPLACE 111-603-AB (3.0.3) P: 111-503-AB & 111-505-AB & 111-51B-AB Integration into the workplace is a seminar course designed to help the student integrate into private practice and other work environments. The stu- dent will work in small groups and will develop strategies to ease the transition from school into the workplace. Different aspects of the profession are examined, including professional ethics, jurisprudence, professional responsibilities, and office manage- ment. A resumé (CV) is produced and interview strategies are practiced. COMMUNITY FIELDWORK 111-604-AB (1.3.1) P: 111-503-AB & 111-505-AB & 111-51B-AB This course is divided into two sec- tions. The theoretical aspect covers the preparation of community dental health interventions for specific target groups and the evaluation of pro- grams and educational interventions. The stage consists of the implementa- tion of the dental health programs planned in the Community Dental Health course. It provides experiences in which the student can apply vari- ous community public dental hygiene theories in an actual community health setting. This stage enables the student to experience public dental health programs and it also provides exposures to other community health programs offered to various socio- economic and cultural milieu. ORTHODONTICS 111-614-AB (2.2.2) P: 111-503-AB & 111-505-AB & 111-51B-AB This course is an introduction to the diagnosis, prevention, interception and treatment of various malocclu- sions of the teeth. Various techniques related to orthodontics will be cov- ered such as the design, the applica- tion, and the control of functional and corrective appliances. The student will also learn to develop a personalized oral self-care program for the ortho- dontic client. By the end of this course the student will master the competency of contributing to ortho- dontic treatments. CLINIC III 111-62B-AB (0.12.0) P: 111-503-AB & 111-505-AB & 111-51B-AB This course allows students to acquire as well as reinvest acquired compe- tencies in providing dental hygiene care in a clinical setting. Under the supervision of licensed dental hygien- ists and dentists, the student will assess the client’s dental hygiene needs, elaborate treatment plans based on individual needs, imple- ment preventive and restorative thera- py and evaluate dental hygiene care for each client. PROGRAM COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT 990-111-A0 P: 111-503-AB & 111-505-AB & 111-51B-AB Upon completion of this program, the dental hygiene student will be able to practice safely and effectively by ful- filling the functions of treatment and prevention in a variety of practice set- tings in accordance with the rules and regulations dictated by the dental hygiene profession. All eleven Elements of competency of the Program Exit Profile are subdivid- ed into objectives. In order to obtain a passing grade in the Comprehensive Program Assessment the dental hygiene student must successfully complete each one of the objectives which will be evaluated in the follow- ing sixth semester courses of the pro- gram: 111-603-AB Integration into the Workplace, 111-614-AB Orthodontics, 111-604-AB Community Fieldwork and 111-62B-AB Clinic III. 76
  • 77. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES (244.A1) FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-115-AB Mathematical Models I 244-105-AB Introduction to Technology 244-113-AB Circuit Assembly 244-124-AB Electric Circuits 244-144-AB Light and Sound SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 244-204-AB Design and Simulation 201-225-AB Mathematical Models II 244-225-AB Electronic Circuits 244-235-AB Control Logic 244-255-AB Matter and Heat PHOTONICS OPTION PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2007 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___ - ___ Complementary Course 244-315-AB Workshop Techniques 244-335-AB Introduction to Control Systems 244-345-AB Applied Physics Technologies 244-355-AB Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer 244-374-AB Introduction to Optics FOURTH SEMESTER 602- FRENCH ___ - ___ Complementary Course 244-414-AB Management & Maintenance 244-435-AB Automation and Control 244-446-AB Motion and Energy 244-465-AB Thermal Applications 244-475-AB Materials FIFTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 244-536-AB Robotics 244-555-AB Energy Analysis 244-576-AB Advanced Optics 244-586-AB Project I SIXTH SEMESTER 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 244-635-AB Data Acquisition & Analysis 244-644-AB New Technologies 244-684-AB Opto-electronics 244-686-AB Project 2 Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses. The Engineering Technologies Department operates within the domain of the Applied Physics Technology Program. It is structured to provide students with the necessary education needed to fulfill the functions of an applied physics technol- ogist. The 3-year program is designed to provide job entry into private and government research laboratories, in com- panies producing high-technology components or equip- ment, in engineering firms and in university laboratories. Applied physics technologists work in engineering and physics sectors such as: optics, photonics, acoustics, vacuum techniques, micro-electronics and integrated circuits, ther- mal systems, non-destructive testing and automation. Students may also continue their education at university in various Engineering or Physics programs (the necessary prerequisites can be taken while in the program). The program combines the subject areas of optical, elec- tronic, mechanical, computer, automation systems tech- nologies, and energy analysis. Students apply what they learn through a hands-on approach coupled with a theoret- ical perspective. Employment opportunities for graduates have always been excellent, and will most likely increase, as the demand for technologists with a multidisciplinary back- ground continues to grow. NEW for students beginning in Fall 2007 is the choice between two Exit Profiles – one in Photonics and the other in Energy Management. The first 4 semesters are common to both profiles and students will make their choice before beginning their last year. For further information about the Engineering Technologies Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Engineering Technologies Chairperson at local 5901 or by email: engineering.tech@johnabbott.qc.ca. Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures Section for specific Admissions requirements. 77 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 78. 78 ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES (244.A2) FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-115-AB Mathematical Models I 244-105-AB Introduction to Technology 244-113-AB Circuit Assembly 244-124-AB Electric Circuits 244-144-AB Light and Sound SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 201-225-AB Mathematical Models II 244-204-AB Design and Simulation 244-225-AB Electronic Circuits 244-235-AB Control Logic 244-255-AB Matter and Heat ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROFILE PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2007 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___ - ___ Complementary Course 244-315-AB Workshop Techniques 244-335-AB Introduction to Control Systems 244-345-AB Applied Physics Technologies 244-355-AB Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer 244-374-AB Introduction to Optics FOURTH SEMESTER 602- FRENCH ___ - ___ Complementary Course 244-414-AB Management & Maintenance 244-435-AB Automation and Control 244-446-AB Motion and Energy 244-465-AB Thermal Applications 244-475-AB Materials FIFTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 244-536-AB Robotics 244-555-AB Energy Analysis 244-586-AB Project I 244-596-AB Building Construction & Automation SIXTH SEMESTER 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 244-604-AB Manufacturing 244-635-AB Data Acquisition & Analysis 244-644-AB New Technologies 244-656-AB Industrial Energy Audit 244-686-AB Project 2 Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses.
  • 79. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FIRST SEMESTER MATHEMATICAL MODELS I 201-115-AB (3.2.3) P: MATH 526 OR 536 Designed specifically for Engineering Technologies students, course con- tent includes complex numbers, deMoivre’s Theorem, roots, vectors and applications, systems of equa- tions, Cramer’s rule, determinants, logarithms, trig, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, equations, limits and deriv- atives of polynomials. INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY 244-105-AB (2.3.1) The objectives of the course are to provide an overview of technologies and their present day applications. This course helps the students identi- fy the various sectors of employment available in Applied Physics Technologies ( ie; photonics, elec- tronics, thermal /energy fields.) Students are introduced to the vocabulary and working methods of technologists and engineering disci- plines. This experience is designed to assist the student in assessing aca- demic orientation and developing career objectives. ELECTRIC CIRCUITS 244-124-AB (2.2.2) Fundamental concepts related to electricity and electronics, using a sys- tems approach are developed by the student. This is the first of several courses in which the students analyse electrical instruments, circuits and components which provide a back- ground knowledge necessary for con- tinued courses. Electrical principles and problem solving methods are developed and established. CIRCUIT ASSEMBLY 244-113-AB (0.3.0) Practical approaches to electronic cir- cuit construction, repair and trou- bleshooting are taught. Component replacement, circuit layouts, compo- nent substitution and electrical testing are some of the real world/hands-on topics that are covered. Modern cir- cuit fabrication techniques are also explored. LIGHT AND SOUND 244-144-AB (2.2.2) All the basic concepts and theory required for an objective approach to optics and acoustics are established. The subject of Wave Mechanics is used to correlate the two sciences, and develop transferable skills. Students take advantage of the state of the art facilities at the Montreal Physics Technology and Photonics Center, while engaging in lab activi- ties. SECOND SEMESTER MATHEMATICAL MODELS II 201-225-AB (3.2.3) P: 201-115-AB Designed specifically for Engineering Technologies students, this course is a continuation of 201-115. Content includes calculus, slopes, derivatives, including log and trig functions, Newton’s Method, minimum and maximum problems, antiderivatives, definite integrals, area, algebraic and trig substitutions, integration by parts, Fourier Series, differential equations and separation of variables. DESIGN AND SIMULATION 244-204-AB (1.3.2) Modern approach to optical, mechanical and electrical system designs revolves around the use of computer simulation of the system to verify the design quality and perform- ance. The student will learn to use various softwares, which are used in industry to design and control systems, processes and machines. Students will be introduced to program control software (Labview, Logo!, Oopic), electronic simulation (EWB), optical simulation (OSLO), and mathematical tools (Matlab). ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS 244-225-AB (3.2.2) P: 244-124-AB This course will provide a bridge from the Electric Circuits course, to the world of electronic circuits. Students will begin to understand how the electronics that surrounds us works by analyzing and building ana- log and digital circuits used in such things as amplifiers and computer cir- cuits. Troubleshooting and repairing skills will also be developed. CONTROL LOGIC 244-235-AB (3.2.2) Industrial processes, automobiles, cli- mate control and almost every device or system you can imagine will even- tually adopt a form of corrective con- trol, which is achieved via sensors, data acquisition and logic control. This process has provided tremen- dous improvements in accuracy, per- formance, and efficiency of devices and systems. Students will explore various aspects of this field through system analysis and troubleshooting, sensor measurements, control pro- gramming and data processing. MATTER AND HEAT 244-255-AB (3.2.2) P: 244-144-AB Thermal systems are fundamental to our existence and yet widely misun- derstood. Students will be able achieve a firm, basic quantitative understanding of thermal concepts and processes, and how materials retain, resist, or conduct or transform, as heat is added or removed. THIRD SEMESTER WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES 244-315-AB (1.4.1) P: 244-113-AB & 244-225-AB In order to apply technology, it is essential to have knowledge and skills of fabrication and production process- es. The student will learn to build var- ious projects, which require metal, plastic and wood fabrication tech- niques. Project management, time- lines and safety are key elements in this course. INTRO TO CONTROL SYSTEMS 244-335-AB (2.3.2) P: 244-235-AB Most of our modern machines, appli- ances and industrial processes are now controlled by computers, which monitor sensors, in order to provide accurate, intelligent and optimal sys- tem control. Theoretical concepts are established, and related to real world applications, with supporting labora- tory experiments. 79 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 80. APPLIED PHYSICS TECHNOLOGIES 244-345-AB (2.3.2) P: 244-225-AB & 244-255-AB Principles of physics provide the framework for all engineering and applied science applications. This course will demonstrate how theory and practice co-exist, as students are re-acquainted with physics, mathe- matics, scientific process and problem solving techniques. THERMODYNAMICS & HEAT TRANSFER 244-355-AB (3.2.2) P: 244-255-AB Temperature, heat transfer, heat capacity, pressure and expansion are common to all materials, and requires much consideration in the design of most electrical, mechanical and build- ing systems. Students are given thor- ough coverage of thermal processes, and how they apply to modern tech- nologies and systems. Carnot cycle, entropy, enthalpy, latent heats, specif- ic heat and conductivity, are prime elements of the course. INTRODUCTION TO OPTICS 244-374-AB (2.2.2) P: 244-144-AB Basic electromagnetic theory and ray trace optics provide a solid, introduc- tory basis for understanding the behavior of light. Learning is support- ed with correlated laboratory experi- ence. Optical instruments, lens systems, opto-electronic components, light sources, colour theory, and laser principles are introduced in this course, and put in context with mod- ern applications, such as telescopes, cameras, medical imaging systems and laser systems. FOURTH SEMESTER AUTOMATION & CONTROL 244-435-AB (3.2.2) P: 244-335-AB This course continues from “Intro to Control Systems” to provide advanced examples of control theory in modern industrial applications. Students configure control software (Labview), PLC’s (programmable logic array’s), and use MATLAB (math soft- ware) to solve control system prob- lems, and implement new designs. Theoretical concepts are implement- ed through industry standard systems, giving students the ability to effective- ly engage with common systems of control, used presently in industry. MOTION & ENERGY 244-446-AB (4.2.2) P: 244-345-AB Advanced concepts of motion (Newtonian kinematics) and static forces, are brought into focus in this course. The design and construction of simple machines, and rocketry, is done in laboratory classes to provide real context and create a challeng- ing, intriguing and motivating exam- ple for advanced analysis, and active learning. THERMAL APPLICATIONS 244-465-AB (3.2.2) P: 244-355-AB Thermal principles and theory are rig- orously demonstrated in existing sys- tems and machines. The student is exposed to a variety of typical appli- cations and situations, where theoreti- cal knowledge is integrated with common sense. Thermal load deter- mination, heat transfer, insulation, heating and cooling principles and systems are evaluated. This provides the student with initial skills that are thermal management, and energy effi- ciency oriented. This skill set is widely applied in industry, and very much in demand. MATERIALS 244-475-AB (3.2.2) Research in materials science has gen- erated improved materials and new materials, which are less costly, stronger, lighter and resistant to corro- sion, decay and fire. It is vital that stu- dents be aware of common material composition, and the principles of production and application. Metallurgy, polymers, composite materials, and nano-processes are explored, giving the student a relevant and modern perspective of material science used in engineering today. MANAGEMENT & MAINTENANCE 244-414-AB (2.2.1) The driving forces behind elevated standards of living are directly related to automated and mechanized pro- duction processes. Many systems and processes are large industrial plants, which take advantage of “economies of scale”. The end results are lower costs for products and energy, with advancing levels of quality and per- formance. It is essential to have knowledgeable technologists, who can devise and implement cyclic and scheduled maintenance programs. Reliability projection (MTBF), and emergency response and repair are also explored. The students are also challenged with a variety of examples concerning industrial systems and machines. They learn the skills needed to respond in a rational and objective fashion to maintenance, repair and obsoles- cence issues. Students will develop planning skills to efficiently sustain electrical, optical, mechanical and thermal industrial systems. FIFTH SEMESTER ROBOTICS 244-536-AB (2.4.2) P: 244-435-AB Industrial mechanization involves machinery in motion. Machines which can replicate human manipulation and can make intelligent, autonomous decisions are considered robotic. In this course students will conquer the fundamentals of robotics systems and control. Realization of robotic skills will be achieved through theory and labs. Construction of robotic devices with a robotics trainer will provide to students the skills to successfully oper- ate, expand or modify existing indus- trial systems. ENERGY ANALYSIS 244-555-AB (3.2.2) P: 244-465-AB Present demands for energy will con- tinue to increase. It is of vital impor- tance to manage and utilize the present and future resources with effi- ciency. Students will learn to evaluate all of the major energy sources eco- nomically, technically and environ- mentally to develop methods of optimum use. Industrial and domestic buildings and processes will be ana- lyzed for performance and cost. Heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) systems will be covered along with lighting systems. Optimizing the operation of these systems will also be discussed. 80
  • 81. ADVANCED OPTICS 244-576-AB (3.3.2) P: 244-374-AB This course continues from Intro to Optics to provide the student with advanced knowledge of electromag- netic (light) behavior. Spectrum analy- sis, interference, diffraction, coherence and laser phenomena will be covered. The nature of wave parti- cle duality and an introduction to rel- ativistic mechanics will be covered. This course shall prepare students for engineering applications in the follow- ing course (Photonics). BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND AUTOMATION 244-576-AB (3.3.2) P:244-465, 244-414 Modern society is defined by the quality of its buildings and dwellings. New materials, optimized construc- tion techniques and automation sys- tems have provided an unparalleled standard of comfort and economy. Automation systems which control heating, ventilation air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting can substantially improve the energy efficiency, com- fort and longevity of a building. Students will cover the traditional and historical building methods and mate- rials as existing structures are com- monly renovated with newer materials and automated systems. The course shall also examine contempo- rary building construction techniques and automation systems with the intent of optimizing energy efficiency and ergonomic value. Energy analysis is essential to building improvement and new construction. This course is a fundamental of that pursuit. PROJECT I 244-586-AB (1.5.1) P: 244-414-AB & 244-435-AB & 244-446-AB & 244-465-AB & 244-475-AB Students are required to undertake a technical project and complete it on schedule in a professional manner. The student will propose, plan, sched- ule and construct or execute the proj- ect. The project consists of performing an energy analysis and audit of an industrial or domestic building, or undertaking a project approved by the department. Students must pres- ent the project to faculty and students at the end of the course and will demonstrate their knowledge with an exchange of questions. SIXTH SEMESTER OPTO-ELECTRONICS 244-684-AB (2.2.2) P: 244-225-AB The electronics industry has been steadily increasing its use of optical components, in display technologies, detectors and remote control devices. This course bridges the use of electri- cal and optical principles, and focuses on the applied use of electronic com- ponents, which generate and detect light. Light emitting diodes (LED’s), liq- uid crystal displays, cathode ray tubes, laser diodes, photo-transistors, optical fiber and infra-red diodes, are some of the components that are studied, measured and applied in this course. MANUFACTURING 244-604-AB (2.2.2) P: 244-555 At no time has there been a greater array of products and materials as there are today. Manufacturing has trans- formed from a labour intensive endeav- or to a mechanized regime. In this course students shall study common manufacturing systems and how mech- anized systems, robotics and automa- tion are used to create products of advanced quality and low price. Field trips will demonstrate real world appli- cations and students shall study electri- cal, mechanical and automation systems which are common to many manufacturing processes. Common safety and fire standards for manufac- turing processes and systems shall also be reviewed. The objective of this course is to prepare students to enter the industrial market with a transferable knowledge which will be applicable to any existing system. DATA ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS 244-635-AB (2.3.2) P: 244-536-AB Students implement a system to acquire and analyze a data from an experimental setup. Skills sets related to the interface of computer platforms to outside data sensors and systems are developed. Introductory coverage of the C programming language and micro controller code is established. Basic communication formats in com- puter communication are explored. NEW TECHNOLOGIES 244-644-AB (2.2.2) Modern technology is rapidly advanc- ing and has offered many improved alternatives to materials and process- es, which provide superior perform- ance at lower cost. Students need to be aware of present developments and future direction. A wide range of technology developments shall be sur- veyed. The need to stay informed and current, in a dynamic technical world will be encouraged. INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AUDIT 244-656-AB (1.5.2) P: 244-555 Demand for energy efficiency in industry is a modern necessity. Students shall integrate previous course content with the Industrial Energy Audit course in order to perform energy efficiency audits of industrial systems and buildings. Common heating and electrical loads shall be studied. Electrical systems and rates shall be covered. Students shall learn spreadsheet techniques and basic analytical techniques common to energy audits. Capital investment required for system and infrastructure improvement shall be balanced with ROI (return on investment) projection methods. PHOTONICS 244-696-AB (2.4.2) P: 244-576-AB Photonics is the integration of electri- cal and optical systems, and has many applications in telecommunications, medicine and computing systems. This developing technology offers immense possibilities for data communications. Students will explore modern applica- tions and learn applied techniques used in industry today. Optical fiber systems and measurements shall be covered. Laser systems and applica- tions will also be covered. PROJECT 2 244-686-AB (0.6.1) P: 244-586-AB This second project course permits the student to propose, plan and build an electrical or mechanical device, which will include prototyp- ing, debugging, packaging and docu- mentation. Students may also choose to perform an energy audit or to par- ticipate in an industrial stage in the workplace. The objective of the course is to engage the student in an autonomous and comprehensive use of skills and knowledge from previous courses. Students are required to sub- mit a written report and provide an oral presentation. 81 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 82. INFORMATION AND LIBRARY TECHNOLOGIES (393.AO) We are living in an information-based society. The Web has made possible unprecedented access to, and sharing of, information, which has opened up the market for informa- tion workers. Corporations, institutions of all types, schools, and the government accumulate vast amounts of informa- tion in the course of conducting business – information in a variety of formats, including books, reports, websites, elec- tronic files, audiovisual information, plans, etc... Technicians are needed to organize and make available the accumulated information. This program of study will make you a specialist in informa- tion management. You will become familiar with the organi- zation and use of resources ranging from specialized databases, websites and computer files to books and business documents. You will also gain professional working experi- ence through two fieldwork courses in the sixth semester. Upon graduation you can expect to find work as a techni- cian or research assistant in: archives, documentation cen- tres, database maintenance services, film/television, indexing and abstracting services, information retrieval, libraries, records management or education institutions. If you already have a DEC you may complete the program in two years (see page 85). For further information about the Information and Library Technologies Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Information and Library Technologies Program Chairperson, local 5472. Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures Section for specific Admissions requirements. 82 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION _____-_____ Complementary Course 393-DCA-03 The Profession of Documentation Technician 393-DCB-06 Reference Work 393-DCC-03 Automation & Documentation I SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION _____-_____ Complementary Course 393-DDJ-03 Communication and Teamwork 393-DCL-03 Automation & Documentation II 393-DCM-05 Special Reference Sources PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2003 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 393-DCD-03 Physical Processing & Preservation 393-DCF-04 Cataloguing I 393-DCJ-05 Principles of Classification 393-DCN-03 Introduction to Archives & Records Management 393-DDL-04 Public Relations FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 393-DCK-04 Cataloguing II 393-DCP-03 Circulation 393-DCS-03 Dewey Decimal Classification 393-DCV-04 Indexing: Subject Headings 393-DCW-06 Records Management FIFTH SEMESTER 393-DCT-04 Information Retrieval I 393-DCU-05 Acquisitions 393-DDA-04 Documents & their Producers 393-DDC-04 Indexing and Abstracting 393-DDD-06 Archives 393-DDK-03 Computerization and Documentation 393-DDM-03 Document Formatting 393-DDN-03 Library of Congress Classification SIXTH SEMESTER 393-DDB-05 Information Retrieval II 393-DDS-08 The Working Environment I 393-DDT-08 The Working Environment II 393-DDU-03 The Document Centre 393-DDW-03 Collection Development Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses.
  • 83. INFORMATION AND LIBRARY TECHNOLOGIES FIRST SEMESTER THE PROFESSION OF DOCUMENTATION TECHNICIAN 393-DCA-03 (1.2.2) This course must be taken in the first semester. It is a prerequisite for all courses taken in semesters two to six. Students are introduced to the profes- sion of documentation/information technician, and to the theories and skills of information management. This includes an awareness of how these skills are used in various types of settings (libraries, archives, records management centres) and with vari- ous types of information. Students will also learn about the importance of well-developed communication and interpersonal skills to the profession. REFERENCE WORK 393-DCB-06 (2.4.2) C: 393-DCA-03 This introduction to reference work provides students with the skills to use and cite general reference materials, both print-based and electronic. They learn to analyze reference questions and to identify appropriate sources. The nature of the reference interview and the skills necessary for communi- cating effectively with clients will also be covered. AUTOMATION AND DOCUMENTATION I 393-DCC-03 (1.2.2) C: 393-DCA-03 This course introduces students to the basic concepts necessary for comput- er use, and concentrates on the acquisition of the keyboarding, word- processing and file-management skills necessary for information manage- ment settings. SECOND SEMESTER AUTOMATION AND DOCUMENTATION II 393-DCL-03 (1.2.2) P: 393-DCC-03 This course reinforces the keyboard- ing, word-processing and file manage- ment skills acquired in the preceding course, and builds on these skills so that students are able to produce more complex documents. It also introduces students to the variety of interfaces, word processing software and spreadsheet software used in documentation management. COMMUNICATION AND TEAMWORK 393-DDJ-03 (2.1.2) P: 393-DCA-03 Students learn the basic theories of verbal and non-verbal interpersonal communication and their application in library, records management and archival settings. They learn how to use good communication techniques with clients and co-workers in a wide variety of situations such as reference interviews, needs assessment inter- views and storytelling. Teamwork is an important tool in the workplace, so students are taught basic teamwork models. Using these models, they develop their group work skills while working on problems typical in infor- mation management. SPECIAL REFERENCE SOURCES 393-DCM-05 (2.3.2) P: 393-DCB-03 This course focuses on electronic and specialized reference sources. Upon completion of the course, students are able to search for information based on client profiles. THIRD SEMESTER CATALOGUING I 393-DCF-04 (1.3.2) In this course students learn to write the descriptive cataloguing records for print, audiovisual and electronic doc- uments with low levels of complexity according to the established catalogu- ing rules. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHIVES AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT 393-DCN-03 (1.2.2) This course introduces students to the processes and concepts required to organize and maintain records man- agement and archival systems. PHYSICAL PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION 393-DCD-03 (1.2.1) In this course students learn the pro- cessing, shelving and storage tech- niques appropriate for library, archival and records management situations. In the context of preservation of materials, students learn how to do minor repairs. They are also intro- duced to the conservation standards for paper, electronic and audiovisual documents and to appropriate emer- gency response procedures to various types of disasters. PRINCIPLES OF CLASSIFICATION 393-DCJ-05 (2.3.2) This course introduces students to the basic concepts of knowledge organi- zation, classification and subject analysis in the domains of general knowledge. It prepares them for future in-depth courses on Dewey Decimal Classification, Library of Congress Classification, Subject Headings and Indexing. PUBLIC RELATIONS 393-DDL-04 (1.3.3) Students learn to promote the various types of services provided by libraries, records centres and archives. This includes target market analysis, the design and scheduling of promotional plans and the organization of promo- tional activities. FOURTH SEMESTER CATALOGUING II 393-DCK-04 (1.3.2) P: 393-DCF-04 Students build on knowledge acquired in Cataloguing I in order to create cat- alogue records for print, audiovisual and electronic documents of medium to high complexity. They learn how to provide various access points, to verify and use copy cataloguing data and to use MARC coding. Verification of the various access points and mainte- nance of authority files are included. CIRCULATION 393-DCP-03 (1.2.2) P: 393-DCA-03 This course helps students acquire the competencies required for performing tasks related to the circulation of library materials. It familiarizes them with the knowledge, policies, procedures, and mechanics needed to operate an effi- cient circulation control system. DEWEY DECIMAL CLASSIFICATION 393-DCS-03 (1.2.3) P:393-DCJ-05 This course reinforces and builds on the knowledge of Dewey Decimal Classification gained in Principles of Classification. Students synthesize classification numbers using the Dewey Decimal schedules and the 83 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 84. auxiliary tables and learn to work with copy-cataloguing data in a critical manner. Students work with different types of documents. INDEXING: SUBJECT HEADINGS 393-DCV-04 (1.3.2) P:393-DCF-04 Students build on techniques of subject analysis gained in Principles of Classification and learn to assign subject headings to various types of documents. Subject headings are drawn from Library of Congress Subject Headings, Sears List of Subject Headings, Canadian Subject Headings, the Vedettes-matières de Laval, and similar lists. Students also learn how to inte- grate the appropriate cross-references into catalogues and retrieval tools, and to maintain subject authority files. RECORDS MANAGEMENT 393-DCW-06 (2.4.2) P:393-DCN-03 In this course students learn how to analyze the needs of an organization and to plan and implement an appro- priate records management program. FIFTH SEMESTER ACQUISITIONS 393-DCU-05 (2.3.2) P:393-DCA-03 This course enables students to follow the procedures for acquiring all types of material for any type of library/doc- umentation setting. Students learn to work with automated as well as man- ual systems. ARCHIVES 393-DDD-06 (2.4.3) P: 393-DCW-06 Students acquire the competencies required to work in an archival repos- itory. They learn how to organize the various types of archival materials and to apply the Rules for Archival Description. COMPUTERIZATION AND DOCUMENTATION 393-DDK-03 (1.2.2) P: 393-DCM-05 C: 393-DDB In this course students learn the prin- ciples of database design using multi- purpose database software and specialized library-oriented software. The focus is on hands-on experience. DOCUMENT FORMATTING 393-DDM-03 (1.2.2) P: 393-DCL-03 This course introduces students to the basic concepts of document layout for print and electronic files in informa- tion management settings. It includes desktop layout and presentation soft- ware, and HTML coding. DOCUMENTS AND THEIR PRODUCERS 393-DDA-04 (2.2.2) P: 393-DCA-03 In this course students will build on the knowledge gained about the vari- ous aspects of the publishing industry, both at the national and international levels. Students become familiar with the characteristics of electronic pub- lishing and its impact on information management. Government organiza- tion and its implication for access to government-produced documents will be covered in detail. INDEXING AND ABSTRACTING 393-DDC-04 (1.3.2) P: 393-DCJ-05 Students build on the techniques of subject analysis and hierarchical struc- turing gained in Principles of Classification to perform various types of subject indexing for print, electron- ic and audiovisual documents. The maintenance, role and use of thesauri are emphasized. Students gain experi- ence in periodical indexing, database indexing and back-of-the-book index- ing. Through practical exercises stu- dents also learn the two major forms of abstracts. INFORMATION RETRIEVAL I 393-DCT-04 (1.3.2) P:393-DCM-05 This course introduces students to the basic features of database software used for information management and retrieval. Through hands-on practice using DIALOG as the base, students learn to interrogate an online information retrieval system. The course also provides an overview of the principles of textual database management systems and the differ- ent types of software used in the information sector. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CLASSIFICATION 393-DDN-03 (1.2.3) P: 393-DCJ-05 Students learn to apply the Library of Congress Classification scheme to all types of print, electronic and audiovi- sual documents, and to work with copy cataloguing data in a critical man- ner. This course contains a component of the comprehensive assessment. SIXTH SEMESTER COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT 393-DDW-03 (1.2.2) P: 393-DCB-03 & 393-DCU-05 This course introduces the student to the theories and methodology of col- lection development. It focuses on the management of collections of all types of materials in libraries, documenta- tion centres and bookstores through the use of selection policies, assess- ment of user needs, inventory control and weeding (discarding) procedures. This course contains a component of the comprehensive assessment. INFORMATION RETRIEVAL II 393-DDB-05 (2.3.2) P: 393-DCT-04 Students learn the use and impor- tance of online information retrieval systems in fulfilling the diverse needs of users. With hands-on experience, they will learn how to retrieve the required information and develop an understanding of the different online information retrieval systems. THE DOCUMENT CENTRE 393-DDU-03 (1.2.2) P: 393-DCD; 393-DCK; 393-DCM; 393-DCP; 393-DCS; 393-DCU; 393-DCV; 393-DCW; 393-DDA; 393-DDB; 393-DDC; 393-DDD; 393-DDJ; 393-DDK; 393-DDL; 393-DDM; 393-DDN This course focuses on the manage- ment of the documentation centres/special libraries that form parts of larger organizations (e.g., compa- nies, schools). This includes the analy- sis of organizational and user needs, collection management, the planning of personnel and physical resources, budgeting, and reference service planning. This course contains com- ponents of the comprehensive assess- ment. 84
  • 85. THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT I (FIELDWORK) 393-DDS-08 (1.7.3) P: 393-DCD; 393-DDK This fieldwork placement takes place in records centres, archives, book- stores or related businesses where stu- dents can see the operations and relationships among the various departments and/or sections. In addi- tion to gaining experience in particu- lar techniques, students can also explore their preferences and apti- tudes within the field. This course contains a component of the compre- hensive assessment. THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT II (FIELDWORK) 393-DDT-08 (1.7.3) P: 393-DDK; 393-DDN This fieldwork placement takes place in a library, documentation/ resource centre or related business where stu- dents can see the operations and rela- tionships among the various departments and/or sections. In addi- tion to gaining experience in particu- lar techniques, students can also explore their preferences and apti- tudes within the field. PROGRAM COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT 990-393-A0 The comprehensive assessment is a portfolio that consists of 5 different projects administered within the noted courses during the final year. These projects test the student’s abili- ty to perform capably in the areas of cataloguing, reference, collection management, records management and database structuring. Students must pass all five components in order to pass their comprehensive assessment (pass/fail). In the event of a failure, students are expected to redo the component correctly. 85 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 86. INFORMATION AND LIBRARY TECHNOLOGIES (393.A1) 86 Students who have already completed a DEC in another program are credited for the general education compo- nent, and are able to follow an intensive schedule in order to complete the ILT program within two years. This may also apply to students with other types of advanced stand- ing such as partial or complete university degrees. FIRST SEMESTER 393-DCA-03 The Profession of Documentation Technician 393-DCB-06 Reference Work 393-DCC-03 Automation & Documentation I 393-DCD-03 Physical Processing & Preservation 393-DCF-04 Cataloguing I 393-DCJ-05 Principles of Classification 393-DCN-03 Introduction to Archives & Records Management 393-DDL-04 Public Relations SECOND SEMESTER 393-DCK-04 Cataloguing II 393-DCL-03 Automation & Documentation II 393-DCM-05 Special Reference Sources 393-DCP-03 Circulation 393-DCS-03 Dewey Decimal Classification 393-DCV-04 Indexing: Subject Headings 393-DCW-06 Records Management 393-DDJ-03 Communication and Teamwork TWO-YEAR INTENSIVE PROGRAM PLANNER (FOR STUDENTS WITH A PREVIOUS DEC OR UNIVERSITY CREDITS) FALL 2003 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 393-DCT-04 Information Retrieval I 393-DCU-05 Acquisitions 393-DDA-04 Documents & their Producers 393-DDC-04 Indexing and Abstracting 393-DDD-06 Archives 393-DDK-03 Computerization and Documentation 393-DDM-03 Document Formatting 393-DDN-03 Library of Congress Classification FOURTH SEMESTER 393-DDB-05 Information Retrieval II 393-DDS-08 The Working Environment I 393-DDT-08 The Working Environment II 393-DDU-03 The Document Centre 393-DDW-03 Collection Development
  • 87. NURSING (180.A0) Graduates of the program are expected to have the knowl- edge and abilities to practice nursing in a rapidly changing health care system, in a manner which is professional, car- ing, clinically competent and ethically and legally grounded. They will function as collaborative members of the health care team, in accordance with the Quebec Nurses’ Act. Graduates receive a CEGEP diploma, following which they are eligible to write the Quebec licensing examinations administered by the Ordres des infirmiers et infirmières du Québec (OIIQ). Some students must also demonstrate appropriate knowledge of oral and written French with the Office de la langue française before a licence to practice will be granted. The Nursing Program is based on a conceptual framework of nursing adopted by the John Abbott Nursing Department, which is designed to meet the Nursing compe- tencies provided by the Ministère de l’éducation du Québec. The College is also part of the McGill consortium which includes the other Anglophone CEGEPs that offer Nursing. The consortium and John Abbott have adapted concepts and content with the McGill program to prepare students to continue with university studies. After comple- tion of the 3-year CEGEP diploma in Nursing at John Abbott College, eligible students may apply to McGill University and continue courses for two years full-time or four years part-time toward a Baccalaureate degree in Nursing (BN). Each semester, students acquire theoretical knowledge and nursing skills from classroom, laboratory and clinical experi- ences that help them meet the competencies required of graduates at the end of the program. John Abbott offers clinical experience in hospitals and agencies located in Montreal and the West Island. Clinical experience is obtained in obstetrics, pediatrics, psychiatry, medicine, sur- gery, geriatrics and in ambulatory care services in the hospi- tal and community settings. For further information about the Nursing Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Nursing Program Chairperson, local 5376. John Abbott also offers a 2-year Nursing Intensive Program. For information on that program please see page 90. Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures Section for specific Admissions requirements. 87 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 101-805-AB Anatomy & Physiology I 180-10D-AB Nursing I - Introduction to Nursing 350-803-AB Developmental Psychology SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH ___-___ Complementary Course 101-806-AB Anatomy & Physiology II 180-20G-AB Nursing II - Introduction to Nursing II 387-803-AB Sociology of Diverse Families and Communities PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2006 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 101-814-AB Microbiology & Immunology 180-30K-AB Nursing III - Health and Illness I 350-813-AB Psychology: Issues in Health Care FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 180-40K-AB Nursing IV - Health and Illness II 387-813-AB Sociology of Health FIFTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 101-823-AB Pathophysiology 180-51J-AB Nursing V - Health & Illness III SIXTH SEMESTER 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 180-60N-AB Nursing VI - Integration Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses. CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 88. NURSING FIRST SEMESTER NURSING I – INTRODUCTION TO NURSING 180-10D-AB (6.8.7) The first nursing course in the pro- gram provides an introduction to the conceptual framework of the pro- gram. The concepts include: caring, health and illness, nursing process, development, nursing abilities and human needs. Students will gain the- oretical knowledge and skills from classroom content, nursing laboratory and clinical experience. Content in the semester includes an introduction to the profession, the need for com- fort, health care assessment, hygiene care and vital signs. There is also an introduction to pharmacology includ- ing legalities and medication adminis- tration. Students will care for clients with health concerns in rehabilitation and convalescent health care settings. ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I 101-805-AB (3.2.3) This course is the first of several courses designed to introduce Nursing students to the study of the human body. In this course, students will first review the structural and functional organization of the body. This will include an overview of all body sys- tems by examining the anatomy of each system and investigating how each system works to maintain home- ostasis (balanced functioning of the human body). Students will then study the chemical, cellular and tissue levels of body organization before making a detailed study of the anato- my and physiology of the integumen- tary, skeletal and muscular systems. Students will learn basic scientific ter- minology as it is applied to medical and surgical nursing practice and will become competent in various rele- vant laboratory skills such as proper dissection techniques, the proper use of the compound microscope and modern physiological equipment. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 350-803-AB (3.0.3) Human development consists of sever- al related sections beginning at con- ception and ending at death. Each stage or section will focus on the physi- cal, cognitive and psychosocial changes and development of that par- ticular period. Students will study and compare all three aspects of each of the different stages. SECOND SEMESTER NURSING II – INTRODUCTION TO NURSING II 180-20G-AB (5.12.5) P: 180-10D-AB & 101-805-AB In the second course there will be an introduction to professional commu- nication and continued practice in the application and documentation of the nursing process. Content focuses on common illnesses, health promo- tion, and infection control, including medical and surgical asepsis, wound healing and administration of more complex medications. Specific human needs studied are safety and activity. Skills of basic assessment and care in minor emergency situations will be developed. Students will care for clients in acute medical and surgical settings. ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II 101-806-AB (4.2.3) P: 101-805-AB This course continues the study of the human body. The content of this course includes a study of the body's control systems (nervous and endocrine systems) and concentrates on how the digestive, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, and urinary systems work to maintain homeosta- sis. The reproductive system will also be studied. SOCIOLOGY OF DIVERSE FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES 387-803-AB (3.0.3) This course is an integral part of the Nursing Program. It is designed to meet part of competency 01Q6 of the program. This competency deals with social and cultural realities relat- ed to health care and focuses on the diverse families, cultures and commu- nities that comprise Canadian Society. Nursing professionals are required to interact with clients from a broad range of ethnocultural groups, reli- gious groups, and social backgrounds. The purpose of the course is to devel- op sensitivity to issues which might arise in a variety of professional situa- tions. THIRD SEMESTER NURSING III – HEALTH AND ILLNESS I 180-30K-AB (6.14.4) P: 180-20G-AB & 101-805-AB & 101-806-AB This course will use the student’s increasing knowledge of nursing care, anatomy and physiology to focus on health and illness. Content focuses on the needs for oxygenation, nutrition and elimination and their related ill- nesses. Special emphasis is placed on focused health assessment and the process of clinical teaching. Students will be introduced to the care of fami- lies and infants during the perinatal period for half of the semester and the other half of their clinical time is spent caring for clients in a medical setting. MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 101-814-AB (2.2.2) P: 101-806-AB This is a general course with a strong emphasis on infection and medically important bacteria and viruses. Morphology and physiology of microorganisms will be followed by discussions of host-parasite relation- ships, infections, immunity and epi- demiology, the control of microorganisms and chemotherapeu- tic techniques. Laboratory activities will include aseptic technique, proper handling of microorganisms and some diagnostic procedures. Microbiology and Immunology is a required course for all students preparing for a career in Nursing and is a critical part of the training for this profession. From the simple but criti- cal act of hand washing to the com- plex care of a patient with an infectious disease, a sound working knowledge of microbiology and epi- demiological principles is essential for safe practice in the health field. PSYCHOLOGY: ISSUES IN HEALTH CARE 350-813-AB (3.0.3) Every day, nurses must deal with a variety of situations related to the people in their care, and at the same time manage their own physical and mental health. Observing and inter- preting patient behaviour, being alert to potentially dangerous situations, and helping patients cope with loss 88
  • 89. and bereavement are some of the nursing issues related to psychology that will be covered in this course. In addition, this course will help prepare students for professional demands by addressing topics such as managing one’s own emotions and stress, and learning about professional burn-out. By the end of the course, students will have a greater knowledge of psy- chological theories and research, find- ing how these relate directly to the practice of nursing. FOURTH SEMESTER NURSING IV - HEALTH AND ILLNESS II 180-40K-AB (6.14.4) P: 180-30K-AB The student will be introduced to more advanced communication and therapeutic skills with the aging pop- ulation and clients with mental health concerns. Competencies related to caring, communication and advocacy will be a focus and will include the ethical and legal issues arising in both clinical areas. Health concerns in aging and mental illness will be addressed in depth. The nursing process will focus on the needs for self-esteem, social interaction and rest and sleep. Clinical areas are in gerontology and psychiatric settings. SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH 387-813-AB (3.0.3) This course is the second sociology course that addresses a societal per- spective and acts as an integral part of the Nursing Program. It is designed to meet competency 01Q6 of this pro- gram. This competency deals with social and cultural realities related to health care. This competency enables the students to focus on the social, environmental, and cultural dimen- sions of health and illness. The focus is on the health care system (Medicare) and relevant federal and provincial legislation. Current prob- lems associated with health care delivery are also evaluated. As well, ethical and social dilemmas related to the role of health care providers in the institutional context and the larger society are critically analyzed. FIFTH SEMESTER NURSING V – HEALTH AND ILLNESS III 180-51J-AB (4.15.5) P: 180-40K-AB The course will focus on integration of all the needs of the client with complex health problems, genetic dis- eases and illnesses that require major surgical intervention. Students will apply knowledge of family and cultur- al issues when caring for clients in both pediatric and surgical areas. Students will assume more responsi- bility to promote health and family coping and discharge planning. This course is coordinated with the patho- physiology course to maximize the application of learning in class and clinical settings. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 101-823-AB (3.0.3) P: 101-814-AB The purpose of this course is to study topics in biology not previously cov- ered in detail, i.e. genetics, metabo- lism, embryology and fetal development. The course will also study selected disease processes that are commonly encountered by Nursing students in clinical settings. SIXTH SEMESTER NURSING VI – INTEGRATION 180-60N-AB (5.18.6) P: 180-51J-AB In this final course the student will continue to integrate all concepts and skills from previous semesters and demonstrate achievement of the com- petencies required to graduate. Approximately two-thirds of the course will focus on the client with complex health problems that require major medical and surgical interven- tions in hospital. Students will spend three days per week in medical or surgical clinical settings consolidating knowledge and skills required to prac- tice competently as a graduate nurse. The other segment of the course will focus on knowledge and practice in ambulatory care or palliative care set- tings to provide a perspective of health and illness beyond the hospi- tal. In class and clinical practice the student will focus on the transition to the professional role by examining and applying knowledge of current issues in the workplace. COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT 990-180-01 The Nursing program comprehensive assessment consists of a practical examination of clinical competence including short answer questions. Students are eligible for this exam after successfully completing all cours- es in the program. The exam is taken in the exam period after 6th semester. 89 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 90. NURSING (180.A1) 90 FIRST SEMESTER 101-805-AB Anatomy & Physiology I 180-10D-AB Nursing I – Introduction to Nursing 350-803-AB Developmental Psychology SECOND SEMESTER 101-806-AB Anatomy & Physiology II 180-20G-AB Nursing II - Introduction to Nursing II 387-803-AB Sociology of Diverse Families & Communities PROGRAM PLANNER TWO-YEAR INTENSIVE PROGRAM PLANNER FOR STUDENTS WITH A PREVIOUS DEC SUMMER 2003 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 101-814-AB Microbiology & Immunology 180-30K-AB Nursing III - Health and Illness I 350-813-AB Psychology: Issues in Health Care FOURTH SEMESTER 180-40K-AB Nursing IV - Health and Illness II 387-813-AB Sociology of Health FIFTH SEMESTER 101-823-AB Pathophysiology 180-51J-AB Nursing V - Health & Illness III SIXTH SEMESTER 180-60N-AB Nursing VI - Integration There is a 2-year Intensive Nursing program that is offered at John Abbott College every January. It has been devel- oped on recommendation from the Ministry of Education in response to the critical shortage of nurses in Quebec. The objective of this Intensive Nursing Program is to pre- pare students for the challenging and exciting role of the graduate nurse in a 24-month time frame. Students eligible for this program must have completed all of their CEGEP general education courses (4 English, 2 French, 3 Humanities, 3 Physical Education, and 2 Complementary courses) before entering the program and have the follow- ing prerequisites: Physical Science 436, Chemistry 534 and Math 436. For further information about the Nursing Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Nursing Program Chairperson, local 5633. Each semester, students acquire theoretical knowledge and nursing skills from classroom, laboratory and clinical experiences. John Abbott College’s clinical experience takes place in hospitals and agencies located on the West Island and downtown Anglophone hospitals. Graduates receive a CEGEP diploma, following which they are eligible to write the Quebec licensing examina- tions administered by the Ordre des infirmières du Québec (OIIQ). Some students must also demonstrate appropriate knowledge of oral and written French with the Office de la langue française before a license to practice will be granted. John Abbott College is also part of the McGill consor- tium which includes the other Anglphone CEGEPs that offer Nursing. The consortium and John Abbott have adapted concepts and content with the McGill program to prepare students to continue with university studies. After completion of the 2-year CEGEP diploma Intensive Nursing at John Abbott College, eligible students may apply to McGill University and pursue their studies for two years full-time or four years part-time toward a Baccalaureate degree in Nursing (BN). Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures section for specific admissions requirements.
  • 91. POLICE TECHNOLOGY (310.AO) John Abbott’s Police Technology Program prepares students for a career in law enforcement. In addition to classroom courses covering criminal and civil law, interrogation tech- niques, criminal investigation and crime prevention, students receive practical experience in patrolling, traffic control, criminal investigation and other protective methods. As part of their coursework, students are also required to demonstrate a high level of competence in driving and swimming, and to show a high standard of physical fitness. To this end, candidates must have a minimum of a proba- tionary driver’s license by the MMaarrcchh 11sstt application dead- line and successfully complete a day of physical testing prior to applying to the program. For a complete description of the physical testing require- ments, testing dates, sign-up sheets and answers to the most frequently asked questions, visit our web site at www.johnabbott.qc.ca, click on Prospective Students, Programs, and Police Technology. Qualified candidates who have completed a DEC or have completed the general education courses (4 English, 3 Humanities, 3 Physical Education, 2 French, 2 Complementary courses) may be invited by the Police Technology Admissions Selection Committee to complete the program in 4 semesters (2 years). For further information about the Police Technology Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Police Technology Department, at local 5464. Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures Section for specific Admissions requirements. 91 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Lifestyles 310-110-AB Communication I 310-111-AB First Responder 310-112-AB Criminology & Judicial Process 310-113-AB Quebec Legal System 310-114-AB Police Organizations/Functions & Ethics SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Activities ___-___ Complementary Course * 310-210-AB Communication II 310-211-AB Establishing the Commission of a Crime 310-212-AB Operations 387-213-AB Interaction with Clientele THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course * 310-310-AB Investigation I 310-311-AB Crime Control 387-313-AB Interaction with Communities 310-413-AB Quebec/Municipal Laws FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 310-312-AB Highway Code 310-410-AB Communication III 310-411-AB Self-Defense 310-412-AB Penal Matters 310-414-AB Police Interventions/Stage FIFTH SEMESTER 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 310-510-AB Crisis Intervention 310-511-AB Penal Offence Evidence 310-512-AB Control of Violent Individuals 310-513-AB Impaired Driving & Reports 310-514-AB Youth Intervention 310-515-AB Preventive Driving SIXTH SEMESTER 310-610-AB Private Law 310-611-AB Community Intervention & Resources 310-612-AB Physical Skills 310-613-AB Alcohol, Drugs, Narcotics 310-614-AB Fire Prevention 310-615-AB Accident Report 310-616-AB Investigation II (CA) POLICE TECHNOLOGY 3-YEAR PROGRAM PROGRAM OF STUDY AS OF FALL 2006 * Complementary courses : Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for Rules / Restrictions on Complementary Courses. For course pre-requisite and co-requisite information see the Course Calendar or Schedule of Classes. Students will be required to pass an English Exit Exam and a Comprehensive Assessment in Police Technology. CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 92. POLICE TECHNOLOGY FIRST SEMESTER COMMUNICATION I 310-110-AB (2.2.3) In this course students adapt the prin- ciples and techniques of basic com- munication in the context of police interventions and in everyday occupa- tional situations encountered by police officers. Students will also be taught to write up reports including objective and accurate descriptions of people, actions and objects and by including neat and clear sketches. FIRST RESPONDER 310-111-AB (2.1.1) Students learn to provide emergency care as the first responder for car- diopulmonary problems, different types of haemorrhages, burns and injuries by using the material and equipment generally used by the first responder, while observing the rules of police ethics and discipline. They will also learn to provide clear and accurate information to the per- sonnel concerned. CRIMINOLOGY & JUDICIAL PROCESS 310-112-AB (3.1.2) Students learn to apply criminology concepts to police work. Students are taught to distinguish between deviant, marginal and criminal behav- iours and to distinguish the various types of criminals. They learn to describe the crime situation in a given territory and estimate the risks of someone committing an offence as well as determine the course of action to be taken. The roles of the police officer and other intervening parties in the judicial and social rehabilitation processes are examined. Students lean to assess the various conse- quences, which a judicial intervention may have on a victim, a witness or on the accused. Students learn how to collaborate with the intervening par- ties regarding the choice and adminis- tration of sanctions. QUEBEC LEGAL SYSTEM 310-113-AB (3.0.3) Students will learn to establish the roles and responsibilities of the police force within the legal system of Québec in everyday occupational sit- uations encountered by police offi- cers, using the Criminal Code of Canada and its related laws, the Civil Code of Québec, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Québec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms, and the Code of ethics of Québec police officers. They will learn to distinguish: 1. An incident of a criminal nature from that of a civil nature. 2. The functions of different state institutions as regards to criminal mat- ters, and of each party involved. 3. And assess the constitutional and legal aspects of police interventions. POLICE ORGANIZATIONS, FUNCTIONS AND ETHICS 310-114-AB (3.1.3) One half of this course focuses on ethical issues faced by individuals as citizens and professionals. It helps stu- dents to clarify their values and estab- lish a framework for ethical decision-making. Ethical issues which relate to a wide variety of concerns are examined. Students will explore a variety of professional ethical codes and apply decision-making models to dilemmas in their personal and pro- fessional lives. The other half of the course looks at the makeup of police organizations on the municipal, provincial and federal level. The stu- dents will learn to analyze the occu- pational and organizational aspects of the work of a patrol officer by refer- ring to laws and regulations governing police organizations. SECOND SEMESTER COMMUNICATION II 310-210-AB (2.2.3) In this course, students will learn to put into practice specialized police communication techniques at the time of events of a criminal nature and by using software available to police officers. They will learn to interview a victim, a complainant or a witness, interrogate a suspect or an offender and to record statements in an investigative report. ESTABLISHING THE COMMISSION OF A CRIME 310-211-AB (4.0.3) Students will learn to establish that a crime has been committed for the most common crimes recorded by police officers in their occupational functions by using the Criminal Code of Canada and its related laws, as well as the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. POLICE OPERATIONS 310-212-AB (1.2.2) Students will learn to perform police activities within planned or supervised operations within the context of dif- ferent situations such as a disaster, flooding, major accident, a disappear- ance in an urban or rural environ- ment, a large gathering, a work con- flict, etc. With the use of the Manuel de base de la sécurité civile au Québec, geo- graphic maps, portable radiotele- phones, flashlights and first aid kits. INTERACTION WITH DIVERSE CLIENTELE 387-213-AB (2.1.2) An essential component of the Police Technology Program is learning about interactions diverse clientele. This course professionalizes the police in their dealings with marginalized groups. Students learn to understand the historical origins of each type of clientele especially in dealing with authorities. A variety of such groups will be studied in terms of their social relationships in general and with authority figures in particular. Marginalized groups may include: victims of physical and sexual aggres- sion, gays and lesbians, street kids, the mentally ill, ex-cons and the homeless. THIRD SEMESTER INTERACTION WITH DIVERSE COMMUNITIES 387-313-AB (2.1.2) Canada is a pluralistic society that requires working professionals to develop culturally sensitive practice. Given that police officers are fre- quently interacting with citizens com- ing from divergent areas in the world, this course is designed to help stu- dents develop competencies related to the interaction with diverse cultural and ethnic communities. This Course is an integral part of the police Technology Program and it is designed to meet competency CG-13 of this program. The course will acquaint students with some of the 92
  • 93. important issues involving members of both dominant and marginalized groups, the police and the diverse cultural communities in Canada. It acquaints students with the role that immigration and refugee settlement have played in Canada. It helps stu- dents identify manifestations of intol- erance such as stereotyping and discrimination. It addresses the follow through of policing responsibilities in fair and equitable ways that avoid discrimina- tion against members of any ethnic or ethno cultural group. Finally, it pro- vides students with an ability to reflect on their own capacity to communi- cate effectively with people from diverse backgrounds through verbal and non-verbal means and to do so using both theoretical and practical exercises in the classroom setting. INVESTIGATION I 310-310-AB (2.2.3) This course teaches the student to carry out a first-level criminal Investigation at the time of events of a criminal nature possibly requiring the enforcement of powers of arrest, except in cases of high-risk crime and the use of force. They will learn to use the software and equipment gen- erally used by police officers. They will draw up an investigation plan. Intervene with a victim, a com- plainant or a witness. Analyze and classify in order of priority the gath- ered evidence. Write up information with a view to obtaining arrest or search warrants. Proceed with the arrest of the suspect. Proceed with searches and seizures. Interrogate the suspect or offender. Build an inves- tigative file. Assist witnesses and vic- tims in court. Follow up the case with a view to a long-term solution. CRIME CONTROL 310-311-AB (1.2.2) Students learn to carry out control and deterrence interventions; locate a criminality problem; analyze data obtained on a problem - related situa- tion and determine safety measures according to interventions. Students must be able to carry out interven- tions such as target surveillance, terri- tory combing and verifications. Students are required to make a report and plan a follow-up. HIGHWAY CODE 310-312-AB (3.1.2) The Highway Code and related regu- lations are studied. Students learn how to re c o rd the commission of highway safety or road transportation penal offences, fill out a statement of offence and make a decision as to the use of special powers. Students learn to choose a method of servicing for the statement of offence. FOURTH SEMESTER COMMUNICATION III 310-410-AB (2.2.3) P: 310-210-AB In this course students will learn to interact with members of their police organization as well as learn to man- age stress inherent to police work. This will be done by detecting elements affecting motivation in the workplace, recognizing the phenomena related to work group dynamics and using strate- gies to resolve conflicts. They will also recognize the causes and conse- quences of stress specific to police work, put in to practice stress manage- ment strategies in everyday situations and guard against the serious conse- quences of stress specific to police work, or react to them. SELF-DEFENSE 310-411-AB (1.3.0) The course teaches students to defend themselves in combat situa- tions and in situations where two or more individuals of different strengths must fight against each other. Students are taught how to defend themselves against blows: assess the dangerousness of a combat situation; assume a safe position; and execute blockings, dodges, execute throwing and sweeping techniques; immobi- lizations, arm locks, controls and elbow/shoulder/wrist locks. Students are required to assess their own inter- ventions. PENAL MATTERS 310-412-AB (3.0.3) P: 310-113-AB & 310-211-AB Referring to events that might require the exercise of a power of arrest with- out a warrant excluding any type of physical control or the use of force, students learn to exercise the powers and duties of the police regarding penal matters. Students learn how to decide whether to release or detain a person in custody before he or she appears in a court of law; prepare the filing of information or of a statement of offence following an arrest without a warrant; and to assess the level of constitutionality and legality of a police investigation. QUEBEC/MUNICIPAL LAWS 310-413-AB (3.0.3) P: 310-113-AB Quebec laws and municipal bylaws are reviewed. Students learn how to report the commission of an offence against a Quebec law or regulation and against a municipal or urban community by-law. Students learn to complete a statement of offence and choose a method of servicing for the statement of offence. POLICE INTERVENTIONS/STAGE 310-414-AB (2.4.3) P:420-DCT-04 Students carry out police interven- tions in situations involving minor incidents such as motorists in difficul- ty, minor conflicts, demonstrations of insecurity related to the presence of prowlers. Interventions are carried out with different clienteles and in situa- tions which are devoid of verbal threats or physical violence. FIFTH SEMESTER PREVENTIVE DRIVING 310-515-AB (1.2.2) P: STUDENTS MUST POSSESS A FULL LICENSE TO TAKE THIS COURSE. LEARNER’S PERMITS AND PROBATIONARY DRIVER’S LICENSES ARE INSUFFICIENT . With a vehicle similar in size to a patrol car and on public roads ,stu- dents must be able to check a motor vehicle before using it and apply pre- ventive driving pre c e p t son a pub- lic road. Students must be able to execute special manoeuvres on a nor- mal route as well as on an closed obstacle course. Students learn to carry out police interventions related to traffic and road accidents, direct traffic in a rural or urban environ- ment. In simulations, students are required to respond to accident calls involving road vehicles, take safety measures at the scene of an accident, give assistance to the injured, gather information at the scene and com- 93 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 94. plete the intervention at the scene. Students are required to write a report and plan follow-up measures . CRISIS INTERVENTION 310-510-AB (1.3.1) P: 310-414-AB Through the use of simulations or ver- bal reconstructions, students learn to apply intervention techniques to peo- ple who are in a crisis situation. The intervention techniques exclude the use of physical control or the use of force. Students must be able to assess a situation, intervene with the person in a crisis situation and self-assess their intervention. PENAL OFFENCE EVIDENCE 310-511-AB (3.0.3) P: 310-413-AB Students learn to analyze and com- municate penal violation evidence. Students must be able to assess penal evidence, complete and submit prop- er documents, transmit the evidence, prepare to testify, and testify before a court of law. CONTROL OF VIOLENT INDIVIDUALS 310-512-AB (1.3.0) P: 310-411-AB Students learn techniques of control- ling violent individuals. Students prac- tice in combat rooms and with simulated reconstructions of actual police interventions in which one or two people are attacked by another person or persons. Students must be able to accurately assess the danger of various aggressive situations, know how to assume a safe position and be able to control a violent person or per- sons in foreseeable situations and after a threat. Students are expected to be able to react successfully to unpre- dictable and violent physical attacks and assess their own intervention. IMPAIRED DRIVING AND REPORTS 310-513-AB (1.2.2) P: 310-312-AB & 310-410-AB & 310-413-AB In this course students will learn to carry out police interventions related to impaired driving under the influ- ence of alcohol or drugs in situations involving, driving and the care and control of a motor vehicle, by using the Highway Safety Code, the Criminal Code of Canada and docu- mentation generally used in these situ- ations. They will also learn about the usage of an approved screening device and Physical Coordination Tests found in the Highway Safety Code. They will also learn to Identify of all verbal and nonverbal signs possibly related to intoxication by alcohol or drugs and the correct distinction between signs related to intoxication by alcohol and those related to intoxi- cation by drugs. In the application of intervention pro- cedures students will learn the obser- vance of the spheres of authority granted to police officers by law, by the Ministère de la Sécurité publique with respect to police practices, and by the internal directives of police organizations. The observance of the provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The determina- tion of the relevance of using stan- dard impaired driving tests. The observance of procedures for using standard impaired driving tests. The determination of the relevance of using an approved screening device. The determination of the relevance and legality of demanding a breath or blood sample. The observance of the procedure for obtaining a breath sam- ple when a breath analyzer is used. Understand the clear communication of the order to provide a breath or blood sample. The observance of the procedure for obtaining the telewar- rant required to take a blood sample when the suspect is unconscious. The detection of any abnormality when making a brief mechanical inspection of the motor vehicle. The correct writing up and serving of legal docu- ments. The written report of accurate information relating to the interven- tion, erratic driving, behaviour of the suspect, other observations, commu- nication of rights, inspection of the motor vehicle, procedures relating to analyses and their results, and other relevant information . YOUTH INTERVENTION 310-514-AB (2.1.2) P: 310-412-AB In this course students will learn to determine the role of the police offi- cer in different situations involving young people in difficulty or young offenders in everyday occupational situations encountered by police offi- cers by referring to laws and regula- tions relating to young people, referring to response protocols relat- ing to young people and referring to the Entente multisectorielle relative aux enfants victimes d’abus sexuels, de mauvais traitements physiques ou d’une absence de soins menaçant leur santé physique. SIXTH SEMESTER PRIVATE LAW 310-610-AB (3.0.3) P: 310-510-AB Private law concepts are examined in the context of police interventions. Students must formulate temporary solution hypotheses in various situa- tions of a private nature and deter- mine ways of intervening in disputes of a private nature. COMMUNITY INTERVENTION AND RESOURCES 310-611-AB (2.1.2) P: 310-510-AB Students will learn to work in partner- ship with different community resources and to plan and apply inter- vention strategies that are preventive, repressive and community-oriented. With regard to recurrent crimes that are the subject of tactical analysis by police organizations, such as rob- beries, breaking and enterings, van- dalism, misconduct, etc., or situations of social disorder creating a feeling of insecurity, such as street gangs. Using the material required to carry out an intervention by relying on statistics, surveys on victimization and existing prevention programs and the using of software available to police officers. In everyday occupational situations encountered by police officers they will learn by referring to different response protocols specific to cliente- les such as victims of conjugal vio- lence, victims of sexual assault, individuals with mental health prob- lems, the elderly, etc. They will also learn to establish part- nerships with different community resources with appropriate presenta- tion techniques, clear definition of type of possible collaboration and the showing of attitudes and behaviours favourable to maintaining a partner- ship. 94
  • 95. They will also learn to analyze situa- tions possibly requiring recourse to community resources and to refer an individual in difficulty to a community resource. Carry out the interventions with appropriate choice and use of material and equipment, efficient coordination of tasks, observance of surveillance, clearing and identity check techniques. By effective com- munication with different partners, effective supervision of activities and detailed recording of observations and findings made during the inter- ventions, detailed and accurate reports. To show safety-oriented atti- tudes and behaviours during the interventions with the observance of rules of police ethics and discipline and the demonstration of ethical judgment. PHYSICAL SKILLS 310-612-AB (0.4.0) P: 310-512-AB Students are given standard tests and simulations in a gym, outdoors and in the water to ensure that they meet the physical requirements specific to police work. Students are required to perform extended running endurance tests, specific muscular tasks, and be able to clear obstacles in various situations. They are expected to be able to carry out rescue interventions in the water and successfully react to visual stimuli. ALCOHOL , DRUGS & NARCOTICS 310-613-AB (2.1.2) P: 310-510-AB Students learn to assess the situation regarding alcoholic beverages, drugs and narcotics in a given territory and analyze data gathered following a com- plaint. They learn to carry out police interventions on alcohol, drugs and nar- cotics and about the equipment gener- ally used by police officers to carry out this type of intervention. Students are taught safety measures to be used and how to carry out investigations in rela- tion to offences against the law, includ- ing municipal by-laws. Report writing and follow-up are covered. FIRE PREVENTION 310-614-AB (2.1.2) This course is an introduction to the Fire Service as a parallel resource to the Police Service. Students will learn about the structure and procedures utilized by the Fire Department in emergency situations from structural fires to Haz Mat. This allows for a bet- ter understanding of the dangers and risks involved in dealing with theses situations. The students will also be given awareness training with regards to terrorism. ACCIDENT REPORT 310-615-AB (1.2.3) During this course students will learn to carry out police interventions relat- ed to traffic and traffic accidents. In situations relating to traffic obstruc- tion, situations relating to accidents involving a joint report of automobile accident, or material damage and requiring an accident report, or physi- cal injuries, or a hit-and-run offence, or train accidents. Using a first-aid kit, a radiotelephone, security cones, road flares and a tape to mark off an acci- dent scene. Application of the Highway Safety Code and the use of software available to police officers. Students will also learn to direct traffic in a rural or urban environment, the appropriate choice and use of cloth- ing and equipment, adopting of a safe position and accurate performance of movements for directing traffic, rapid and appropriate reaction to unpre- dictable situations and the effective use of authority. Participate in scenarios simulating receiving a call concerning an accident involving motor vehicles and visualize the problem by gathering of relevant data and request for assistance from the appropriate resources and proper judgment as to the nature of an acci- dent and the urgency of a call. 310-616-AB INVESTIGATION II Comprehensive Assessment is required by all Professional Programs including the Police Technology Program. The assessment runs over fifteen weeks during the sixth semes- ter and is given in or as part of the 310-616-AB Investigation II course. To be eligible for the Comprehensive Assessment, students must have suc- cessfully passed all 310 courses in semesters one through five if in the three year program and all 310 courses in semesters one through three if in the two year program. Students must be completing their fourth or sixth semes- ter courses during the assessment. In addition, students must have previ- ously passed all three components of the 310-515-AB Preventive Driving Course. Grading for the Comprehensive Assessment is pass or fail in the fol- lowing components: • Ten week Powers of Arrest Review course within the Investigation II course. There will be two (2) tests within the Investigation II course. Students will be required to attain a passing aver- age of 60% on both tests, in order to complete the legal component of the Comprehensive Assessment. • Students must successfully pass the following Physical Skills components: 8k run, 12 minute run, Muscular tests and 200m swim/Tow tests. Those students who do not pass their 8k or 12 minute run during the time period from January to April will be required to run during a Comprehensive Assessment test- ing day in early May. Please see the attached test protocols. • During the last five weeks of the Investigation II course, students must successfully demonstrate com- petency in scenarios which may incorporate any of the thirty six (36) program competencies. • The last component in the assess- ment is the “Circuit Ferme” and the written “Theory” driving test Which will take place in May. There are no retests on any of the Comprehensive Test components. 95 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 96. 96 POLICE TECHNOLOGY (310.A1) 2 year program FIRST SEMESTER 310-110-AB Communication I 310-111-AB First Responder 310-112-AB Criminology & Judicial Process 310-113-AB Quebec Legal System 310-114-AB Police Organizations/Functions & Ethics 310-311-AB Crime Control 387-313-AB Interaction with Communities 310-514-AB Youth Intervention SECOND SEMESTER 310-210-AB Communication II 310-211-AB Establishing the Commission of a Crime 310-212-AB Operations 387-213-AB Interaction with Clientele 310-411-AB Self-Defense 310-413-AB Quebec/Municipal Laws 310-414-AB Police Interventions/Stage 310-614-AB Fire Prevention THIRD SEMESTER 310-310-AB Investigation I 310-312-AB Highway Code 310-510-AB Crisis Intervention 310-511-AB Penal Offence Evidence 310-512-AB Control of Violent Individuals 310-513-AB Impaired Driving & Reports 310-515-AB Preventive Driving FOURTH SEMESTER 310-410-AB Communication III 310-412-AB Penal Matters 310-610-AB Private Law 310-611-AB Community Intervention & Resources 310-612-AB Physical Skills 310-613-AB Alcohol, Drugs, Narcotics 310-615-AB Accident Report 310-616-AB Investigation II (CA) PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2006 OR LATER TWO-YEAR INTENSIVE PROGRAM PLANNER (FOR STUDENTS WITH A PREVIOUS DEC)
  • 97. 97 PRE-HOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE (181.AO) FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- 103 PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Lifestyles ___-___ Complementary Course * 101-107-AB Human Anatomy & Physiology I 181-100-AB Introduction to the Profession 181-101-AB Emergency Care Patient Transportation 181-202-AB Emergency Services Communication 181-103-AB Emergency Intervention I 387-181-AB Ethnic & Sociocultural Communities SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- 104 PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Activities 101-108-AB Human Anatomy & Physiology II 181-200-AB Pre-Hospital Clinical Evaluation I 181-201-AB Intro to Pharmacology 181-102-AB EMS Professional Ethics System 350-181-AB EMS Communication Skills THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES ___-___ Complementary Course * 101-109-AB Microbiology & Immunology 101-110-AB Intro to Pathophysiology 181-300-AB Pre-Hospital Clinical Evaluation II 181-301-AB Medical Emergencies I 181-302-AB Stage in Hospital Setting I 181-303-AB Emergency Intervention II FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES (Ethics) 109- 105 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 181-400-AB Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support I 181-401-AB Medical Emergencies II 181-402-AB Stage in Hospital Setting II 181-403-AB Applied Pathophysiology 181-404-AB Applied Pharmacology 350-182-AB Psychopathology FIFTH SEMESTER 181-500-AB Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support II 181-501-AB Medical Emergencies III 181-502-AB Professional Behaviour 181-503-AB Crisis Intervention I 181-504-AB Ambulance Stage I 109-505-AB Self-Defence 350-183-AB Stress Management SIXTH SEMESTER 181-600-AB Integrating Seminar 181-601-AB Emergency Vehicle Driving 181-602-AB Ambulance Stage II 181-603-AB Crisis Intervention II 109-604-AB Physical Skills PROGRAM PLANNER AS OF FALL 2008 * Complementary courses : Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for Rules / Restrictions on Complementary Courses. The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system, of which paramedics are a part, is a complex health care system made up of personnel, equipment, and resources established to deliver aid and emergency medical care to the community. It includes both pre-hospital and in-hospital care. The roles and responsibilities of the paramedic in this sys- tem have changed dramatically in the past 10 years. Advanced Pre-Hospital Emergency Care is an enormous responsibility for which the paramedic must be mentally, physically and emotionally prepared. Students must realize that they will be responsible for pro- viding not only competent Pre-Hospital Emergency Care but also emotional support to patients and families. Students also need to realize that during their careers as paramedics they will be exposed to many kinds of physical and emotional stress. They will face situations involving infectious diseases, fear, physical danger, death and dying. They must thus become familiar with the use of equipment and strategies that will help them remain physically and emotionally safe and healthy. By understanding safe prac- tices, they will be better able to avoid harm from violent people, roadway hazards and infectious diseases. Students will be taught to make appropriate choices about how they live rather than having a physical or emotional injury make that decision for them. They will also learn how they can take action to prevent illness and injury, not only in their own lives but in those of their co-workers and the patients they encounter. CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 98. PRE-HOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE FIRST SEMESTER HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 101-107-AB (3.1.3) Human Anatomy and Physiology (101-107) is the first of four required Biology courses in the Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Program. This course introduces the essential concepts of homeostasis, the organization and functioning of the human body. Students will study the organization of the human body at the chemical, cel- lular and tissue levels before begin- ning a detailed study of the Nervous, Endocrine, and Cardiovascular. This course is intended only for stu- dents in the Pre-Hospital Emergency Program (181-AO). INTRODUCTION TO THE PROFESSION 181-100-AB (3.1.1) In this course students will learn to analyze the job function of a para- medic by referring to the organization of the health and social services net- work and by referring to the orienta- tions of the Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec with respect to the occupation. They will become aware of the laws, regula- tions, standards and codes currently in effect which govern the characteris- tics of the occupation and its working conditions. They will get an accurate general definition of the occupation with clear distinction of the areas of intervention of paramedics. They will be able to define the working condi- tions and identify work environments related to pre-hospital emergency care. They will be made aware of the distinction of the roles of different emergency response agencies. EMERGENCY CARE PATIENT TRANSPORTATION 181-101-AB (1.3.1) In this course students will learn to move a variety of patients in various pre-hospital care settings, in emer- gency or non-emergency situations, using different modes of transport. They will learn to work in a team or in collaboration with other emergency response agencies. They will learn to choose methods and techniques for moving patients in both pre-hospital and hospital settings, while observing safety and ergonomic rules for meth- ods and techniques selected for lift- ing, transferring and moving patients. EMERGENCY SERVICES COMMUNICATION 181-202-AB (2.1.2) Students will learn to properly com- municate in the workplace by refer- ring to the legislation governing confidentiality and access to personal information. This will be applied in various situations with colleagues, superiors, the care team and other emergency response workers. This will be done by using observation checklists and sample coaching reports while working collaboratively within a care team. They will be able to demonstrate attitudes and behav- iors that promote a positive work cli- mate through effective communication of information. They will also learn to collaborate in an interdisciplinary context through accurate identifica- tion of each person’s role and respon- sibilities. Students will learn to effectively communicate the needs and expectations of a particular situa- tion and information about a patient while maintaining respect for other people’s expertise. They should be able to effectively collaborate during problem-solving and decision-making in a variety of situations. They will learn to apply the correct use of health science terminology to interact in conflictual work situations. EMERGENCY INTERVENTION I 181-103-AB (1.2.1) Students will learn to intervene with patients requiring resuscitation in a pre- hospital care setting. In doing so, they will refer to the legal framework gov- erning the practice of the occupation in various situations involving medical and trauma resuscitation, with all types of patients. They will learn to apply these skills in a team or in collaboration with other emergency response workers, all the time using clinical intervention pro- tocols, reference materials and adminis- trative documents. ETHNIC & SOCIO-CULTURAL COMMUNITIES 387-181-AB (2.2.2) As the urban and city areas become increasingly populated by individuals from various countries with different religious, social and cultural realities it is necessary to develop a broader awareness of issues. As well, within the cities there are increasingly complex social-ethnic interactions which need to be addressed and understood. The purpose of this course will be to expose the First Responders to the diversity of their future clientele, rang- ing from ethnic groups, homeless, gang issues, trans-cultural differences, aging population, domestic issues and oth- ers, in order for them to develop cop- ing skills, anticipate issues and enhance their skills. This course will utilize class lectures, scenarios and projects to develop the skill necessary to facilitate social, cultural and ethnic interactions when clients are under stress. SECOND SEMESTER HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 101-108-AB (3.1.3) This course continues the study of the human body focusing on the Muscular, Respiratory, Digestive, and Urinary Systems. In each System, stu- dents will study the gross anatomy and histology and will concentrate on the role of the System in the mainte- nance of homeostasis. This course is intended only for stu- dents in the Pre-Hospital Emergency Program (181-AO). PRE-HOSPITAL CLINICAL EVALUATION I 181-200-AB (2.2.1) Students in this course will learn to apply proper patient assessment methods in a pre-hospital care setting by referring to the legal framework governing the practice of the occupa- tion. This will apply to all types of patients based on various medical or trauma situations indoors and out- doors, in various locations and weath- er conditions and in collaboration with various emergency response workers. They will learn to use the necessary devices and equipment to perform patient assessments all the while using clinical intervention pro- tocols, reference materials and patient assessment tools and referring to sci- entific evidence. INTRO TO PHARMACOLOGY 181-201-AB (3.0.2) This course establishes relationships between drug administration and clin- ical situations by referring to the legal framework governing the practice of 98
  • 99. the occupation. Students will learn to perform patient assessments by gather- ing the appropriate data, including medical prescriptions. This will be facilitated by using clinical intervention protocols and reference materials. Students will become familiar with clinical situations involving correct identification of classes of medication and the use or administration of med- ication, as well as be able to relate clinical signs to the use of medication. They will also learn to determine the medication(s) to administer and the conditions for administering medica- tion in a pre-hospital care setting. EMS PROFESSIONAL ETHICS SYSTEM 181-102-AB (2.1.1) Students will learn to behave profes- sionally in accordance with the occu- pation’s code of ethics. They will apply this behavior in situations with patients and members of their family, superiors, colleagues, the care team and other emergency response workers. They will become familiar with the values of the occupation and assume responsi- bility for their actions and decisions in accordance with decisions attributed to Paramedics. They will use ethical judgment in work-related situations and become committed to maintaining and improving the quality of pre-hos- pital care. BASIC PATIENT COMMUNICATION 350-181-AB (2.1.2) This course will provide the para- medic student with the verbal and nonverbal skills pertinent to establish helping communication between the patient and their entourage in a pre- hospital setting. The student will learn how to solicit information about the patient’s health complaint, as well as their values and demographics so as to foster a trusting and helping rela- tionship. The student will additionally learn how to discuss the patient’s state of health with the patient and/or their entourage as well as to inform them of the possible treatment options. Keeping within the frame- work of the helping relationship, the student will learn how to support the patient and/or their entourage in their treatment decision. How best to pro- vide support for the patient’s entourage in the case of sudden death of the patient will also be addressed. To establish a successful helping relationship, the use of respectful and caring verbal and non- verbal communication is important across all these communication roles. PPlleeaassee nnoottee:: tthhiirrdd yyeeaarr ccoouurrsseess aarree iinn ddeevveellooppmmeenntt.. THIRD SEMESTER MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 101-109-AB (2.1.2) A sound working knowledge of Microbiology and Immunology is important for any professional work- ing in the Health Care Field. This course emphasizes medically impor- tant bacteria and viruses and focuses on the skills and knowledge required to identify and minimize the risk of transmission of infectious diseases. The student will be introduced to the role of micro-organisms in the devel- opment of diseases, the modes of transmission of micro-organisms, and the body’s defense mechanisms which help to ward off infectious dis- eases. Asepsis, disinfection, steriliza- tion and the preventive measures needed for the safe practice of pre- hospital care are also studied. INTRODUCTION TO PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 101-110-AB (3.0.2) This course is designed to study the etiology, progress and treatment of selected diseases that are frequently encountered by Paramedics in the pre-hospital care setting. Special emphasis is given to how these dis- eases disrupt homeostasis. PRE-HOSPITAL CLINICAL EVALUATION II 181-300-AB (TBD) This course is the second of two deal- ing with proper patient assessment methods in a pre-hospital care setting. It will apply to all types of patients based on various medical or trauma sit- uations Indoors and outdoors, in vari- ous locations and weather conditions and in collaboration with various emer- gency response workers. They will be using the necessary devices and equip- ment to perform patient assessments all the while using clinical intervention protocols, reference materials and patient assessment tools and referring to scientific evidence. MEDICAL EMERGENCIES I 181-301-AB (TBD) This is the first of three courses in dealing with patients requiring med- ical care in a pre-hospital setting. Dealing with emergency or non- emergency situations and referring to the legal framework governing the practice of the occupation. This will apply to various situations requiring medical care (e.g. cardiac, respiratory, neurological problems) and with all types of patients. They will learn to work as a team or in collaboration with other emergency response work- ers while using clinical intervention protocols, reference materials and administrative documents. They will also be using equipment and materi- als used in pre-hospital settings. Students will be learning to identify all potential health and safety hazards. They will gathering all necessary infor- mation and use protective measures adapted to the situation. They will learn to determine an appropriate location in which to perform the intervention, select appropraite equipment and materials appropriate for the situation. They will learn to perform patient assessment methods adapted to the context. Establish plausible hypothesis regarding a patient’s medical problem and accu- rate determinate the level of stability while taking into consideration the patient’s reactions and condition. Students will learn to make the appropriate choice of medication while respecting rigorous application of administration protocols. STAGE IN HOSPITAL SETTING I 181-302-AB (TBD) Off campus students will observe and perform the skills they have been taught in the previous courses relating to the Profession in a Hospital setting. The areas that will be covered by the stage are the Triage and Emergency room, Obstetrics (birthing room), Respiratory Care, Pediatrics (Children’s Hospital), Geriatrics and Trauma. The students must submit a written report and maintain a diary of their daily tasks. EMERGENCY INTERVENTION II 181-303-AB (TBD) Part II of the course where the stu- dents learn to intervene with patients requiring resuscitation in a pre-hospi- tal care setting. While referring to the legal framework governing the prac- 99 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 100. tice of the occupation and in various situations involving medical and trau- ma resuscitation, with all types of patients. They will learn to apply these skills in a team or in collabora- tion with other emergency response workers, all the time using clinical intervention protocols, reference materials equipment and administra- tive documents. FOURTH SEMESTER PRE-HOSPITAL TRAUMA LIFE SUPPORT I 181-400-AB (TBD) This is the first of two courses where students will learn to intervene with patients in trauma situations. In a pre- hospital care setting whether in emer- gency or non-emergency situations and by referring to the legal frame- work governing the practice of the occupation students will learn to deal with various trauma situations (e.g. falls, motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries and physical assaults). They will be learning to deal with all types of patients by working as a team or in collaboration with other emergency response workers. Students will be using clinical intervention protocols, reference materials and administrative documents as they will learn to iden- tify all potential health and safety haz- ards and the gathering of all necessary information. They will be able to do a reconstruction of events in order to determine the type of possible trau- mas while respecting the appropriate use of protective measures adapted to the situation. They will be able to determine an appropriate location in which to perform the intervention. They will apply effective communica- tion techniques with their partner or other emergency care workers. They will also apply correct patient moving techniques and monitor the patient during transport while demonstrating constant attention and vigilance. They will learn to gather the correct infor- mation and formulate a report of the intervention. MEDICAL EMERGENCIES II 181-401-AB (TBD) This is the second of three courses in dealing with patients requiring med- ical care in a pre-hospital setting. Dealing with emergency or non- emergency situations and referring to the legal framework governing the practice of the occupation. This will apply to various situations requiring medical care (e.g. cardiac, respiratory, neurological problems) and with all types of patients. They will learn to work as a team or in collaboration with other emergency response work- ers while using clinical intervention protocols, reference materials and administrative documents. They will also be using equipment and materi- als used in pre-hospital settings. Students will be learning to identify all potential health and safety hazards. They will gathering all necessary infor- mation and use protective measures adapted to the situation. They will learn to determine an appropriate location in which to perform the intervention, select appropraite equipment and materials appropriate for the situation. They will learn to perform patient assessment methods adapted to the context. Establish plausible hypothesis regarding a patient’s medical problem and accu- rate determinate the level of stability while taking into consideration the patient’s reactions and condition. Students will learn to make the appropriate choice of medication while respecting rigorous application of administration protocols. STAGE IN HOSPITAL SETTING II 181-402-AB (TBD) Part two of the course where students will be off campus in a hospital setting observing and performing the skills they have learnt in the previous courses relating to the profession. The areas that will be covered by the stage are the Triage and Emergency room, Obstetrics (birthing room), Respiratory Care, Pediatrics (Children’s Hospital), Geriatrics and Trauma. The students must submit a written report and maintain a diary of their daily tasks and interventions respecting estab- lished protocols. APPLIED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 181-403-AB (TBD) In this course student will apply knowl- edge, concepts and techniques in the interpretation of a clinical situation while in a pre-hospital care setting. They will refer to the legal framework governing the practice of the occupation: • With all types of patients; • Based on various medical or trauma situations; • Based on data gathered during patient assessment; • Alone or in collaboration with vari- ous emergency response workers; • Application of clinical intervention protocols and the use reference materials. They will interpret dysfunctions or health problems. Students will establish plausible hypothesis regarding the patient’s dysfunction or health problem. They will recognize physical traumas and establish plausible hypothesis regarding the patient’s trauma and also determine relevant relationships established between clinical signs and the hypothesis regarding the trauma. They will relate dysfunctions or health problems to accurately determine care treatment(s), in accordance with the dysfunction or health problem. APPLIED PHARMACOLOGY 181-404-AB (TBD) In this course students will apply rela- tionships between pharmacology or drug use and clinical situations by referring to the legal framework gov- erning the practice of the occupation. This will apply to all types of patients based on data gathered during the patient assessment, including medical prescriptions. This will be applied by using clinical intervention protocols and reference materials. Students will apply their knowledge in a clinical sit- uation involving correct identification of classes of medication the use or administration of medication and be able to relate clinical signs to the use of medication. They will also deter- mine the medication(s) to administer and the conditions for administering medication in a pre-hospital care setting. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 350-182-AB (TBD) In this course, students will gain an understanding of the various types of mental disorders and learn appropri- ate means of interacting with a person who is displaying symptoms of psy- chopathology. They will learn to identify and monitor signs and symp- toms linked to an increased risk of aggressive or self-injurious behaviour. This course will enable students to adapt their approach towards these individuals to optimize the success of their intervention. 100
  • 101. PROFESSIONAL THEATRE (561.CO, 561.AO) 101 While it certainly takes talent and creativity to be successful in the entertainment industry, it also requires hard work, collaboration and the acquisition of specialised skills. The Professional Theatre Department of John Abbott College offers 3 complete, multi-faceted training programs in Acting, Design or Technical options to prepare students for the exciting and rewarding careers available in Theatre, Film and Television. 561.CO THE ACTING OPTION The Acting Option provides intensive instruction over three years. Students take classes in acting for the stage, acting for the camera, theatre creation, performance, movement, voice, text, professional management and theatre history. Areas of concentration include improvisation, character study, speech and dialect, script analysis, mime, dance and mask work. There is an emphasis on scene study, the rehearsal process, auditioning techniques and fully staged public performances. 561.AO THE PRODUCTION DESIGN AND TECHNICAL OPTION In response to evolving industry conditions the Production Design and Technical Option has recently revised its programs. In addition to preparing students for work in the Theatre we are now responding to the reality that also finds our successful graduates employed in allied areas of the profession such as “Cirque du Soleil”, the cruise ship entertainment industry, video, television and cinema. In consequence we have incorporated a greater number of practical courses and introduced media based training along with the successful traditional courses in theatre. The first year of the Production Design/Technical Option is a common core to provide a broad base of introductory skills. Contingent upon the student’s choice he/she will then further specialize in Design or Technical. THE DESIGN OPTION The Design Option provides professional instruction in stimulating and imaginative behind-the-scene careers. Students will explore many aspects of Design, including Set and Costume Design, Lighting and Properties and how they apply to theatre and other camera associated media. There is an emphasis on practicality, public performances and productions. THE TECHNICAL OPTION The Technical Option provides an exciting and creative curriculum of courses which covers all the technical and design aspects of Lighting, Sound, Scenic Construction and Properties Fabrication. Students will receive training in the organisational skills required for stage and production management in the theatre and entertainment industry. In conjunction with the Acting and Design Options there is an emphasis on practicality, public performances and production. THEATRE WORKSHOP The Theatre Department in association with C.A.L.L. (Creative Arts, Literature and Languages) provides courses for pre-university students registered with C.A.L.L. The Theatre Department and C.A.L.L. enjoy a fine reputation for collaborating and providing excellent public performances under the name of Theatre Workshop. For further information on Theatre Workshop, please consult the C.A.L.L. program. For further information about the Theatre Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Professional Theatre Program, at local 5425 or 5759 or by email at: theatre@johnabbott.qc.ca. Several courses require students to be available outside regularly scheduled class hours of 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (for example, production work in the evening or during the week-end). Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures section for specific admission requirement. CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 102. PROFESSIONAL THEATRE (561.CO, 561.AO) FIFTH SEMESTER 561-154-AB Theatre History III 561-255-AB Voice & Diction III 561-356-AB Movement & Dance I 0561-453-AB Theatre Creation V 561-653-AB Text Laboratory III 561-758-AB Performance Laboratory III 561-853-AB Acting for Camera I SIXTH SEMESTER 561-164-AB Theatre History IV 561-265-AB Voice & Diction IV 561-366-AB Movement & Dance II 561-463-AB Theatre Creation VI 561-663-AB Text Laboratory IV 561-768-AB Performance Laboratory IV 561-864-AB Acting for Camera II 561-964-AB Professional Management I 102 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 561-114-AB Theatre History I 561-213-AB Introduction to Voice I 561-313-AB Introduction to Movement I 561-413-AB Theatre Creation I 561-516-AB Acting I SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 561-124-AB Theatre History II 561-223-AB Introduction to Voice II 561-323-AB Introduction to Movement II 561-423-AB Theatre Creation II 561-526-AB Acting II ACTING OPTION 561.C0 PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2005 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH ___-___ Complementary Course 561-235-AB Voice & Diction I 561-334-AB Movement & Lifestyle I 561-433-AB Theatre Creation III 561-536-AB Acting III 561-634-AB Text Laboratory I 561-736-AB Performance Laboratory I FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 561-245-AB Voice & Diction II 561-344-AB Movement & Lifestyle II 561-443-AB Theatre Creation IV 561-546-AB Acting IV 561-644-AB Text Laboratory II 561-746-AB Performance Laboratory II COMMENTS: *complementary courses: please refer to the Schedule of Classes for Rules/Restriction on complementary courses ALL professional courses are sequential and require the preceding level course as a pre-requisite. For course pre-requisite and co-requisite information see the Course Calendar or Schedule of Classes. Students are required to pass an English Exit Exam and a Comprehensive Assessment in Professional Theatre
  • 103. PROFESSIONAL THEATRE TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTION: DESIGN OPTION 561.DD PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2008 OR LATER 103 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 561-G1C-AB Scenery Construction I 561-G1D-AB Intro to Design I 561-G1E-AB Costume Execution I 561-G1H-AB Theatre in Perspective I 561-G1M-AB Intro to Media 561-G1R-AB Scenic Drafting I SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES ___-___ Complementary Course * 561-G2B-AB Intro to Stage 561-G2C-AB Scenery Construction II 561-G2D-AB Intro to Design II 561-G2E-AB Costume Execution II 561-G2H-AB Theatre in Perspective II 561-G2R-AB Scenic Drafting II THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 561-D3C-AB Scenic Design I 561-D3U-AB Costume Design I 561-D3Y-AB Styles I 561-G3E-AB Costume Execution III 561-G3H-AB Performance and Cinema in the 20thC I 561-G3L-AB Theatre LAB I FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH ___-___ Complementary Course * 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 561-D4C-AB Scenic Design II 561-D4E-AB Costume Execution IV 561-D4U-AB Costume Design II 561-D4Y-AB Styles II 561-G4H-AB Performance and Cinema in the 20thC II 561-G4L-AB Theatre LAB II FIFTH SEMESTER 561-D5A-AB Props Design 561-D5D-AB Media Design I 561-D5M-AB Design Media LAB I 561-D5P-AB Scene Painting LAB I 561-D5T-AB Set Design I 561-D5U-AB Costume Design III 561-D5Z-AB Design Specialization LAB I 561-G5L-AB Theatre LAB III 561-G5W-AB Production LAB I SIXTH SEMESTER 561-D6D-AB Media Design II 561-D6M-AB Design Media LAB II 561-D6P-AB Scene Painting LAB II 561-D6T-AB Set Design II 561-D6U-AB Costume Design IV 561-D6X-AB Lighting Design 561-D6Z-AB Design Specialization LAB II 561-G6L-AB Theatre LAB IV 561-G6W-AB Production LAB II COMMENTS: *complementary courses: please refer to the Schedule of Classes for Rules/Restriction on complementary courses ALL professional courses are sequential and require the preceding level course as a pre-requisite. For course pre-requisite and co-requisite information see the Course Calendar or Schedule of Classes. Students are required to pass an English Exit Exam and a Comprehensive Assessment in Professional Theatre CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 104. PROFESSIONAL THEATRE TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTION: TECHNICAL DIRECTION OPTION 561.TT PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2008 OR LATER 104 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 561-G1C-AB Scenery Construction I 561-G1D-AB Intro to Design I 561-G1E-AB Costume Execution I 561-G1H-AB Theatre in Perspective I 561-G1M-AB Intro to Media 561-G1R-AB Scenic Drafting I SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES ___-___ Complementary Course * 561-G2B-AB Intro to Stage 561-G2C-AB Scenery Construction II 561-G2D-AB Intro to Design II 561-G2E-AB Costume Execution II 561-G2H-AB Theatre in Perspective II 561-G2R-AB Scenic Drafting II THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 561-G3E-AB Costume Execution III 561-G3H-AB Performance & Cinema in the 20th C I 561-G3L-AB Theatre LAB I 561-T3C-AB Scenery Construction III 561-T3S-AB Sound I 561-T3X-AB Lighting I FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course * 561-G4H-AB Performance & Cinema in the 20th C II 561-G4L-AB Theatre LAB II 561-T4C-AB Scenery Construction IV 561-T4G-AB Management I 561-T4S-AB Sound II 561-T4X-AB Lighting II FIFTH SEMESTER 561-G5L-AB Theatre LAB III 561-G5W-AB Production LAB I 561-T5A-AB Props Construction I 561-T5G-AB Management II 561-T5M-AB Technical Media LAB I 561-T5Q-AB Lighting and Sound I 561-T5T-AB Set Construction I 561-T5Z-AB Technical Specialization LAB I SIXTH SEMESTER 561-G6L-AB Theatre LAB IV 561-G6W-AB Production LAB II 561-T6A-AB Props Construction II 561-T6G-AB Management III 561-T6M-AB Technical Media LAB II 561-T6Q-AB Lighting and Sound II 561-T6T-AB Set Construction II 561-T6Z-AB Technical Specialization LAB II COMMENTS: *complementary courses: please refer to the Schedule of Classes for Rules/Restriction on complementary courses ALL professional courses are sequential and require the preceding level course as a pre-requisite. For course pre-requisite and co-requisite information see the Course Calendar or Schedule of Classes. Students will be required to pass an English Exit Exam and a Comprehensive Assessment in Professional Theatre.
  • 105. PROFESSIONAL THEATRE ACTING (561.C0) FIRST SEMESTER THEATRE HISTORY I 561-114-AB (3.0.2) This course familiarizes students with the major periods in Western civiliza- tion and examines the theatre that emerged from those times and places. The basic elements of theatre are examined as well as the roots of drama. This is followed by a survey of Western theatre from ancient Greece up to the end of the Middle Ages in Western Europe. A materials fee will apply. INTRODUCTION TO VOICE I 561-213-AB (1.2.1) The voice classes aim to free the voice of its behaviour patterns and regain its spontaneity. The first semes- ter is concerned primarily with the structure and process of the vocal mechanism, breathing, exploring sound vibrations and the channel for sound. INTRODUCTION TO MOVEMENT I 561-313-AB (1.2.1) In this first semester, the movement training aims to develop physical awareness, ease of motion, co-ordi- nation and stamina. Laban, move- ment fundamentals and unarmed stage combat are included in the course. THEATRE CREATION I 561-413-AB (0.3.1) Different types of improvisation help the student to open up, discover and develop a sense of play. Action Theatre includes exercises to expand awareness, stimulate the imagination, strengthen the capacity for feeling and develop skills of expression. Contact Improvisation helps the student listen, respond and initiate on a body level. Tumbling, weight support, fall and recovery are part of the training. ACTING I 561-516-AB (2.4.1) This course is designed to achieve four student objectives: to discover the nature of acting, to learn how to express action without the use of words, to gain a sound degree of self-awareness, and to realize and develop each student’s own resources of imagination, memory and sensory perceptiveness. The work involves improvisation, sensory development exercises, theatrically relevant games and an analysis of “play” itself. A materials fee will apply. SECOND SEMESTER THEATRE HISTORY II 561-124-AB (3.0.2) P: ALL FIRST SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES The second semester begins with the Renaissance and moves from the 14th century to the 18th beginning in Italy, then going to England and ending with France. The major theatrical con- tributions of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries are dealt with successively. A materials fee will apply. INTRODUCTION TO VOICE II 561-223-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL FIRST SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES Study and work begun the previous semester are continued, further devel- oped and refined. INTRODUCTION TO MOVEMENT II 561-323-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL FIRST SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Introduction to Movement I. THEATRE CREATION II 561-423-AB (0.3.1) P: ALL FIRST SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES The second semester is a continuation of Theatre Creation I. ACTING II 561-526-AB (2.4.1) P: ALL FIRST SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES In this semester roles from dramatic texts (including scenes and mono- logues) are assigned and students are expected to work towards a presenta- tion at the end of the semester. A materials fee will apply. THIRD SEMESTER VOICE & DICTION I 561-235-AB (2.3.1) P: ALL SECOND SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course provides the student with the opportunity to continue to devel- op an increased awareness of the vocal instrument. Emphasis is placed on diction, dialect and singing skills while working with a wide range of dramatic texts. MOVEMENT & LIFESTYLE I 561-334-AB (1.3.1) P: ALL SECOND SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This class includes floor exercises, movement skills, related movement topics and period dance. The focus is on economy of action, expressive movement patterns and a sense of style. THEATRE CREATION III 561-433-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL SECOND SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES Students further develop their improvisational skills by means of guidance and structured exercises based on breath, voice and body coordination. ACTING III 561-536-AB (2.4.1) P: ALL SECOND SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course extends the acting skills students have explored in their first year. Character analysis, character development and scene study are emphasized in class exercises and open-class presentations. TEXT LABORATORY I 561-634-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL SECOND SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES The course of study includes oral and written exercises in script analysis, techniques for strengthening the audi- tory and visual aspects of the text, development of the sensory experi- ence of the spoken word, and tech- niques for preparing actors for the rehearsal process. PERFORMANCE LABORATORY I 561-736-AB (1.4.1) P: ALL SECOND SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course deals with preparing stu- dents for their first fully staged public performance. The main elements of this preparation are teamwork, rehearsal techniques, role interpreta- tion, and voice and movement skills. A materials fee will apply. 105 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 106. FOURTH SEMESTER VOICE & DICTION II 561-245-AB (2.3.1) P: ALL THIRD SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Voice & Diction I. Vocal skills continue to be developed. They are also integrat- ed with acting techniques, and the performance of dramatic texts, song, poetry and prose. The course pro- vides the opportunity for some of the works to be presented in a public set- ting before the end of semester. MOVEMENT & LIFESTYLE II 561-344-AB (1.3.1) P: ALL THIRD SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Movement & Lifestyle I. THEATRE CREATION IV 561-443-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL THIRD SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Theatre Creation III. ACTING IV 561-546-AB (2.4.1) P: ALL THIRD SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course extends the acting skills students have explored in the three previous semesters. Further skill development and application are emphasized through scene studies, class exercises and open-class presen- tations. TEXT LABORATORY II 561-644-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL THIRD SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Text Laboratory I. PERFORMANCE LABORATORY II 561-746-AB (1.4.1) P: ALL THIRD SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Performance Laboratory I. A materials fee will apply. FIFTH SEMESTER THEATRE HISTORY III 561-154-AB (3.0.3) P: ALL FOURTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Theatre History II. VOICE & DICTION III 561-255-AB (1.4.1) P: ALL FOURTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Voice & Diction I and II. As such, the course continues to provide the student with the opportunity to develop their vocal skills and acting techniques, and to apply them to dramatic text, song, poetry or prose. The course may pro- vide the opportunity for a work to be presented in a public setting before the end of semester. MOVEMENT & DANCE I 561-356-AB (1.5.0) P: ALL FOURTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This class includes Laban Efforts, acro- batics and movement for selected texts. Attention is given to composi- tional skills related to selected texts from various plays. THEATRE CREATION V 561-453-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL FOURTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES Students progress to the study, prepa- ration and presentation of an improvi- sational theatre piece. TEXT LABORATORY III 561-653-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL FOURTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course equips the student with the skills required to analyze a dra- matic text for the purpose of perform- ance. A brief history of the origin of scripts, style, the playwright’s world, plot structure, visualization, character- ization and the vocal life of the char- acter are some of the skills that will be explored and developed. PERFORMANCE LABORATORY III 561-758-AB (1.7.2) P: ALL FOURTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Performance Laboratory II. A materi- als fee will apply. ACTING FOR CAMERA I 561-853-AB (1.2.2) P: ALL FOURTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course provides the actor with introductory level skills in preparation for an acting career in film and televi- sion. The basic stage training that the student has received to date will pro- vide a foundation on which to build a “tool box” of skills specifically required for acting for the camera. This course also includes an introduc- tion to the on-camera audition process. A materials fee will apply. SIXTH SEMESTER THEATRE HISTORY IV 561-164-AB (3.0.2) P: ALL FIFTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Theatre History III. VOICE & DICTION IV 561-265-AB (1.4.1) P: ALL FIFTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Voice & Diction III. MOVEMENT & DANCE II 561-366-AB (1.5.0) P: ALL FIFTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Movement & Dance I. THEATRE CREATION VI 561-463-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL FIFTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Theatre Creation V. TEXT LABORATORY IV 561-663-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL FIFTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Text Laboratory III. This course provides the student with the opportunity to develop and apply their text analysis skills, acting techniques, and vocal techniques to a performance of a full length-but short-play. The plays will be presented during the semester as a demonstration of the student’s competency within these disciplines. 106
  • 107. PERFORMANCE LABORATORY IV 561-768-AB (1.7.2) P: ALL FIFTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES A continuation of Performance Laboratory III. A materials fee will apply. ACTING FOR CAMERA II 561-864-AB (1.2.1) P: ALL FIFTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course is a continuation of Acting for Camera I. A materials fee will apply. PROFESSIONAL MANAGEMENT I 561-964-AB (2.1.1) P: ALL FIFTH SEMESTER THEATRE COURSES This course introduces the student to the various aspects of preparing for and operating in the job market. Topics include the preparation of the actor’s photo and résumé, money management, and the audition process. A materials fee will apply. DESIGN & TECHNICAL THEATRE (561.DT) FIRST SEMESTER (Common First Year) INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN I 561-G1D-AB (1.2.2) This course introduces the contribut- ing components for design in Theatre and Film. It surveys “design organiza- tion” and the theory of “concept development” for set, costume and lighting design. The student will receive drawing instruction, read a play to produce a staging concept with a scaled maquette and a cos- tume file with renderings. The course culminates with an oral and visual presentation. A materials fee will apply. SCENERY CONSTRUCTION I 561-G1C-AB (1.2.0) This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of set and prop- erties construction for Theatre and Film. The course introduces the workshop with its attendant equip- ment and materials, placing an emphasis upon safety. The student will learn and practice the fundamen- tal procedures and techniques of using hand tools, power tools and conventional materials to build scenic elements and certain properties. Students are required to provide specified tools, safety glasses and footwear. A materials fee will apply. COSTUME EXECUTION I 561-G1E-AB (1.2.0) This course provides the basic knowl- edge and understanding of the funda- mental aspects of costuming for Theatre and Film. Through practical work the students will acquire rudi- mentary skills in the manipulation of fabric. The work consists of learning the various materials and equipment, elementary sewing skills and the use and maintenance of sewing machines, overlockers and industrial irons. Students will also learn the ter- minology of a costume shop. A mate- rials fee will apply. SCENIC DRAFTING I 561-G1R-AB (1.2.1) The course introduces essential scenic drafting techniques and conventions and how they are applied to Theatre and Media Arts. The course covers hand drafting, ground plans, wall ele- vations, orthographic projection and centre-line cross sections. A materials fee will apply. THEATRE IN PERSPECTIVE I 561-G1H-AB (3.0.2) This course covers the period from the origins of the Theatre and Ritual of Performance to the Renaissance. The content draws from the following areas: general history, theatrical prac- tices and conventions, plays and play- wrights and artistic styles, i.e., painting, sculpture, architecture, décor, furniture, fashion and music. A materials fee will apply. INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA 561-G1M-AB (2.1.1.) This is an introductory course which covers Video, Television and Cinema production. The course introduces basic equipment and techniques, as well as a survey of the personnel required in the industry. SECOND SEMESTER (Common First Year) INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN II 561-G2D-AB (1.2.1) This course is a continuation of Intro to Design I with a particular emphasis on Film design. Students design a set and costumes for a conceptual small scale film. They will be introduced to drawing a “story board” and will pres- ent their designs at the culmination of the course with conventional visuali- zation, including storyboard, maque- tte and costume renderings. A materials fee will apply. SCENERY CONSTRUCTION II 561-G2C-AB (1.2.0) This course is a continuation of Scenery Construction I and concen- trates upon furthering the student’s knowledge of construction techniques used in scenic and properties con- struction. Emphasis is again placed upon “safe practice” and teamwork. Alternate material usage will be explored, if applicable. A materials fee will apply. COSTUME EXECUTION II 561-G2E-AB (1.2.0) This course is a continuation of Costume Execution I, and introduces students to techniques, materials, equipment and procedures requiring a greater level of skill. The comple- tion of an appropriate project is required. A materials fee will apply. SCENIC DRAFTING II 561-G2R-AB (1.2.1) This course is a continuation of Scenic Drafting I and includes areas of tech- nical drawing not previously covered. Isometric projection, construction detail drawings and the introduction of basic AutoCAD (computer assisted drawing) are covered in this course. A materials fee will apply. THEATRE IN PERSPECTIVE II 561-G2H-AB (3.0.2) This course is a continuation of Theatre in Perspective I and covers the period from the Renaissance to the post-romantic period at the end of the 19th century. A materials fee will apply. INTRODUCTION TO THE STAGE 561-G2B-AB (2.1.1) This course continues the introduc- tion to performance technology start- ed with Introduction to Media. It will deal with the physical space of “The Stage” and its attendant infrastructure of light, sound, communication sys- tems and rigging. The student will be 107 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 108. introduced to basic electronics. An overview of theatre personnel and their roles will also be discussed. A materials fee will apply. TECHNICAL (561.TT) THIRD SEMESTER SCENERY CONSTRUCTION III 561-T3C-AB (1.2.0) This course is a continuation of Scenery Construction II and focuses on set and properties building as well as rigging scenery for the stage and finishing techniques for Theatre and Film. Project management of people and resources is introduced in this course. A materials fee will apply. COSTUME EXECUTION III 561-G3E-AB (1.2.0) This course is a continuation of Costume Execution II and focuses on costume fabrication for Theatre and Film, including management skills as they are directly applied to costume projects. A materials fee will apply. PERFORMANCE AND CINEMA IN THE 20TH CENTURY I 561-G3H-AB (3.0.2) This course explores Theatre and Cinema styles and practices from the end of the 19th century to today, including contributions of Canadian playwrights and filmmakers. As in Theatre in Perspective I and II, the content is drawn from general history, theatrical practices and conventions, film practices and conventions, plays, playwrights, screenwriters and artistic styles. A materials fee will apply. LIGHTING I 561-T3X-AB (1.2.1) This course introduces the role of lighting in a stage or screen produc- tion. The student will learn technical lighting terminology used in the pro- fessional milieu, the functions of basic lighting equipment, stage lighting installations, optics, principles of elec- tricity, colour theory, photometrics, lighting control systems, graphical rep- resentations of lighting installations, basic stage lighting techniques and how lighting relates to the other aspects of a stage or screen produc- tion. A materials fee will apply. SOUND I 561-T3S-AB (1.2.1) This course is the production stu- dent’s introduction to the use of sound in Theatrical production. Topics discussed will include: the physics of sound, acoustics, psychoa- coustics, connectors, sound consoles, microphones, loudspeakers and com- pact disc players. THEATRE LAB I 561-G3L-AB (0.8.0) The student is assigned to a technical working crew for the preparation and running of a professional program pro- duction. A materials fee will apply. TECHNICAL (561.TT) FOURTH SEMESTER SCENERY CONSTRUCTION IV 561-T4C-AB (1.2.0) This course is a continuation of Scenery Construction III, further advancing the skills of the student in management techniques and com- pleting projects with a high level of surface finish. A materials fee will apply. PERFORMANCE AND CINEMA IN THE 20TH CENTURY II 561-G4H-AB (3.0.2) This course is a continuation of Performance and Cinema in the 20th Century I exploring Theatre and Cinema styles and practices from the end of the 19th century to today, including contributions of Canadian playwrights and filmmakers. The con- tent is drawn from general history, theatrical practices and conventions, film practices and conventions, plays, playwrights, screenwriters and artistic styles. A materials fee will apply. LIGHTING II 561-T4X-AB (1.2.1) This course is a continuation of Lighting I, and introduces students to the concepts of realistic and formalis- tic lighting. Students will learn the process of lighting design, including the choices of colour, intensity, tex- ture, rhythm, atmosphere and mood. Lighting for the Theatrical stage is highlighted, along with the concert stage, film and television. Projects explore these topics in greater detail. SOUND II 561-T4S-AB (1.2.1) This course is a continuation of Sound I and is the production student’s intro- duction to the practical aspects of sound in theatrical production. Topics discussed will include: use of sound cues to enhance theatrical pro- duction, analysis of the script for appropriate sound cues, use of the online sound library, use of sound editing and CD-burning software and preparation of the sound cue list. THEATRE LAB II 561-G4L-AB (0.8.0) This course is a continuation of Theatre Lab I. The student is assigned to a technical working crew, for the preparation and running of a profes- sional program production. A materi- als fee will apply. MANAGEMENT I 561-T4G-AB (2.1.2) This course explores the roles of man- agement as applied to Theatrical and Cinematographic production, i.e., the role of Stage Manager, Production Manager, Technical Director; First and Second Assistant Directors and other management personnel. Students will study how to generate professional paperwork, including lists, plots and schedules. Communication and inter- action within the production team is highlighted. A materials fee will apply. SET CONSTRUCTION I 561-T5T-AB (0.3.0) This course focuses on set building, including drafting and finishing tech- niques, and shop management skills used by the Head Carpenter of a pro- duction. Any pre-production organi- zation undertaken by the set crew chief for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab course during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream compo- nent in the official course outline. A materials fee will apply. TECHNICAL (561.TT) FIFTH SEMESTER PROPS CONSTRUCTION I 561-T5A-AB (1.2.0) This course focuses on props fabrica- tion techniques, including graphic skills, finishing techniques and man- 108
  • 109. agement skills used in overseeing a props department for a production. Any pre-production organization undertaken by the props crew chief for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream component in the official course outline. A materials fee will apply. LIGHTING AND SOUND I 561-T5Q-AB (1.2.2) This course includes an intensive proj- ect where the student focuses on recreating realistic stage lighting for a simulated production. The project will begin with a script, go through the planning stages and culminate in actual onstage execution. Students will master rigging and focussing skills and expand on their knowledge of the lighting control desk. The balance of this course is the production stu- dent’s introduction to the application of sound to audio-visual production. Sound recording, editing and sweet- ening for simple video productions will be discussed. Any work undertaken by the lighting or Sound Designer, Chief Electrician or Sound Operator for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as separate stream component in the official course outline. A materials fee will apply. PRODUCTION LAB I 561-G5W-AB (0.9.0) The student is assigned a Crew, Crew Chief or Management position for the preparation and running of a Stage production. THEATRE LAB III 561-G5L-AB (0.6.0) This course is a continuation of Theatre Lab II. The student works as a Crew, Crew Chief, Manager, Lighting or Sound Designer for the mounting and running of a Professional Program Production, including techniques relating to man- aging crews and engineering critical paths to meet production deadlines. A materials fee will apply. MANAGEMENT II 561-T5G-AB (2.1.2) This course is a continuation of Management I and focuses on how to best allocate resources for a stage or screen production, concentrating on time, management, scheduling, logis- tics, human resources and finances. Any production work undertaken by the Stage Manager or Production Manager for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream compo- nent in the official course outline. TECHNICAL MEDIA LAB I 561-T5M-AB (0.3.1) The student undertakes a Crew, Crew Chief or Management assignment for the preparation and running of a Film or Television Production. A materials fee will apply. TECHNICAL SPECIALIZATION LAB I 561-T5Z-AB (0.7.4) This course, which runs concurrently with the Theatre Lab course, consists of specialized projects and activities tailored to the individual student’s interests and aptitudes and, where possible, furthering the Professional Theatre Program’s final production of the semester. This may include man- agement of a production crew or detailed construction projects requir- ing advanced skills. A materials fee will apply. TECHNICAL (561.TT) SIXTH SEMESTER SET CONSTRUCTION II 561-T6T-AB (0.3.0) This course is a continuation of Set Construction I and focuses on set building, including drafting and finish- ing techniques, and management skills used by the head carpenter for a production. Any pre-production organization undertaken by the set crew chief for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream compo- nent in the official course outline. A materials fee will apply. PROPS CONSTRUCTION II 561-T6A-AB (1.2.0) This course is a continuation of Props Construction I and focuses on props fabrication techniques, including graphic skills, finishing techniques and management skills used in overseeing a props department for a production. Any pre-production organization undertaken by the props crew chief for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream component in the official course outline. A materi- als fee will apply. LIGHTING AND SOUND II 561-T6Q-AB (1.2.2) This course is a continuation of Lighting and Sound I, and includes an intensive project where the student focuses on recreating a formalistic lighting scenario. Students will select a thesis statement concerning a theme that they wish to explore and will create a sculptured element and a sound environment to further con- tribute in the expression of the light- ing scenario. The balance of the course is the production student’s introduction to the application of live sound to theatrical production. Microphone choice and placement, stage monitoring, feedback suppres- sion and dynamic processing will be discussed. Any work undertaken by the lighting or Sound Designer, Chief Electrician or Sound Operator for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab cours- es during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream component in the official course outline. A materials fee will apply. PRODUCTION LAB II 561-G6W-AB (0.10.0) This course is a continuation of Production Lab I. The student is assigned a Crew, Crew Chief or Management position for the prepara- tion and running of a Stage produc- tion. THEATRE LAB IV 561-G6L-AB (0.6.0) This course is a continuation of Theatre Lab III. The student will work as a Crew, Crew Chief, Manager, Lighting or Sound Designer for the mounting and running of a Professional Program Production, including techniques relating to man- aging crews and engineering critical paths to meet production deadlines. A materials fee will apply. 109 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 110. MANAGEMENT III 561-T6G-AB (2.1.1) This course is a continuation of Management II, furthering the stu- dent’s knowledge of stage and pro- duction management techniques. Any production work undertaken by the stage manager or production manager for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream compo- nent in the official course outline. TECHNICAL MEDIA LAB II 561-T6M-AB (0.3.1) This course is a continuation of Technical Media Lab I. The student undertakes a Crew, Crew Chief or Management assignment for the preparation and running of a Film or Television Production. A materials fee will apply. TECHNICAL SPECIALIZATION LAB II 561-T6Z-AB (0.8.4) This course is a continuation of Technical Specialization Lab I and runs concurrently with the Theatre Lab Course. The course consists of specialized projects and activities tai- lored to the individual student’s inter- ests and aptitudes and, where possible, furthering the Professional Theatre Program’s final production of the semester. This may include man- agement of a production crew or detailed construction projects requir- ing advanced skills. A materials fee will apply. DESIGN (561.DD) THIRD SEMESTER SCENIC DESIGN I 561-D3C-AB (1.2.1) A considerable portion of this course is devoted to perspective drawing techniques and the development of rendering skills. The student will develop a scenic design and present the finalized concept with the use of rendering, drafting, painted eleva- tions, paint/finish samples and proper- ty drawings. The student will develop time management skills to assist him/her in finalizing the project and will also assess the budgetary, techni- cal and resource implications of the project. This course focuses on developing designs for Television and Film media. A materials fee will apply. COSTUME EXECUTION III 561-G3E-AB (1.2.0) This course is a continuation of Costume Execution II and focuses on costume fabrication for Theatre and Film, including management skills as they are directly applied to costume projects. A materials fee will apply. COSTUME DESIGN I 561-D3U-AB (1.2.2) A considerable portion of this class is devoted to drawing techniques for the costume designer. Assisted by these skills, the student will develop a practical costume design for a given text, and will explore the implications of budget, time and resource man- agement, presenting the concept visu- ally with rendering, fabric swatches and costume plot. A materials fee will apply. PERFORMANCE AND CINEMA IN THE 20TH CENTURY I 561-G3H-AB (3.0.2) This course explores Theatre and Cinema styles and practices from the end of the 19th century to today, including contributions of Canadian playwrights and filmmakers. As in Theatre in Perspective I and II, the content is drawn from general history, theatrical practices and conventions, film practices and conventions, plays, playwrights, screenwriters and artistic styles. A materials fee will apply. STYLES I 561-D3Y-AB (3.0.1) This course is an in-depth study of styles from selected historical periods. The course covers the historical and political context and its implications upon the arts, including architecture, painting, sculpture, décor and fash- ion. Parallels are drawn between dra- matic and cinematographic works and the impact that “style” has upon them. A materials fee will apply. THEATRE LAB I 561-G3L-AB (0.8.0) The student is assigned to a technical working crew for the preparation and running of a professional program production. A materials fee will apply. DESIGN (561.DD) FOURTH SEMESTER SCENIC DESIGN II 561-D4C-AB (1.2.2) This course is a continuation of Scenic Design I and focuses on set and props design, including analysis of dramatic texts, lighting, drawing, finishing tech- niques, scenic painting and manage- ment skills. This course focuses on developing design for a Theatrical Stage production. A materials fee will apply. COSTUME EXECUTION IV 561-D4E-AB (1.2.0) This course is a continuation of Costume Execution III and focuses on costume fabrication for Theatre and Film, including management skills as they are directly applied to costume projects. A materials fee will apply. COSTUME DESIGN II 561-D4U-AB (1.2.2) This course is a continuation of Costume Design I and includes analy- sis of dramatic texts, lighting, drawing, finishing techniques and management skills used in the process of develop- ing costume designs for Television, Film Media and/or the Stage. PERFORMANCE AND CINEMA IN THE 20TH CENTURY II 561-G4H-AB (3.0.2) This course is a continuation of Performance and Cinema in the 20th Century I exploring Theatre and Cinema styles and practices from the end of the 19th century to today, including contributions of Canadian playwrights and filmmakers. The con- tent is drawn from general history, theatrical practices and conventions, film practices and conventions, plays, playwrights, screenwriters and artistic styles. A materials fee will apply. STYLES II 561-D4Y-AB (3.0.1) This course is a continuation of Styles I and contains an in-depth study of styles from selected historical periods. The course will cover the historical and political context and the implica- tions upon the arts, including archi- tecture, painting, sculpture, décor and fashion. Parallels are drawn between dramatic and cinemato- graphic works and the impact that “style” has upon them. A materials fee will apply. 110
  • 111. THEATRE LAB II 561-G4L-AB (0.8.0) This course is a continuation of Theatre Lab I. The student is assigned to a technical working crew, for the preparation and running of a profes- sional program production. A materi- als fee will apply. DESIGN (561.DD) FIFTH SEMESTER SET DESIGN I 561-D5T-AB (1.2.2) This course focuses on designing scenery for the stage and includes management skills used in developing set designs for a production, as well as assessing the personnel, time and budgetary realities. Any set design undertaken by a single student designer for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream compo- nent in the official course outline. MEDIA DESIGN I 561-D5D-AB (1.2.2) This course focuses on designing scenery for Television and Film and includes management skills used in developing set designs for a produc- tion, as well as assessing personnel, time and budget realities. A materials fee will apply. COSTUME DESIGN III 561-D5U-AB (1.2.2) This course is a continuation of Costume Design II and includes draw- ing and the integration of personnel, time and budgetary realities into the design process. Any costume design undertaken by a student for the cur- rent Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a sepa- rate stream component in the official course outline. PROPS DESIGN 561-D5A-AB (1.2.1) This course focuses on designing and building props for the stage, film and television. It will include manage- ment skills used in developing props for a production, as well as assessing personnel, time and budget realities. Any props design undertaken by a student for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream compo- nent in the official course outline. A materials fee will apply. PRODUCTION LAB I 561-G5W-AB (0.9.0) The student is assigned a Crew, Crew Chief or Management position for the preparation and running of a Stage production. THEATRE LAB III 561-G5L-AB (0.6.0) This course is a continuation of Theatre Lab II. The student works as a Crew, Crew Chief, Manager or Designer for the mounting and run- ning of a Professional Program Production during Weeks 10 to 15, including techniques relating to man- aging crews and engineering critical paths to meet production deadlines. A materials fee will apply. DESIGN MEDIA LAB I 561-D5M-AB (0.3.0) The student undertakes a Crew, Crew Chief, Management or Design assign- ment for the preparation and running of a Film/Television Production. A material fee will apply. SCENE PAINTING LAB I 561-D5P-AB (0.3.0) This course introduces advanced scene painting techniques as applied to Production. A materials fee will apply. DESIGN SPECIALIZATION LAB I 561-D5Z-AB (0.4.0) This course, which runs concurrently with the Theatre Lab course, consists of specialized projects and activities tailored to the individual student’s interests and aptitudes and, where possible, furthering the Professional Theatre Program’s final production of the semester. This might include scene painting, and construction proj- ects requiring advanced skills. A materials fee will apply. DESIGN (561.DD) SIXTH SEMESTER SET DESIGN II 561-D6T-AB (1.2.2) This course is a continuation of Set Design I and focuses on designing scenery for the stage and includes management skills used in developing set designs for a production, as well as assessing personnel, time and budget realities. Any set design under- taken by a student designer for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream component in the official course outline. A materials fee will apply. MEDIA DESIGN II 561-D6D-AB (1.2.2) This course is a continuation of Media Design I and focuses on designing scenery for Television and Film, and includes management skills used in developing set designs for a produc- tion, as well as assessing personnel, time and budget realities. A materials fee will apply. COSTUME DESIGN IV 561-D6U-AB (1.2.2) This course is a continuation of Costume Design III and includes drawing and the integration of per- sonnel, time and budgetary realities into the design process. Any costume design undertaken by a student for the current Production Lab or Theatre Lab courses during the first 5 weeks will be attached to this course as a separate stream component in the official course outline. A materials fee will apply. LIGHTING DESIGN 561-D6X-AB (2.1.1) This course is an introduction to light- ing design and its role in stage and screen productions. Students will learn the process a lighting designer follows, what lighting provides for a production and how it relates to other design elements. PRODUCTION LAB II 561-G6W-AB (0.10.0) This course is a continuation of Production Lab I. The student is assigned a Crew, Crew Chief or Management position for the preparation and running of a Stage production. THEATRE LAB IV 561-G6L-AB (0.6.0) This course is a continuation of Theatre Lab III. The student works as a Crew, Crew Chief, Manager, or Designer for the mounting and run- 111 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 112. ning a Professional Program Production, including techniques relat- ing to managing crews and engineer- ing critical paths to meet production deadlines. A materials fee will apply. DESIGN MEDIA LAB II 561-D6M-AB (0.3.0) This course is a continuation of Design Media Lab I. The student will undertake a Crew, Crew Chief, Management or Design assignment for the preparation and running of a Film/Television Production. A materi- als fee will apply. SCENE PAINTING LAB II 561-D6P-AB (0.3.0) This course is a continuation of Scene Painting Lab I, and focuses on advanced scene painting techniques as applied to Production. A materials fee will apply. DESIGN SPECIALIZATION LAB II 561-D6Z-AB (0.5.0) This course is a continuation of Design Specialization Lab I and runs concurrently with the Theatre Lab course. The course consists of spe- cialized projects and activities tailored to the individual student’s interests and aptitudes and, where possible, furthering the Professional Theatre Program’s final production of the semester. This will include manage- ment of a production crew, Scene Painting and construction projects requiring advanced skills. 112
  • 113. PUBLICATION DESIGN AND HYPERMEDIA TECHNOLOGY (412.A0) 113 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 412-100-AB Web Design I (HTML) 412-101-AB Computer Graphics 412-102-AB Document & Presentation Software 412-104-AB Typography & Design SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course * 412-200-AB Drawing Software 412-201-AB Page Design 412-202-AB Web Design II Dreamweaver and CSS 412-203-AB Digital Photo Processing PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2006 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 602- FRENCH 412-300-AB Book Design 412-301-AB Web Design III (Styles) 412-302-AB Graphic Design 412-303-AB Multimedia I (Flash) FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 412-400-AB Copy Writing & Promo Materials 412-401-AB Multimedia II (Advanced Flash) 412-402-AB French Publications & Translation 412-404-AB Newsletter Design 420-DDJ-AB Web Programming FIFTH SEMESTER 345- HUMANITIES ___-___ Complementary Course * 412-500-AB Web Design IV (Corporate) 412-501-AB Spreadsheets & Databases 412-502-AB Scanning & Prepress 412-505-AB Graphics Studio 412-605-AB Running a Business & Project Management SIXTH SEMESTER 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 412-600-AB Electronic Portfolio 412-601-AB Print Portfolio 412-602-AB Customer & Technical Support 412-604-AB Reports & Forms 412-606-AB Stage 412-506-AB Integrated Project The Publication Design & Hypermedia Technology Department at John Abbott College offers students the chance to develop skills in web site creation, publication design and graphics design – skills needed for today's busi- nesses, whether you set up your own company or join the corporate world. This program involves extensive hands-on computer experi- ence using popular industry software, including Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Dreamweaver, Adobe Flash, QuarkXPress, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Acrobat, XHTML, Javascript, ActionScript and CSS. Students also become proficient in standard business software required in the workplace (Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Access and Project). In their final semester, students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired and enter the workplace for a three-week fieldwork placement to gain practical experi- ence in the design industry. In addition to all of these classes, students are required to take the following general education courses throughout their three year stay in order to get their DEC: 4 English, 2 French, 3 Humanities, 2 Physical Education and 2 Complementary Courses (chosen from any domain except Computer Science). For further information on the PDHT Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the PDHT Program Chairperson, local 5930. Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures Section for specific Admissions requirements. * Complementary courses : Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for Rules / Restrictions on Complementary Courses. Note: Stage is a final semester course only available in the Winter semester. PDHT department chair people will ensure that all eligible students embarking on stage have fulfilled the requirements of all the program courses, including their Winter semester program courses, before leaving on stage. Students will be required to pass an English Exit Exam and a Comprehensive Assessment in Publication Design and Hypermedia Technology CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 114. PUBLICATION DESIGN & HYPERMEDIA TECHNOLOGY FIRST SEMESTER WEB DESIGN I (HTML) 412-100-AB (1.3.2) This course provides students with a thorough grounding in the basics of HTML (file management, layout, typographical effects, tables, frames, styles, links, etc.) The course also presents a general introduction to web page design (combining text, links and graphics) and encourages students to synthesize theoretical concepts with practical experience by creating and uploading their own web pages. COMPUTER GRAPHICS 412-101-AB (2.2.2) This course introduces students to three key graphics software applica- tions in our program. Students will learn to use the MAC operating sys- tem, popular with print designers. Students will create logos and simple drawings on the computer with Adobe Illustrator, retouch and com- bine images such as digital photos with Adobe Photoshop, and import text, logos and images to design CD packaging with a leading page layout program, Adobe InDesign. DOCUMENT & PRESENTATION SOFTWARE 412-102-AB (1.3.2) Students will learn to use Microsoft Word, the most widely used word processing software, in order to devel- op their basic knowledge of docu- ment production, and Microsoft PowerPoint, the most popular presen- tation software, to create computer slide shows and handouts to accom- pany oral presentations. Keyboarding skills are developed in a systematic manner using a state-of-the-art key- boarding software. TYPOGRAPHY & DESIGN 412-104-AB (2.2.2) Students will learn typographic princi- ples of basic letter forms, type classifi- cation, font relationships, psychology of fonts, type history and when to use specific fonts for print and web. To complement their design work, students will get experience in free- hand drawing through various proj- ects where they will discover the relationship between observation and graphic representation. Students will learn the basic principles of perspec- tive drawing, design principles using the square, circle and triangle, as well as brainstorming techniques for creat- ing images that stand out and have purpose. SECOND SEMESTER DRAWING SOFTWARE 412-200-AB (1.3.2) Using Adobe Illustrator, students will create drawings on the computer consisting of objects, which can be graphic elements and text elements. Students will create and trace tem- plate layers with the Pen tool (Bézier). They will also use the Reshape tool and Pathfinder to create 2D art. They will create 3D effects using gradient mesh, gradients, blends and 3D effects that extrude objects or give them perspective. Students will also make symbols and design brush strokes. Artwork created will include a tracing project and an illustration with 3D effects. PAGE DESIGN 412-201-AB (2.2.2) Students will acquire a firm grounding in Adobe InDesign as applied to page layout applications. They will learn how to customize and create master pages, templates with guides, text, pictures, colours and styles in a vari- ety of applications. They will also integrate these features in creative projects, such as journals and calen- dars. Layout is the main focus and students will create layouts for various print formats. WEB DESIGN II (DREAMWEAVER) 412-202-AB (1.3.3) This course presents both the theoret- ical basis of designing an effective, functional web site and the hands-on mechanics of creating such a site using Dreamweaver. Students will work with the two basic web page components – structural mark-up and design with CSS – to create web sites that are technically functional, stan- dards compliant, aesthetically pleas- ing, and marketable. They will use DIVs and behaviours to create dynamic pages that respond to user input, and expand their knowledge of Photoshop to create images for their own original web pages. DIGITAL PHOTO PROCESSING (PHOTOSHOP/BRIDGE) 412-203-AB (2.2.3) This digital photo-processing course is designed to further explore Adobe Photoshop, the leading image pro- cessing, retouching and manipulation software. Students will explore the difference between using layers, alpha channels and selections. They will learn digital retouching and composit- ing and how to create clipping paths. They will learn to save in the appro- priate formats to export to other applications. Students will be intro- duced to colour theory and applying custom colour, like spot colour chan- nels, and duotones. They will also be looking at Adobe Bridge for managing their digital media and work with RAW images as well as learn how to create HDR (High Dynamic Range) images. THIRD SEMESTER BOOK DESIGN 412-300-AB (2.2.3) P: 412-201-AB In this course students will learn to design and create books and other multi page documents. Using Adobe InDesign, the leading page layout pro- gram, students will explore features that are useful in long documents, such as style sheets, headers and foot- ers for facing pages, page numbering, the book palette, indexing, and gen- erating lists such as a table of con- tents. They will design master pages using grids, guides, rules, screens, and other design elements. Students will use typographical cues to highlight key points. Screen capture software such as SnagIt will be used to take high quality screen captures. Students will learn how to prepare long docu- ments for service providers and com- mercial printing as well as save for Adobe Acrobat pdf format as well. WEB DESIGN III (STYLES) 412-301-AB (2.2.3) P: 412-202-AB This course emphasizes design princi- ples for the web and encourages stu- dents to develop creativity through an exploration of a variety of web styles, such as Gothic, Mondrian, and Grunge. Students will apply their practical skills in Photoshop and Dreamweaver to the creative process of designing and creating original, aesthetically pleas- ing, marketable web pages. 114
  • 115. In additional to design principles, issues explored include readability, effective navigation, cross-browser and cross-platform performance, client interaction, and advanced Dreamweaver/HTML techniques like jump menus, pop-ups, behaviours, animation and CSS. GRAPHIC DESIGN 412-302-AB (2.2.3) P: 412-200-AB General design principles like bal- ance; proportion, unity, contrast and typographic harmony will be intro- duced in the Graphic Design course and become a part of your design strategy to appropriately render a communications objective. Software includes Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and on occasion, QuarkXPress. Efficient layout and secrets behind effective design will be revealed beginning with the Gestalt psychology fundamentals of document organiza- tion. The basic architecture of typog- raphy from classification to formation will be reviewed and developed. Basic colour theory will be explored along with the psychological connota- tions colour can convey through design. Understanding the colour spectrum and colour models will cul- minate in the structuring of a personal colour wheel. Other projects include designing a poster, a menu using cataloguing sys- tems, advertisements and stationery sets with a personal logotype, a busi- ness card and envelope. MULTIMEDIA I (FLASH) 412-303-AB (2.2.3) P: 412-200-AB This course introduces students to concepts and techniques of animating vector drawings, bitmap images and sound elements over time using Adobe Flash CS4, a multimedia pro- gram that combines motion, graphics, sounds and interactivity in a format that is efficient on a web page. Students will use Flash to enhance web sites with animated logos, ban- ners and animated buttons. They will animate characters with bones and create an e-greeting card. Students will learn principles of animation and apply them to their movies. Freeware will be used to capture and record sound elements. FOURTH SEMESTER COPY WRITING & PROMO MATERIALS 412-400-AB (3.1.4) This course provides students with an integrative experience designed to simulate the real-world advertising environment. Students will develop the creative and tactical framework of an advertising campaign and will then write all the advertising copy including slogans, titles and body text. Students will therefore have an opportunity to develop their English writing skills through close attention to editing and proofreading. After the conceptual basis has been established, students will develop the materials for both on-online (web) and print production using their creative talents. Web text, brochures, direct mail copy, flyers, in-store promotional materials, and other forms of advertising will be addressed. MULTIMEDIA II (ADVANCED FLASH) 412-401-AB (1.3.3) P: 412-200-AB, 412-303-AB This course continues to develop advanced concepts of animation using Adobe Flash CS4. Students will explore advanced web site enhance- ments such as galleries with transitions and preloaders. Students will incorpo- rate digital video into Flash movies and add external sound to their movies. Students will be introduced to game development on Flash. Projects include a simple Flash game and a Flash website with animation. FRENCH PUBLICATIONS & TRANSLATION 412-402-AB (2.2.3) P: 602-___-___ Students will become familiar with the French vocabulary specific to the fields of graphic design, publication design and web design. They will be able to create French texts and per- form French linguistic revisions, apply- ing the rules of French typography. They will translate texts from French to English and English to French. They will learn to spot and avoid anglicisms and Gallicisms. Students will showcase their French writing and translations by designing and creating French and bilingual publications. NEWSLETTER DESIGN 412-404-AB (2.2.3) P: 412-201-AB, 412-302-AB Using QuarkXPress, the industry stan- dard page layout application for jour- nal, magazine and newspaper publications, students will design and produce newsletters. Students will advance their under- standing of mechanical layout and page design that balances both form and function within the context of newspaper design. Essential elements of page structure and organization of information that facilitate reader- friendly page layouts will be explored. They will be introduced to the ver- nacular of newspaper layout while learning key techniques to make their pages interesting, such as teasers, sidebars, pull quotes, sig's and bugs. Photomontage skills will be devel- oped through the understanding of the dominant photo techniques in a photo spread layout. Students will learn how to mock-up a dummy and create templates conforming to accepted standards and principles of good story design while satisfying aes- thetic considerations such as balance of positive and negative space. Students will write article summaries and other original material to fill in the gaps. They will learn to edit their own, and other contributors' work, to conform to grammatical standards and principles of good journalism, as well as to satisfy design considera- tions such as space. Students will also set production deadlines to learn to encourage contributors to meet their deadlines. WEB PROGRAMMING 420-DDJ-AB (2.1.3) P: 412-100-AB This course builds on Web Design I, allowing students to further develop their knowledge of HTML – including tables, forms, cascading style sheets, and browser-specific features – as well as develop other programming skills necessary to good web site management. These skills include using event handlers in JavaScript, running Applets or other programs, preserving state by using cookies, and incorporating CGI scripts such as site search engines and counters in a client's web site. Students will be able to address Internet security issues and 115 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 116. other e-commerce issues. An intro- duction to cutting-edge web page features will ensure that students' web pages remain avant-garde in a rapidly changing industry. FIFTH SEMESTER WEB DESIGN IV (CORPORATE) 412-500-AB (2.2.3) P: 412-301-AB This advanced web design course covers the major components of con- temporary web design that allow stu- dents to plan, organize, and create a corporate or small-business web site from start to finish. The major compo- nents include: practical corporate design (clean and sleek format, little boxes format, newsletter format, mag- azine format and BLOG-style format), CSS and XHTML (transitional, frame- set and strict), and the theory and practice of web site development. Some of the theoretical considera- tions are planning, site structure, speed/bandwidth considerations, accessibility requirements and much more. SPREADSHEETS & DATABASES 412-501-AB (2.2.3) In this course students will learn two further applications of Microsoft Office to the business side of publica- tion and web design: Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access. Using Microsoft Excel, students will design and modify spreadsheets to perform useful calculations, create budgets, projections and graphs, adding graphics, colour and special effects to enhance the readability and attractiveness of their row and col- umn worksheets. They will access real-time data using Web queries, perform what-if analyses, link Excel worksheets to Word documents, cre- ate templates and work with consoli- dated workbooks. Using Microsoft Access, students will create, query and maintain databases and print reports. The usefulness of databases in the design business and e-commerce is undeniable. SCANNING & PREPRESS 412-502-AB (2.2.3) P: 412-203-AB This prepress course prepares stu- dents to enter the workplace with a sufficiently technical understanding of print reproduction to help them ensure quality output with a mini- mum of wasted time and effort. Students will learn to scan images at high quality while applying advanced features such as gamut correction during the scanning process. Issues of color reproduction theory, four color process printing, film and plates, spot colors, Pantone Matching System, dot gain, electronic color management as well as trapping will be covered. This course will familiar- ize students with the technical jargon of the printing industry. GRAPHICS STUDIO 412-505-AB (1.3.3) P: 412-200-AB & 412-203-AB Integrating concepts and skills devel- oped in the previous graphic arts courses in the program, students will be encouraged to creatively draw upon their theoretical design and technical skills in Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop to create complex, exciting and appropriate images for the web and for print media. Students will have ample opportunity to work independently with guidance and feedback, on a variety of self-directed graphic arts projects. RUNNING A BUSINESS & PROJECT MANAGEMENT 412-605-AB (2.2.3) This course provides information essential to management a graphic or web design business. The standard procedures used in small, medium size, or large design firms are exam- ined based on Acts and regulations in the Federal and Provincial arenas. Students are also introduced to the concepts, issues and procedures encountered while completing a proj- ect within a specific timeframe for a set amount of money. Using Gantt Charts and Microsoft Project, students plan, trade and complete their proj- ects on time. Students will work in teams on one or more "real life" publication and web design projects developing interper- sonal and management skills neces- sary to perform in today's business environment. SIXTH SEMESTER ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIO 412-600-AB (1.3.4) P: 412-500-AB As the culmination of their web design, graphic arts, and business courses, Electronic Portfolio gives stu- dents experience in creating and managing a complex web site that may include forms, multimedia, JavaScript, style sheets, templates, Flash animations, and other elements. In preparing this site, from pitch to final delivery on-line, students will be exposed to real-world situations, chal- lenges, and solutions. Students will prepare and bring together their best web and print work in a professional-quality Electronic Portfolio. PRINT PORTFOLIO 412-601-AB (1.3.4) P: 412-505-AB In this advanced graphic arts course students will refine their personal print- based portfolios as well as explore presentation skills relevant to their par- ticular interests and career goals for the print industry. Students will also pre- pare appropriate written materials to accompany their portfolios. Students will learn different methods of portfolio display, documentation, gallery presen- tation, letter writing and professional portfolio preparation techniques. Students will receive individual feed- back on how to revise and supplement their submissions to showcase their work effectively. CUSTOMER & TECHNICAL SUPPORT 412-602-AB (2.2.3) This course introduces students to the concepts of customer support and technical support. Students will learn to assist clients in both English and French, face-to-face, on the phone, in print, by fax and via the Internet. Students will also receive hands-on experience in trouble-shooting, upgrading and repairing personal computers. They will become familiar with virus protection software for both Windows and Macintosh platforms, Internet security issues and common network, internet and printing prob- lems often encountered in a work environment. Methods by which technology can be utilized to assist customer and technical support will be explored. 116
  • 117. REPORT & FORMS 412-604-AB (2.2.3) P: 412-201-AB In this course, students will be responsible for the design and pro- duction of reports and forms. Students are required to design, assemble, and edit reports, in both French and English using appropriate typographical cues and levels of head- ings. Imported visual elements may include photos, illustrations, and charts. Students will also create original forms, including web or virtual forms, ensuring that the written language (both English and French) is well edit- ed and the form headings are clear and grouped in a logical order according to principles of form cre- ation. Principles of form design, such as placement of rules and screen, are used to improve the visual presenta- tion of the form. INTEGRATED PROJECT 412-506-AB (0.4.0) Third-year students integrate skills developed in previous courses to run a small design company serving real clients from the John Abbott College community and outside. They devel- op procedures for running an office and design and create products requested by clients, including web sites, brochures, flyers, calendars, bookmarks, business cards, posters and slide shows. In addition to learn- ing how to deal with clients, students develop team-leading skills such as how to supervise a team, delegate work, run meetings, motivate staff, meet real-life deadlines and deal with problems. STAGE 412-606-AB (1.7.2) P: 412-500-AB & 412-502-AB Note: All PDHT courses must be completed or in progress in order to be eligible to enter the Stage course. Third year students prepare for and participate in a three-week workplace stage, integrating and synthesizing their theoretical and practical knowl- edge in the field of publication design and hypermedia technology. Students may work within an actual web design or graphic design department of a company or provide publication design or web site support to compa- nies desiring outside expertise. International stage possibilities in Nice, France and in Chihuahua, Mexico are also available to students. 117 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 118. YOUTH AND ADULT CORRECTIONAL INTERVENTION (310.B0) Courses in the three-year Youth and Adult Correctional Intervention Program provide students with a sound founda- tion in applied social sciences and in criminology, penal law, and psychology. Student activities and fieldwork play an inte- gral part of the program. Students are encouraged to partici- pate in community and campus programs connected with Correctional studies to allow them to exercise and develop interpersonal skills. Fieldwork courses involve students work- ing in youth and adult correctional institutions such as youth rehabilitation centers, prisons, penitentiaries, half-way hous- es, community organizations, schools, drug rehabilitation cen- ters, etc. Although graduates of the Youth and Adult Correctional Intervention Program find rewarding and challenging careers within the adult and juvenile correctional systems and relat- ed fields, a number of them choose to pursue their studies at university in programs such as Criminology, Sociology, Psychology or Social Work. Career opportunities for our graduates include working with juveniles in community pro- grams, rehabilitation centres, group homes, court services, drug rehabilitation centers, or counselling victims, and more. They may also find employment working with adult offend- ers as correctional officers, drug rehabilitation counsellors or in the development of recreational, educational and voca- tional programs for adult offenders. With further studies, some may choose to work as probation or parole officers within the Quebec or Canadian correctional system. NNOOTTEE:: Students must be physically able to successfully complete the Self-defense course and the CPR First Responder course, two compulsory courses required to graduate in the program. Students who have been found guilty of a criminal offence may be blocked from fieldwork placements A basic knowl- edge of French is an asset. For further information about the Youth and Adult Correctional Intervention Program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Correctional Intervention Program Chairperson, local 5770. Refer to the Admissions Policies and Procedures Section for specific Admissions requirements. 118 FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ Complementary Course 310-100-AB Analysis of the Profession 310-101-AB Judicial System 310-104-AB Intro to Criminology 310-105-AB Observation Methods SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 310-200-AB Communication Techniques 310-201-AB Adult Criminology 310-202-AB Juvenile Criminology 310-205-AB Penal Law 350-206-AB Adolescence to Maturity PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2007 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 310-300-AB Correctional Services 310-301-AB Juvenile Institutions 310-302-AB Clinical Criminology I 310-303-AB Psychopathology & Deviance 310-304-AB Prevention 310-305-AB Fieldwork I FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 310-400-AB Clinical Criminology II 310-402-AB Community Resources 310-403-AB Crisis Intervention 310-404-AB Fieldwork II 387-401-AB Ethnic & Social Diversity FIFTH SEMESTER 345- HUMANITIES ___-___ Complementary Course 310-501-AB Drugs 310-502-AB CPR & First Responder 310-503-AB Self-Defense 310-506-AB Group Techniques 310-507-AB Integrating Legal Intervention 310-508-AB Fieldwork III SIXTH SEMESTER 310-600-AB Fieldwork IV 310-602-AB Integration Seminar Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses.
  • 119. YOUTH AND ADULT CORRECTIONAL INTERVENTION FIRST SEMESTER ANALYSIS OF THE PROFESSION 310-100-AB (2.1.2) The goal of this course is to help stu- dents gain an understanding of the correctional network and to examine tasks, operations, skills and behaviors required by the occupation. Students will begin to define and formulate an opinion with regards to delinquency, training and job requirements. Student’s personal motivation for intervening with delinquents will also be explored. JUDICIAL SYSTEM 310-101-AB (3.0.3) This course will explore every step of the judicial process while paying spe- cial attention to the Canadian and Quebec Charters and the rights of individuals in the judicial process. Students will also analyze the effects of various private and social legisla- tion on delinquents, their families and friends. The rights of victims will also be examined. OBSERVATION METHODS 310-105-AB (1.2.2) Students will learn to apply a system- atic observation process for various everyday environments in which adult delinquents and young offend- ers live. Students will learn to use observation grids and reports sup- plied by social and correctional serv- ices. They will also learn to observe the physical environment and objects, and describe their features and conditions as well as observing delinquents and groups of delin- quents in various settings. Students will also learn to describe their own emotional, intellectual and physical reactions on the job. Record, analyze and describe their observations to colleagues as well as designing an intervention to match the individual and the situation. INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY 310-104-AB (3.0.3) Using key concepts in criminology: criminality, crime, victimology, deviance, marginality, hidden and offi- cial delinquency, aggravating and extenuating factors, modus operandi, etc., students will learn to identify criminogenic factors likely to lead to delinquency during adolescence and adulthood. As well, students will learn to recognize the influence of social val- ues on the criminalization and decrim- inalization of various types of behaviors such as abortion, cannabis possession, prostitution, euthanasia, etc. SECOND SEMESTER COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES 310-200-AB (1.2.3) Using verbal and non-verbal commu- nication techniques, students will determine the objectives and types of relations to establish with delinquents, their families and friends. They will learn to communicate with delin- quents, their families and friends in various professional situations and to conduct directed, semi-directed and open interviews. They will also assess their ability to communicate and interact with delinquents, their fami- lies and friends. ADULT CRIMINOLOGY 310-201-AB (2.1.3) P: 310-104-AB This course will enable students to understand the scope of adult delin- quency in society. Students will learn to characterize male and female delinquency, their values, lifestyle, types of misdemeanors, social toler- ance, motivations, gangs, organized crime and membership in a criminal organization. JUVENILE CRIMINOLOGY 310-202-AB (2.1.3) This course is designed to familiarize the student with various aspects of the phenomena of juvenile behavior. Students will learn to identify the vari- ous problems juveniles encounter in their different levels of maturity and development and how young people deal with these problems. Criminal offences committed by both male and female youths will also be explored. An overview of gang delinquency and recruitment will also be given. PENAL LAW 310-205-AB (3.1.2) This course will provide students with an understanding of the criminal code and related acts, and the Quebec code of penal procedure. Students will learn to distinguish between crim- inal acts and infractions, sentencing guidelines and goals, the steps involved in obtaining a pardon, etc. Students will also explore the Quebec code of penal procedure and exam- ine key infractions contained therein. ADOLESCENCE TO MATURITY 350-206-AB (3.0.3) This course provides an opportunity for students to study cognitive, affec- tive and social development stages of adolescents (12 to 17 year old) and adults. The challenges of each period of development are examined and factors, both inherited and environ- mental, that influence development are identified. THIRD SEMESTER CORRECTIONAL SERVICES 310-300-AB (1.2.3) This course will give students an understanding of the mission, policies, standards and rules of correctional services in Quebec and Canada. Students will understand the roles and responsibilities of correctional workers such as correctional service officers, head of sector, director of operations, unit managers, probation officers, parole officers, etc. The role of cor- rectional officers in specific programs offered in community residential facil- ities will also be explored. JUVENILE INSTITUTIONS 310-301-AB (1.2.3) P: 310-202-AB Students will examine the structure and operation of the youth intervention network. They will analyse services and programs available, the role, responsibilities, powers and duties of youth workers. They will also learn to write evaluation reports and make recommendations to the person legally responsible for a youth. As well, they will learn to avoid traps inherent in various interventions when dealing with a delinquent or pre-delinquent youth. CLINICAL CRIMINOLOGY I 310-302-AB (2.1.3) This course will provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of the various theories and clinical approaches used in the treatment of troubled youths, delinquents, and 119 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 120. criminals. Students will be exposed to a range of treatment models such as Psychoanalytical, Cognitive- Behavioural, Reality, Gestalt etc. They will also learn to critically analyze and assess these models. This course is a prerequisite for Clinical Criminology II PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND DEVIANCE 310-303-AB (2.2.3) Through this course, the student will learn to distinguish the characteristic symptoms of various types of mental disorders among delinquents. They will gain an understanding of the link between mental disorders and crimi- nality and learn appropriate means for intervening with a delinquent who is displaying a mental disorder. PREVENTION 310-304-AB (1.2.2) Prevention focuses on the many risk factors that contribute to involvement with crime. These may include inade- quate parenting, substance abuse, lack of self-control, peer association and others. The course considers innovative strategies that include peer support, mentorship and community networks that can ensure long term viability. Preventative interventions dealing with delinquency, personal security and physical security will also be examined. FIELDWORK I 310-305-AB (1.3.1) P: 310-105-AB Fieldwork 1 involves a series of visits to organizations in the juvenile and adult correctional intervention milieu. Students will be exposed to the working environment, and the physi- cal setting. They will also gain a bet- ter understanding of the staff functions and various clientele. FOURTH SEMESTER CLINICAL CRIMINOLOGY II 310-400-AB (1.2.2) P: 310-302-AB In this course, although there will be a brief review of the theories and modalities covered in Clinical Criminology I, the main focus will be on the application of them. Thus, using case studies, students will work on developing the skills necessary to work in settings with troubled youths, delinquents, and criminals. COMMUNITY RESOURCES 310-402-AB (1.2.2) This course will identify the commu- nity resources available to delin- quents, their families or friends. Students will learn what resources are available, to assess the delinquents problems, needs and situations and seek a suitable resource or refer him to the appropriate resource. They will learn to follow-up on their referrals. Students will also understand how a community resource is organized and operates. CRISIS INTERVENTION 310-403-AB (1.3.2) This course will identify various types of crisis such as physical and verbal aggression, accidents and distress situ- ations like psychotic or suicidal crisis. Students will learn to observe delin- quents and situations and recognize advance warning signs. They will learn to protect their physical integrity and manage stress while taking appro- priate action depending on the type of crisis. Students will learn to defuse a crisis, ask for help, intervene in a non-violent manner, follow up and assess the impact of the intervention on all participants. FIELDWORK II 310-404-AB (1.3.1) P: 310-105-AB Fieldwork II is a continuation of Fieldwork I. Students will continue to observe and learn about various milieus in the field of correctional intervention and gain a more in-depth understanding of the tasks and opera- tions of the occupation, and the skills and behaviours required to pursue a career in the field. ETHNIC AND SOCIAL DIVERSITY 387-401-AB (1.2.3) The goal of this Sociology course is for students to acquire the profes- sional skills that enable them to effec- tively support their youth or adult delinquent clientele. These skills include: developing understanding of social and ethno cultural diversity; learning to recognize and identify behavior and attitudes that indicate intolerance towards certain social and ethnic groups; and developing a tol- erance and acceptance towards these and other groups and their differ- ences. Correctional Technology stu- dents learn how to formulates and ask questions of clients about their lifestyles, including their living condi- tions and education, beliefs and val- ues. Students also learn to understand the actions of their clients, to demonstrate respect towards them, to communicate with them, and to adapt to the clients’ needs in order to help resolve prob- lems. Clients may include: victims of physical and sexual aggression; drug users and abusers; gays and lesbians; street kids; homeless; gang members; and/or members of marginalized eth- nic, religious and racial communities. This course develops sensitivity in students to issues which may arise in a variety of professional situations. FIFTH SEMEESTER GROUP TECHNIQUES 310-506-AB (1.2.2) Students will learn how to work in a team by understanding the roles, responsibilities, and skills of a team worker. Students will develop the necessary attitudes and behaviors for productive team collaboration as well as the various methods of information sharing. They will learn to participate in and lead meetings between col- leagues as part of a multidisciplinary team. As well, they will learn to resolve conflicts within a team, estab- lish and maintain ties with team members and assess their own way of working as part of a team and in part- nership. Students will also learn the basics of planning and running a group for delinquents. DRUGS 310-501-AB (1.3.2) In this course, students will learn to recognize psychotropic substances, their signs and symptoms. Students will be informed of the damaging effects and the dangers of drug use and abuse, how to detect signs of drug use and identify symptoms of intoxication. They will identify the factors underlying heavy drinking or substance abuse by delinquents. The extent of drug use by delinquents and the links between substance abuse and delinquency will also be exam- ined. This course also provides infor- mation on drug intervention resources. 120
  • 121. CPR & FIRST RESPONDER 310-502-AB (2.1.1) In this course, students will learn to use first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. While complying with crisis intervention protocols, students will learn to determine the care required by the type of physical prob- lem identified in a client and correctly execute first aid and cardiopulmonary techniques. As well, students will learn to refer clients to appropriate resources, correctly report the facts, inform their colleagues, the client’s family and examine the repercussions of the intervention in professional and personal terms. SELF DEFENSE 310-503-AB (1.2.0) In compliance with protocols for crisis intervention, students will learn the proper use of necessary force when dealing with clients; while keeping a clear focus on their personal security as well as the security of the premises and that of others involved in the crisis or incident. Students will learn the correct execution of dodging, blocking, control, immobilization and release techniques. As well, students will learn to refer clients to appropriate resources, correctly report the facts, inform their colleagues, the client’s family and examine the repercussions in professional and personal terms. INTEGRATING LEGAL INTERVENTIONS 310-507-AB (1.2.2) Students will be presented an overview of the structure and operations of the youth and adult intervention system and how a technician’s responsibilities relate to the application of legal measures targeting young people with behavioral problems, young offenders and adult offenders. It is an integration of two previous law courses as well as juvenile institutions and correctional services. Students will examine legislation governing private and social relations that affect delinquents, their family members and persons close to them. They will examine the consequences of crime on victims as well as their rights. They will also explore recourses open to persons whose rights have been infringed. Students will also go over the preparation and giving of testimony in court and we will consider ethical and professional values while working with delinquents. Finally, students will learn how to avoid traps inherent in various intervention situations with delinquents. FIELDWORK III 310-508-AB (2.6.2) P: 310-305-AB, 310-404-AB In this fieldwork, students are placed in a correctional intervention setting for 8 hours per week for 15 weeks, under the supervision of a field supervisor. Students will gain an in-depth under- standing of the general principles of intervention and internal functioning of an organization. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the methods, rules, procedures and, codes governing the organization. This fieldwork will permit students to identify the role(s) they feel most comfortable in assuming. SIXTH SEMESTER FIELDWORK IV 310-600-AB (2.30.4) P: 310-508-AB C: 310-601-AB In this final fieldwork, students per- form unremunerated work in a cor- rectional or related setting for 32 hours per week for 15 weeks. Students will intervene with clients individually or in groups. Duties may include, among others, organizing, running and evaluating, individual or group activities. Working within a team students will, under supervision of their field supervisors, gradually perform the tasks they will ultimately be called upon to carry out in their respective career. In a supervised con- text they will become aware of their intervention capacities, attitudes and aptitudes in a helping relationship. INTEGRATION SEMINAR 310-601-AB (1.2.1) C: 310-600-AB This course permits students to inte- grate their knowledge, skills and atti- tudes in relation to their working experience during their final Fieldwork. In class students are expected to share their Fieldwork experience with others and develop and implement interventions with the aid of their supervisors and feedback from their classmates. COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT The comprehensive assessment is a summative assessment of the stu- dent’s achievement of the set of objectives and standards of the Correctional Intervention Program. The assessment has the following two components: The successful comple- tion of two working stages for a total of 600 hours and the successful com- pletion of a written comprehensive assessment consisting of approximate- ly 5 case studies which require the student to integrate and apply the knowledge gained through their courses and stage experience. The questions will require knowledge of both the general and specific compe- tencies and assess the capacity to apply legal, sociological, and psycho- logical concepts to practical field situ- ations. 121 CAREERPROGRAMS
  • 122. GENERAL EDUCATION VISION STATEMENT FOR GENERAL EDUCATION The teachers in General Education believe that students should develop breadth through study of English, Humanities, French and Physical Education, as well as achieve some depth of knowledge in the specific disciplines offered in their programs. They see their role in the programs as providing students with a well-rounded and balanced education. Through the courses offered in General Education, students learn to appreciate, as well as critique, some of the major influences in Western and non-Western thought and literature. They also learn to communicate in written and oral French in order to live and work in Quebec. They learn the principles of good health and how to integrate them into their lifestyle. They explore disciplines and develop competencies that are complementary to their program of study. In General Education courses, students learn to articulate their own ideas based on relevant premises leading to logical conclusions. They learn to acknowledge, appreciate, and respond to the ideas of teachers and fellow students. These skills help them to develop an informed awareness and a critical appreciation of our social and cultural milieu so that they can make informed intellectual, aesthetic, and ethical decisions, as well as acquire a sense of their membership in society, with its attendant rights and responsibilities. 122 FRENCH (2 courses required) (Levels are assigned based on placement and high school French marks) Level 1 Basic communication in French Level 2 More advanced communication in French Level 3 To communicate comfortably in French Level 4 To engage in a cultural or literary subject in French B-Block To apply these communication skills to a field of study PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3 courses required) Course 1 To establish the role of regular physical activity as a part of a healthy lifestyle. Course 2 To improve one’s effectiveness when practising a physical activity. Course 3 To demonstrate one’s responsibility for being active in a manner which promotes health ENGLISH (4 courses required) Introduction to English To analyze and produce various forms of discourse Literary Genres To apply a critical approach to literary genres Literary Themes To apply a critical approach to literary themes B-Block To communicate in the forms of discourse appro- priate to one or more fields of study HUMANITIES (3 courses required) World Views To apply a critical thought process to world views Knowledge To apply a logical analytical process to how knowledge is organized and used B-Block To apply a critical thought process to ethical issues relevant to a field of study COMPLEMENTARY COURSES (2 courses required) The courses are chosen from the domain allowed for the student’s program and outside of the subjects of the student’s concentration. Complementary domains are as follows: Arts & Aesthetics Social Science Science & Technology Modern Languages domain Math & Computer Science Following is a list of the General Education courses required at John Abbott College:
  • 123. ENGLISH COURSES PREPARATORY ENGLISH COURSES The following two courses are required for students whose placement test results indicate that they will experience difficulty passing their introductory English course. Although these are credit courses, they cannot be taken as English credits. Students who demonstrate a need for a second language course will be placed in Preparation for College English, 603-001. Students are encouraged to take the course in the summer, although it is also offered in the fall. Second language and anglophone students whose test results indicate that their language skills need more attention will be encouraged to register for Effective Reading and Writing 603-001 which is offered in both summer and fall. 123 THREE “BLOCK A” COURSES INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH 603-101-04 (2.2.4) (AVAILABLE IN TWO LEVELS) LITERARY GENRES 603-102-04 (2.2.3) MAY BE TAKEN AFTER 101 LITERARY THEMES 603-103-04 (2.2.3) MAY BE TAKEN AFTER 101 ONE “BLOCK B” COURSES ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PROGRAMS 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) FOR ALL PROGRAMS OR 603-DBV-04 (2.2.2) FOR LIBERAL ARTS STUDENTS Introduction to College English 101 is the prerequisite for the other three courses. English 102 and 103 may be taken in either order. English for Specific Programs is usually taken in the fourth semester. All students (except those entering from Quebec Anglophone high schools whose grade 10 English mark was over 80%) are required to take the John Abbott College placement test before registering at the College. The results of this test place students in the appropriate level of the introductory course, or, if necessary, in one of the preparatory courses. STUDENTS NEED ONE OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES TO COMPLETE THEIR DEC: GENERALEDUCATION
  • 124. PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE ENGLISH: MISE À NIVEAU (NOT FOR GENERAL EDUCATION CREDIT) 603-001-03 BY PLACEMENT ONLY This course is designed for second language students whose English skills, as determined by the placement test, need further development before they can enter the introductory course in the regular English program. The course uses a variety of methods to teach students basic skills in read- ing, writing, and oral communication. To pass, students must attain the level of competency required for the intro- ductory English course. PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE ENGLISH: EFFECTIVE READING AND WRITING (NOT FOR GENERAL EDUCATION CREDIT) 603-001-03 BY PLACEMENT ONLY This course is intended for students whose English skills, as determined by the placement test, need further development before they can enter the regular English program. The course prepares students for entry into college-level English courses by work- ing on reading, writing and communi- cation skills. Tutors and specially selected teachers prepare students to deal with the requirements of later English courses in particular and col- lege studies in general. "BLOCK A" A-Block English courses are intended to bring students to a college level of profi- ciency in the areas of reading, writing, lis- tening and speaking, with particular emphasis on written production and read- ing comprehension. Regular and ongoing exercises develop students’ language and analytical skills, while the reading material, representative of various genres and peri- ods and expressing a variety of themes, encourages an appreciation of the aesthetic and cultural value of literature. INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH The introductory course is offered at two levels: one is INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH: LITERATURE and the other is INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH: COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE. Students whose placement scores suggest that they need more help with their reading and writing will be placed in COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE. NN..BB.. Students are required to take one, not both, of these courses. English 101 is intended to help stu- dents develop the critical abilities they need at the college level. Although the content of various sections vary somewhat, all emphasize writing skills and reading comprehension. If you receive no notification of placement, register for the course INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH: LITERATURE. 603-101-04 (2.2.4) BY PLACEMENT ONLY This range of courses is intended for students who must develop and improve the critical abilities needed for reading and writing at the college level. Course objectives are: (1) to analyze written and spoken discourse (2) to apply a critical approach to literature (3) to produce written and spoken discourse These courses help students discover ways of responding, both personally and analytically, to readings and to learn the basics of literary interpreta- tion, by writing frequently about the literature they are reading. To pass this course, students must write a 750-word essay that meets specific criteria. COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE Courses include: Life’s Like That! Reflections of Ourselves The Word About Us Approaches to Literature Understanding Literature, Understanding Ourselves INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH: LITERATURE 603-101-04 (2.2.4) Courses include: Children’s Literature Dark Fiction The Discovery of Self English Express English Without Tears Global Voices Family Matters Introduction to Canadian Literature Introduction to Western Literature Mythology The Outsider in Society Prose, Poetry and Drama A Slice of Life As Simple (or complex) as ABC Modes of Literary Discourse Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction House and Home Reading and Writing Strategies for Successful College Essays WRITING TUTORS 603-102, 603-103, 603-DBW This course is designed for students who have developed a high level of proficiency in their own writing and who are interested in sharing their knowledge with other students. The course heightens awareness of the writing process and provides an important service to students who seek assistance in developing their language skills. Students will also study fiction, drama and poetry and recognize how literature interprets the human condition. Students will improve their own writing skills through writing short responses on lit- erature, editing one another’s work and writing essays about literature. 124 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS NN..BB.. Not all sections of the courses listed below are offered each semester. Please consult your Schedule of Classes for exact course offerings.
  • 125. 125 CULTURAL STUDIES AND HISTORICAL STREAMS In order to allow students to concentrate their English studies in these areas of interest, a number of courses are identified as belonging in both of these streams. CULTURAL STUDIES STREAM Cultural studies examines the complex power relationships (class, gender, race, colonialism) between literature and society. Courses in the profile would begin by examining our assumptions about “culture” to encourage students to come up with a basic defini- tion of culture. Cultural artifacts will be drawn from literary clas- sics as well as popular culture, such as film, popular music, and television. Later in the profile, students will be introduced to some of the basic theories of cultural and literary studies such as class theory, psychological approaches, gender studies, post-colo- nialism, queer theory, etc. The underlying premise of the profile is that we may best understand our culture by stepping outside of it and returning to it frequently. 603-101-04 Mythology The Beach The Literature Of The Fantastic Global Voices 603-102-04 Theatre Of The Absurd The Graphic Novel The Image Makers Historical Fiction Shakespeare For Our Time I And Thou The Fairytale Tradition The Study of Poetry 603-103-04 Shakespeare At The Movies Monster-Making: Tales Of Horror Scots: Kilts, Castles And Clans Technology and Human Nature in Stories About the Future The Romantic Imagination Tainted Love Trauma and Witness Into the West 603-DBW-04 American Dream/Realities Adapting Stories Understanding Media The Metamorphic Self Women And Knowledge Documenting Barbarism: Genocide Literature History, Memory, Identity Postmodern Concerns Texts And Contexts Berlin: Literature-Culture-History The West and the World HISTORICAL STREAM The characteristic of courses in the Historical Stream is that the literature in each of the courses is drawn from a particular histori- cal period. The idea is that in taking all four of his/her English courses in this stream, the student will begin to see that literary creation arises within an historical context and that literary move- ments are sequential and bear a relationship to each other. Historical context is by no means the exclusive concern of any of these courses; it merely serves as the basic organizing principle in courses that explore a full range of stylistic and thematic consider- ations, in addition to historical context. 603-101-04 Stories Of War And Peace, The Ancient World Mythology 603-102-04 Theatre Of The Absurd American Gothic Drama: Tragedy And Comedy The Evolution of Horror Twentieth Century Historical Fiction The Study of Poetry What’s So Funny Medieval And Renaissance Literature Introduction To Modern Poetry Canadian Poetry Since The Forties Shakespeare For Our Time 603-103-04 Shakespeare At The Movies Contemporary Fiction Themes Of Modern Poetry Enlightenment and Romantic Era The Romantic Imagination Coyote Dreams: Stories by Native Canadian and American Writers 603-DBW-04 Twentieth Century: History, Memory, Identity Texts And Contexts Berlin: Literature-Culture-History Documenting Barbarism: Genocide Literature Traces of Memory: 20th Century Through Literature GENERALEDUCATION
  • 126. LITERARY GENRES 603-102-04 (2. 2. 3) P: 603-101-04 The main focus of these courses is to study the relationship between form and meaning. The broadest literary ‘genres’ (or kinds of literature) are poet- ry, drama and prose (fiction or nonfic- tion). There are numerous sub-genres within these broad categories. In these courses, the focus may be on either one genre (e.g., short fiction, comedy) or on a variety of genres. Students learn to identify and analyze such structural ele- ments as plot, character, point of view, tone, symbol, diction, rhythm, rhyme, metaphor and how these devices inter- act to produce meaning. The courses will focus on helping students recognize the patterns that enrich the works, the themes that these patterns suggest, and the relationship between the significant elements of the work and the themes. To pass these courses students are expected to write a 1,000 word essay that meets specific criteria. AMERICAN GOTHIC 603-102-04 (2.2.3) While the term ‘Gothic’ often con- jures up images of ruined castles, damsels in distress and supernatural forces, the genre referred to as ‘American Gothic’ is an entirely differ- ent beast. By examining literature, art and film from the period spanning the early 19th Century to the present, we will examine how American writers and artists strove to create a means through which they could address specifically North American cultural concerns, including issues surrounding national identity, religion, race rela- tions, and the urban environment. THE ARTHURIAN TRADITION 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Students will examine a range of gen- res featuring stories about King Arthur and his knights. Genres will include Middle English romance, chronicle, poetry by Tennyson, modern novels, and film. Issues to be considered include: values of individuality and community within Arthurian society, ideals of heroism, the formation of identity of knights, the role of combat in defining the individual and the community, and the ethic of chivalry. THE ART OF FICTION 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course will introduce the student to twentieth-century writers from many different backgrounds and will focus on narrative prose in the form of the short story and the novel. Students will be encouraged to undertake close textual analysis, both independently and in small groups, in order to familiarize themselves with and reach conclusions about the effects of the elements of fiction. THE BEST OF POPULAR LITERATURE 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Maybe “hack” writers with their escapist formula plots, unbelievable protagonists, and episodes of gross physical titillation know more about their readers than we like to think. This course will examine, analyze and evaluate the formal characteristics and thematic concerns of commercial bestselling fiction. It will argue, along with psychologist Carl Jung, that liter- ature which is dedicated to telling its readers what they want to hear and which is mostly unconscious of its own values may have quite as much to say about the society that pro- duced it as serious literature. BRAVE NEW WORLD 603-102-04 (2.2.3) The fruits of the applied sciences include steam engines, guillotines, Botox, computers and pace-makers. Inventions like these often provoke strong reactions on the street, but also in literature. In this course we will ask the question: What do writers think of the world we have created? Is it scary or pleasant? Civilizing or dehu- manizing? All of the texts in this course offer answers to questions like these and raise other considerations about the uses and perhaps abuses of science. In addition to looking at the intersection between human inven- tion and literature, we will also (1) consider the texts as multifaceted works of literature that belong to a larger literary tradition and (2) provide students with the opportunity to improve their writing skills. THE CANADIAN SHORT STORY 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Today’s Canadian short-story writers are much bolder than their literary ancestors. Issues of sexuality and vio- lence and ethnicity, for example, are being treated in frank and disturbing ways, while humour often winks from a footstep away. Apart from provoca- tive content, our writers are ambi- tiously experimenting with form and technique. This course will survey the best of the ‘new’ writers, fitting their work into the Canadian short fiction tradition. COMEDY: WHAT’S SO FUNNY? 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course is designed to give stu- dents a historical overview of the genre of comedy - from ancient Greece to modern times. Students will learn to recognize the universal as well as the historically and culturally specific features of comedy. Besides the lectures and work on assigned class material, students will be respon- sible for pursuing their own investiga- tion of the comic in the journal project for which the student will select material. Much attention is given to the writing process: reading critically, brainstorming, outlining, drafting and editing. CREATIVE WRITING 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course will introduce students to literary genres through reading, dis- cussion and writing. The genres pre- dominantly covered will be the personal essay and the short story. Major topics will include plotting, scenes building, character develop- ment and the development of theme. Students will have many opportunities to do "creative writing". The weekly two hours of practical work (required for all literary genres courses) may take place in the computer lab. CREATIVE WRITING FOR CHILDREN 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Most people’s introduction to stories happens in childhood, through chil- dren’s books. Writing for children isn’t as easy as it seems. The work has to be accessible, engaging, and original. In this course, we will exam- ine the genre of children’s literature, from picture books to the young adult novel. The writing assignments will be mostly creative. Students will write their own picture books, as well as the opening chapters of early read- ers and young adult novels. 126
  • 127. DRAMA: TRAGEDY AND COMEDY 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Tragedy and comedy are two dramat- ic genres that portray two contrary visions of human potential, action, and circumstance. In tragedy, human action and conflict seem ruled by an almost perverse logic that leads relentlessly to a shocking and fatal conclusion. Whereas in comedy, sur- prise rules in a world where conflicts miraculously are resolved and human wishes fulfilled. The course will exam- ine the Ancient Greek tragedy Antigone, the 17th century French comedy Tartuffe, and the early 20th century Czech tragicomedy R.U.R. Throughout the semester we will also look at examples of tragedy, comedy, and tragic-comedy on film. DRAMA: TREADING THE BOARDS 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course deals with drama in two ways: as a literary genre and as a per- forming art. To this end, we will see, as well as read, a selection of plays, concentrating on plot, character, stage directions, settings and props, and, above all, dramatic dialogue of that vital element which, through tightly controlled language, holds the audi- ence, tells the story, reveals character, and exposes the theme of the play. ENGLISH IN MANY TONGUES 603-101-04 (2.2.3) This course introduces students to English literature written from various cultural perspectives. The material consists of poems, plays, short sto- ries, and non-fiction from an interna- tional array of authors who provide a voice for the voiceless in the English language. EPIC AND ROMANCE 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course is intended as an introduc- tion to the Epic and the Romance, two forms of literature which have had a major influence on the history of ideas, especially in terms of defining heroic behaviour and the relative roles of men and women in society. Following an introduction to these two genres of lit- erature, students will be introduced to specific examples of epic and romance, beginning with the Greek world of Homer, and moving on the Roman world of Virgil, the Germanic tribal world of Beowulf, the feudal world of Charlemagne, and the Arthurian world of quest and courtly love. THE EVOLUTION OF HORROR: FROM GOTHIC TO GORE-THICK 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Though a great deal of criticism is often levelled at the genre of Horror, (it is dismissed as un-literary, trashy, and juvenile) it can never be described as static. From its 18th cen- tury Gothic beginnings to contempo- rary works that place emphasis on blood, gore, and scantily clad college students, Horror has always been a medium through which writers and artists can discuss and deal with indi- vidual, personal, and societal con- cerns. Through the ages, and through ever-changing definitions of what is ‘scary’, writers have had to find new methods with which to express the fears of their time. In order to do so, they must choose to either draw upon or reject generic conventions of the past in an attempt to lead readers to a greater understanding of humani- ty’s deepest conscious and uncon- scious fears. THE FAIRY TALE TRADITION 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course will examine the artistic, cultural, and intellectual appeal of fairy tales. In addition to studying the symbolic structures and the archetyp- al themes of fairy tales, we will explore how the genre constructs and challenges our understanding of child- hood innocence and adult experi- ence. Students will consider how psychology, ideology, and gender con- tinue to exert influence on the ways fairy tales are understood. FICTION: SMALL, MEDIUM, LARGE. 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Myths, fables, legends and tales are ancient forms of storytelling that engage the imagination and often teach a moral. Out of these shorter, more simplistic forms of fiction grew the modern short story, a genre that is more complex in plot, characterization and theme. The novella is a form that combines the compression of short fic- tion with the wider scope of the novel. In this course, we will read works of fiction in all these genres: myth, fable, legend, tale, short story, novella, and novel. We will explore the conventions of the various forms and illuminate how the authors produce meaning while entertaining the reader. THE GRAPHIC NOVEL 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course focuses on the relatively recently identified genre of the graph- ic novel, or the comic book as serious literature. In surveying a selection of these texts students will explore not only the range of this literary genre, which includes fiction, memoir and non-fiction narratives, but also the distinctive artistic techniques which distinguish the graphic novel form from that of purely textual works. THE IMAGE MAKERS 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course is designed to teach stu- dents how to think, read and write about literature and film as art forms by using film, an in-depth study of one or more literary works and essays about film and literature. The approach will be one that emphasizes formal elements such as action, dia- logue, character, imagery, setting and narrative techniques. Parallels between film and other literary genres such as drama, the novel and poetry will be drawn so that the student emerges with an overall concept of what a literary genre is. INTRODUCTION TO MIDDLE EASTERN LITERATURE 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This historical survey course intro- duces the student to the literature of the Middle-East, predominately from Persian and Arabic traditions (often Islamic), but including works from various countries. The first half of the course examines classical and medieval literature (e.g., Gilgamesh, 1001 Nights, selections from Attar, Ferdowsi, Koran and Bible), while the second half of the term is devoted to modern literature, predominately prose fiction (by noted writers such as Naguib Mahfouz). The works are also selected in order to address specific questions of genre, with its unique history in Middle Eastern literature. INTRODUCTION TO POETRY 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course introduces students to the basic elements of poetry (form, rhythm, rhyme, metaphor, symbol, image, etc.) through the study of selected poems from various eras in English literature, with a particular emphasis on modern works. The 127 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 128. course is designed to demystify poetry and help the student enjoy this funda- mental form of human expression. Activities include essays, tests, discus- sions, presentations, web research, etc. JAPANESE LITERATURE ON FILM 603-102-04 (2.2.3) The purpose of this class is to intro- duce students to contemporary Japanese literature and film. Students will look at, discuss, and write about the literature and cinema of Japan from the end of World War II to the present. The main goal of the course is to discover the common ground that our respective cultures share. JAZZ LITERATURE 603-102-04 (2.2.3) "Jazz Literature" will appeal to lovers of music. A unique genre of literature is emerging out of the changing mix of sounds categorized as "jazz." Its advanced vocabulary has been dis- missed as an elitist art form, intellectual music too sophisticated for the average person, only for the college crowd. You have come to the right course! LITERARY GENRES 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course will examine a range of lit- erary texts selected by the teacher. These texts may be from one or more of the following genres: fiction, film, poetry, drama and nonfiction. Students are expected to read texts carefully and to comprehend the author’s use of generic elements, rhetorical tech- niques, and literary devices. MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE LITERATURE 603-102-04 (2.2.3) In this course we examine key English texts during the transition from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. By reading texts by Chaucer, Shakespeare and others writers, stu- dents will gain a solid understanding of how gender roles, courtly love, chivalry, religion and sexuality changed, as well as how they were represented, in the early days of English literature. REALISM, ROMANCE, IRONY 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Writers have at their disposal various ways of representing the world in which we live: they may report it as faithfully as possible, remaining always within the limits of human perception; they may stretch its laws of probability, preferring imagination over accuracy; or they may playfully distort it, allowing us to view the familiar world in an unfamiliar light. In this course, we will study the con- ventions that distinguish three major modes of literary representation: real- ism, romance, and irony. In addition to exploring the formal elements of each mode, we will consider how each mode lends itself to particular thematic concerns. Finally, we will reflect on the unique place and func- tion of each mode within human society and culture. THE MIDDLE AGES AND RENAISSANCE 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course will focus on different types or genres of literature (poetry, drama, essays, epic and romance, for instance) inasmuch as they reflect the concerns of these two historical peri- ods. We will deal with selections which reflect the other-worldly con- cerns of the Middle Ages with its emphasis on this life as a preparation for the next, as compared to others which reflect the humanistic, this- worldly concerns of the Renaissance era with its emphasis on the perfectibil- ity of humans and human society. ROMANTIC TRADITION: WESTERNS, FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Out of the mists of mythology comes the romantic tradition of storytelling. Astride a muscular steed the gleaming knight hurtles against the dragon, his bloody lance carrying him through winds of flame. The knight dismounts on the main street of a dusty town, the burning sun at his back, deadly metal in his hand. With a flash remi- niscent of lightning, the air shatters and the knight travels on, past the set- ting sun. Stars crown him, their cold light glistening on his helm and he drifts from the safety of his space craft.... SHAKESPEARE FOR OUR TIME 603-102-04 (2.2.3) In this course, we will focus on Shakespeare’s use of comedy and tragedy to engage with compelling social and psychological issues in his time and ours. We will use recent critical approaches to explore Shakespeare’s complex representa- tions of human identity and experi- ence, with an emphasis on topics like gender, sexuality, male-female rela- tionships, race, racism and class. These issues were as interesting and problematic to Shakespeare and his audience as they are to us 21st centu- ry postmoderns, and allow us to see connections and differences between Shakespeare’s culture and ours. We will emphasize the close reading and viewing of individual plays so that stu- dents can understand and come to enjoy Shakespeare’s language, theatri- cality and themes. SHAKESPEAREAN COMEDY 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course is designed to give stu- dents an overview of Shakespeare’s comedy through the study of an early, middle and late comedy. Students will learn to recognize the common fea- tures and distinctions in Shakespeare’s comedies, noting both the develop- ment and ultimate consistency of Shakespeare’s comic vision. Much attention is given to the reading and writing processes: reading critically, brainstorming, outlining, drafting and editing. SHAKESPEARIAN DRAMA 603-102-04 (2.2.3) In this course we examine two or three key plays by William Shakespeare. Although a considerable amount of history gets worked into the course, the primary focus will be on the formal properties of Shakespeare’s poetry, prose and, more generally, his dramas. Readings will be accompanied with viewings of the plays in production. Some of the plays we have read recently: Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, The Winter’s Tale et al. SHORT FICTION 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course is an introduction to the short story in which emphasis is placed on the reader’s critical response and the articulation of that response. Consideration will be given to tradition and innovation in the genre and to the author’s marshalling of the story’s components to achieve dramatic and subtle effects. Readings 128
  • 129. are drawn from the works of a wide variety of authors. Classes comprise some lecture on and considerable dis- cussion of the assigned readings. Written assignments provide practice in literary analysis and in the expres- sion of interpretive commentary on readings. THE SHORT STORY 603-102-04 (2.2.3) “Literary Genres: The Short Story” is a post-entry level course in the A-block component of English with a special emphasis on understanding the for- mal aspects of the short story. The course will allow students to enjoy reading a number of short stories by D.H. Lawrence and E. Hemingway, discuss these in their historical and lit- erary contexts, and examine why they are effective (or otherwise). The objective of this course is to enable students to apply a critical approach to literary genres. Students will learn to recognize literary genres and con- ventions. SPECTACULAR DRAMA 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course introduces students to the genre of traditional drama as perform- ance art. Through reading, hearing, seeing, and even performing scenes from plays, students will gain a fuller appreciation of the tremendous power of plays to shape meaning and transform society. By reading and watching six plays - from Greek com- edy to American tragedy, including those by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Ibsen, Shaw and Williams - students will become more perceptive and critical theatre-goers. A major assumption, as well as the goal of this course, is the notion that learning about, watching, and participating in the dramatic arts can be enjoyable as well as educational. The focus of the course will be on drama as it is performed, so students should be prepared to participate, not only as critics, but as readers and per- formers as well. THE STUDY OF POETRY 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course aims to introduce stu- dents to a broad range of poetry, spanning several historical periods and poetic genres. We will focus on developing skills in close reading while learning the characteristics spe- cific to particular types of poetry. Students will learn to identify and work with key elements in the criti- cism of poetry, such as tone, irony, paradox, and ambiguity. THEATRE OF THE ABSURD 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Theatre of the Absurd presents a vision of a bizarre and illogical world that is both deeply tragic and darkly comic. By combining elements from surrealist art, existential philosophy, and black humour, absurdist plays make audiences sad to the point of despair while also making them roar with laughter. In this course we will study plays and films that both lament and laugh at life’s absurdities. THEATRE WORKSHOP: ENGLISH 603-102-04 (2.2.3) Students will read a variety of plays, examining the basic elements of the dramatic genre, both as literature and as “theatrical event.” The aim is to develop an appreciation of drama though individual and collaborative activities, such as class discussion, personal journals, “theatrical” presen- tations, as well as planning and writ- ing a critical analysis. THE TWENTIETH CENTURY NORTH AMERICAN NOVEL 603-102-04 (2.2.3) The past 100 years have been a peri- od of tremendous controversy and upheaval all over the world. In this course, students will read a number of interpretations of this era written by North American novelists. Twentieth century versions of univer- sal themes such as love, death, and the changing role of science and tech- nology will be investigated. THE TWENTIETH CENTURY NOVEL 603-102-04 (2.2.3) The calamitous and dazzling 20th century was an age of movement and change on a massive scale, one which bore the miraculous fruit of human invention and the horrors of human pride. The course will examine three books written after the two World Wars and on the peripheries of the European, Soviet and American empires, with an emphasis on theme (the desire of men and women to break from history, to seek truth and happiness) and style. VICTORIAN GOTHIC 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course focuses on the Victorian Gothic, grouping texts thematically into three sections that represent spe- cific societal anxieties: the fears raised by the rapid pace of technological and scientific change, the preoccupa- tion with the borders of sexuality and the self, and the obsession with death. Students who want to write a ghost story may attempt this oral form of storytelling at the end of the course. THE WORDSMITH: INTRODUCTION TO SHORT FICTION 603-102-04 (2.2.3) This course will introduce the student to the work of twentieth century writ- ers. The course will encourage students to formulate their response to the sub- tle and varied complexity of this liter- ary genre. The class will use discussion and written assignments to interpret their own responses to the readings. WRITING THE SELF 603-102-04 (2.2.3) “Writing the Self” is an introduction to life writing. Through a considera- tion of different forms of autobiogra- phies in their historical and cultural contexts, this course will challenge you to consider the problems inher- ent in ‘writing the self’. It will equip you to both analyze autobiographical texts as well as produce autobio- graphical works of your own. LITERARY THEMES 603-103-04 (2.2.3) P: 603-101-04 These courses examine how literature interprets the human condition. Formal analysis (looking at the organization of a work) provides many insights about a liter- ary work, but we can also ask questions about perspective, attitudes, assumptions and social settings. To this end, in these courses students should learn to recognize a work’s literary themes, cultural context and value system. To pass these courses students are expected to write a 1,000 word essay that meets specific criteria. BEYOND REASON 603-103-04 (2.2.3) If there is no God, and if there are no absolute values, twentieth-century humans may either seek for an earlier natural self of intuitive awareness or retreat in bewilderment and confu- 129 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 130. sion, alienated from the world around them. Beginning with the short story and the novel, we will be reading a variety of texts that call into question the power of reason as a means of understanding our world. CANADIAN CROSSINGS 603-103-04 (2.2.3) Crossings can be real or metaphorical. They can occur between countries, cultures, religions or even states of mind. Using contemporary Canadian literature, we will explore the theme of crossings. We will look closely at the characters involved in the cross- ings and at how the experiences pre- cipitate a change of lifestyles, perspectives and values. We will explore whether the effects of the crossings are temporary or perma- nent. What is gained and what is lost? Students will learn a lot about Canada in this course. CANADIAN LITERATURE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) In this course, students will read selected works of Canadian literature in various genres and learn to distin- guish and discuss critically the myths and techniques characteristically employed in Canadian writing. The thematic focus is, then, issues of cul- tural and national identity and the pedagogic focus is on textual analysis, interpretation and writing skills. CHILDREN’S LITERATURE: REPRESENTATIONS OF NATURE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course explores children’s litera- ture with a special focus on represen- tations of nature, including animals, wilderness, land, trees, and water. We discuss children’s interactions with the natural world. We study the develop- ment of nature-consciousness, using both picture books and chapter books. Western and indigenous world-views are compared. Central to the course is an in-depth reading of three books for children and young adults that focus on animals, the natu- ral world and the cycles of the sea- sons, death and rebirth. COLLAPSE: SHAKESPEAREAN TRAGEDY 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course concentrates on Shakespearean tragedy, especially as this unique and powerful art form dramatizes ambition, moral conflict, and personal collapse. Students will also be introduced to the life and times and reasoning of Shakespeare, particularly to those aspects of his experience and beliefs (insofar as we know them) which have influenced the language and characters of his greatest plays, the tragedies. Video and/or film productions of each play studied will be viewed and discussed in class. CONTEMPORARY FICTION 603-103-04 (2.2.3) The course will examine two novels and some short stories that have as a theme people’s struggles to find love and a place within their societies. Texts by three to four writers will be chosen from the following: Khaled Hosseini, Jonathan Coe, J.M. Coetzee, Melissa Bank, and Margaret Atwood. CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE LITERATURE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course examines literary themes through the study of post World War II Japanese Literature. We will look at such themes as the human cost of war, the evolution of the status of women, isolation and loneliness, alienation and identity in modern society, the avant-garde. The class will explore these themes through short stories novels, and films. COYOTE DREAMS: STORIES BY NATIVE CANADIAN AND AMERICAN WRITERS 603-103-04 (2.2.3) The course attempts to explore a few examples of stories by Native writers in order to look more closely at the place of mythology in native story- telling and its role as a source of spiri- tual strength. Through the study of original myths as well as stories by contemporary writers, such as Louise Erdrich, Thomas King and Leslie Marmon Silko, students will learn about the history and present-day realities of Aboriginal peoples of North America. EARLY MODERN DRAMA AND THE OCCULT 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course is devoted to three early modern plays that feature magic, alchemy, witchcraft, and other aspects of the occult. While unified by their witchy and strange content, the plays are characterized by different generic conventions, performance histories, styles of language, and cultural con- texts. With the aim of understanding and enjoying different kinds of early modern drama, we will study the lan- guage, contemporary relevance, and theatricality of the readings. We will compare each of the assigned plays to a related twentieth-century film, an exercise which should stimulate some interesting discussion about the conti- nuity and difference between the early modern period and our own. EROS AND POLIS (LOVE AND THE CITY) 603-103-04 (2.2.3) In this course, we will be looking at texts which deal with the perennial conflict between love and social-polit- ical ideas, or between the personal and the public realms. The reading list includes a classical Greek tragedy, a play by Shakespeare, a modern play and novel. Students will engage in a number of critical projects, including essay writing (drafting and editing), presentations, group discussions, and short writing exercises (e.g., short answer questions) in order to gain an understanding of the various elements of literature and the critical interpreta- tion of literature, as well as to improve their writing skills. FOLKLORE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course focuses on the traditional stories and music of a variety of cul- tures, and the relevance of these tra- ditions to postmodern society. We will consider widespread and culturally specific folkloric motifs; the political, religious, and moral implications of folkloric stories; and the difficulties of preserving oral traditions in the face of increased literacy and globaliza- tion. FOOD FOR THOUGHT 603-103-04 (2.2.3) Students of this course will explore the thematic and metaphorical use of food in literature. Food, or its absence, has been an effective tool to express the significance of relation- ships, cultural history, family tradition, women’s issues, political dissent, and personal memory. By studying a vari- ety of authors and their “food litera- ture,” students will discover how food can serve as an important theme in creative expression. 130
  • 131. IN SEARCH OF SELF 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course examines the central theme of self discovery. Students will study novels and short stories in which the characters seek to answer questions about who they are, who they will become and how they can adapt to society without sacrificing their own individuality. The course content focuses on the search for identity during the different stages of life, beginning with childhood and ending with old age. INTO THE WEST 603-103-04 (2.2.3) The idea of the West has long gripped the American imagination with the hope that there, somewhere beyond the western horizon, one might finally escape the various falsehoods of his- tory and culture to become, if not free, then at least real. In this course we will attempt to understand some of the different ways that writers have contributed to or commented on the image of the West as an enduring utopian ideal. Along the way we will reflect on how the Western’s imagi- nary landscape has served as a ground on which to stage—some- times to challenge, sometimes to reaf- firm—dominant ideas about individualism, capitalism, progress, nature, and gender—in short, ideas about America itself. INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA 603-103-04 (2.2.3) We will study several important dra- matic works which address themes crucial to the mood and experience of the mid-twentieth century; select- ed playwrights may include such sig- nificant figures as Eliot, Auden and Isherwood, Brecht, Beckett and Pinter. INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course will focus on news report- ing in the print media – mainly mass- circulation newspapers. We will establish what a news story is and will learn the skills necessary to write effective news stories. This will involve writing effective leads, learn- ing to ask the right questions, cover- ing a meeting, speech, or press conference, writing a “Streeter”, con- ducting an interview, writing a profile, writing a play review from notes after attending a live performance, writing a news story, doing effective research, learning how to peer-edit, among other journalistic skills. There will be lectures, tutorials, discus- sions, interactive Internet exercises, speeches, library exercises and guest lecturers. The prevailing teaching style is learning by doing: classes will be hands-on and interactive: students must be prepared to participate. LOSS AND DISCOVERY 603-103-04 (2.2.3) Students will read from a selection of stories, essays, poetry, and a novel, which all deal in some way with the theme of loss and discovery—loss, in the sense of leaving something irre- trievably behind; discovery, in the sense of gaining new and transforma- tive knowledge. We will look at vari- ous issues that arise in the texts as they relate to our course theme: the nature and importance of rites of pas- sage, gender differences in the process, responses to authority, the relevance of love and death. The course will also develop students’ crit- ical skills for interpreting and writing about literature. LOVE AND DEATH 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course examines women’s and men’s views of themselves and their world, exploring the concerns that emerge as universal themes in world literature: innocence and experience, love and hate, conformity and rebel- lion, aging and death. Our aim is to establish texts not as isolated achieve- ments, but as belonging within a world context, connected across the boundaries of historical period and geographical border. LOVE IN SHAKESPEARE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course provides students with an overview of Shakespeare’s dramatic and poetic art through the study of the theme of love in his poetry and his comic and tragic drama. Thus, while focusing on Shakespeare’s com- plex treatment of the idea of love, students will also learn to recognize generic distinctions among poetry and drama, as well as comedy and tragedy. Much attention is given to the reading and writing processes: reading critically, brainstorming, out- lining, drafting and editing. THE MARITIME MUSE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) The Maritime Provinces of Canada conjure up many romantic and scenic images, from the red sandy beaches of charming Prince Edward Island to the wild rocky coastal shores of Newfoundland. The people are thought of as friendly, down-home charmers. While all these impressions hold a great deal of truth, there is another side to life in Atlantic Canada. It is a side that is a little less picture-perfect, a little seedier than the postcard depictions of this inter- esting part of the country. In this course we will read the works of sev- eral writers to learn about the ways of life, values, hardships, and triumphs of life in Atlantic Canada. MONSTER MAKING: TALES OF HORROR 603-103-04 (2.2.3) H.P. Lovecraft once said that “the oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.” Yet, is the unknown really intangible or is it simply that which our society deems taboo, a set of fears that swirl around such unspeak- able topics as perverse sexuality, mor- tality, loneliness or even technology out of control? Rather than speaking directly about these issues, we choose to create monsters that embody these fears, and who sym- bolically function as emblems of what we will become if we trespass into the realm of the forbidden. Horror fiction, in its earliest days, was known by its props and settings, but with Edgar Allan Poe in the 1830s and ‘40s, it begins to shift away from the exterior trappings to emphasize the psyche of the monster. Following in his footsteps, the contemporary hor- ror fiction writer takes as a starting place the concern with interior entropy—spiritual and emotional breakdown. With this shift, the “monster” becomes increasingly human. We will also explore the his- torical and cultural origins of horror fiction (e.g. changing ideas about rationality and madness; the psycho- logical significance of apparitions, omens, and haunted houses; the 131
  • 132. importance of the doppelganger in horror fiction, etc.), so that students can compare and contrast the way writers use literary techniques to express their moral, psychological and social significance. MUSIC IN LITERATURE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) "Music in Literature" examines the work of musicians who have authored books using college-level English. The literary legacy of composers and song- writers will be analyzed in counter- point with their music. This course will also reveal popular Canadian composers and poets who have achieved international acclaim, yet who remain unknown to Canadian readers and listeners. NEOCLASSICAL/ ROMANTIC THEMES 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course will deal with selections which reflect the concerns and themes of two historical periods in lit- erature: the Enlightenment, with its emphasis on the importance of order and a rational approach to life, fol- lowed by the Romantic period, with its emphasis on the importance of the individual’s feelings and emotions, and on the power of imagination. PRACTICAL ETHICS IN SHAKESPEARE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) Although Shakespeare is not an ethi- cal theorist, his insight into personal and interpersonal conflict is central to his tragedies. In this course we will examine the challenging ethical dilemmas dramatized in two of them. We will examine some of the conflict- ing motives and desires that we all encounter. We will then consider the consequences, both to ourselves and others, of the decisions we make. Most importantly, we will learn to think in terms of "otherness" – how to consider our actions as part of a social network where all actions necessarily affect others. QUEBECOIS FOLKLORE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course considers the patrimonial traditions of French-Canadians in Québec, including folkloric stories, music, dance, and cuisine. We will examine recurring trends in folkloric stories, the manner in which tradi- tions are preserved and disseminated in the postmodern era, and the vari- ety of international influences which have contributed to the unique cul- tural heritage of our province. THE ROMANTIC IMAGINATION 603-103-04 (2.2.3) Reason versus the imagination; child- hood innocence and adult experi- ence; individualism and social conformity; the primacy of nature; and the obsessive attraction with the dark side—these are some of the themes that have defined the roman- tic revolution of the 18-19th cen- turies. In examining the development of a Romantic aesthetic and attitude in poetry, fiction, the visual arts, and music, we will question the cultural relevance of the romantic imagination upon our lives today. SCOTS: KILTS, CASTLES AND CLANS 603-103-04 (2.2.3) The myths and legends of Scotland are rich and varied, offering intriguing tales of saints and kings, heroes and villains, magicians and monsters, giants and ghosts, foul deeds and frightening fiends, told against a dra- matic backdrop of stern castles, sinis- ter caves, craggy peaks and swirling mists. In this course, through literature spanning several centuries, reflecting the challenges, triumphs and defeats which the Nation has endured, the story of Scotland unfolds. SHAKESPEARE AT THE MOVIES 603-103-04 (2.2.3) Shakespeare is the world’s most pop- ular playwright. Today, his plays are reaching new audiences through the medium of film. But to what extent are these transplants from stage to screen successful? The class will study two of Shakespeare’s plays in depth. Students will develop a firm grasp of the text as they explore its treatment in film. SHAKESPEAREAN FAMILIES 603-103-04 (2.2.3) In this course we examine Shakespeare’s dramatization of family relations in two or three plays. We will be especially interested in study- ing the various conflicts and renegoti- ations that take place between family members (and sometimes friends) as children pass into adulthood. Also important will be romantic love, and the tension it creates with other rela- tionships. Readings will be supple- mented with viewings of the plays in performance. SURVEY OF POETRY 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course will provide a thematic survey of poetry. The first two-thirds of the course will cover modern poet- ry. In the last third we will study a play by Shakespeare. Students will have the opportunity to write their own poetry if they wish; however,"creative" work will not be a requirement. TAINTED LOVE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) Is love a blissful experience that makes us forget all our troubles, or is love an emotional snake-pit that con- ceals its true nature until it has us trapped within its snaky coils? The aim of this course is to examine how writers from different eras and cul- tures explore love in order to account for the good, the bad and the ugly sides of one of the emotions central to our very existence. Specifically, we will focus on the ways in which writ- ers use, abuse, adhere to, or ignore traditional notions of love in an attempt to represent forms of love that are often viewed as untraditional, socially unacceptable or ‘tainted’. TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN NATURE IN STORIES ABOUT THE FUTURE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) Open up the science section of any newspaper, and one finds reports of advances in genetic engineering, or statistics about how ‘wired’ we are, or reviews of new-and-improved biome- chanical prosthetics, or speculation about the latest drugs (legal or illegal) designed to keep the mind sharp, or improve physical performance. Is sci- ence and technology now driving human evolution? This course is about the complex relationship between the human body, human culture, and human technology as it is explored in literature, film, and games. THEATRE WORKSHOP ENGLISH 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course is ideal for students study- ing or just plain interested in theatre 132
  • 133. (Theatre Workshop students, Professional Theatre students, scien- tists who really want to go on the stage...) The all-round, all-in-one, magic theatre course for all horses. Designed to meet the requirements of students in the Professional Theatre Program and those enrolled in the Theatre Workshop, “Theatre English” accommodates students in all stages of the CEGEP English curriculum. All students work together on theatrical projects, while doing other assign- ments specific to their college level. In Theatre English, students can expect to develop facility in reading, watch- ing and interpreting a variety of texts (dramatic, fictional, poetic, cinematic) as well as improving written and oral expression in English. The Final Showcase offers an opportunity for dramatic writing to students in the Playwright Stream and group per- formance to all participants. THEMES IN LITERATURE 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course will examine the themes and ideas in a range of literary texts selected by the teacher. These texts may be from one or more of the fol- lowing genres: fiction, film, poetry, drama and nonfiction. Students are expected to read the texts carefully and to comprehend the themes and ideas being developed by the author through the use of generic elements, rhetorical techniques and literary devices. THEMES IN MODERN POETRY 603-103-04 (2.2.3) In this course students will study a selection of representative poems and poets of the modern period. The objective of the course is to under- stand modernist poetics and the vari- ous developments in poetry in our times in order to help students appre- ciate contemporary verse, de-mystify- ing the whole genre and assumptions about the inscrutability of poetry. THE MONSTROUS 603-103-04 (2.2.3) Students will examine a range of early English literature featuring stories about conflicts between heroes and monsters. Works will include the Old English classic Beowulf the Irish classic The Tain, as well as other stories from Old Norse saga, in translation. Students will explore the way that these stories about conflicts between representatives of a society and a monstrous ‘other’ express, shape, and challenge a society’s values TRAUMA AND WITNESS 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course will further develop the skills essential for effective reading and writing about literature though the critical, analytical study of an array of texts which explore the inter- related themes of trauma and witness. Students will explore the treatment of these themes across an array of fiction and non-fiction genres including memoir, film, drama, novel, graphic novel and journalism, and will consid- er the diverse aspects of these themes as well as the various ethical facets and implications of both theme and genre choice. WORLD LITERATURE III: THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND THE ROMANTIC ERA 603-103-04 (2.2.3) This course is the third in the sequence of four required Liberal Arts Program English courses. It comprises the study of a selection of texts from the British and European eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The course explores the prevailing ideas and themes associated with the neo-classi- cal “Enlightenment” and with the Romantic revolution. It examines the images and literary techniques which embody the ideas and themes. The course’s approach emphasizes close examination of texts, the reader’s crit- ical response to the texts and the articulation of that response. Classes comprise some lectures on and con- siderable discussion of the assigned readings. Written assignments provide practice in literary analysis and in the expression of interpretive commen- tary on readings. WORLD WIDE WOMEN 603-103-04 (2.2.3) The life experiences of women around the world are vast and varied. Whether women are living under the veil of Islam, drawing water from wells in Africa, or climbing corporate ladders in the west, what unites women around the world is more than just biology. There are mental and social connections as well. In this course we will take a literary trip around the world to hear the voices of women. What work do women do; what types of relationships do women have with men and with each other; what conflicts and triumphs do women experience; how do religion, social class, and gender shape women’s lives? These are some of the questions this course will seek to answer. 133
  • 134. “BLOCK B” With due attention to the varieties of dis- course in speech, print and images that students are likely to encounter in the programs and their lives outside of school, B-Block English courses teach stu- dents how to become active and aware users of discourse as well as effective and ethical communicators. It is our firm conviction that these goals are valuable not only to programs wishing to produce skilled graduates but also to the vital role of General Education in higher education and in the culture at large. ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PROGRAMS 603-DBW/T/V-04 (2.2.2) P: 603-101-04 These courses enable students to commu- nicate in forms appropriate to programs of study. Students learn to recognize appropriate forms and conventions of communication and the organization of various types of discourse. They also learn to develop their own ideas into arguments and theses, and to organize, revise and edit their work. To pass the course students must write a 1000-word essay that meets specific criteria. ADAPTING STORIES 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Designed for students with an interest in literature, theatre, marketing, anthropology, creative writing, inter- active media, or film-making, this course focuses on how stories work – across cultures, through time, and in different media. Students are encour- aged to explore where issues of medi- um and message intersect, as we examine at least two stories that have been adapted across media lines (i.e. from fiction to film, film to stage, biography to television series, myth to game, or poetry to song). AMERICAN DREAMS/REALITIES 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) The American Dream is an elastic concept that has had many defini- tions. The conservative American Dream emphasizes the ‘rags to riches’ myth of limitless economic opportu- nity whereas the liberal version emphasizes the promise of equal rights for all Americans. Drawing on essays, photographs, and films about the American Dream, we will work towards an understanding of one of the central myths of contemporary American culture. ARGUMENT AND PERSUASION 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) In this advanced course in reading and writing, students will hone skills in reading critically and communicat- ing effectively. In studying the strate- gies of argumentation and persuasion, students will become more conscious of the principles and techniques for developing ideas and, by means of an appreciation of the rhetoric of argu- ment, sharpen analytical skills and enhance their power to communicate clearly and persuasively. BERLIN: LITERATURE-CULTURE-HISTORY 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Berlin. One of the great centres of the world, this city is a nexus of liter- ary, cultural and historical significance. From the heart of this often troubled city have come works of literature that have had a profound effect on the discourse of the rest of the world, and in this city are gathered treasures of human culture and history span- ning millennia. This course is avail- able as a travel option (which includes visiting Berlin) and a regular course option. CANADIAN CULTURE 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) What does it mean to be Canadian? Is it possible or even desirable to express and define ourselves as such given the country’s size and spread, its history of conflict among the Native, French and English popula- tions, the current multicultural mix of our cities, and our intimate links to a country which is not only the world’s superpower but whose culture domi- nates our own? Over the semester we will address these questions by read- ing a variety of literary and expository texts, and work towards clarifying our own responses to them. CHANGING CLIMATES 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) There have always been individuals critical of the Western world’s habits of careless consumption, and who see the damage to our environment as too high a price to pay for economic prosperity. However, as evidence of climate change accumulates, a con- viction is growing among many - including scientists, people in the Humanities, business people and politicians - that our way of life, or “business as usual,”is unsustainable, and that actions must be taken to change our habits and our technolo- gies. Over the semester we will address the crisis by reading and writ- ing on a variety of expository texts - some on the histories of past ecologi- cal breakdowns, and many on climate change specifically - and develop a response to the most pressing prob- lem of our time. COMING OF AGE 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) “Maturity is a bitter disappointment,” Kurt Vonnegut has said. The mature civilizations of Europe and the ancient cultures of Asia have tended to see American idealism and energy as naive, even childish. A story about the 20th century Chinese leader, Mao Tse-tung, might help put this issue in perspective. Reportedly, Mao was asked his opinion in the 1940s regarding the most important result of the French Revolution, which took place in 1789. “It’s too soon to know,” was his answer. What does it mean to “grow up” as an individual in a country as young as Canada? How is it different from “coming of age” in previous times and/or in different countries of the world? We will read and discuss books in this course which focus on such questions. COMMUNICATION AND COMMUNITY: VETERAN’S HOSPITAL 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Communication and Community is a practical communication course based on fieldwork. It comprises weekly 4-hour fieldwork sessions with veterans residing at Ste-Anne's Hospital who have cognitive impair- ment and/or other disorders. The course provides an opportunity for participants to establish a relationship in a hospital setting with persons much older. These relationships will be the subject of a developmental journal and a case-presentation. 134
  • 135. COMMUNITY 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Using literature, this course focuses on two contemporary approaches to the scientific account of evolution, with one science-based vision leading to the ongoing destruction of the Earth community (plants, animals, humans) and with the other science- based vision having the potential to help the Earth community flourish. The focus of the course will be on the second positive vision and its new kinds of heroes as seen in contempo- rary literature. One novel, short sto- ries, myths, fairy tales, essays and poems are included. DOCUMENTING BARBARISM: GENOCIDE LITERATURE 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Our focus is on comparative forms of discourse used in the representation of the Armenian, Jewish, and Rwandan genocides. After placing these genoci- dal events in their proper historical, ideological, and social contexts, we explore the ethical challenges inherent in the act of documenting historical memory through autobiography, fic- tion, film, the graphic novel, journal- ism, nonfiction, poetry, and the visual arts. By building an informed aware- ness of the impact of genocide upon our individual and collective memo- ries, we aim to explore constructive, critical, and responsible ways of bear- ing witness to historical atrocity. ENGLISH DBW: ENGLISH FOR PROGRAMS 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course will examine themes in a range of texts selected by the teacher. These texts may be from one or more forms of discourse appropriate to given fields of study. Students are expected to read the texts carefully, to comprehend the themes and ideas being developed by the author, and to respond orally and in writing to the discursive frameworks presented in the course. THE FRAGILE MIND 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) In this course we will examine texts in which the protagonist has been diag- nosed with a mental illness and has received treatment for that disorder. Each of the texts deals with a different kind of psychosis and provides insight into the patient’s experience both with illness and with therapy. In addi- tion to reading fictional and biograph- ical accounts, students will be encouraged to investigate the psycho- logical literature, to assess the implica- tions of mental illness as a social construct and to develop communica- tion strategies appropriate to their own field of study. GREEN CITIES 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course is designed to help stu- dents acquire techniques of research and essay writing by considering pressing issues within the greatest challenge of our century: human cohabitation with nature, more specifically, the need for environmen- tal consciousness. Indeed, planetary overpopulation is fuelling an unprece- dented urban sprawl, which is eating up green spaces at an alarming rate. Through the study of various aspects of this dilemma from an architectural, scientific, sociological, geographical, and cultural point of view, we will try to identify solutions that may if not reverse the trend but at least diminish the threat to our survival as inhabi- tants of one and the same planet. Along with this preoccupation we will also strive to master the technical writing aspects of the course, as described above. IRELAND IN FOLKLORE, FACT AND FICTION 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) The small island of Ireland has long been celebrated for its rich folklore, and for its ability to preserve a strong sense of its Gaelic culture in the face of Norse, Norman, and English inva- sions and occupations. In this course, we will examine the folklore and liter- ature of Ireland and the influences of Irish history and ancient Gaelic culture on these oral and literary traditions. JOURNALISM: THE NEWS AS MUSE 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course serves as an introduction to the conventions of journalism. It will provide marketable skills for stu- dents who wish to pursue a career in journalism. The focus will be upon issues in the news related to each stu- dent's specific program. Creativity will be encouraged by using the news as a "muse" (source of inspiration). LITERARY FORGERIES 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Literary forgeries are often overlooked due to the notion that their criminality and historical inaccuracy outweigh their literary merit. Yet forgeries have played an important role in the shap- ing of literary, cultural, social, and political trends. In this course, we will consider the various motives behind and responses to several literary for- geries in an effort to determine where the boundaries are (if any exist) between forgery and fiction and between subjectivity and dishonesty— and to consider whether there is such a thing as an ethically justifiable lie. LITERATURE AND THE LAND 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course explores the relationship between the land, community, sur- vival, and writing. We read poetic and scientific texts from Western and traditional cultures that reflect con- sciousness of the land and of environ- mental issues. We explore how different genres allow diverse per- spectives, world views and types of knowledge to be portrayed. We con- sider a variety of ways in which authors explore human consciousness of the land, and see how all living beings coexist on Earth in dynamic interrelationship. MANUFACTURING IDENTITY 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course examines how human identity is shaped by industrialization and technology. Students will learn about the history of the division of labour and emerging technologies (from the steam loom weaver to pho- tography to voice recording) and how they affected our understanding of the stability and the fragility of the self. The course also investigates the development of surveillance tech- nologies from Orwell’s telescreens to Facebook. MATERIAL WORLD, IN A 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) We live in a society dominated by consumerism, a shop-till-you-drop world where material goods are val- ued above all else. The end goal of contemporary life is not to be virtu- ous, but to be rich. The pursuit of pleasure preoccupies us more than the pursuit of wisdom. In this course 135 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 136. we will take a close, critical look at our consumerist society from numer- ous angles, including teen culture, advertising, education, the environ- ment, and the developing world. Students will improve their oral and written argumentative skills while dealing with this interesting issue. MYTH AND SOCIETY 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course is designed to introduce students to the study of mythology and its various components: its pur- pose, its methods, and the various connections to be made with other forms of literature, to religion, and especially to cultural attitudes. The content of the course will include selections from Native American, Hebrew, Greek and European cul- tures. NATURE 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course focuses on positive rela- tionships between humans and nature, as presented in essays (natural history and expository), one novel, and short stories. THE NEWS AS MUSE 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course serves as an introduction to the conventions of journalism. It will provide marketable skills for stu- dents who wish to pursue a career in journalism. The focus will be upon issues in the news related to each stu- dent's specific program. Creativity will be encouraged by using the news as a "muse" (source of inspiration). POSTMODERN CONCERNS 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course offers an introduction to some of the more useful and engag- ing ideas and issues associated with the term "postmodernism." Students will develop a familiarity with and mastery of key postmodern terms and concepts through the study of an array of literary genres (critical theory, expository prose, memoir, graphic novel and drama) as well as film, Broadway musical, television and opera. PRACTICAL COMMUNICATION 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Problem-solving and communication are skills vital to success in almost all fields of work. This course aims to provide the student with instruction and practice in various kinds of real world communications – addressing problems and finding solutions. Largely through the use of a case study method, the course emphasizes communicating in business and pro- fessional contexts and is intended to be of practical value for students look- ing to sharpen their abilities in con- ceiving, organizing, writing and presenting effective texts. READING AND WRITING ABOUT THE ARTS 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) We regularly consume works of art— film, dance, architecture, etc.; some- times we respond to them. This course explores the relationships between works of art and verbal response. The major assignments will involve exploring the relationship between some area of the arts and the student’s field of study. SIGNS OF OUR TIME 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course will examine certain cur- rent social issues and ideas of concern to most of us. Through a selection of literature, we will explore aspects of popular culture and assess their validi- ty. Students will be encouraged to read actively and think critically and to interpret and evaluate the texts. Students will practise several forms of writing relevant to studies in social science. STRANGERS IN A STRANGE LAND 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) What happens when we find our- selves in a totally new and unfamiliar environment? Do we reinvent our- selves, conquer the new, or seamless- ly assimilate? This course will explore the different methods, philosophies, and challenges in which characters, who have suddenly become strangers in a strange land, adapt to new places and new modes of being. Works read may include Shelley’s Frankenstein, Greene’s Our Man in Havana, and short stories from Lahiri, Diaz, and Ballard. TEEN TALK 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) In the western world, society revolves around the concept of youth. Images of youth dominate popular culture, as well as the consumer world. The mes- sage to adults is that they should try to remain forever young. And yet, in all of this, where is the voice of teens? What are teenagers’ real values and desires? Are teens merely crass mate- rialists, or are they also concerned with serious social issues? What is it like to be a teenager in our consumer society? This course will address some of these questions by reading texts, both non-fiction and fiction, that cen- tre on the teen experience. We will deal with issues such as gender, race, sexuality, family, consumerism and materialism, all through the voice of teens. THEATRE WORKSHOP: ENGLISH 603-DBW-04 This course is ideal for students study- ing or just plain interested in theatre (Theatre Workshop students, Professional Theatre students, scien- tists who really want to go on the stage...) The all-round, all-in-one, magic theatre course for all horses. Designed to meet the requirements of students in the Professional Theatre Program and those enrolled in the Theatre Workshop, the course accommodates students in all stages of the CEGEP English curriculum. All students work together on theatrical projects, while doing other assign- ments specific to their college level. Students can expect to develop facili- ty in reading, watching and interpret- ing a variety of texts (dramatic, fictional, poetic, cinematic) as well as improving written and oral expression in English. The Final Showcase offers an opportunity for dramatic writing to students in the Playwright Stream and group performance to all participants. THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) The Bible is the foundation document of two of the three great Abrahamic religions, Judaism and Christianity. Even Islam, notwithstanding the absolute pre-eminence of the Qur’an, acknowledges a debt to the Bible. It is therefore a significant monument in the cultural landscape of a great many of us. It is seminal to many great works of literature, art, music and architecture in the Western tradi- tion. In addition, the ethical princi- ples found therein are at the heart of the sense of justice and the codes of justice most of us live with. 136
  • 137. Note that it is a fundamental premise of this course that all religious narra- tives are myths created by people, in this instance, largely, if not exclusively, men, in specific times and places and for purposes about which their very existence invites us to speculate. This is not to say that the Bible should not be considered true. It is “true” in the same way that all great literature is true, insofar as it resonates with para- digms and motifs that hit at the heart of the psycho-spiritual experience of humankind. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS: AN INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY GENRE (LIBERAL ARTS B-BLOCK) 603-DBV-04 (2.2.2) Texts and Contexts will familiarise stu- dents with the main contemporary theoretical approaches to literature. By describing features shared by the most effective critics, the course will attempt to give students a sound basis for their own writing. The approaches we examine will be applied to major writers of the 20th century and stu- dents will be encouraged to apply these approaches to the literary texts they will be studying in their other Liberal Arts courses. THE HOLOCAUST 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course explores the “Shoa”. Its purpose is to remember, to remind and to bear witness to the calamity that is called the Holocaust. The class will be engaged in a collective as well as a personal journey through the his- tory of the people, places and events that marked this terrible period of human endeavour. The class will read testimonials, view films and par- ticipate in activities intended to reaf- firm the values of mutual respect and dignity for our fellow human beings. THE METAMORPHIC SELF 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Many works of literature focus on characters that undergo enormous changes in their lives: Alice’s adven- tures in Wonderland find her becom- ing magically larger and smaller, and Dr. Jekyll unlocks his own darker side to become Mr. Hyde. As readers, we can look at these characters to see how their transformations allow them (or us) to gain perspective, learning more about themselves and the world in which they live. In this course, we will examine how such changes open up new possibilities for thought and feeling, and how a self might be understood when we can see it being two things at once. TRACES OF MEMORY: 20TH- CENTURY HISTORY THROUGH LITERATURE 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course explores various forms of discourse used in the representation of 20th-century history. As our focus is predominantly on genocide, oppres- sion, and war, we will explore the roots and subsequent impact of racial, fascist, Nazi, and totalitarian ideolo- gies as well as situate these in their proper historical and social contexts. We will then explore the ethical chal- lenges inherent in the act of docu- menting historical memory through autobiography, fiction, film, the graphic novel, journalism, nonfiction, poetry, and the visual arts. By building an informed awareness of the impact of genocide, oppression, and war upon our individual and collective memories, we aim to explore con- structive and critical ways of under- standing the weighty role of history upon our lives. UNDERSTANDING MEDIA 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Why study popular culture? Popular culture reflects the values of our soci- ety. It also influences our ideas and behaviour. Thus, we understand our society and the forces that shape us better if we analyse popular culture. Lastly, it is interesting to examine the often highly sophisticated techniques it uses to get its messages across and their impact. As Marshall McLuhan often remarked, “The medium is the message.” The course will examine advertising, television programming, news and film. VOLUNTEERING: COMMUNITY AND COMMUNICATION 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) Volunteering: Community and Communications is a practical com- munications course focused on doing volunteer work with seniors and dis- advantaged members of the commu- nity. The class is centred on the idea that besides being college students pursuing academic goals, young adults are also vitally connected to their community. These positive visions go beyond the traditional role of students following an academic program, to include fieldwork options: preparing and delivering meals, designing recreational activities for shut-in seniors and mentally hand- icapped, tutoring at-risk immigrant pupils, running food and clothing banks, hospital assistance… Students thus learn more about their own compassionate strengths in the broad- er context of the community. In addition to their weekly fieldwork, students keep journals, write essays, engage in research and readings and deliver oral case reports. THE WEST AND THE WORLD 603-DBW-04 (2.2.2) This course surveys contemporary lit- erature and film about encounters, interactions, and tensions between “Western” and “non-Western” cul- tures. Topics may include Canadian multiculturalism, immigrant experi- ences and reasonable accommoda- tion, literature about cultures formerly dominated by the West, and Western responses to troubled parts of the world today. The course emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing, while encouraging students to explore their own perspectives on the current climate of culture wars. 137 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 138. 138 ENGLISH EXIT EXAM IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS MINISTERIAL EXAMINATION OF LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION “ENGLISH EXIT EXAM” • The exit test is a test of competency in the areas of read- ing, writing, and critical thinking. • Students may write the test when they have completed three BLOCK A courses (101, 102, 103); they may be registered in the third. • Students have four hours in which to select one of three readings (traditionally two non-fiction, one short-fiction) and write a 750 word critical analysis of it. • They may bring a dictionary (English and/or other), but no electronic ones. No Thesaurus. • The three categories that students are evaluated on are comprehension and insight, organization and expression. • The essays are read by two teachers who must agree on two out of three marks and be no further than one apart on the third. • Any mark lower than “C” in any of the three categories results in a failure of the whole test. • Within each of the categories are four specific criteria (see chart beside). • The John Abbott College Learning Centre, in co-operation with the English Department, runs a number of work- shops during the semester to help students prepare for the test. STUDENTS WHO DO NOT PASS THE EXAM WILL NOT RECEIVE THEIR (dec) DIPLOMA OF COLLEGE STUDIES. • Students who are interested and eligible to write the French Exit Exam should inquire at the Registrar’s Office.
  • 139. FRENCH Students must take 2 French courses: ONE BLOCK “A” COURSE : GENERAL FRENCH ONE BLOCK “B” COURSE: PROGRAM RELATED FRENCH For each block, there are four levels of courses. Placement in the appropri- ate level of French is determined by the students’ High School marks. The French Department reserves the right to change the placement of a student upon written notice.Please refer to the French Placement Chart in the College Schedule of classes. Students take the Block “B” course at the same level as the Block “A” course. If placement determines that students do not have a college level of profi- ciency in French, students may be required to take one or two remedial courses to upgrade their knowledge of the language. These courses are called “mise à niveau” or “language development”. The program determines during which semester students do each of their two courses. For example, Social Science students usually do their Block “A” course in the first semester and their Block “B” in the third semester, whereas Science students do their Block “A” course in the sec- ond and their Block “B” course in the fourth semester. BLOCK”A” COURSES : The Block “A” course numbers are as follows: 602-100-03 LEVEL 1 FRENCH 602-101-03 LEVEL 2 FRENCH 602-102-03 LEVEL 3 FRENCH 602-103-03 LEVEL 4 FRENCH French Second Language (Block “A”) courses are designed to prepare stu- dents for full participation in Quebec society. The objective of these cours- es is to enable students to communi- cate in French with a certain degree of fluency. Four levels of Block “A” courses are offered. These courses take into account the objectives of the second- ary French program and also accom- modate the varying abilities of individual students. By the time stu- dents arrive at college, they should have acquired basic skills in four areas of language proficiency : speaking, reading, writing and listening, empha- sizing reading and writing. A variety of teaching methods are used in the Block “A” courses depending upon which of the four skills is being taught. Whenever possible, the written materials studied are texts originally intended for francophone readers. Each level is defined by the complex- ity of the texts studied and the type of written assignments students are expected to produce. Beginners’ French (602-100) works on develop- ing equally the four basic language skills so students can communicate in French with a basic degree of facility. Low intermediate French (602-101) works on developing the four basic language skills, however, the empha- sis is on reading and writing. The objective is to communicate in French with a certain degree of facili- ty. In Intermediate French (602-102), reading assignments are longer and more complex. The written assign- ments are more demanding and the cultural component more important. The Advanced French (602-103) is centered entirely on the study of lit- erature and culture. Textual analysis and composition are emphasized. At this level, the different sections have specific themes such as: • Arts et culture des romantiques – XIXe siècle • Cinéma • Contes et nouvelles • Création littéraire • Histoire de la langue française • Introduction à la littérature du XXe siècle • Journalisme • La condition féminine • Le roman contemporain • Le roman policier • La Littérature française à travers les âges • Littérature des temps modernes • Littérature fantastique • Montréal : Culture et spectacles • Poésie • Poésie québécoise • Théâtre Those themes may vary from one semester to another. BLOCK “B”COURSES : The Block “B” course numbers are as follows: 602-DBJ-03 LEVEL 1 FRENCH 602-DBK-03 LEVEL 2 FRENCH 602-DBL-03 LEVEL 3 FRENCH 602-DBM-03 LEVEL 4 FRENCH Students are permitted to register in their Block “B” course only after com- pletion of their Block “A” French course. (The Block “A” course credit is a prereq- uisite to the Block “B” course). The program-related Block “B” French course is designed to help stu- dents consolidate and improve skills developed in the Block “A” course. It also enriches students’ command of French by emphasizing language abili- ties directly related to a particular type of profession or field of study. The College determines the specific course content which best responds to students’ needs. The teaching methods, texts, written and oral exams, group work, class presenta- tions, portfolios, etc., are tailored to students’ program of study or future professional requirements. As in the common core (Block “A”) courses, there are four levels of pro- gram related (Block “B”) courses. The standards and objectives of the differ- ent levels vary according to the diffi- culty of the material studied and the length and complexity of the written assignments. At the Advanced Level (602-DBM), students with excellent written skills may choose to register in a special course and upon recommendation become tutors to help other students at the caf (centre d’aide en français). For more information, please contact Daniel Rondeau of the French Department. 139 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 140. HUMANITIES Visit the Humanities Department on line: www.johnabbott.qc.ca Click on Current Students and select Academic Departments to find the department home pages. Humanities courses are general edcuation courses. You must pass three Humanities courses in order to graduate. These courses must include: TWO (2) BLOCK A COURSES one from each of these two categories: HUMANITIES: WORLD VIEWS 345-102-03 AND HUMANITIES: KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 AND ONE (1) BLOCK B COURSE: HUMANITIES: ETHICAL ISSUES 345-DBU-03 OR 345-DBW-03 OR 345-DBX-03 OR 345-DBY-03 OR 345-DBZ-03 P: 345-102-03 & 345-103-04 BLOCK A COURSES You may only take one World Views (345-102-03) and one Knowledge (345-103-04) course. The course numbers 345-102-03 and 345-103-04 apply to whole categories of courses. Individual courses in these categories are described below. The two categories of courses in Block A (Knowledge and World Views) pursue the general goals of: developing logical thought and recognizing its limitations; under- standing various ways of acquiring knowledge and how those ways have developed historically; and examining systems of under- standing. Knowledge and World Views courses help students understand different views of humanity and of knowledge through the use of a multi-disciplinary approach. This understanding will equip students to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate knowledge claims and world views. To pass courses in these categories students are expected to demonstrate the ability to reflect in an informed manner and to express what they have studied in an organized and coherent fashion. HUMANITIES: WORLD VIEWS 345-102-03 (3.0.3) World views are understandings of reality shared by groups or societies defined or self-defined on the basis of common geography, economic status, gender, sexu- al orientation, ideology, history, religion, spirituality, political values, psychology, language, culture, (dis) ability, etc. AFRICA: ISSUES ON THE “DARK CONTINENT” 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Tyrannical governments, civil war and ethnic conflict, and border invasions all threaten the possibility of peace and stability in many regions in Africa. Pandemics such as AIDS, avoidable famines, illiteracy, and gender issues also combine to keep Africa underde- veloped and in poverty. This course will examine contemporary issues on the African continent within their his- torical context. Students will study some of the political, social and eco- nomic ideas that guide African coun- tries’ attempts to break these ongoing patterns that result in poverty and underdevelopment. The primary educational approach will be through case studies. ASPECTS OF FREEDOM 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Students will examine (with the help of the instructor) the question of indi- vidual freedom and societal liberty. Therefore they will be introduced to the various problems of authority (negative freedom). In the course of the semester, possible solutions, if any should exist, will be considered and debated. THE ART OF BEING HUMAN 345-102-03 (3.0.3) What does it mean to be human? Do we realize the fullness of our humani- ty in quiet contemplation, study, or prayer? Or is it the case that we can only hope to realize the fullness of our humanity in the messy world of human relationships? Do we become fully human only when we care for friends and family members, children and strangers? Or is true salvation to be found in animistic communion with Nature? Human beings have been asking questions of this kind for thousands of years. This course is an introduction to some of these timeless questions. But it is also a survey of the historically-specific answers. This course is meant to be a general intro- duction to the humanities, centering upon the West’s centuries-old preoc- cupation with the art of being human. BODY-MIND 345-102-03 (3.0.3) “I think, therefore I am.” Who thinks? What is thinking? What are thoughts? How does the mind affect the body and vice versa? What is mind? How can the mind work for and against us? What is it capable of? This course will attempt to address some of these per- plexing questions. BODY-MIND INTENSIVE 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course will cover the same philo- sophical questions as outlined in Body/Mind over the course of 10 weeks on campus. The remaining 5 weeks will be condensed into an Intensive portion, where for one weekend, students will be immersed in the application of Body/Mind analysis, including practical applica- tions in an ashram setting. Course fees will apply. CANADA: WHO NEEDS IT? 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Generally speaking this is a course about our identity as Canadians. It’s about how this identity affects how we understand and order our experi- ence and the choices we make as individuals and as a community. Particularly, we will examine the American influence on Canada’s cul- ture, economy, politics, etc. and how this shapes our ideals, values and beliefs, and the limits this imposes on our choices as a country. Among other issues, we will critically exam- ine some of the icons and cliches of Canada’s self definition such as multi- culturalism, bilingualism, mosaic, “a community of communities,” and “the peaceable kingdom,” and debate their validity and value in our 140
  • 141. claim to a unique identity in North America. This course is based on the premise that the dual processes of Americanisation and globalisation are rapidly closing the door to an inde- pendent and sovereign Canada in which a truly unique Canadian iden- tity and worldview can be devel- oped. If this is the Canada we choose, then indeed... who needs it? THE CANADIAN LANDSCAPE 345-102-03 (3.0.3) In his conclusion to The Bush Garden, Northrop Frye makes the fol- lowing comparison: “To enter the United States is a matter of crossing an ocean; to enter Canada is a mat- ter of being silently swallowed up by an alien continent.”1 Canada has come to be defined by this primor- dial encounter with the forbidding wilderness, a land indifferent and occasionally hostile to humanity’s presence. We will investigate the ways in which early Canadian culture was largely formed by this encounter, and to what extent it continues to shape our art, literature and national consciousness. CHINA AND JAPAN: CONFRONTING THE MODERN CHALLENGE 345-102-03 (3.0.3) The course will begin with a brief his- torical sketch of the mid-19th century as a background for a more detailed examination of the social transforma- tions which have occurred in China and Japan during the more contem- porary period. Discussion will focus on the two countries’ strikingly differ- ent concepts of modern transforma- tion, the actual implementation of these models and the various success- es and failures which have resulted from these experiences. CREATIVITY AND THE ARTIST’S LIFE 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course explores elevated artistic expression and its characteristics by comparing the lives of six remarkable artists: three who suffered from turbu- lent mood extremes, and three who did not. First are the Russian compos- er Peter Ilych Tchaikovsky, American poet Sylvia Plath, and Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh. Secondly, the Czech composer Antonin Dvorak, British poet W.H. Auden, and Spanish painter Pablo Picasso. By comparing their cultures, nationalities, sexuality, disposition and work habits, we examine the nature of the creative temperament. CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON PHOTOGRAPHY 345-102-03 (3.0.3) In this course photographic representa- tions that form part of the dominant discourses about pleasure, individual- ism and group belonging will be criti- cally examined. The popular assumption of the essentially truthful or objective nature of photography makes it a particularly powerful medium in shaping our understanding of ourselves and the world. Such assumptions and their effects will be questioned through the study of different photographic genres, artistic movements and theo- ries about photography. One of the major themes running through the course will be the representation of the body. The photo-body is an inescapable feature of contemporary life and is a site of anxiety, desire and the formation of identity. EDUCATION AND WORLD VIEWS 345-102-03 (3.0.3) What do we mean by education? There are many worldviews on this question. Some say we are empty vessels waiting to be filled. Some say we already know; it needs only the right stimulation or opportunity to manifest itself. According to other worldviews, what we need comes from established disciplines via texts, teachers and tests in assigned class- rooms. For others still, it comes via experience, encounters in nature and in life outside the classroom. In exam- ining education we also need to con- sider different learning styles and how they, in turn, shape one’s worldview. EGYPTIAN AND NEAR EASTERN CIVILIZATION 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course is an introduction to the great civilizations of Egypt and the Near East. We begin with a brief description and discussion of histori- cal events and excerpts from literature in order to provide a context within which to understand such important developments as the invention of writing, the first known set of laws, and the creation of monumental works of art and architecture glorify- ing pharaohs and kings. We also examine more mundane and human aspects of daily life, such as love and see and religion and magic in this part of the ancient world. EXPLORING GENDER RELATIONS: GENDER MAPS, EROTIC PRISMS 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Our worldviews about males and females assume diagnoses about what roles, identities and experiences are natural vs unnatural for men and women, and imply prescriptions about what, for both, constitutes life- affirming-vs life-negating values, choices and actions. Our identifica- tion as male or female is significant in its consequences. It thus frames and influences the questions we ask about ourselves and the ideals that we pur- sue as sexual beings, the terms for success or failure in our intimate rela- tionships, the response of others to our personal and interpersonal sexual self-expression, and the assumptions we make about heterosexual, homo- sexual and bisexual identities as such world views are sites for the appropri- ation and experience of our gen- dered/sexual selves. This course provides an opportunity for students to study opposing and complementa- ry worldviews, both secular and non- secular: biological, spiritual, psychological, sociological, anthropo- logical and philosophical. HUMAN NATURE AND SOCIAL VALUES 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Are human beings essentially good or bad? Is inequality a natural and nec- essary condition of humankind? Is his- tory progressing towards a particular end? Are we living in a free society? These are some of the questions that are vital to the understanding of our modern world. We will try to answer those questions and, in the process, we will examine different views of human “nature” and identify the val- ues we share with the rest of society. We will study the ideas of famous thinkers, from ancient Greece to the twentieth century, and explain how our views of the world have been shaped by centuries of reflection on human nature and society. Ultimately, the objective is to better understand the meaning of key values promoted (or disputed) in society: power, free- dom, equality, and peace. 141 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 142. FEMINISM: I’M NOT A FEMINIST, BUT... 345-102-03 (3.0.3) But what? You want your little sister to feel safe walking home? You hate if when your friends call you a “fag” for taking yoga? The post-feminist myth tells us we don’t need feminism any- more: sexism has disappeared, girls have gone wild, boys can use cover up, and we are living gender equal lives. Are we… really? A closer look shows a more complicated picture. Using an intersectional framework which inte- grates racism, classism and homopho- bia, we will look at how young people in Canada try to make sense of their lives in not so post-feminist times. IMAGES IN MYTH AND EPIC 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Myths define world views in story, rit- ual, and symbol. Focusing on the mythology of the ancient and medieval worlds, students in this course explore the world views behind various tales of creation, and investigate a variety of answers to the meaning of love, war, death, power, and life itself. INDIAN VIEWS 345-102-03 (3.0.3) The Iroquoian Great Law of Peace informed North American social organization, while the East Indian Vedas informed the sciences of the East, from which many western scien- tific ideas derived. Both Indian soci- eties responsible for these documents are masters of organization, with well- developed social and epistemological philosophies and cosmologies. Present-day agriculture, architecture, mathematics, aesthetics, philosophy, medicine, "alternative medicine", astronomy and literature owe acknowledgments to these cultures, so often regarded as anathema to European ideas of the rational. In this course we will use two great works, Longfellow's Hiawatha and Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, to understand the Great Law of Peace and the yogic codes for the search for elusive peace and their cultural overlaps with our current aspirations as global people. AN INTRODUCTION TO WORLD VIEW 345-102-03 (3.0.3) The purpose of the course is to enable the student to articulate and investi- gate questions about the meaning and nature of world view as a concept and a reality. Issues discussed include the importance of this concept in aca- demic research, in our everyday inter- actions, in understanding issues related to international events and, finally, the questions and concerns raised when world views meet or col- lide within multicultural societies. JAPAN: LOST IN TRANSLATION? 345-102-03 (3.0.3) What happens when our understand- ing of another culture comes to us through the lens of our own world- view? How do images and desires produced, for example, by novels or films create an ahistorical image of Japan as "Other"? This class introduces Japanese culture and society and questions the construction of "the Japanese" as a monolith. We focus on the diversity within contemporary Japan, looking at how groups such as teenagers, gays and lesbians, femi- nists, resident Koreans (among others) experience life and resist dominant sexist, capitalist, and racist discourses. MARXISM 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Marxism is an integral worldview blending a philosophy (including a materialist conception of history), an economic theory, the theory and tac- tics of the communist movements in their diversity (including the Marxist appraisals of the most important mass trends in the present-day democratic movement), and the theory of social- ism and communism. In this course, we will study the fun- damentals of Marxism and compare Marxism with other worldviews such as Existentialism, Freudianism, Thomism, and Platonism. THE NEXT GENERATION? 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course explores the history and nature of childbirth and childrearing in Canada at individual, family and social levels including the 'medical institutionalization' of pregnancy and birth. In addition, it looks at the col- lective development of 'generations' or age cohorts; their shared experi- ences, characteristics, life 'markers' and power (or lack thereof) wielded by each of these groups in society. NORTH-SOUTH RELATIONS – CLASH OF WORLD VIEWS 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course deals with the following issues: (i) an examination of under- standing of a Third World culture; (ii) the dynamics of change the Third World culture is undergoing in the face of a dominant international (Western) culture; (iii) a historical and contemporary review of the relations and trade between the industrially developed countries (North) and the Third World (South). POETRY AND SOCIAL CHANGE 345-102-03 (3.0.3) In this course we will look at the dif- ferences between poetry and propa- ganda; the similarities between poetry and prayer; the fertile ground between poetry and song. Using list- serve sources and students' findings, we'll attempt to see how poets have influenced social conceptualization in the past and present, in the West and elsewhere. REEL POLITICS: MYTH IN THE MAKING 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course explores how feature films project political views and social val- ues. We will highlight the film-maker’s message by analyzing the cinematic techniques, characters and plots of political-genre films and by exploring our own intellectual and emotional reactions. RELIGIONS AND LIBERATION 345-102-03(3.0.3) This course will examine the tradi- tions of liberation in the religious worldviews of Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism, especially as they relate to the work of social justice in the world. While the practice of liberation as a source of personal transcendence and awakening is amply documented in books and the media, the traditions of religious liberation as a means to build a just society tends to be over- looked. If religious traditions are all too often understood to be one of the many causes of sectarian violence, wars, and other forms of oppression, this course will examine those tradi- tions, and the social movements born from them, that inspire religious peo- ples to work for social justice in their own contexts. 142
  • 143. THE STAGES OF LIFE 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Thinkers from Ovid to Shakespeare to Freud have understood human life as being divided into various stages, or seasons. From the infant, “mewling and puking in its mother’s arms,” to the elderly person on the brink of death, “sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything,” as described by Jaques in Shakespeare’s As You Like It, each age has been reflected upon, written about and, of course, depicted. On a grand scale, this course will be an attempt to under- stand how art informs the under- standing of the self in transition, past, present and future. TAKING SIDES ON WORLD VIEWS AND DRAMA 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Interested in debating? Interested in discovering how you can use world views to contextualize an argument? Using Lorraine Hanberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, David Mamet’s Oleanna, and Bertolt Brecht’s Three Penny Opera, you will learn how to apply world views to interpret drama. Afterwards you can then use these techniques in whatever academic or non-academic area you wish to pursue. TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN VALUES 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Technology provides us with a form of knowledge and a way of doing things that are based on instrumental rea- son, expediency and functionalism, even though many of us remain con- vinced that it is “value-free.” Besides inventing and using technologies, human beings happen to have moral experiences as they constantly grapple with questions regarding freedom, rights, responsibilities, good, evil, right and wrong. In this course we will be examining and assessing the scope and limitations of technology from a humanistic and ethical perspective. TELEVISION DRAMA: THE CULTURAL CONTEXT 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Television is the most pervasive medi- um of mass communication in our lives today. Its role is to inform, edu- cate, and entertain us. When it per- forms all three at the same time this represents 'quality television' which produces meaning for its audiences. The televisual form that corresponds most often to this label is 'drama' because drama tells us stories about who we are as individuals and as a nation. It tells us where we came from, and what we are capable of. Drama presents us with the heroes and villains who inhabit the history of our country and the depths of our humanity; memorable characters who shape our experience and our cul- ture. This course will examine Canadian television drama past and present. Then we'll compare and con- trast Canadian dramatic traditions and conventions with those of other coun- tries, particularly the American net- works and Britain's BBC. GAY/QUEER: PERCEPTION AND MISPERCEPTION 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Or is it? Can you be sure? How did you come to believe what you believe about lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, queers, and the transgendered and intersex folk with whom they are so often confused? This course will inter- rogate some conventional and popular understandings of LGBQTI peoples and juxtapose them with the diverse ways in which LGBTQI people under- stand and represent themselves and their worlds. The course makes use of an intersectional framework that takes race, ethnicity, class, gender and sex into account in rethinking what it means to be “gay.” THE THEATRE OF LIFE: STAGING EXPERIENCE AND EXPLORING VALUES 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Derived from the Greek ‘theatron’, theatre creates external spaces that provide both insight into our interior lives, and instruction about the human condition. It allows us to see and recognize timeless truths about ourselves and others. Divided into three acts: ACTI: HUMAN NATURE AND CHARACTERAZION; ACT II: BRINGING CHARACTER TO LIFE & ACT III: CHARACTERS IN CONFLICT, this team-taught course holds theatre and ‘the drama’ up to students as a mirror which presents them with diverse angles of vision about the real, the true and the good. Students will develop a discriminating perception allowing them to explore the reality of what they see and hear in theatrical works of art; to examine what they judge to be true or false about the psychological development and emo- tional make-up of character; and to reveal the values underlying and motivating their own behaviour/per- formance as well as that of others. THIRD WORLD AND CANADA: CONTRAST 345-102-03 (3.0.3) The course contrasts a Third World (traditional) culture with the Canadian culture. It also deals with the issue of poverty in the Third World. The objec- tive of the course is to increase the stu- dent’s awareness of Third World cultures, and problems they face in the context of the modern world. VALUING DIVERSITY 345-102-03 (3.0.3) Recently we have seen a radical, diffi- cult, and uneven shift toward a world view that values diversity and mutuality. This development can most readily be seen in the explosion of movements against discrimination and against the division of the world into “haves” and “have-nots.” This emerging world view challenges most traditional ideologies which hold that people in one group (e.g., men, whites, Christians, Brahmins, heterosexuals) are better than and/or have a right to more than people in another group (e.g., women, people of color, non-Christians, “untouch- ables,” gays and lesbians). This ongo- ing shift is changing the way we see others and ourselves, and our views on education, our economic views, and our laws. VIEWS ON DEATH AND DYING 345-102-03 (3.0.3) We look at contemporary North American attitudes, and examine some ways in which people have tried to resolve the universal problem of death. We will also consider the consequences of the denial of death and the importance for the individual of coming to terms with his or her mortality. The course will seek to establish the various means by which people have come to terms with their own mortality. VIEWS ON ORDER AND FREEDOM 345-102-03 (3.0.3) The function of a world view is, in part, to describe how society is and/or should be organized. “Order” and “freedom” are two important concepts 143 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 144. in any such description. How can we achieve an “ordered” society? How much “freedom” should citizens have? Answers to these (and other) questions come from various political theories, many of which will be examined in this course. These include theories from Ancient Greece, the Renaissance, and the modern period. GLOBAL SOUTH (SOUTH ASIA AND IRAN) 345-102-03 (3.0.3) In this course we will look at diverse world views in different parts of South Asia and the Middle East. The objective of this course is to gain a better understanding of the cultural, social and political ideas in these parts of the 'global south.' In particular, we will look at the ideas and beliefs that have shaped the culture of these regions by examining their religions and customs. We will also look at the contemporary social and political situation in these regions. WAR AND PEACE IN THE MIDDLE EAST 345-102-03 (3.0.3) With the end of World War II and the creation of the state of Israel, the rela- tions between three of the world’s major religions – Christianity, Judaism and Islam – were thrown into conflict. The Arab Nation was broken into a number of nation-states which have developed in various ways from tenta- tive approaches toward westerniza- tion and democratic forms of government to the counter reactions of resurgent Islam. There have been a series of wars, some involving Israel and its neighbors, and many, mostly unrealized, peace proposals. The poli- tics of oil has magnified all the region- al conflicts into world issues. The course is about worldviews in conflict without resolution yet. WAR, PEACE AND WORLD ORDER 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course will provide students with an understanding of several views on global order. Students will critically analyze the realist world view, which sees competition, inequality and war as inherent features of our state sys- tem, and examine the implications of this perspective for world order. This world view will then be compared to a number of alternative perspectives, inspired by such sources as liberalism, pacifism, socialism, feminism, anar- chism and ecologism. Each world view will be examined according to a number of dimensions, including its core values and views on human nature, the fundamental cause(s) of war, and the possibilities for peace. WOMEN’S HUMAN RIGHTS 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course will look at the develop- ment of an international movement to advance women’s human rights over the past 20 years. Students will study the tensions and commonalities between approaches to the question of women’s human rights from the perspectives of various agents: femi- nist, women, NGO and human rights groups, national governments (particu- larly in Asia), and the United Nations. Is domestic violence a human rights issue? Are human rights a form of western imperialism masquerading as a universal? What assumptions are human rights based upon? How have women both interrogated and mobi- lized these concepts to advance their rights in various national, regional and international contexts? Can previously excluded groups such as lesbians effectively use human rights discourse to address their issues? Topics to be explored include: human rights, femi- nism, universalism, cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, anti-ethnocentrism, activism, global/local relations, and international networking. Emphasis will be on new anti-ethnocentric femi- nist approaches and the Asian context. THE WORLDS OF MUSIC 345-102-03 (3.0.3) The Worlds of Music will examine the music produced by different societies and groups as well as the ‘worlds’ cre- ated by music. Using musical case studies, students will learn to identify the key elements of a world view and the basic concepts that determine a society or group’s interactions with music. From societies where music is forbidden, to societies where it plays a central part in daily life, the course will begin by examining the complex relationship between music, sound and society. We will use case studies to look at how different social cultures incorporate music and music-making into an understanding of religion, defense, personal relationships, poli- tics, group identify and other aspects of social life. THE WIDE WORLD OF SPORTS 345-102-03 (3.0.3) This course will examine the sports culture of different societies and groups, and the significance of the growing influence of professional sport in North American society. Using case studies, students will learn to identify the key elements of a worldview, and the concepts that shape and define a society or group’s relationship with sport. From societies where sport par- ticipation is tied to national identity and pride, to places where it plays an “entertainment content” role in a cor- porate media conglomerate, we will examine the complex human relation- ships with sport. HUMANITIES: KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) A field of knowledge can be any serious body of knowledge relating to education, law, psychology, creativity, social behav- ior, or other disciplines. Humanities approaches each from an interdisciplinary perspective. CANADA'S DOCUMENTARY TRADITION 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Canada, through its National Film Board, has come to define the docu- mentary film. The Film Board's pur- pose has always been "to reflect Canada to Canadians and the rest of the world". CBC television continues the tradition of excellence with docu- mentary programming such as The Nature of Things and The Fifth Estate. This course will examine the history of documentary filmmaking and the non-fiction film tradition in this coun- try. We will analyze the intentions of documentary filmmakers and discuss the audio-visual techniques, approaches and styles they employ in telling their stories. THE CITY, SOCIETY AND THE ENVIRONMENT 345-103-04 (3.1.3) The city is one of the most important physical expressions of human society. How did cities begin? What makes a city work? These are some of the questions which will be explored in this course. The course will examine the modern city and some of its prob- lems in today's globalized world. It will compare the modern city with the liv- ing spaces of more traditional, indige- nous societies. In this course we will 144
  • 145. look at the relationship of the city to culture, environment, technology and energy. We will also explore new ways of imagining different kinds of com- munities which are more sustainable. COLONIZATION BY KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) In this course we will use written, electronic and audio-visual material to explore some of the important conditions for knowledge of others and ourselves. We will begin with definitions of human rights to deter- mine what basic rights we can claim: those which contribute to the pursuit of knowledge and truth universally. We will look at humans’ relationship to the environment, and how it has evolved to make certain types of knowledge nearly inaccessible and other types of knowledge, in certain contexts, nearly meaningless. We will look at who lays claim to knowledge, and for what purposes and at the evolution of “knowledge communi- ties” and people’s attempts to resist them. We’ll look at who chooses to “stay dumb” and why. COMMUNICATION: SELF & SOCIETY 345-103-04 (3.1.3) “I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.” What does it mean to communicate? What do you say after you say “Hello”? Why is it so dif- ficult to understand each other? Why do some people argue and fight all the time? If people use the same words, why do they mean different things? Just what is body language? Are first impressions really right? Is there such a thing as constructive criticism? What does it mean to listen? Didn’t you hear what I said? How many times do I have to tell you? What’s the matter, are you deaf? What’s the point of try- ing to talk to you? Doesn’t anyone understand me? Can I learn to com- municate more effectively? CURRENT EVENTS 345-103-04 (3.1.3) With satellite television and the Internet, the distinction between news makers and reporters often dis- appears. Truth is the first casualty of war and public relations the first har- binger of peace. Newspapers com- pete with television for versions of the sensational. Images determine elections. Sound bites control deci- sions. Polls influence what becomes public policy. How are we to know what is happening in our world, given the mix of fact and fiction, the plethora of docudramas and info- mercials, the varieties of propaganda and expert opinion? DOCUMENTING MYTHS: POLITICS OF CITIZENSHIP 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Documentary films engaging a variety of social and political issues have in recent years attracted enormous popu- lar attention and critical praise. In this course we explore how knowledge about the world and its inhabitants is produced, shared, contested, and dis- tributed across societies and national borders through the vehicle of docu- mentary film. By viewing a dozen or so documentaries we will address a num- ber of issues and responsibilities (the filmmakers' and ours) related to repre- sentation, ethics, citizenship, consump- tion, and social engagement. The aim of the course is to make us better- informed and equipped citizens in an increasingly complex and interconnect- ed global society. GENRE CINEMA AND IDEOLOGIES 345-103-04 (3.1.3) This course will examine the relation- ship between cinema and dominant ideologies as sources of knowledge for understanding our world. The course will be framed through the lens of genre cinema: the western, film noir, and horror. The individual films examined in the course will be critically appraised within their respective genres and also within the socio-political, cultural, and historical context in which they were made and viewed. As a sometimes controversial popular cinematic form, genre cine- ma offers a resonant frame through which to analyze conflicting ideolo- gies, social controversies, and debates on historical perspectives in the nine- teenth and twentieth centuries. KNOWING THE INNER SELF 345-103-04 (3.1.3) The twentieth century has seen an explosion of interest in human psy- chology and personal development, from the early investigations of Freud and Jung, through the “human devel- opment movement” of the sixties and seventies, to Alcoholics Anonymous and other self-help groups (e.g., incest survivors, cancer survivors, holocaust survivors). From individual and small group settings, these issues are now widely popularized in bestselling paperback books and on television programs such as the Oprah Winfrey Show. This course provides an overview of the dramatic change in understanding human nature. KNOWING THROUGH CREATIVE WORKS 345-103-04 (3.1.3) People from all societies explore and understand the world in part through creative works such as myths, fairy tales, novels and films. We will cover a number of recent creative works. The goal of the course is to comprehend the role of such works in our lives. A special emphasis will be how current social issues are dealt with in popular novels and films. We will be exploring: • what we learn about life through creative works; • how such knowing differs from and yet connects with other forms of knowing (through research, intu- ition, etc.) • how creative works have different functions at different times; and how people’s lives, ideas, and favourite creative works or fictional characters may be linked. KNOWING THROUGH MUSIC 345-103-04 (3.1.3) This course uses music to show how we create, acquire and process knowledge in different ways. Music is universal; it expresses emotion and symbolic content. All varieties of musical expression have a place in our society, and the course aims to include many of these expressions. Through attentive listening to music, reading, thinking, watching movies about, experiencing and discussing it, the student should emerge with a broader knowledge and appreciation of the phenomenon known as music. MASS MEDIA AND KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) This course is about the information the mass media provides to Canadians and the effect this has on 145 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 146. our ability to know and understand the world. More specifically, we will examine the limits and biases of cor- porate controlled mass media and how the mass media form, fashion and limit our knowledge of contem- porary social issues. In a word, we are going to work at “media literacy” in this course by helping students devel- op a critical and informed under- standing of mass media techniques, methods and content and how this constructs our knowledge of reality. MYTHS AS A SOURCE OF KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) The goal of this course will be to understand myth as a concept as well as to explore particular myths from a variety of historical and cultural con- texts with the aim of understanding how myths function as repositories and transmitters of knowledge. We will examine the function of myth in the formation of culture as well as in the individual’s search for meaning. We will investigate different theories, both ancient and contemporary, of myth interpretation with particular emphasis placed on the knowledge which is transmitted by myth. Finally we will examine the use and interpre- tation of myths in our own contem- porary context(s) in order to begin an exploration of what our own use and interpretation of myths can help us learn about ourselves. ON EDUCATION 345-103-04 (3.1.3) In this course we will examine the objectives and methods of education according to a variety of theories. We will identify the forces which con- tribute to the content (knowledge) of the educational process and the effects of this knowledge on the indi- vidual and society as a whole. It is important to uncover the assumptions about people and society embedded in these theories. Students will con- sider the role authority/power plays in determining education content and style as well as the influence of the learning environment on the educa- tion process. ORIENTALISM: WESTERN KNOWLEDGE OF THE EAST 345-103-04 (3.1.3) What comes to mind when you hear the word the Orient, or the Far East? This course examines the repertoire of images, concepts, and stereotypes that make up Western knowledge of the Far East, in particular China and Japan. At the same time it examines the socio-historical circumstances that led to the creation of such knowl- edge. Students will learn to identify Orientalist forms of knowledge in films and literary works. REEL HISTORY: HISTORY, FILM AND KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) This course will examine how feature films influence our understanding of historical events and personalities. We will explore how film-makers project their stories of the past through the medium of cinema and the impact of those films on our interpretation of history. REEL THEATRE: THEATRE, FILM AND KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) This course will examine how stage plays are adapted to the medium of cinema and the impact of those films on our appreciation and understand- ing of drama as a cultural reflection of society and the times. SCIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) This course will examine the scientific way of arriving at knowledge and consider whether scientific method is the best, (or even the only way) to know our world and ourselves. We will look at the main assumptions behind the scientific method; consid- er those assumptions in their historical context; and criticize their adequacy. SCIENCE, PSEUDOSCIENCE AND SUPERSTITION 345-103-04 (3.1.3) How can one distinguish between legitimate, reliable forms of knowl- edge, and exciting though deceptive claims? We will examine various claims that have been put forward in recent years and taken seriously by intelligent, educated people who have nevertheless fallen into traps and try to discover a path to critical thinking. KNOWLEDGE: SCOPE AND LIMITS 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Can we know anything? What can we know? How can we know it? Various historical theories of knowledge. Some contemporary beliefs and the assump- tions that underlie them. Elementary logic and probability theory. SELF-KNOWLEDGE THROUGH YOGA 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Knowledge is a tool with which one seeks to achieve something – under- standing, a sense of control, etc. It can be used and abused. Self-knowl- edge teaches people how to recog- nize how they use knowledge. We will assume that the purpose of knowledge is action: better, more productive, more harmonious, gain- ful, fulfilling action. With knowledge comes response-ability, the ability to answer for one’s actions, to explain them to oneself and put them into a larger context. In this course, students act on knowledge. Through the prac- tice of yoga, students will acquire new knowledge of self, along with the abil- ity to apply it productively. Some old knowledge will be accessed in a new way. Possibly the only way to talk about mind is through metaphor: paying minute attention to the work- ings of the body in yoga provides unparalleled metaphor. SEX AND SEXUALITY 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Sexual behaviour is fundamental to human existence, yet it remains shrouded in mystery to many people due to lack of knowledge and fear of indecency. What exactly is sex and sexuality? How is knowledge of sexu- ality and sexual relations determined and examined? What are some of the main sexual concerns for young adults and people worldwide? This course will examine the answers to these questions and more from various dis- ciplines and perspectives, with an emphasis on values, cross-cultural diversity, responsible sexual behaviour and self-awareness. SEXUAL STYLES, SEXUAL JOURNEYS 345-103-04 (3.1.3) This course provides an in-depth con- sideration of various modes-personal –philosophical, psychological, and sociological – of acquiring knowledge about the fundamental questions of human sexuality: Why do we behave sexually? How do we behave sexually? How should we behave sexually? The 146
  • 147. course will examine traditional approaches and current theories in exploring these questions. SHAPING THE FUTURE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Based on the work of Montreal philosopher Horst Hutter, this course focuses on five time-honoured strate- gies of self-overcoming: 1) periodic retreats into solitude for quiet reflec- tion; 2) the cultivation of challenging friendships; 3) proactive reading and introspective writing; 4) close atten- tion to “nutrition” (understood expan- sively to include food and drink as well as air, sound, and much else, including images—such as those viewed on the nightly news); and, 5) the physical—and perhaps metaphysi- cal—activity of dance. KNOWLEDGE, SHELTER 345-103-04 (3.1.3) What does “home” mean to you? What are the differences between “house” and “home”? This course explores the nature of human shelter from the Paleolithic period up to the present day in cultures all around the world. From the huts and farmhous- es of pre-urban cultures, to the luxury high-rises and tenements of contem- porary cities, we will examine a diverse array of architectural spaces that people call home. Issues to be discussed include social justice, disas- ter housing, environmental sustain- ability, and the new urbanism. SONIC TRUTHS 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Music from Thrash Metal to Mozart is a significant element in our under- standing of the world. People play and listen to music without really knowing what and how they are learning. This course aims to move beyond the charms of music and sub- mit it, and our relationship with it, to analysis. Sonic Truths will deal with the history of human music-making and its role in different societies. We will begin by examining contempo- rary popular music and the relation- ship between musical culture and social identity in Western society. We will also look at the making, market- ing and hearing of hit songs in twenti- eth-century North America. The course will examine four types of musical authority, social status and relationships between men and women. STUDIES IN VISUAL CULTURE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Visual Culture is a relatively new field of study which draws on ideas from cultural studies, art and art history, sociology and anthropology, among other disciplines. Visual Culture is a way of studying the contemporary or historical world through photographs, pictures, and images, rather than through texts and words. THE STRUGGLE OF IDEAS IN MODERN DRAMA 345-103-04 (3.1.3) In this course we will debate contrast- ing sociological schools of thought or ways of knowing in relationship to three great plays of modern drama: Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler, and George Bernard Shaw’s Major Barbara. In this course a variety of innovative teaching techniques will be used, including knowledge and inter- pretive gaming and improvisation. The teacher will spend time in the computer lab to help students with their writing to make sure students come to class with the best possible essays they can possibly produce. THINKING, LOGIC, AND KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) How knowledge is acquired, classified, communicated, and how it is and should be applied, with special empha- sis on the analysis of dialectical and for- mal logic in human thinking. The social context of knowledge: philosophy, eco- nomics, politics and culture. UNDERSTANDING WAR THROUGH FILM 345-103-04 (3.1.3) This course will examine how and what we learn about war through viewing feature films. How do we decipher fact from fiction in movies? How do filmmakers influence our imagination about the nature of war and our interpretation of specific wars? And how do we process that knowledge on the cognitive, emotion- al and subconscious levels? VISIONS OF THE MEDIA 345-103-04 (3.1.3) A course in Media Literacy which involves a critical analysis of the form, content, and function of both the print and electronic media in North America. This course attempts to create understanding of the enormous influ- ence of mass information, mass persua- sion, and mass culture in our society. THE WISDOM OF CUISINE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) This course will explore the various ways in which humans have learned to meet their nutritional needs while examining the role of smell and taste in our acquisition of knowledge. In the process, students will learn to rec- ognize, define, categorize and analyze culinary wisdom through an examina- tion of cuisines from societies around the world. Major historical develop- ments in agriculture, trade, cultural contacts and cuisines will be explored for their impact on our current under- standing, appreciation and consump- tion of food. WOMEN, POWER AND KNOWLEDGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) In this course we will learn to think critically about the production of knowledge about women in various contexts. This will involve exploring key concepts which influence how we think about women, such as: sex, gen- der, race, culture, age, ethnicity, and class. We will learn to examine our assumptions critically, but not blame- fully, by unearthing the sources of our knowledge (and blind spots) about women. We will ask questions which help us to understand how our knowl- edge is always only partial and often biased: who speaks, who listens, and who decides whose perspectives count? This will necessarily involve questioning our knowledge about men and masculinity as well. In partic- ular, this course will teach students how to find and listen to dissident voices which productively challenge our knowledge of what it means to be a woman or man in the world today. WOMEN AND WAR 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Our knowledge about war has been shaped for centuries by men's experi- ences; in fact, war in most cultures has been seen as the quintessentially male activity. Women's participation and support for war have been largely ignored, and women have long been linked more with peace than war. This course will examine recent 147 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 148. research which focuses on women's experiences and questions the con- struction, use, and validity of these deeply-rooted beliefs that link men to war and women to peace. This study will demonstrate how our knowledge is often biased, partial and rooted in a social context, and provide students with a more complete understanding of the problem of war and of the role that women's studies has played in expand- ing and reshaping our knowledge. WORKING IN CANADA 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Work will probably occupy close to a third of most of our adult lives. There’s very little else that any of us will do that so centrally affects our choices about such key issues as where and how we live, what we value and what we can and cannot do as individuals and with others. What kind of work do you want when you graduate? How much money do you expect to earn? What kind of boss do you want? Do you want to be the boss? Do you need a union? What do you need to realize your dream career in life? Given the evolution and transforma- tion of work in this country, can these dreams be realized? These are the kind of questions we’ll be asking in this course. How do your answers fit into the reality of working in Canada? In sum, through a better knowledge and understanding of work in Canada we will develop a richer sense of our- selves and the country we are building for ourselves and future generations. WORLD MUSIC IN THE GLOBAL VILLAGE 345-103-04 (3.1.3) Unlike generic musical terms such as traditional, folk or popular, “World Music” must be rooted in strong eth- nic elements. The term “world music” first entered the commercial marketplace in the 1980’s, initially referring to sounds recordings that fused Western popular music with indigenous music from around the world. Since the 1990’s, new tech- nologies have made the recording and distribution of indigenous ethnic music far more accessible, and musi- cian-performers have increasingly been in demand to tour with their original material, thus, the popularity of world music has soared. The study of world music offers insight into both the cultural mosaics of distinctive societies as well as some of the cultur- al conflicts inherent in this era of increasing globalization. BLOCK B COURSES HUMANITIES: ETHICAL ISSUES Students at John Abbott College normally take their Ethical Issues B-Block course after completion of their two A-Block Humanities courses. The B-Block courses build on the concepts and skills devel- oped in the earlier courses. All of these sections deal with ethical issues and aim at aiding the student in making connec- tions between these issues and his/her pro- gram of studies. These courses allow stu- dents to develop the skills needed to apply critical thinking to the values asso- ciated with diverse issues they will face at university, at work or in daily life. ISSUES FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY 345-DBU-03 ETHICS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 345-DBU-03 (3.0.3) Different sources of ethical guidelines for behaviour – including religion, philosophy, and the social sciences – are examined in order to discover whether there is any basis for univer- sal morals, or whether it all depends on culture or personal choice. Current social issues will be explored through group debates. ETHICS IN FICTION 345-DBU-03 (3.0.3) This course explores the ways ethical issues such as pollution, technology, and personal responsibility are pre- sented in works of fiction from Greek myth and drama to contemporary novels and plays. ETHICS OF TRAVEL 345-DBU-03 (3.0.3) This course will examine some impor- tant ethical issues related to travel. These include: the financial, cultural and ecological implications of travel and tourism. In all countries of the world we can find issues of rights vio- lations whether of humans, animals or the environment. Should we give weight to these issues as we plan our vacations and trips from home? How can we travel more ethically? Should we want to travel more ethically? The course aims to make students aware of these ethical issues and to provide appropriate analytical tools, as well as to allow them the opportunity to con- sider and debate such questions. MORAL CONTROVERSIES IN SOCIETY 345-DBU-03 (3.0.3) The purpose of this course is to improve the student’s ability to assess controversial moral issues in contem- porary society in order to arrive at informed, well-founded and strongly- supported positions relating to them. Students will be required to construct sound arguments in defense of the conclusions they reach, as well as to communicate their points of view effectively. Subjects for critical exami- nation will include persistent social issues like abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, and freedom of speech, as well as more recent moral dilem- mas like reproductive technologies, drug testing, consumption patterns, world hunger, and population growth. PREJUDICE 345-DBU-03 (3.0.3) This course examines some of the psychological, social, and political effects of prejudice on the lives of people judged as undesirable in any society. Using contemporary and his- torical examples of oppresion, the stu- dent will examine how prejudice functions to normalize distorted facts and opinions even in people of good will. While personally opposed to prejudice, an individual may enjoy economic and cultural privilege as a member of a dominant group. The social implications of these ethical issues as well as the benefits of diverse points of view and knowledge available in integrated or multicultural societies will also be explored. ETHICS AND AESTHETICS 345-DBW-03 DEBATING ETHICAL ISSUES IN DRAMA 345-DBW-03 (3.0.3) Using Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, and Rolf Hochhuth’s The 148
  • 149. Deputy, we will be debating the follow- ing ethical issues: freedom of speech, sexual discrimination, and the responsi- bility of the individual to take a princi- pled position in cases of war and oppression. In this course the classroom itself will become a kind of theatre as students act out the various conflicting ethical positions that emerge from these works of drama. IMAGE ETHICS 345-DBW-03 (3.0.3) This course will examine images and ethics. Students will be introduced to issues such as: ethical behaviour on the part of creators or visual media; public perception of a lack of ethics in photography, films, tv and advertising. Students will learn to assess what is artistic and editorial freedom while considering the rights of subjects – questions of consent, infringement of privacy and objectivity within the doc- umentary film form. Problems of mis- representation, particularly as it affects minority communities and women in fiction films, will be explored. VALUES AND THE ARTS 345-DBW-03 (3.0.3) Modernists desired to cast aside tradi- tion in favour of the creation of the new and uncorrupted. Post-mod- ernists claim that project has col- lapsed in our endlessly contemporary culture. By means of images from the visual arts of the last two hundred years, we will examine modernist aims to reevaluated art, society and life itself, and look at postmodern cul- ture: art ‘after the end of art’. SOCIAL ISSUES 345-DBX-03 ANIMALS AND SOCIETY 345-DBX-03 (3.0.3) This course investigates the many relationships between human beings and animals. We use animals as household pets and care for them in shelters, but also control them in dis- turbing fashion in factory farms, labo- ratory experiments, and entertainment centers (such as zoos and circuses). How ethical, then, is our treatment of animals? Are we at all justified in using animals to serve our (human) interests? We pursue these questions critically, reflecting throughout on the notion of equality between humans and animals. CURRENT ETHICAL ISSUES 345-DBX-03 (3.0.3) The subject matter of this course varies according to student interest from areas such as: racism, pollution, sex and society, drugs, the future of Quebec, the relationship between law and morality, etc. The course is designed to give the student a basis for the normative analysis of various ethical issues. It aims to arouse aware- ness, to challenge the intellect and imagination of the student in reading and thinking about various ethical issues in contemporary society. ETHICAL QUESTIONS ON RACISM 345-DBX-03 (3.0.3) What is ‘racism’? What makes an action ‘racist’? This course examines these questions by looking at how racism has manifested in our society. In particular, we will discuss various historical cases of racial oppression in Canada. We will subsequently use that understanding to consider some contemporary questions and contro- versies regarding racism. GODS, MONSTERS, AND STRANGERS 345-DBX-03 (3.0.3) What are monsters? What do they show (monstrare) the world? How have monsters been constructed in history and how are they being defined today? This course will criti- cally engage the history of monsters in myths, religious texts, and non-reli- gious traditions as a means to exam- ine the construction of “otherness” in the contemporary world. What do monsters tells us about the ethical stances often taken in relation to oth- ers, or strangers? Do monsters make us secure the system of boundaries that surround us? Religious texts often demonize monsters as a threat to rigid boundaries. Yet some texts deify the monster as a revelation of the holy. At other times, the monster is both demonized and deified, showing a deep ambivalence about the place of monsters and “otherness” in the world. LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP 345-DBX-03 (3.0.3) What do you love? Why? How does this love manifest itself in your thoughts, words, and deeds? What does it mean to say that someone is your friend? What does that bond entail? Are there different kinds of love and friendship? What are they? What distinguishes them from one another? Human beings have been asking questions of this kind for thousands of years. This course is an introduction to some of these time- less questions. But it is also a survey of the historically-specific answers. This course is meant to be a general introduction to the field of ethics, centering upon the West’s centuries- old preoccupation with love and friendship. ME, YOU AND US: THE ETHICS OF HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS 345-DBX-03 (3.0.3) When confronted with an issue in a relationship, what factors do you consider? What is the weight of your own needs when considering a course of action? What about the needs of others? By drawing on ethi- cal principles from Eastern and Western philosophies, this course will examine ethical issues that arise in many types of human interaction, such as the relationship with one’s own self, romantic partners, family members, friends and society. MEDIA MESSAGES AND SOCIAL ISSUES 345-DBX-03 (3.0.3) This course provides the opportunity to examine the relationships between social issues and the mass media. Students will explore television, film, advertising, music, news, and popular culture to see how media representa- tions shape our global culture through their constructed realities, and will also assess the impact of converging communications and entertainment technologies. Critical perspectives gained in this course will lead stu- dents to the goal of media literacy. Methodology includes short lectures, video, films, and media analysis dis- cussions. SOCIAL ISSUES: PEACE SEMINAR 345-DBX-03 (3.0.3) This course gives students a forum to bring together their understanding of peace in an integrative manner. The course will be divided into modules, including: literature and philosophy; globalization, cultural colonization 149 GENERALEDUCATION
  • 150. and marketing; history and politics of current wars. Priority for this course will be given to Peace Studies stu- dents, with remaining places open to students not pursuing the peace stud- ies certificate. SOCIAL ISSUES THROUGH LITERATURE 345-DBX-03 (3.0.3) Literature can help us focus on the elements and consequences of some of the social issues which dominate our world. By examining the plot, characters, and attitudes revealed in the assigned texts, we will look at soci- etal attitudes towards race, war and violence, health and health care, gov- ernmental intervention in private lives, and the extent and nature of individ- ual responsibility towards others. SCIENCE AND SOCIETY 345-DBY-03 BIOETHICS 345-DBY-03 (3.0.3) Bioethics is a rapidly-evolving, dynamic field, concerned with issues, conflicts and controversies about how we should treat living beings. Among the issues discussed will be: ethics and scientific research; ethics and health care; allocation of scarce resources; fundamental rights; legal rights; conflicts of interest; conflicts of values; conflicts between cultural viewpoints; autonomy versus pater- nalism; conflicts between rights; con- flict between obligations; the search for universal ethical principles in this field; whether health care or scientific research should be run as businesses; the impact of bioethics on the indi- vidual and society as a whole. CRITICAL THINKING FOR THE NEW MILLENNIUM: ETHICAL ISSUES IN SCIENCE 345-DBY-03 (3.0.3) Critical thinkers reflect on and ana- lyze their thinking; curiosity and cre- ativity accompany critical thinkers who, while paying attention to others’ opinions, discover their own path. Throughout the semester students will work on becoming aware of and improving their thinking, reading and writing skills. Simultaneously, and using these developing skills, we shall examine several different ethical issues presented in science and scien- tific endeavours, covering a wide vari- ety of topics from the use of animals in science; techniques and funding of research; and bioethical issues like reproductive technology and gene research. ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS 345-DBY-03 (3.0.3) For over a century now, our attempts at mastering nature have caused extensive pollution, resource deple- tion, and suffering for countless human and non-human beings. Is there something fundamentally wrong with "the system" (our values, institu- tions, technologies)? We examine this question critically by tracing the evo- lution of anthropocentrism (or "human-centeredness") and docu- menting some of its most problemati- cal expressions, such as the development of military technologies and economic globalization. Topics may also include animal rights, the growth of cities, the security of the food supply, and challenges to main- stream medicine. Throughout, we seek to determine how rightful it is to use nature for human projects. ETHICS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 345-DBY-03 (3.0.3) Science and technology are not neu- tral forces in society. By seeking to understand and control nature, they offer hopes of progress and freedom for the average citizen. However, they also pose serious ethical dilemmas or problems, affecting the rights of human and non-human beings. This course will: discuss the values of sci- ence; describe the relationship between science, technology, and economic /political power; and iden- tify the various ethical problems asso- ciated with scientific research and techno-logical development. We will explore the issues conceptually, his- torically, and through several case studies (energy, military production, medical practice and genetic engi- neering, agriculture, the space pro- gram, computers). SCIENCE AND SPIRIT 345-DBY-03 (3.0.3) In this course we explore the moral and ethical implications of one of the greatest puzzles of our time: Can sci- ence and spirit coexist or are they mutually exclusive; compatible or contradictory? We will initially review and assess more traditional models that leaders in the fields of science and philosophy espouse about this important yet divisive dilemma. With that background we will then examine some of the new works and theories by current scientists and philosophers, PhDs in physics and genetics, experts in quantum theory and mathematics, renowned scholars and mystics, best- selling authors, and award-winning international think-tanks and founda- tions that champion avant-garde inter- pretations and cutting-edge paradigms. Throughout the semester we will analyze how these various positions on this age old question raise ethical choices in the new millennium. THE SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS 345-DBY-03 (3.0.3) This course was developed by JAC students to provide meaningful work and course credit for over-extended but under-engaged students to research, produce, contest and apply knowledge and codes of ethics in a practical campus sustainability proj- ect. We ask, “How do College deci- sions about what we learn and how we interact with the environment (programs and purchasing, hiring and firing, governance and garbage) affect the broader human and species com- munities in Montréal, Canada, and our planet as a whole? What are the impacts of our career paths and lifestyles upon our environment, com- munity, and conscience? Our chal- lenge is then to devise and implement concrete measures on campus to transform the nature of our relation- ship to the natural world, our com- munity, and our economy. THE SCIENTIST, SOCIAL ISSUES, AND DRAMATIC LICENSE 345-DBY-03 (3.0.3) Scientists have been socially con- structed to be moral giants and base demons, the saviors of the world and the world’s nemesis, while dramatists have imaginatively created the per- sona of scientists to serve their own political purposes. This course will explore the moral ambiguities sur- rounding the role of the scientist. Using three plays, Galileo, Copenhagen, and An Enemy of the People, we will explore the interface between science and drama and the social issue debates that result from that interaction. 150
  • 151. PHYSICAL EDUCATION Students are required to successfully complete three Physical Education courses: 109-103, 109-104 and 109-105. Courses 103 and 104 are prerequisites for 105 and may be taken in any order. GENERAL INFORMATION 151 STUDENT EVALUATION: Each course is evaluated in the following manner: 100% competency based. Individual instructor’s interpretations of this gen- eral guideline may vary. Precise breakdowns appear in the course outline distributed during the first class. COURSE EVALUATIONS: The Physical Education Department incorporates student evaluation com- ponents into all course offerings. This feedback plays an important role in helping improve the curriculum and quality of instruction. MEDICAL EVALUATIONS: At the start of each semester, students in Physical Education classes are required to complete a medical ques- tionnaire. These questionnaires help instructors become aware of any medical situations that may potential- ly arise. MEDICAL PROBLEMS / LEARNING DISABILITIES: All students must take a Physical Education course. Questions concern- ing medical problems, unique disabil- ities or specialized courses should be directed to an academic advisor or the Chair of Physical Education. RESOURCE CENTRE: Resource materials and the expertise of faculty members are available to students in the P.E. Resource Centre, C-114D. Website address: www.johnabbott.qc.ca/physed FFIIRRSSTT CCLLAASSSS OOFF EEAACCHH SSEEMMEESSTTEERR:: Students must come to their first Physical Education class of each semester fully prepared to actively participate. Requirements for each acategory of activity are listed below. PPhhyyssiiccaall EEdduuccaattiioonn ccoouurrsseess aarree ooffffeerreedd iinn tthhee ffoolllloowwiinngg ccaatteeggoorriieess AQUATICS • Bathing suit and towel required • Goggles strongly recommended • Deep end swimming ability recommended for all courses • All courses are co-educational DANCE • Appropriate dance wear strongly rec- ommended • All courses are co-educational FITNESS & WEIGHT TRAINING • Certain courses are held off-campus, e.g., Spinning. Students must provide their own transportation. • Some courses require outdoor partic- ipation – e.g., jogging • Fitness tests administered in fitness courses • All courses are co-educational OUTDOOR EDUCATION • Some courses are compressed, i.e., minimum 8 classes + 1 or 2 weekends • Swimming ability is required for some courses • A swimming test will be administered for any course with activity(s) involving water • A fitness test may be administered for some courses • Students may be required to provide or rent equipment for some courses • Travel fee for all outdoor education courses • All courses are co-educational RACQUET SPORTS • Students must provide their own squash eyeguards and squash ball (available for rent/purchase at Casgrain Equipment Desk) • All courses are co-educational INDIVIDUAL/TEAM SPORTS • Certain courses are held off-campus, e.g., Curling at Baie d’Urfé Curling Club. Students must provide their own transportation. • All courses are co-educational GENERALEDUCATION
  • 152. COURSE INFORMATION CCoouurrsseess 110099--110033 aanndd 110099--110044 mmaayy bbee ttaakkeenn iinn eeiitthheerr oorrddeerr,, bbuutt bbootthh mmuusstt bbee ttaakkeenn bbeeffoorree ccoouurrssee 110099--110055.. 152 LIFESTYLE 109-103-02 (1.1.1) Physical Education courses teach students to become more responsible for their own health and wellness. In course 109-103, students examine the relationship between various lifestyle behaviours and health. Through physical activity, students learn the effect exercise has on their physical and mental well-being, and through experimentation with different activities, they can identify those activities which best suit their personal abilities, interests and needs. Examples of 109-103 course offerings: AQUATICS Swim Activities FITNESS Circuit Training Fitness Conditioning Mind Body Fitness Dance INDIVIDUAL SPORTS Archery / Fitness Martial Arts OUTDOOR ED. Introduction to Outdoor Education RACQUETS Squash/Racquetball/Badminton TEAM SPORTS Team Sports ACTIVE LIVING 109-105 (1.1.1) P: 109-103-02 & 109-104-02 Courses 103 and 104 are prerequisites for course 109-105, which is an extension and amalgamation of both. Students learn to plan, practice and evaluate activities in a health perspective. They plan and execute their own programs and practice with- in the context of the realities of their lives. At the completion of this course, students have the necessary tools to take control of their healthy and active futures. Examples of 109-105 course offerings: AQUATICS Individual Swim Program FITNESS Step Workout Individual Fitness Programs Mind Body Fitness Spinning Core Strength Training Dance INDIVIDUAL SPORTS Golf Martial Arts OUTDOOR EDUCATION Bicycle Camping Canoe Camping Canoe / Kayak Camping Mountain Hiking and Camping Urban Outdoor Activities Outdoor Survival RACQUETS Squash Badminton Tennis TEAM SPORTS Curling Team Sports Volleyball Soccer Basketball ACTIVITY 109-104-02 (0.2.1) Course 109-104 requires students to set personal objectives or goals specific to their chosen activity and to later evaluate their attainment of these goals. Throughout the semester, students evaluate their skills and identify any difficulties they encounter. Students learn to respect the rules and safety procedures specific to their chosen activity. Examples of 109-104 course offerings: AQUATICS Swim Conditioning FITNESS Pilates Yoga Jogging Dance INDIVIDUAL SPORTS Golf Martial Arts OUTDOOR EDUCATION Alpine Skiing Kayaking Snowboarding Cross Country Skiing Orienteering Rock Climbing Winter Camping Mountain Biking ECO Camping Paddling Skills RACQUETS Badminton Squash Tennis TEAM SPORTS Basketball Curling Soccer Volleyball Visit www.johnabbott.qc.ca/physed for more info. Visit www.johnabbott.qc.ca/physed for more info. Visit www.johnabbott.qc.ca/physed for more info.
  • 153. COMPLEMENTARY COURSES Complementary courses provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration and are offered in five areas: Social Science, Science and Technology, Foreign Languages, Mathematics and Computer Science, Arts & Aesthetics. Students must take two complementary courses as part of their General Education requirement. The following complementary courses are offered at John Abbott College but not all of them are offered each semester. Students are advised to check the complementary section of the Schedule of Classes each semester for course offerings. 153 COMPLEMENTARY RULES DOMAIN 01 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DOMAIN 02 MATHEMATICS DOMAIN 03 SOCIAL SCIENCES DOMAIN 04 COMPUTER SCIENCES DOMAIN 05 ARTS AND AESTHETICS DOMAIN 06 FOREIGN LANGUAGES • Students are encouraged to select courses from subjects that are outside their program of study. • Note the program restrictions on each complementary course listed in the schedule of classes. • All programs, except Liberal Arts, require students to take two courses totalling four credits, from two different ensembles within the Domains. • Each ensemble has a different competency. • It is possible to take two of the same ensembles as long as they are from two different Domains. Example 1: A Social Science student can select “Introduction to Computers” (Ensemble 1) in the Science Domain and “Intro to Programming” (Ensemble 2) in the Science Domain as they are in two different ensembles. Example 2: A Social Science student can select “Introduction to Computers” (Ensemble 1) in the Science Domain and “Spanish 1” (Ensemble 1) in the Foreign Language Domain as they are in two different Domains. COMPLEMENTARYCOURSES
  • 154. ANTHROPOLOGY FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY 381-DBE-AB (3.0.3) Forensic Anthropology is an applied field of Anthropology directed at the recovery, identification, and evalua- tion of human remains in a criminal context. As a complementary, this course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the scientific perspective of Anthropology and its application to forensic technology. The course is focussed on Anthropology’s “Holistic Perspective” in understanding questions of death and disposal (taphonomy) and identi- fication of individuals from skeletal remains (forensic osteology) and involves hands-on experience in assessing actual skeletal remains. The course will be of practical value to students considering a career in Forensic Science, Archaeology, Physical Anthropology, Police Sciences, Criminology, and Law and of general interest to any student who wishes to learn about the forensic sci- ences. BIOLOGY BIOLOGY OF SEX 101-DAA-03 (2.1.3) A Biology complementary course for non-science students which examines reproduction in humans as well as other organisms. Topics covered include the evolution- ary significance of sex, embryology, anatomy and physiology of the repro- ductive system, nervous and endocrine regulation of sexual behav- iour, conception, pregnancy, birth, lactation, contraception, abortion, and sterilization. Some of the new technological developments for genet- ic manipulation and fertility will be studied. The material is taught through lectures and A/V presenta- tions. Some lab demonstrations may be included. This course may be taken as part of the Women’s Studies and Gender Relations Certificate. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY 101-DAB-03 (2.1.3) This Biology complementary course for non-science students should be of interest to all students who are con- cerned about the environment and man’s impact on the environment. This course will look at the relation- ships between science and technolo- gy and will focus on environmental challenges arising from recent scientif- ic and technological discoveries. This course will include an introduc- tion to the basic principles of Ecology including ecosystems, energy transfor- mations, communities and popula- tions. These principles will then be applied to the study of some of the critical environmental problems facing man today such as air and water pol- lution, global warming, damage to the ozone layer, human population growth, and ecotoxicology. This course may be taken as part of the Environmental Studies Certificate. BUSINESS BASICS OF BUSINESS 401-DAA-03 (3.0.3) This course is designed to introduce students to the primary functional areas of business study, including Management, Marketing, Accounting, Finance and Law. Students acquire an extensive knowledge of business terms and concepts as well as the analytical and decision-making skills needed for any future business courses. CERAMICS INTRODUCTION TO HANDBUILT CERAMICS 570-DBA-03 (1.2.3) This course introduces students to basic ceramics techniques, including traditional construction methods (pinching, coiling and slab building), decoration, glazing and the firing of objects. The emphasis is on individual practical work, supplemented by instructor lectures and demonstra- tions. INTRODUCTION TO THROWING ON THE POTTER’S WHEEL 570-DBB-03 (1.2.3) This course introduces basic ceramics techniques, throwing on the potter’s wheel, decoration, glazing and firing, and emphasizes individual practical work, supplemented by instructor lec- tures and demonstrations. CHEMISTRY CLIMATE CHANGE FROM SNOWBALL EARTH TO GLOBAL WARMING 202-DAC-AB (3.0.3) This course is not so much a chem- istry course per se, but rather an earth science course that uses notions of physics, geology, chemistry and biolo- gy to look at our planet’s changing cli- mate. Climate change is a hot topic these days, with global warming rear- ing its ugly head. Did you know that Earth’s climate has been evolving con- stantly and naturally for millions of years? Were you aware that climate has been known to change over the course of a human lifetime without human influence? Did you know that qualifying carbon dioxide as a ‘toxic gas’ is largely a fallacy? Or that we are facing the prospect of a new ice age within just a few hundred years, either man-made or natural? This course starts with an introduction detailing global circulation and the basics of climate before moving on to take a look at climates of the past. It then covers atmospheric pollution and finishes with a study of the cur- rent global warming issue. CHEMISTRY OF SEX 202-DAB-03 (3.0.3) This course deals with some of the current issues involved in sex hor- mone chemistry and therapy, pheromones and the chemistry of sex attraction. It examines the link between structure, chemistry and physiological effect of the major male and female sex hormones, and dis- cusses the scientific basis of pregnan- cy testing, oral contraceptives (i.e. the “pill”), the “morning after” pill, and the treatment of female and male infertility. The pros and cons of taking synthetic estrogens, progestins and anabolic steroids are also examined. Pheromones and the chemistry of sex attraction in insects are investigated along with potential applications of pheromone based pest control. Also, evidence pointing to the existence of human pheromones and their possi- ble role in human sexual attraction is examined. 154
  • 155. CHEMISTRY OF WINEMAKING AND BEER BREWING 202-DBA-03 (1.2.3) The techniques of winemaking and beer brewing are presented in this course from a chemical perspective. The chemistry of fermentation is examined against a backdrop of wine and beer culture, including the history of wine and beer, the cultivation of grapes, and modern scientific wine- making and beer brewing practices. The scientific approach will be further explored in a laboratory setting, in which students will experimentally determine characteristic features of wine and beer such as acidity, sulphur levels, and alcohol content. A three step tasting protocol will be intro- duced to allow for critical evaluation of different wines and beers. A batch each of wine and beer will be assem- bled and made in class, and students will have the opportunity to repeat the process at home, effectively put- ting into practice what they are learn- ing in the classroom. CHEMISTRY OF CRIME 202-DBC-03 (2.1.3) This course takes an in-depth look at how the modern sleuth uses a wide array of scientific techniques to solve crime. Students will get to play detec- tive and investigate some well-publi- cized cases. COMPUTER SCIENCE ENHANCING YOUR COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE 420-DAB-AB (1.2.3) This course will enhance your com- puter knowledge by covering key con- cepts and developing your knowledge of today’s popular software. It will explore contemporary software such as file management, word processing, presentation graphics, and spread- sheets. General computer concepts will help students assess and deter- mine their needs in home computing. INTRODUCTION TO E- COMMERCE 420-DAC-AB (2.1.3) This course will encourage students to consider the place, role and evolution of the basic principles of E-Commerce in our society and to characterize its different uses. Topics covered will include, understanding E-Commerce, building an income generating web- site, traffic building techniques, and E- Commerce security concerns. INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING WITH VISUAL BASIC 420-DBA-03 (1.2.3) A hands-on course in Visual Basic programming. In this course the stu- dent will learn how Visual Basic can be used to build small programs that run on a Windows PC. Topics include an introduction to the Visual Basic integrated development envi- ronment, the Visual basic program- ming language, building error free Windows applications with forms, controls, properties and event proce- dures. This course assumes that the student knows how to work with the Windows graphical user interface and can use Windows Explorer to manip- ulate folders and files. INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING WITH VISUAL C++ 420-DBF-03 (1.2.3) This course introduces structured and disciplined approaches to computer programming and problem solving to solve everyday computing problems. In this course, the C++ programming language forms the basis for the study and implementation of computer algorithms and for the development of structured programming techniques. Topics include, an introduction to the Visual C++ Integrated Development Environment (IDE), basic C++ lan- guage syntax, structured programming principles, and the debugging and testing of code using the Visual C++ IDE. This course assumes that the stu- dent knows how to work with the Windows graphical interface, and can use Windows Explorer to manipulate files and folders. GRAPHICS PROGRAMMING USING FLASH 420-DBH-AB (1.2.3) This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of graphics pro- gramming. Students will learn about programming and use Macromedia Flash to create various types of graph- ics and games. The student will learn about sound, motion, tweens, and ActionScript programming. As well, each student will create a website that includes their work. ENGINEERING IT IS ROCKET SCIENCE 244-DBB-AB (1.2.3) This course provides an exciting intro- duction to the fascinating world of rocket science, undoubtedly one of humanity’s foremost technological achievements. Perceived to be exceedingly complex, and beyond the capabilities of all but the most gifted scientists and engineers, this course will demonstrate that its fundamentals are within the grasp of all who are interested. Science, mathematics and the art of flight, will come to life with the building and launching of model rockets. No previous scientific or mathematical background is required, only an interest in understanding what Rocket Science is really all about! FINE ARTS INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING 511-DBA-03 (1.2.3) This preparatory course will touch upon the major aspects of printmaking processes. Students will integrate pic- torial experiences in painting and drawing, and apply these various facilities to basic printmaking meth- ods. Emphasis will be on individual and practical use of media. Students will share their insights with others in a group setting. INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING 511-DBB-03 (1.2.3) This introductory course examines drawing as a means of visual expres- sion that encompasses the processes of seeing, thinking, making and com- municating. Students learn about the expressive elements of drawing and explore a variety of media such as pencil, charcoal, ink and collage. Emphasis is placed on the observa- tional aspects of drawing as well as the acquisition of fundamental draw- ing skills. In this hands-on course drawing is approached as a skill that can be learned and no previous drawing experience is required. INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING 511-DBC-03 (1.2.3) This course is about discovering what makes a painting. It will provide stu- dents with an introductory foundation to the fundamentals of making a 155 COMPLEMENTARYCOURSES
  • 156. painting. Students will apply what they learn to a number of in-class assignments, and to different kinds of picture making: still lives, landscapes, etc... The main objective is for each student to gain a working understand- ing as to what a painting is and what potential it may hold in store for them. INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL LITERACY 511-DBE-03 (1.2.3) Based on the idea that visual images are a language, this course introduces students to basic elements and mech- anisms of visual language by explor- ing and comparing its use in different communication contexts. The course goals are pursued in the Digital Media Computer Lab employing vari- ous computer graphic programs. FOREIGN LANGUAGES At John Abbott College students have a choice as complementary courses to study the following Foreign Languages: German, Italian, Mandarin, and Spanish. These language courses are primarily offered at Beginners level, though stu- dents who have studied at least two years of the language in High School, or are native of that language are strongly encouraged to enroll in higher levels. Descriptions of the advanced lan- guage courses are listed under the Creative Arts, Literature and Languages Program p. (51) Note: Language courses Level III and Level IV are offered only in the winter semester. *Please contact an Academic Advisor or the Chair of the Foreign Languages department for further information. GERMAN I 609-DAA-03 (3.0.3) This course is designed for students who have no knowledge of the German language. It focuses on the acquisition of the basic grammatical structures within the context of every- day activities related to student’s immediate environment. The devel- opment of the acquisition of the lan- guage will include four proficiencies: aural and written comprehension; oral and written expression. ITALIAN I 608-DAA-03 (3.0.3) In order to give maximum exposure to the language, the course will be conducted in Italian. The course is designed for students with no previ- ous knowledge of Italian. The aim of the course is to develop basic oral expression, listening com- prehension and elementary reading and writing skills. Students will acquire fundamental grammar structures and vocabulary and learn communicative skills for simple everyday situations. Students will also develop awareness and understanding of the cultural con- text of the Italian language. MANDARIN I 613-DAA-AB/01 (3.0.3) Mandarin I is designed to introduce students to the language, as well as to provide insights into the life and cul- ture of China. Students will begin to de-mystifying the Chinese language by learning the Mandarin phonetics, some characters, and simple sentence structures. Upon completion of the course, students will acquire basic communication skills to hold simple conversations, and be able to read and write short texts. This course is intended for students who have no knowledge of the language or any Chinese dialect. SPANISH I 607-DAA-03 (3.0.3) The primary aim of the Spanish disci- pline is for the student to develop flu- ency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and to appreciate its cultural diversity. This course is for students with no previous knowledge of Spanish. This level I course focuses on the acquisi- tion of the basic grammatical struc- tures of the language while emphasizing the development of aural and reading comprehension as well as oral and written expression. SPANISH II 607-DBA-03 (3.0.3) Prerequisite for this course is Spanish I (607-DAA-03). However, students that have studied Spanish for at least two years in High School may register for Spanish II. This course emphasizes writing, vocabulary acquisition, and the study of more complex grammatical struc- tures. Conversation, group activities, and projects are emphasized. MUSIC MUSICAL LITERATURE: A HISTORY OF AFRO-AMERICAN INFLUENCED ROCK MUSIC 550-DAB-03 (3.0.3) “From the Blues to the Beatles and beyond … ” This course is an ethno- musicological survey of the roots and development of Black influenced Music in North America. This course is designed to develop musical apprecia- tion, perception and awareness and will acquaint the student with various forms of Afro-American Popular Music, performance styles and their influence on rock music in general. Special emphasis will be placed on listening and aural analysis – being able to rec- ognize characteristics in the music studied – by means of recordings, videos and live performances as well as classroom lecture-demonstrations. MUSIC OF OUR TIME 550-DAC-AB (2.1.3) This general music history survey course is designed primarily to bring students along the road to being knowledgeable music lovers. Much of the content will reflect the realiza- tion that the musical system of Western Europe and the Americas is of great importance, but that it is also one of several among the civilizations of the world. While emphasis is placed on the mainstream of Western tradition of the 20th and 21st Centuries, all important develop- ments will be discussed, including attention to popular styles of music – blues, country, film, folk, jazz, latin, musical theatre, pop, rock, swing, traditional, world and many others. A HISTORICAL SURVEY OF WESTERN ART MUSIC 550-DAA-03 (3.0.3) This general survey course of Western art music will demonstrate how music, growing out of its own past, has shaped its own develop- ment. The course will begin with early developments during Antiquity and proceed chronologically through the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and 20th Century eras and conclude with current trends in the arts, specifically related to music. Emphasis will be placed on developing appropriate aural skills for informed listening. 156
  • 157. NUTRITION DIET, WEIGHT & DISEASES 120-DAB-03 (3.0.3) Diet, Weight, and Diseases is based on the premise that by understanding the relationship between degenerative diseases (such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases) and lifestyle choices, one could identify one’s risk factors and ultimately pre- vent the development of these dis- eases. This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills needed in order to 1) characterize health, diseases and dietary behav- iour; 2) illustrate how nutrition relates to health and diseases; 3) explain the aetiology of the diseases and the dif- ferent stages of their development; & 4) deduce the various dietary recom- mendations and practices arising from the established links between diet and diseases. NUTRITION TODAY 120-DBA-03 (1.2.3) In our society, consumers regularly face conflicting information on food, nutrition, health and many other nutrition-related topics. Our society’s quick-fix mentality, profit-making atti- tude, and market-based economy constantly generate controversy, par- ticularly over nutrition and health. These controversies flourish in both the scientific and non-scientific fields. How do we make sense of contem- porary issues such as genetically mod- ified foods, chemically altered foods, unregulated herbal products, environ- mentally-sound diets, ethically-sound diets, and alternative dietary guide- lines? Nutrition Today provides the student with the knowledge and skills needed to 1) describe the science of nutrition; 2) explain contemporary nutritional issues; 3) discuss dietary and health strategies with the help of guidelines; and 4) develop scientifically-, ethical- ly- , and environmentally-sound dietary plans. SPORTS NUTRITION 120-DBB-03 (2.1.3) Sports Nutrition provides the student with the knowledge and skills needed to develop nutritionally- sound strate- gies to train and/or compete in power- and/or endurance sports using the basic criteria of a healthy diet and the metabolic principles of sports nutrition. Specifically, the stu- dent will be able to 1) describe the science of nutrition; 2) describe health-related and sport-related fit- ness; 3) describe nutritional factors for power and endurance sports; 4) formulate the criteria of a healthy diet and the metabolic principles of sports nutrition; and 5) develop sci- entifically sound training and per- formance diet plans. ART OF LIVING WELL 120-DBC-03 (1.2.3) In the past few years, perspectives on health have been evolving in multiple ways. Diversity in perspectives is partly shaped by the fact that health has been advertised as a commodity. The idea that achieving total health is with- in the grasp of every individual has been promoted by alternative health practices. This idea has been a catalyst in marketing multiple health-related products and services. Although the majority of products and services are considered quackery according to sci- entific criteria, the complementary views on health have been successful in delivering care and comfort to peo- ple. Science has been promising cures for diseases through modern technolo- gy. However, its ability to promote overall health has been limited. Selecting and individualizing the best elements of conventional (scientific) and alternative practices for improving health continues to be a challenge for people. One approach, which is used by both disciplines, is wellness: eating well, being active, relaxing, and avoid- ing exposure to harmful substances. The Art of Living Well is founded on the premise that wellness can be individual- ized and uses the best elements of dif- ferent practices in promoting health. PHYSICS SPORTS AND SPORTS EQUIPMENT 203-DAB-03 (2.1.3) Designed for non-science students, this course offers a hands-on, non- mathematical approach to understand the underlying principles for athletic performance and sound technique. Students will be engaged in many out- door and indoor activities to explore both mainstream and fringe sports, focusing on the physical principles and concepts behind the sports equip- ment, the technique for playing the sports (biomechanics), and the impact of new technologies on the athletes, the fans, and the games themselves. The course will introduce the student to the basic laws of mechanics and will look at how these laws are ger- mane to a large variety of sports. Emphasis will be placed upon specific applications. When appropriate, training techniques will be studied, as well as commonly used athletic test- ing procedures. Material will be presented through a combination of hands-on activities, in- class modules (combining teacher pre- sentations with peer discussion and exploration), demonstrations and proj- ects. Students will be actively involved during much of the class, either observing or participating in an analysis of biomechanical principles. Small group work for activities and projects will employ simple measurements and analysis to examine sport techniques. MYSTERIES, MAGIC & MYTH 203-DBC-AB (1.2.3) Nature, at times, can be so strange it appears magical, behaving in totally unexpected ways. Humans, too, like to present things with a magical touch. This course introduces students to the mysteries, magic, and myth of natural or man made phenomena. During lectures illusionary phenomena with real equipment will be presented; moreover, a magician will present and explain some magic tricks. Students will investigate a variety of intriguing phenomena with a hands-on approach. They will be trained in the performance of some magic tricks. In- class explanations and discussions will lead students to identify and explain the scientific laws involved, without the use of mathematics. PSYCHOLOGY INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 350-DAA-03 (2.1.3) This course introduces students to the scientific study of human behaviour. Major topic areas include: 1) the major theoretical approaches to the study of psychology, 2) scientific 157 COMPLEMENTARYCOURSES
  • 158. research methods in the behavioural sciences, 3) the biological basis of psychology including genetics, the brain and nervous system, sensation, and perception, 4) learning and memory, 5) stress. The emphasis is placed on how knowledge in each of the aforementioned areas can be applied to daily life. INTERACTION AND COMMUNICATION 350-DBA-03 (2.1.3) Communication makes us human: whether at school, work or play we are constantly absorbing information, ask- ing questions and trying to make sense of and share our discoveries. We often take this feature of our experience for granted, not realizing that social inter- action and communication are skills which can be studied and improved upon to enhance the quality of our lives. This course exposes students to the patterns of communication and social interaction and helps them appreciate the potential for personal development that may follow. Topics covered in this course include: relevant components of the processes of human interaction and communi- cation; self image, self confidence, and their characteristics; interpersonal perception; verbal and nonverbal communication; obstacles and sug- gestions for enhancement; decision making and problem solving; work groups; leadership and membership; assertive and compliant behaviors and their consequences. PUBLICATION DESIGN & HYPERMEDIA INTRODUCTION TO WEB DESIGN 412-DBB-AB (1.2.3) This course presents both the theoret- ical basis of designing an effective, functional web site and the hands-on mechanics of creating such a site using Dreamweaver and HTML. Students will work with the three basic web page elements – text, links, and multimedia (primarily images and sounds) – to create web sites that are technically functional, aesthetically pleasing, and marketable. They will also learn to upload their sites. PHOTOSHOP FOR PRINT AND THE WEB 412-DBC-AB (1.2.3) Many students today take digital photos and print them or use them on the web. They also scan regular photos for print or internet applications. These photos can often be enhanced in Adobe Photoshop, the industry stan- dard photo manipulation software used by almost everyone to prepare digital photos and scanned images for printing and internet applications. Using Adobe Photoshop CS2, you will learn to retouch and optimize your digital pho- tos and scanned images for print and the web. Computer skills you will develop include colour correction, cropping, colorization, compositing, selecting, resizing images, masking and layering, changing image formats, using channels, transparency, compression, cloning and painting. You will learn proper scanning techniques and how to take better digital photos. CREATIVE ARTS FILM CINEMA AND SOCIETY 530-DAA-03 (2.1.3) This course explores the ways cinema can reflect, criticize or support social organizations and their values or myths. Each year the course concentrates on different themes, e.g., war and peace. This course may be taken as part of the Peace Studies Certificate and the Women’s Studies and Gender Relations Certificate. MODERN CINEMA 530-DAD-03 (2.1.3) This course explores the ways cinema can reflect, criticize or support social organizations and their values or myths. Each year the course concentrates on different themes - e.g., war and peace. QUEBEC CINEMA 530-DAE-03 (2.1.3) The popularity and international stature of Quebec cinema have grown immensely over the past twen- ty years. Films produced in Quebec have been recognized for their unique social content, sophistication and artistic energy. This course pres- ents some of the most compelling Quebec films of this period. (A knowledge of French is not necessary for this course: films that are not in English will have sub-titles.) INTRODUCTION TO CINEMA 530-DAM-03 (3.0.3) Designed for both beginners and more experienced students of film, the primary objective of this course is to help students understand the fundamentals of film criti- cism: how a film tells its story and real- izes its meanings. TELEVISION VIDEO PRODUCTION 530-DBC-03 (1.2.3) This complementary course is designed for students outside of the Creative Arts discipline who wish to experiment with video. Various styles of video production will be explored and during the semester students will work on a production that could be a part of an assignment for a course taken within their discipline. INTRODUCTION TO BROADCAST MEDIA: RADIO AND TELEVISION 585-DBF-03 (1.2.3) In this course students learn how to prepare talk shows, newscasts and pro- motions for radio and television through planning, creativity, writing, speech, directing, visualization and production techniques. Classes are structured in two parts: A) Radio in which announcing theories and tech- niques are explained and demonstrat- ed. B) Television involves practical work in the studio under the instructor’s supervision. A newscast is produced. PHOTOGRAPHY DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY I 585-DK1-AB (1.2.2) This is a course in black and white 35mm.photography. In it students learn the tools and techniques of camera functions, film exposure and development and fine printing. They are introduced to the aesthetics of the black and white photographic tradi- tion as well as to contemporary issues addressed by artists using this medi- um. Students work on technical exer- cises and create a final portfolio that demonstrates technical proficiency and expresses the student’s develop- ing artistic vision. There is a $150.00 course fee for materials and camera rental. PPlleeaassee nnoottee:: Students registering for Darkroom Photography 1 and Darkroom Photography 2 must have a couple of hours available on either Wednesday or Friday between 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. to work in the darkroom on their assignments. Course cost is $100.00 for materials and $60.00 for camera rental. 158
  • 159. RELIGION MAGIC, RELIGION AND SCIENCE 370-DBA-03 (3.0.3) This course examines the nature of faith in magic, religion and science. It explores the development of Western religion in terms of the suppression of local cultures, of women, of magic and the “irrational,” and the subse- quent expression of religion by the cult of science (Scientism). Student will be introduced to some different expla- nations for an practical experiences with various forms of divination. In addition, depending on student’s program and her or his personal inter- ests, each will explore a topic in either the rationality, the ideology, or the iconography of magic, religion and science. SOCIOLOGY CRIME AND DEVIANCE 387-DBA-AB (3.0.3) The purpose of this course is to intro- duce the student to the topic of Deviance and Crime. Students will learn the concepts, theories and methods used by criminologists who engage in this social science. Students will also have an opportunity to learn more about specific crimes such as murder, sexual assault, prostitution, drug abuse, organized crime and business crime. CULTURE AND MEDIA 387-DBC-03 (3.0.3) This course introduces students to our world and the world in which we want to live from the perspective of the media – television, radio, newspa- pers, magazines. It focuses on how media messages influence our think- ing about our society and each other. For example, how does sex-role stereotyping in advertising and pornography encourage feelings of sexual inadequacy and isolation? Is violence on television used as a means of social control to instill fear in us? Who owns the media and how do they influence the content we accept as “truth”? Are advertisers sell- ing us a synthetic culture in an unreal world which doesn’t exist? This course helps students understand our media and how it influences our lives. 159 COMPLEMENTARYCOURSES
  • 160. FEES AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE STUDENT FEES Student fees are $142 per semester for full-time day stu- dents and $33 per course for part-time day students. Fees are subject to change on a yearly basis. Students who do not pay the fees will not be permitted to register. The fees are divided into five categories: registration fee $20 ($5 per course for part-time day students), educational support fee $25 ($6 per course for part-time day students), student services fee $42 ($10 per course for part-time day students), student association fee $45 ($12 per course for part-time day students), student association capital cam- paign fee $10 for full-time students. Refer to the Student Services section of the Course Calendar for further informa- tion regarding the disbursement of the funds. The Student Fees Refund deadline is published each semes- ter in the Schedule of Classes. TUITION FEES Quebec residents who are full-time students following a program of study do not pay tuition fees for CEGEP credit courses. Registration and other fees established by the College are listed in the Schedule of Classes. Some courses may have costs for materials and/or equip- ment used in class. The costs for these courses are listed in the Schedule of Classes must be paid at registration. These fees are totally or partially refundable according to the dates pre-established for each semester by the College. SUMMER COURSES There are tuition fees imposed by the provincial govern- ment for courses offered during the summer. All fees are listed in the Summer School Schedule and are subject to change on a yearly basis. Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for a complete listing of fees applicable to the current semester. ACCIDENT INSURANCE Students (except student visa holders) may pick up informa- tion for a low-cost insurance plan at the beginning of the semester. This plan supplements Medicare and helps cover among other expenses, ambulance, physiotherapy, dental and out-of-country costs. Students are covered 24 hours a day from August to August. Annual premiums are $11.00 for females and $20.00 for males. These prices are subject to change. Detailed information and application forms are available in Student Activities, Herzberg, Room 159. REPLACEMENT OF IDENTIFICATION CARDS Students who lose their ID card or pick up their first ID card after the third week of classes will be required to pay a $10.00 fee. All ID cards are updated with a sticker each semester. Replacement of this sticker costs $5. STUDENTS WITH OUTSTANDING DEBTS 1. Students with outstanding debts will be informed in writ- ing by the individual department. 2. Students will not be permitted to register for a subse- quent semester until the debt is paid. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT FEES Student Visa Holders with authorization to attend John Abbott College must pay the following fees, in addition to the Student Activity Fee: The following tuition fees are based on the rates of the 2008-2009 academic year. An increase of about 2% is expected. Updated tuition fees will be posted on the John Abbott College website once they are made available. Tuition Fees: $4,090 per semester for pre-university pro- grams and for Computer related and Social technologies, $5,295 per semester for Theatre and Science technologies, and $6,339 per semester for biological (or health-related) technologies as established by the Ministry of Education. These fees are subject to change from year to year. Tuition fees must be paid by the first day of classes each semester. Health and Accident Insurance Fee: Obligatory Health and Medical Insurance for international students: It is manda- tory for all International students to participate in the group insurance plan for foreign students attending CEGEPs. The insurance has to be purchased through the College: The cost for the insurance for a year is $ 936 (Aug. 1, 2009 – July 31, 2010). Updated fees for 2009-2010 will be posted on the Fees and Financial Aid section of the John Abbott College website once available Payment for the insurance must be made in person by cash or Credit/Debit card at the Financial Services Office, SH- 209 during regular business hours, or by mailing a money order, travelers cheques, or a personal cheque payable to John Abbott College , Financial Service, 21275 Lakeshore Raod, Ste-Anne de Bellevue, QC, H9X 3L9, before the start of the semester. 160 PAYMENT OF FEES Any fees collected by the College may be paid by cash, cheque, Master Card, VISA or bank cards (Interac, Instabank, etc.), or money order made payable to John Abbott College. A $15.00 College charge will be imposed for each cheque returned because of insufficient funds. If your fees are paid by an outside Agency (e.g., Travail Quebec, School Board) you must inform the Registrar’s Office at the time of Registration.
  • 161. Participation in the insurance plan is mandatory for all eligi- ble foreign students. However, any eligible foreign students may be exempt from participation if they can demonstrate their enrolment to the Quebec Health Insurance Plan under the reciprocity agreement for health and social security signed with certain countries (Denmark, Finland, Greece, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal and Sweden) The International Programs Office will order your insurance automatically in accordance with your registration records. You do not have to advise the office to order the card for you. Upon your first day of classes, please come to the International Programs Office, located in Herzberg H 416 and we will provide you with a fulfillment package which includes an insurance card and a booklet explaining your coverage in more depth and a claim form. College Fee: $50.00 fee applicable to Student Visa holders admitted to the College from outside Canada. Established to pay for additional expenses incurred by the College, this fee must be paid at the time of confirmation. Please note that International Students are not eligible to receive Canadian or Quebec government assistance. NON QUEBEC RESIDENT FEES Canadian citizens born outside Quebec and permanent res- idents registered in a cegep who do not qualify as residents of Quebec in accordance with the “Règlement sur la défini- tion de résident du Québec” will be required to pay non resident tuition fees, in the amount of $990 per semester for a full-time student and $4.45 per hour for a part-time student. All tuition fees are subject to change without notice. FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE John Abbott students may benefit from various sources of financial assistance: a) Quebec Student Loans and Bursaries program b) Canada Student Loans program c) John Abbott College Bursaries and Scholarships - see list d) Part-time employment in the College and externally may be found with the help of the Student Employment Centre in Student Services, Herzberg, Room 138. Students who need financial assistance should consult the Financial Assistance Office in Herzberg, Room 139. For more information, please refer to the Student Services Section of the Calendar. 161 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 162. STUDENT SERVICES The Student Services Division provides comprehensive programs, activities and services which directly support the College’s educa- tional mission and respond to student needs. Focusing on the enhancement of student learning and personal development, Student Services is also concerned with the general quality of stu- dent life on campus and student engagement. Student Services Departments are located along “Main Street” in the Casgrain Centre, Herzberg Building and Stewart Hall. ORIENTATION Orientation introduces new students to the College and assists them in making a smooth transition from high school. Orientation activities help students learn about the campus facilities, services, activities and resources available to them. Students are required to participate in a special August pro- gram, which includes a session on strategies for success in college, campus tour, Student Services multi-media show, and an opportunity to meet staff members and ask ques- tions. Students receive their Agenda books and ID cards. They can also buy their books and parking permits. During the first week of classes, various social events are held to facilitate integration into campus life. ACADEMIC ADVISING The primary purpose of Academic Advising is to provide stu- dents with accurate information and to assist students to real- ize educational opportunities available to them. Academic advisors encourage students to make informed decisions regarding education, career and life goals by relating the stu- dents’ interests, skills, abilities, and values to careers, higher education and the world of work. Advisors also maintain a valuable link between students and the College by providing information about students’ needs, preferences and perform- ance to program committees, program chairs, and academic management for use in making institutional decisions and policy. Academic Advisors work with students individually on an appointment basis. Confidentiality and friendly, personal- ized attention is assured. Advisors deal mainly with three basic areas of information: College Information Academic advisors help students select a course of study to meet diploma requirements while respecting the individ- ual’s personal, educational and career goals. In addition they provide information about the college’s policies, pro- cedures, resources and programs. University Information Academic Advisors inform students about university entrance requirements and help with the completion of university and scholarship application forms. Career Information Academic Advisors assist students to relate educational pro- grams to their career goals. BBeeccaauussee tthhee CCEEGGEEPP ssyysstteemm ppllaacceess tthhee rreessppoonnssiibbiilliittyy ffoorr mmeeeettiinngg ddiipplloommaa rreeqquuiirreemmeennttss oonn ssttuuddeennttss,, aallll ssttuuddeennttss aarree eennccoouurraaggeedd ttoo mmeeeett aann AAccaaddeemmiicc AAddvviissoorr aatt lleeaasstt oonnccee eeaacchh sseemmeesstteerr.. UNIVERSITY AND CAREER INFORMATION CENTRE The University and Career Information Centre is a central- ized resource centre that contains a wide variety of infor- mation on college, university and career information. Located in Student Services it contains a large collection of university and college calendars, directories of educational institutions, directories of subjects and programs, university application forms, admissions tests, up to date information on employment prospects and job search techniques as well as access to Internet resources on university informa- tion. There is also a collection of pamphlets, books and monographs describing different occupations and careers. Reference assistance is available. COUNSELLING For many students, entering CEGEP means having to make important adult decisions for the first time. A counsellor can help students to develop decision-making and problem- solving skills. Personal Counselling Counsellors can help students sort out thoughts and feelings in many areas, including family problems, depression, shy- ness, anxiety, relationships, sexual abuse, homesickness and communication skills. Career Counselling Students are helped by counsellors with their career deci- sion making by learning more about their interests, abilities, values and by finding about various career possibilities. This is accomplished through discussion, testing and the use of computerized career exploration programs. Educational Counselling Counsellors offer students assistance with areas such as time management, classroom presentations, exam anxiety, deal- ing with teachers and procrastination. The Counselling department, in monitoring the Standing and Advancement Policy, works with students who have poor academic records. Refer to the Policies and Procedure Section of the Calendar for further information on the Standing and Advancement policy. LEARNING CENTRE The Learning Centre offers academic support to students. It provides individual consultation and assessment of study habits and attitudes, as well as personalized plans of action to succeed in college. It also offers free tutoring and a series of College Success Workshops which include practical instruction and step-by-step strategies for studying, time- management, note taking, listening, effective reading, oral presentation, math and test taking. Through its English as a Second Language (ESL) program, special tutoring assistance is offered to students whose first language is not English. The Centre also has a Read and Write Lab which is opened to 2nd language and any other student needing assistance with speaking, reading and/or writing the English language. 162
  • 163. STUDENT SUCCESS SERVICES Student Success Services offers programs and services designed to support and increase academic success. The Student Success Specialist engages in outreach activities aimed at first semester students, students in entry programs, academi- cally weak students, and students on academic probation. This office works with the college community in activities such as mid-semester evaluation, orientation, staff develop- ment and the coordination of the “Early Alert” system. The specialist also works with both ad hoc student committees and faculty and staff advisory committees toward the cre- ation of strategies for student success. STUDENT EMPLOYMENT CENTRE The Student Employment Centre provides assistance in locating part-time jobs, full-time jobs for Summer and/or Christmas break, and works closely with academic depart- ments to assist graduating students in obtaining full-time employment upon graduation. Through group workshops and individual coaching, there is an on-going program to assist all students with résumé writ- ing, interview preparation, networking and contacting prospective employers. Students have access to information and reference materials on labour market statistics, summer jobs, work abroad and volunteer opportunities. Internet access with links to employment related web sites is also available for on-line job search in the Centre. CULTURAL DIVERSITY The Cultural Diversity Office assists students from all cultural backgrounds to integrate and succeed in college. It provides programs and activities that reflect the diverse cultures in the college and serves as a resource for teachers and staff who have concerns related to diversity issues. STUDENT ACTIVITIES Student Activities advisors work with students on activities which occur outside the classroom, including: CClluubbss:: (approximately 35 socio-cultural or athletic); Bandersnatch (student newspaper); CSKY (student radio station); SUJAC (student government); SSppeecciiaall AAccttiivviittiieess:: Educational Programming (alcohol aware- ness, sexuality, multicultural, leadership, political debates); Winter carnival; Springfest. TThhee AAggoorraa:: John Abbott’s main activity centre, the Agora hosts daily displays, speakers, comedians, etc. MMiinnii--CCoouurrsseess:: Recreational courses such as CPR, income tax, self-defense, standard first aid and driver’s education are just a small sampling of the many mini-courses available to students. TTrriippss:: Travel to destinations such as New York City and Stratford broaden students’ cultural experiences. Ski week is also very popular. SPORTS AND RECREATION John Abbott students may participate in athletic activities at recreational, intramural and intercollegiate levels. College facilities include three gymnasiums, pool, skating rink, play- ing fields, weight training and exercise rooms, sports therapy equipment, squash and racquetball courts. RReeccrreeaattiioonn:: Students may use the facilities during recre- ation periods and sign out equipment from the Casgrain Centre equipment room. There are also more than 35 recreational clubs. IInnttrraammuurraallss:: Students may register with the intramural coor- dinator for: basketball, volleyball, badminton, cosom hockey and indoor soccer for league and tournament competition. The focus of the intramural program is in the winter semester. IInntteerrccoolllleeggiiaatteess:: The John Abbott Islanders compete in the FQSE CEGEP league in women’s basketball, men’s basket- ball (two teams), women’s flag football, mixed golf, lacrosse, women’s hockey, women and men’s rugby, women and men’s soccer, mixed swimming and tennis, women and men’s volleyball, baseball, competitive cheering, cross- country running and synchronized swimming. Women’s and men’s programs enjoy equal status at John Abbott. PPlleeaassee NNoottee:: It is the students’ responsibility to notify the College if they suffer from any health condition or physical disability which would affect their participation in sports activities (recreation, intramural, intercollegiate). FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE SERVICES Financial Assistance Services provides information and application forms for financial assistance programs to which John Abbott students may apply: the Quebec Student Loans and Bursaries program, Canada Student Loans, John Abbott College Bursary and Scholarship funds. A resource person is available to answer questions and provide assis- tance with application procedures and determining eligibility for financial assistance. Financial assistance programs have strict deadlines. Students are advised to apply early. HEALTH AND WELLNESS CENTRE The Health Education Nurse is available for consultations with students to discuss a variety of health-related concerns. Often this includes general health, nutrition, emotional well being, birth control, pregnancy, sexually transmitted infec- tions and stress. Services also link and refer students to community health resources, agencies and services. Health promotion campaigns organized on a college-wide basis include sexual health, alcohol, tobacco and drug use, stress and healthy lifestyle choices. An on-campus medical clinic is open two half-days a week. Students can make an appointment to see a doctor for a variety of general health services. 163 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 164. HOUSING SERVICES On-Campus On-Campus housing is available to 191 full-time students in Stewart Apartments. Each apartment contains two bedrooms, full bathroom, kitchenette and living room/dining area. Apartments are fully furnished and equipped with a refrigera- tor, microwave oven and stove top as well as comfortable liv- ing room and bedroom furnishings. Stewart Apartments offers on-campus housing to both male and female students. Priority for acceptance into the residence will be given to Québec residents. The general criteria for acceptance is based on distance from, and accessibility to, the College. Deadline for application is May 1st. Stewart Apartments operates on a nine (9) month lease arrangement, usually commencing the week before classes begin in the fall semester and ending on the last day of exams in May. For further information, please contact the Housing Services Office, local 5234. Off-Campus Housing Services maintains an up-to-date listing of off-cam- pus housing in neighbouring municipalities or along con- venient bus routes. A variety of arrangements are available, including rooms in private homes, apartments and houses to share. Housing Services will also advise students on how to make the best off-campus accommodation choices. For listings and further information, contact the Housing Services Office or view this list by typing “OFF CAMPUS HOUSING” in the search box located on the college’s website at www.johnabbott.qc.ca. LEGAL ADVISORY SERVICE John Abbott provides legal advice at no cost to students. A private attorney is available to help in an advisory capacity, whether it’s a matter of being cheated on a used car pur- chase or being involved in serious trouble. Typical issues include marital, criminal, immigration, car accidents, new business advice and general civil matters. Legal Advisory clinics are held on alternate Thursdays. CASGRAIN SPORTS CENTRE Under the direction of Student Services, this multi-function- al facility is available for students, staff and the general pub- lic. The Centre includes six squash courts, two racquetball courts, three gymnasiums, two multi-purpose rooms, two weight training rooms, an aerobics/martial arts studio and a 25-metre pool. The Centre also houses a number of aca- demic departments and a theatre used for student produc- tions and community activities. During the day, Monday to Friday, the Casgrain Sports Centre activity areas are used by Physical Education classes, the Sports and Recreation Department, staff and students. At night and on weekends the Centre is open on a mem- bership and drop-in basis to staff, students and the public. CONFERENCE/RENTALS The College offers groups the opportunity to hold work- shops and meetings on campus during the summer months. An effort is made to provide housing, food, facilities and services at a reasonable cost for many types of activities. Rental of facilities is also available on weekends throughout the year. For more information call Student Services, local 5488. BOOKSTORE/SPORTS STORE The Bookstore stocks student texts required by students for all courses, plus drawing instruments, art and stationery sup- plies and other items. Bus passes and student tickets may also be purchased at the Bookstore. FOOD SERVICES Stewart Cafeteria, located on the main floor of Stewart Hall, offers full-course breakfasts and lunches as well as a take-out service and snack bar foods. A snack bar, called the Munchbox, is located on the first floor of the Casgrain Centre and vending machines are located at convenient areas throughout the College. TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING The College is serviced by the Lakeshore 200 bus and the 210 bus (on class days only) from Fairview Shopping Centre; the 211 bus and the 221 metrobus (weekdays and rush hours only) from Lionel Groulx metro station. The 21 bus from Hudson; the 33 bus from Pincourt; the Montreal-Rigaud commuter train from downtown Lucien-L’Allier station, and Rigaud station and the 251 bus from the Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue train station. Bus tickets and monthly passes are available at the College Bookstore in Stewart Hall. Schedules can be picked up at Student Activities in Herzberg, room 159. Campus parking is available for a fee. The amount charged is established on a yearly basis. Campus traffic regulations and decals are available at Orientation and from Campus Security Services, Laird Hall, room 101. CAMPUS DAYCARE CENTRE The Campus Daycare Centre, located on Maple Avenue beside the College, is open to both John Abbott and Macdonald College students and staff. Children from 3 months to 5 years old are eligible for enrollment. As a non-profit organization, parents are actively involved in running the Centre. For further information, please call the Director at 514-398-7951. ABORIGINAL STUDENT RESOURCE CENTRE The Aboriginal Student Resource Centre offers social and academic support for Aboriginal students. The Centre is a welcoming space that reflects aboriginal cultures and tradi- tions. The staff assists students in adjusting to the college environment and advises students concerning available serv- ices and programs within the college and community. 164
  • 165. The staff also serves as an advocate for aboriginal issues and as a liaison between students and teachers. The Centre offers a study area, computers, study skills workshops and tutoring. SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS John Abbott welcomes students with special needs and we provide reserved parking, lockers and ramps in suitable areas, plus access to elevators, telephones and washrooms. The College helps students choose and pre-register in cours- es suitable to the limitations of the disability and modifies classroom procedures and testing techniques. The Learning Centre provides services and specialized equipment includ- ing note takers, tape recorders, books in Braille, computers with large print and attendants for students with physical or medical disabilities. It is important that students inform the College of their spe- cial needs during the admission process before their first registration. For further information and assistance please call the Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities, local 5300. SERVICES FOR LEARNING DISABLED STUDENTS A number of students with normal and above normal intelli- gence have difficulty learning in a conventional manner. The coordinator of services for learning disabled students acts as the liaison between the student who has been for- mally assessed as learning disabled and those who provide services. These services include: • Assistance with choosing courses suitable to the limitation of the disability • Pre-registration • Assistance with reading, writing and study skills in The Learning Centre • Use of word processors with spelling and grammar checks • Specialized computer software to aid learning disabled students For further information and assistance, please call the Coordinator of Services for Learning Disabled students, local 5300. ACCIDENT INSURANCE The College has arranged for students to enroll, at a reduced rate, in a low-cost accident insurance plan that supplements Medicare. For example, the plan helps pay for ambulance, physiotherapy, dental and out-of-country costs. The plan insures students twenty-four hours a day for a full year. Students in high-risk activities are encouraged to enroll. Intercollegiate athletes and members of athletic clubs are required to pay a fee which automatically covers them dur- ing participation in their college activity. Information and application forms can be picked up in Student Activities, H-159. STUDENT FEES The student fees (see Student Fees section of this Calendar for specific costs) are administered jointly by Student Services and the Student Union (SUJAC) through the Student Activity Committee (SAC). Chaired by a student, SAC is composed of three students and two staff members. The committee is responsible for the allocation of all funds according to student needs and interests. SAC funds activities and groups such as: Student Union, Agenda book, ID card processing, Bandersnatch, CSKY Radio, Sports and Recreation, Student Activities, Legal Advisory Services, Employment Centre, Academic Advising, Learning Centre, Counselling, Health and Wellness, University and Career Information Centre, student clubs, social and cultural programs, plus special projects and events. 165 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 166. LIBRARY MEDIA SERVICES LIBRARY Located in the Library Building, the library seats 300 peo- ple. Hours are posted outside the entrance. Additional information about the Library is available from the John Abbott College home page: click on Current Students, then Library Media Services. Collection The Library has a collection of 78,000 books, in addition to periodicals, government documents and microfilms. It has online subscriptions to French and English newspapers, aca- demic and Canadian full text databases. Loans The library lends books for a period of two weeks. The loan period for reserved items is variable. Overdue materials are subject to fines. I.D. cards are required to borrow library items. Reference Reference staff is available for consultation and instruction on the use of the library. On-line resources are available for student use 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. These include academic and Canadian databases. Wireless Internet Access The Library Building is equipped with wireless access to the Internet. This is available in all areas of the library. including the basement. Students may borrow laptops from Media Services to access the wireless service. MEDIA SERVICES Located on the second floor of the Library Building. Hours are posted outside the entrance. Additional information about Media Services is available from the John Abbott College home page: click on Current Students, then Library Media Services. Collection Media Services has a collection of 6,000 items: DVD’s, videos, films, audio cassettes, CD’s and CD-ROM’s. Equipment Media Services has overhead projectors, cassette players, videocassette players, CD-ROM players, multi-media units, projection for videos and computers, DVD players and lap- tops. Loans The circulation desk lends out CDs, CD-ROMs and audio cassette media for a period of two weeks. DVDs and videos are available for classroom and library use only. The loan period for equipment is variable. I.D. cards are required to borrow and use media and equipment. Language Resource Centre The language resource centre is located in Penfield base- ment. Students may use the centre on a drop-in basis. Radio and Television Studios Radio and television studios are located in the Casgrain Building. Students enrolled in radio and television classes book the studios and use the equipment for class-related projects. 166
  • 167. BURSARIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS John Abbott College gratefully acknowledges donations to the following bursaries and scholarships available to John Abbott College students. For students attending John Abbott College John Abbott College Bursary +/- $5,000 each semester to be divided John Abbott College Faculty Association Bursary Three at $500 John Abbott College Management Association Scholarship One at $500 John Abbott College Professional Association Bursary Four at $500 The Auxiliary of the Lakeshore General Hospital Bursaries $5,000 to be divided (Nursing students) The Alumnae Association of the Montreal General $1,000 to be divided Hospital School of Nursing (Nursing students) The Bert Young Memorial Scholarship One at $500 (Social Science students) The Colin Robertson Memorial Scholarship Approximately $200 (Chemistry students) La caisse populaire Dorval - Pointe-Claire One at $250 (First year Business Administration student with the highest academic standing) The David Burt Memorial Scholarship Two at $400 (Biology students) The Doug Anakin Scholarship for Outdoor Pursuits One up to $500 The Jason Panich Memorial Bursary One at $500 (Professional Theatre or C.A.L.L. Media or Performing Arts profile student) The Merck Frosst Employees’ Charity Trust Fund One at $5,400 (First year Nursing students) The Luann Bisaillon Scholarship One at $500 The Angela Wilson Memorial Bursary (Intensive Nursing students) One at $1,800 The Aditya Youth Trust Fund Bursary One at $500 The Kirk MacGeachy Memorial Bursary (Geology and Fine Arts students) One at $500 For students graduating from John Abbott College and pursuing university studies: The Anne-Marie Edward Scholarship One up to $1,500 C A E Electronics Limited (Science graduate) One at $250 John Abbott College Scholarship One at $750 John Abbott College Faculty Association Scholarship Two at $500 La caisse populaire Dorval - Pointe-Claire One at $500; One at $250 (Graduating student in Business Administration with the highest academic standing) McGown-Christoff Scholarship (Dental Hygiene) One at $200 Montreal Lakeshore University Women’s Club One at $2,000 (Female student) Pamela Montgomery Scholarship (Professional Theatre) To be determined Peace Studies Scholarship One at $150 Nick Arganski Memorial Scholarship One at $500 (Mathematics student) Selma & John Greenblatt Memorial Scholarship One at $500 Julie Zachau Memorial Scholarship Bursary One at $1,000 or two at $500 The Andrew Stachrowski Memorial Scholarship One at $3000 (Police Technology student) The Inez Sobers Scholarship in Correctional Intervention One at $250 The Gary W. Sims Quebec Association of One at $300 Applied Educational Technology Scholarship 167 INFORMATION SUBJECT TO CHANGE GENERALINFORMATION
  • 168. CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION Each semester, over 1,000 students attend classes at John Abbott’s Centre for Continuing Education. Credit courses ranging from Computer Science and Psychology to Fine Arts and Mathematics help students complete a DEC, prepare for university or update their career skills. Pathways to Success (081.01) allows students to get started on their col- lege-level studies. Fast-track Attestation (AEC) programs offer career direction and retraining to adults who are preparing to enter or re-enter the workforce. Non-credit community courses are offered in areas such as languages, health, com- munications, business, finance, information technology and leisure activities. The growing demographic of older adults is a strategic focus for Continuing Education and more and more people over the age of 50 are choosing to continue their lifelong learn- ing at the Centre. The Centre is active throughout the year, including a Summer ESL Home-Stay Program for visiting Japanese uni- versity students from Kobe, Japan. Full- and part-time Attestation of Collegial Studies training programs include the following: FFuullll--TTiimmee AAtttteessttaattiioonn PPrrooggrraammss • Bio-Industrial Process Technology (ECA.0B) • Computerized Financial Management (LCA.AB) • Network Administration (LEA.80) • PC Technical Support (LEA.71) • Police Technology for Inuit & First Nations (JCA.OQ) • Residential Real Estate Agent (EEC.1Y) • Refresher Nursing for Registered Nurses (CWA.0D) • Professional Integration Program for Internationally- Educated Nurses (CWA.0K) • Web Technology (NWE.1P) • Event Planning and Management (LCL.21) • Investigative Techniques and Procedures (JCA.12) • Web Programmer (program number TBA) PPaarrtt--TTiimmee AAtttteessttaattiioonn PPrrooggrraammss • Cisco Networking (LEA.BJ) • Finance (LCA.84) • Linux Operating System (LEA.1D) • Marketing (LCA.85) • Publication & Web Page Design (LCE.0Z) People who are currently working and interested in upgrad- ing their IT competencies may be eligible for several part- time training courses subsidized by Emploi-Québec. Details are available on the website. For people who have career experience but no diploma, the Centre also offers a service for recognition of acquired competencies in several programs. Continuing Education has built an excellent reputation for providing top quality business training services to employers throughout the region. From microcomputers or health and safety, to languages or management training, instruction is tailored to address practical concerns and is provided by industry experts. Content can be adapted to individual needs and trainers work in both English and French. Workshops are offered on the campus or at the client’s workplace. The Centre makes every effort to respond to community needs and is interested in receiving student suggestions for programs, courses and workshops. For further information on courses, programs or services offered by Continuing Education: wwwwww..jjoohhnnaabbbbootttt..qqcc..ccaa 551144--445577--55003366 oorr bbyy ffaaxx aatt 551144--445577--66887788 The mailing address is: Centre for Continuing Education John Abbott College Brittain Hall 21275 Lakeshore Road Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec H9X 3L9 168
  • 169. INSTITUTIONAL POLICY ON THE EVALUATION OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT (IPESA) Implementation Date – July 1, 2004 / Approved at the Board of Governors, February 10, 2004 1. GENERAL INTRODUCTION The purpose of this document is to provide John Abbott College with a clear philosophy and procedures for the evaluation of student achievement. Its overall goal is to assure equity and fairness of student evaluation. 2. OBJECTIVES OF THIS POLICY The IPESA is designed to provide teachers, students, and the entire community with information that will make them aware of the expectations and the standards of the College. It provides departments with a structure within which they can assure that all teachers for whom they have responsibili- ty are carrying out fair and valid evaluation. It serves to advise students, teachers, and other members of the college community of their duties, rights, and responsibilities in regard to the evaluation of students’ academic achieve- ment. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES ARE TO 1. Assure equity of evaluation. This does not imply uniformity of course content or evaluation. It implies that students will be evaluated on the Ministerial objectives as clarified by the department and that the standards used will be those of the Ministry as clarified by the department. The objective is to provide teach- ers with the opportunity to use their professional expertise while at the same time following Ministry directives and assuring that students are treated fairly; 2. Support a competency-based education within a Program Approach that includes a common General Education component; 3. Establish and explain the principles to be followed in evaluating student learning; 4. Describe the College’s structures that guarantee these principles are followed in practice; 5. Articulate the rights and responsibilities of students, teachers, departments, program committees, academic administrators, the Academic Council, and the Board of Governors with respect to the evaluation of student achievement; 6. Provide students, parents, universities, and employers with a clear picture of learning evaluation at the College; 7. Provide information that will allow students to understand more fully and exercise their rights in the educational process. 3. THE EDUCATIONAL INTENTIONS The College community has the right and the obligation to identify the fundamental values and intellectual abilities it wishes to transmit to its students. The College is committed to putting the education of the students at the centre of the decision-making process. Furthermore, it is committed to developing in all its students the intellectual abilities and attitudes necessary for success in the twenty-first century. These include, but are not limit- ed to, • Acquiring a sound base of knowledge in their programs; • Communicating in English at a college level, both orally and in writing; • Communicating in French, both orally and in writing, so that students can live and work in Quebec; • Reasoning analytically; • Evaluating information to determine its limitations and biases; • Using information technology for research and communi- cation; • Assuming responsibility for learning; • Being a productive member of a team; • Understanding the meaning of ethical and environmental concerns; • Adapting to a changing workplace environment; • Being responsible for one’s own health and physical well- being; • Developing a commitment to life-long learning; • Developing a commitment to social justice. 4. THE LEARNING CONTEXT 4.1 INTRODUCTION TO THE LEARNING CONTEXT In order to realize these intentions, the College has adopted a learning context that is comprised of clearly focused pro- grams of study. DEC programs include an important general education component. Programs of study are the key units in the provision of CEGEP education. Integrated and coherent learning activities lead to the achievement of Ministerial objectives based on Ministry standards as interpreted by the College. To understand the spirit of CEGEP programs, one must fully understand the notion of competence, i.e. the knowledge and ability to accomplish a complex task, consistent with the overall goal of the program. At the end of the program, a successful graduate must be able to demonstrate mastery of the program outcomes. This demonstration requires the integration of knowledge, abilities, and attitudes in an eval- uation task appropriate to the program known as the Comprehensive Assessment. The College’s coherent curricu- lum focuses on outcomes that provide the learner with fre- quent opportunities to act at ever-increasing levels of complexity, to transfer knowledge and abilities from one area of study to another, and to integrate previously acquired abilities and knowledge. This approach to program conception, development, and delivery is in keeping with the needs of students who are faced not only with the challenge of adapting to ever- changing circumstances in life and in work, but also who 169 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 170. need the ability to engage in life-long learning. This approach has important consequences for the evaluation of student learning which will be described below. 4.2 THE DEVELOPMENT OF DIPLÔMES D’ÉTUDES COLLÉGIALES (DEC) PROGRAMS OF STUDY Many constituencies are involved in the development of CEGEP programs: the Ministry of Education (MEQ), the College community, including its administration, program committees, academic departments, and individual teach- ers. The role of each of these groups will be described briefly below. 4.2.1 THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION (MELS) It is the MELS’s role to authorize programs of study and then to set the overall program goals as well as statements of competency. These statements are the result of consulta- tion with teachers, students, industry, universities, and other concerned parties. The MELS has also developed a general education component, after extensive consultation, that outlines the goals of general education and its contributing disciplines. 4.2.2 THE COLLEGE The College has the right and the obligation to produce a Mission Statement that describes the fundamental values and intellectual abilities that it wishes to transmit to its stu- dents. 4.2.3 THE COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION The College administration provides the framework and support that allow the programs, departments, and teachers to create the curriculum. 4.2.4 THE PROGRAM COMMITTEES The responsibilities of the Program Committees concerning program development are the following 1. Participate in the development of program exit profiles that build on the program goals and objectives provid- ed by the Ministry, and recommend them to the Academic Dean and Academic Council; 2. Participate in the development of program planners that respect the rules provided by the Ministry and that assure that all outcomes within the exit profile are taught and assessed, and recommend them to the Academic Dean and Academic Council; 3. Participate in the development of comprehensive assessments that equitably assess whether the student has integrated the program objectives as defined in the exit profile, and recommend them to the Academic Dean and Academic Council. 4.2.5 THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS Course objectives are more specific statements that guide actual instructional decisions. Faculty within academic departments develop courses that teach and evaluate course objectives as well as learning outcomes that are specified in the exit profile. Learning activities are designed to support an ever-increasing level of complexity, transfer, and integration. Part of the student’s evaluation includes summative evaluations, designed by the teachers, that are used to determine whether the course objectives have been attained to the required standard. Faculty teaching the same course use predetermined, clearly defined, and announced marking criteria to assure equity of evaluation. 4.3 DEVELOPMENT OF ATTESTATION D’ÉTUDES COLLÉGIALES (AEC) PROGRAMS OF STUDY AEC programs are developed by the program coordinator of a specific program with the input of faculty and major industry partners. This is sometimes carried out in coopera- tion with another college. 5. EVALUATING IN A COMPETENCY-BASED ENVIRONMENT 5.1 THEORY OF COMPETENCY-BASED EVALUATION The College attests that a student who passes a course has demonstrated achievement of the learning objectives required by the Ministry to a level agreed to by the Department based on the Ministerial standards. 5.2 THE PURPOSE OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF EVALUATION There should be formative evaluation which may be worth marks. It allows a student to discover any areas of difficulty that require extra work. Summative evaluation occurs after a substantial portion of the course has been completed (or in the case of modular courses, this can be done at the end of a module). There must be a final summative evaluation task (or tasks) in each course that allows the student to demonstrate the aspects of the competencies assigned to that course. 5.3 EVALUATION STRATEGIES Evaluation tasks, created by teachers, are directly related to the learning objectives of the course and the learning out- comes in the exit profile of the program. Examples of evalu- ation tasks include examinations, essays, problem solving exercises, oral exams, artistic productions, laboratory work, case studies, simulations, etc. The evaluation of student per- formance must be impartial, valid, and reliable. Departments and course committees shall ensure equiva- lency in evaluations and ensure that all sections of a multi- section course adhere to a common evaluation framework. In the case of common competencies taught by several dis- ciplines, program or general education committees shall ensure equivalency of evaluation. Evaluation shall take place throughout the semester. In the first weeks of class, the teacher will provide first semester students with feedback on basic skills so that students who need extra help will know and be able to ask for it. All components of the evaluation must be indicated in the course outline and include the weight given to each com- ponent. Unless approved by the Associate Dean, the follow- ing policy applies: No single component will be worth more than 40% The summative evaluation(s) will be worth at least 40% of the student’s final grade Up to 10% of the total marks in a course may be awarded for participation in which case specific criteria must be approved by the Department and included in the course outline. 170
  • 171. Up to 10% of the total marks in a course may be awarded for specific or superior linguistic quality in which case spe- cific criteria must be approved by the Department and included in the course outline. Students must be given sufficient time to prepare for and to complete examinations and assignments for their courses. The final exam schedule for each semester is constructed by mid-semester and printed in College publications to alert students to the dates and times of these exams. In-class tests may not be given in the last 5 class days of the semester if the value of the test exceeds 30% of the final mark for the course. The time allocated for the completion of these tests may not exceed the regularly scheduled class time without the prior approval of the Associate Dean. The final marks achieved by students in each course are submitted by the teachers in accordance with the dates published in the academic calendar. Instructions for the submission of the grades are provided by the Registrar. 5.4 THE COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT The Comprehensive Assessment requires graduating stu- dents to demonstrate that integration of acquired compe- tencies of a given program of studies has taken place. It allows the College to verify that the overall program out- comes, as defined by means of the Exit Profile, have been achieved by the students. The Comprehensive Assessment task may be a research paper, portfolio, oral presentation, artistic production, work placement activity, or any combination of these or other activities. A detailed description of the Comprehensive Assessment Task with its performance criteria will be pre- sented by the Academic Dean to the Academic Council for its advice. The Program Committee will advise the Academic Dean on ways to assure equity of evaluation of the Comprehensive Assessment. Every 5 years or whenever a major program revision takes place, comprehensive assessments will be reviewed by the Program Committee. The eligibility requirements for the Comprehensive Assessment are as follows: PPrree--uunniivveerrssiittyy PPrrooggrraammss Students must be in the final year of study for their program and have completed the appropriate prerequisites for the comprehensive assessment. CCaarreeeerr PPrrooggrraammss Students must be in their 6th semester and have completed the appropriate prerequisites for the comprehensive assess- ment. Exceptions to these eligibility requirements must be recom- mended by the Program Committee and Academic Council, and approved by the Academic Dean. The Comprehensive Assessment must be part of the work for one or more courses. It may not, however, be the entire work done within a course. The Comprehensive Assessment is graded using a pass/fail system. Students will be informed about the nature of the Comprehensive Assessment and how it will be adminis- tered. Information describing this evaluation will be distrib- uted and explained to the students, as part of their program orientation and a description will also appear in the College Calendar. Students who fail a Comprehensive Assessment will be pro- vided with feedback and be allowed to re-submit the assessment, either in the current semester if time permits or in a subsequent semester, or be permitted to retake the course. It is the responsibility of the Associate Dean to ensure that students have this opportunity. 6. STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 6.1 STUDENT RIGHTS All students have the right to 1. Have their learning evaluated in a competent and pro- fessional manner; 2. Be informed of what is being evaluated and the type of measuring instruments to be used; 3. Receive the results of evaluation in due time (normally two weeks) except at the end of the semester; 4. Discuss the results of an evaluation with the instructor; 5. Have access to all of his / her work that has been sub- mitted for evaluation; 6. Have the results of evaluation kept confidential; 7. Equity of workload and evaluation procedures (includ- ing marking criteria and grade apportionment) in all sections of the same course; 8. Appeal a final grade to the department Final Grade Review Committee. The Final Grade Review Committee of the department may change final grades. In those rare situations where circumstances require it, the College, through the Academic Dean, may change a student’s grade after consultation with the department and after providing written justification to the department. 6.2 STUDENTS IN THEIR FIRST SEMESTER IN CEGEP HAVE THE RIGHT TO 1. Feedback on basic skills in the first weeks of the semester so that they can seek extra help if necessary; 2. A mid-semester assessment. 6.3 STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES Students have the responsibility to 1. Follow the rules and regulations specific to their pro- grams of study, included in their course outlines and found in this Policy; 2. Respect their teachers’ right to determine course con- tent, methodology, and evaluation within the guidelines set by the Ministry of Education and constraints estab- lished by the academic departments and this Policy; 3. Take action to solve academic problems, which they may encounter in their courses, by communicating with their teachers or by seeking help through College services; 4. Be honest and to refrain from cheating, plagiarism, and other dishonest or deceptive behaviour; 5. Remain informed about what takes place in their regu- larly scheduled classes even when they are absent; 6. Arrive on time and remain for the duration of sched- uled classes and activities; 7. Wait for the teacher for 15 minutes after the scheduled beginning of a class, unless they have been notified otherwise; 171 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 172. 8. Submit neat and legible assignments within the assigned deadlines with appropriate identification; 9. Ensure that assignments are submitted according to the teachers’ instructions and a copy of work retained as a protection against loss; 10. Write tests and final examinations at the times sched- uled by the teacher or the College; 11. Inform themselves of, and respect, College examina- tion procedures; 12. Keep all assessed materials returned to them for at least one semester in the event of a grade review. 7. COLLEGE ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES CONCERNING THE EVALUATION OF STUDENT LEARNING The College includes a variety of professional personnel and governing bodies (e.g. teachers, departments, program committees, deans, Academic Council, the Board of Governors) each of which has specific roles and responsibil- ities in regard to the evaluation of student learning. Each will be described below. 7.1 THE TEACHER The teacher teaches during the designated classroom peri- ods. He/she is expected to arrive on time and teach for the entire period. A one hour period requires 50 minutes of teaching time. The teacher designs appropriate evaluation tools. For major evaluation tasks, the teacher must provide a written description of the task and the marking criteria. All evaluations must be fair, and must assure that students who pass a course have adequately demonstrated achieve- ment of the learning objectives of the course according to the standards set by the MEQ and clarified by the appro- priate department. The teacher will provide the student with marking criteria when or before an assignment is given and the reasons for the mark when the assignment is returned. Students are entitled to receive written feedback on all major assignments and on their summative evalua- tion if requested. Feedback on final exams may be verbal. All assigned work except final exams and summative evalu- ations must be returned within due time (normally 2 weeks). 7.2 THE DEPARTMENT The department oversees the teaching methods of a course and assures the appropriateness of the evaluation tools used to measure student learning. The department has the responsibility to assure the quality of the courses in its discipline(s). The department, working with the program committee, oversees the development of the courses under its responsibility. It assures that Ministerial objectives are taught and evaluated; it decides on the appropriateness of the learning activities. It clarifies the Ministerial objectives so that they are understood in the same manner by every member of the department. It assures that teachers’ evaluation tasks, marking criteria, and marking schemes conform to departmental guidelines. After consultation with the Program Committee and/or the General Education Committee, departments will bring courses to the appropriate subcommittee of Academic Council which will forward a recommendation to Academic Council. 7.3 THE DEPARTMENT CHAIR The Department Chair will provide a written report on an annual basis to the College on the methods taken to ensure that course objectives are defined, teaching methods are applied, and that evaluative techniques specific to each course for which the department is responsible are estab- lished. This report will also include the methods that the department uses to guarantee the quality and content of courses. 7.4 THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE Program Committees have the responsibility to 1. Participate in the development of program exit profiles that build on the program goals and objectives provid- ed by the Ministry, and recommend them to the Academic Dean and Academic Council; 2. Participate in the development of program planners that respect the rules provided by the Ministry and that assure that all outcomes within the exit profile are taught and assessed, and recommend them to the Academic Dean and Academic Council; 3. Participate in the development of Comprehensive Assessments that equitably assess whether the student has integrated the program objectives as defined in the exit profile, and recommend them to the Academic Dean and Academic Council; 4. Assure that learning activities developed by depart- ments are consistent with the needs of the students, the goals of the program, and are coherent with those of other departments contributing to the program, including the General Education departments, by mak- ing recommendations to them; • Make recommendations to departments and to the Academic Dean concerning course outlines; • Make recommendations to departments and to the Academic Dean concerning generic course outlines and equity of assessment between different courses having the same competency being taught in different depart- ments. 7.5 THE ASSOCIATE DEANS Under the authority of the Academic Dean, Associate Deans assure that teachers, departments, and program committees carry out their responsibilities under this policy. 7.6 THE ACADEMIC COUNCIL The function of the Academic Council (By-Law 5) is to advise the College on any matter concerning the programs of studies dispensed by the College and the evaluation of learning achievement, including the procedures for the cer- tification of studies. 7.7 THE ACADEMIC DEAN The Academic Dean has the responsibility for the quality of education at the College, and co-ordinates the academic activities of the College. In this manner, he/she ensures the highest level of quality, consistency, and coherence. He/she is responsible for presenting this Policy to the Board of Governors and for the implementation of this Policy. 172
  • 173. 8. THE COURSE OUTLINE The course outline is a commitment between the teacher and the student. It should be a reliable and thorough guide to the course. After consultation with the program committee each course outline must be approved by the following College bodies: the department and Academic Council via appropriate sub- committees. During the first week of each semester, a printed course outline is distributed to every student for each course in which he or she is registered. Each item of information should be explained to students at this time. The Dean responsible for the program, the Department Chair and all the students registered in the course must be informed in writing if, due to exceptional circumstances, any changes are made to the course evaluation plan. Departments assure that different sections of the same course are equitable in the amount of work required of the student, the evaluation plan, the summative evaluation and the marking criteria. The course outline must include • the distribution of course hours (class work/fieldwork) with an explanation of the number of homework hours required in a week • the room number • the section number • the teacher’s availability • the objectives of the course which reflect the Ministerial objectives • the course content • the instructional methods • the evaluation procedures and weighting • the role of the course within the program • the required texts • the approximate cost for textbooks and other material (if any) • the departmental absence policy • a reference to the College Policy on Cheating and Plagiarism. The segment of the course outline covering evaluation describes the tasks used in evaluating the student’s work and the weighting placed on these different tasks. The approximate deadlines for the submission of major assign- ments are clearly stipulated. Where student participation and/or linguistic quality are used as part of the evaluation, the marking criteria for student participation and/or linguis- tic quality are given along with the proportion of marks that are allocated to them. 9. THE MINISTERIAL EXAMINATION OF COLLEGE ENGLISH All students enrolled in a program leading to a Diploma of College Studies must pass an evaluation of College English, administered by the Ministry of Education, in order to earn their diploma. Students may write this examination once they have passed two of the three Ministerial English courses and are in the process of completing the third, or have passed the third, when they register for the examination. Students who transfer from a French language CEGEP to an English language CEGEP or vice versa, who have taken and passed at least one of the Language of Instruction and Literature courses that are part of the General Education component common to all programs, may write the exami- nation in that language. The college will, with the students concerned, determine which examination (English or French) they will write. 10. SPECIAL EXAM ACCOMMODATION The Learning Centre will ensure that students with disabili- ties who are entitled to special examination facilities receive these services. 11. EVALUATION FOR CERTIFICATION 11.1 DIPLOMA OF COLLEGE STUDIES (DEC) The Minister of Education sanctions collegial studies upon the recommendation of the College. The DEC is awarded to the student who has successfully demonstrated mastery of the learning outcomes of the program as defined in the Exit Profile, as well as the ability to integrate these out- comes, and has completed all other diploma requirements. Certification of collegial studies is automatically granted with the successful completion of the required courses, the Ministerial Examination of College English, and the Comprehensive Assessment. The College periodically pro- vides the students with a summary of their academic progress, indicating the courses required in order to com- plete a diploma or attestation. The Academic Advising Department assists students with the interpretation of the specific requirements. The requirements of all DEC pro- grams provided by John Abbott College are published in the College Calendar. 11.2 ATTESTATION OF COLLEGE STUDIES (AEC) The College awards an Attestation of Collegial Studies (AEC) to those students who have successfully completed special- ized, College-developed programs of instruction. The requirements for an AEC are published in the Continuing Education Calendar. 12. AWARDING OF DIPLOMAS AND ATTESTATIONS Prior to recommending to the Minister that a diploma be awarded or prior to the college awarding an AEC, the Registrar’s Office will verify that all requirements for the cre- dential have been met including that the student has: 1. Earned a secondary school diploma or equivalent; 2. Met the specific admission requirements of the pro- gram and the standing and advancement require- ments; 3. Met the program objectives; 4. Earned the required credits, including substitutions (SU), exemptions (DI), and equivalencies (EQ); 5. Passed, where applicable, the exit exams as set by the Ministry; 6. Completed a minimum of one full semester of pro- gram-specific courses at John Abbott College; and 7. Passed the program’s Comprehensive Assessment at John Abbott College. 173 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 174. Diplomas are generally received within three months of completion of studies and the College recommendation. Attestations are received immediately upon successful com- pletion of the AEC program. 13. RECOGNITION OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT 13.1 HONOUR ROLL The College recognizes superior academic achievement by its regular students on a semester basis through its Honour Roll. In order to be named to the Honour Roll, the student must meet the following criteria for the semester in ques- tion: 1. Top 10% of the program; 2. Minimum 80% average; 3. No mark under 75%; 4. No more than one course under normal course load for that semester; 5. Be enrolled in at least two concentration courses in the program. The names of Honour Roll Students are posted in the Herzberg Building. 13.2 DEAN’S LIST The College recognizes outstanding academic achievement by its regular students with the Dean’s List. The top 25 stu- dents in the College who have followed all the courses that are required by their particular semester planner will be included on the Dean’s List. The names of the Dean’s List students are posted in the Herzberg Building. 14. ATTENDANCE Attendance is compulsory. Departments may have specific attendance requirements and/or a departmental failure poli- cy for absence. These must be approved by their Associate Dean and included in the course outline. Since marks recognize the extent to which competencies are met, no marks can be given for attendance or deducted for absence. Students must be excused if they have a valid medical or special reason for missing a class or an assessment deadline; teachers should require proof. Teachers are not required to re-teach course material missed by these students. Such stu- dents cannot lose marks for missing a formative evaluation. In this case, the marks for that evaluation may be assigned to another evaluation even if the guidelines in 5.3 are exceeded. However, teachers must provide alternate sum- mative evaluations if students miss a summative evaluation due to an excused absence. Special arrangements should be made for religious holidays, identified by the student at the beginning of the semester where possible, and may be made in cases of chronic illness. If the student misses a sig- nificant part of the course due to excused absences, the stu- dent may fail the course or receive a permanent incomplete. 15. CONFIDENTIALITY Unless the student has given written permission to do other- wise, student records, grades, and cumulative transcripts are confidential and given out only to the students themselves and to staff members who must have access in order to do their jobs, In the case where a student is under 18 years of age, and upon a request presented in writing by the stu- dent’s parent(s) or legal guardian(s), the transcript will be released to the parent(s) or guardian(s). 16. TRANSCRIPTS At the end of each semester, the College issues each regis- tered student a transcript listing all the courses in which he/she has registered and the final results obtained in each of these courses. This transcript is presented in the form prescribed by the Minister of Education. The final transcript lists the competencies associated with each of the courses. 17. GRADE REVIEWS A student contesting a final grade must use the Final Grade Review process. The final grade review must be based on all of the work which was submitted and graded by the deadline for the submission of grades for the semester in question. The review request must be submitted on a Final Grade Review Form available from the Registrar’s Office. The Registrar will send the completed form to the Department Chair for students taking courses leading to a DEC or taking courses leading to an AEC that are under the supervision of that department. Other AEC requests will be sent to the Dean of Continuing Education. The Registrar’s Office will keep a copy of the Grade Review Request. The deadline for grade review request is four (4) weeks after the start of the next regular semester. For all courses, the review is conducted by the departmen- tal Grade Review Committee in accordance with the teach- ers’ collective agreement. The committee is composed of the teacher of the course and two other teachers in the department. The student will be given an opportunity to appear before the Committee. The results of the review must be submitted by the department to the Registrar’s Office within 10 working days of the receipt by the depart- ment of the request. Those received in January before the first day of classes must be processed within 5 working days in order for students to be able to register in the correct course in the Winter Semester. The student is notified in writing by the Registrar’s Office of the outcome. If the out- come affects the student’s registration process for the fol- lowing semester, the student will be informed by telephone. All student work which is not returned to the student must be retained by the teacher or the department until one month past the grade review deadline. A student requesting a final grade review must be prepared to produce any doc- umentation returned by the teacher. Grade review committees may change a student’s grade. In rare situations, where circumstances require it, the College, through the Academic Dean, may change a student’s grade after consultation with the Grade Review Committee and pro- viding a written justification to the department. 18. INCOMPLETES If the teacher is giving a student a temporary incomplete (IT), he/she must provide a copy of the Incomplete Contract, signed by the teacher and the student to the Registrar’s Office. The teacher will then enter the grade earned to date on Omnivox and the Registrar’s Office will enter the IT beside that grade. The deadline for submission of the final grade is published by the Registrar. 174
  • 175. 19. ACADEMIC STANDING AND ADVANCEMENT A basic level of academic achievement is required of each student in the College. In order to maintain sound academic standards, the College monitors each student’s progress on a semester basis in relation to the following criteria. 19.1 DEC PROGRAMS Students who do not pass 50% of the normal course load in their programs for a given semester are placed on academic probation the following semester. A student placed on academic probation is required to meet with a counsellor to sign a probation contract which clearly indicates the number of courses to be passed and recommended remedial activities. Successful fulfillment of the contract removes the student from probationary status and allows him/her to register as a student in good standing for the subsequent semester. Failure to fulfill the requirements of the contract requires that the student be suspended from the day operations and full time status for at least one academic year. The student is able to discuss any extenuating circumstances with a coun- sellor. A student may not be on probation more than twice. The student may appeal his/her case in writing to the Re- Admission Review Committee. The review committee is a college committee and consists of an Associate Dean, a teacher, the chairs of the Academic Advising and the Counselling Departments or their delegates and a student in good standing representing the Student Union of John Abbott College (SUJAC). Final appeals are to the Academic Dean. Those who are refused re-admittance are encouraged to follow courses in the Continuing Education Division on a part-time basis, take summer courses, or apply elsewhere to improve their academic standing. Students in pre-university or entry programs who fail the same (or equivalent) Program specific or mise-à-niveau course twice require written permission from the Associate Dean to enrol a third time. Students who fail one of their courses three times will be required to change their pro- gram. Professional program students and Fine Arts students must also pass 50% of their program courses in any given semes- ter in order to remain in their chosen program. Professional program students are not permitted to fail the same professional program course twice. If they do, they will be required to leave the program. Professional program stu- dents may appeal the above requirement in extenuating cir- cumstances to the appropriate Program Appeal Committee with a final appeal to the Academic Dean. Professional pro- grams with the approval of the Board of Governors’ may have additional program standing and advancement policies, which address dismissal due to failures in specific courses and may have policies with regard to dismissal on issues of safety and security. 19.2 AEC PROGRAMS Students in AEC Programs must pass all of their courses in order to obtain their AEC. Students who do not meet the level of academic achievement required in full-time AEC Programs will be either put on probation or required to leave the program. The requirements for each program are published in the program brochure. Students asked to leave a program may appeal this ruling to the Appeals Committee. The decision of the Appeals Committee is final. The Appeals Committee consists of the Dean of Continuing Education and two of the following: coordinator of the pro- gram, program teacher and/or Counsellor. 20. CHEATING & PLAGIARISM Cheating and plagiarism are unacceptable to John Abbott College. Students are expected to conduct themselves accordingly and must be responsible for all of their actions. The College has the responsibility to inform students of this Policy. It is the responsibility of teachers • To show first semester students how to paraphrase and cite, and allow them to practice this skill; • To teach all students what cheating and plagiarism are; • To deal with those students who are involved in cheating and plagiarism. 20.1 CHEATING Cheating means any dishonest or deceptive practice relative to examinations, tests, quizzes, lab assignments, research papers, or other forms of evaluation tasks. Cheating includes, but is not restricted to, making use of, or being in possession of, unauthorized material or devices and/or obtaining or providing unauthorized assistance in writing examinations, papers, or any other evaluation task and sub- mitting the same work in more than one course without the teacher’s permission. It is incumbent upon the Department through the teacher to ensure students are forewarned about unauthorized material, devices, or practices. 20.2 PLAGIARISM Plagiarism is the intentional copying or paraphrasing (expressing the ideas of someone else in one’s own words), of another person’s work or the use of another person’s work or ideas without acknowledgement. Plagiarism can be from any source including books, magazines, electronic or photographic media, or another student’s paper or work. 20.3 PROCEDURES REGARDING CHEATING OR PLAGIARISM If the teacher is convinced that a student has intentionally cheated or plagiarized, 1. He/she will inform the individual; 2. If cheating occurs during any evaluation (test, exam, or any other evaluation activity), the teacher will collect the student’s papers immediately and/or annotate the work to be evaluated. Then the teacher will allow the student to complete the activity but not necessarily with the same materials; 3. The teacher will gather all available evidence relating to the charge (written material, notes, etc.) and inform the departmental chair; 4. The teacher may require the student to take an oral quiz to confirm his/her knowledge of subject matter if plagiarism is suspected; 5. For cheating or plagiarism, the teacher will assign the student a zero on a formative evaluation task or fail the student in the course on a summative evaluation task. 175 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 176. The teacher will explain to the student the proof of his/her action; 6. The teacher will advise the Registrar, in a written report, of the details of the incident, and a copy will be given to the student (by the teacher if possible). The name of the student and the record of the incident will be held in a confidential file by the Registrar. The stu- dent having been found to have cheated or plagiarized will be informed by the Registrar. Upon receipt of a second report of cheating or plagiarism, the student may be suspended from the College for up to a period of two years. 20.4 APPEAL MECHANISM The student may appeal the decision to the Academic Appeals Committee. This Committee will be a parity com- mittee consisting of three teachers appointed by JACFA and three people appointed by the Academic Dean. SUJAC may appoint an observer. The student in question may be present at the hearing. 21. MARKING SYSTEM 21.1 NUMERICAL SYSTEM The final grade is expressed as a percentage, which denotes the level of achievement of the learning objectives for the course. This calculation is based on the professional evalua- tion of the student’s level of attainment of the learning objectives based on criteria established by the department and approved by the Program Committee. The College utilizes a numerical grading system in which the minimum pass mark is 60%. This pass mark of 60% indicates that the student has demonstrated at least the minimal level of competence in the attainment of the objectives of the course. With a mark of 60 or greater in a course, the student is entitled to receive college credit for that course. The following provides a definition of the levels correspon- ding to numerical grades achieved by students. While the definition may be open to individual interpretation, it pro- vides the student and the general public with an under- standing of the meaning of the numerical grade. The levels are defined as follows: 90-100% A Excellent 80-89% B Very Good 70-79% C Good 60-69% D Pass 0-59% F Fail 21.2 CODING SYSTEM In addition to numerical grades the student transcript pro- vides a notation, if required, and the credits attained for each course. The codes are as follows: IT - TEMPORARY INCOMPLETE A numerical grade, even if it is a zero, must be assigned with the IT comment. There must be a written agreement between the instructor and the student regarding the com- pletion of the course work submitted to the Registrar’s Office. The official deadline for the submission of the com- pleted grade is published in the Academic Calendar. IN - PERMANENT INCOMPLETE Permanent incompletes are only assigned by the Registrar. Permanent incompletes may be awarded for serious med- ical or other reasons that prevented the student from com- pleting the course. Students must provide documentation to support the request. EC - FAIL The EC comment accompanies any failing grade (59% or below). DI - EXEMPTION An exemption is given when the College exempts a student from taking a course, which is part of his/her program. An exemption is only given when a student is unable to enrol in a course and if the course cannot be replaced by another course. The exemption does not entitle the student to the credits provided by this course. The number of credits required by the program is reduced by the number of units provided by the course for which the exemption has been given. In order to receive a medical exemption, the student must provide a doctor’s note, which allows the College to exempt the student from a particular course or group of courses. For an exemption from a course which has been removed from a program, it is necessary to show that there is no replacement course which allows the student to meet the same learning objectives. SU - SUBSTITUTION A substitution allows a student to substitute a course nor- mally required in his/her program of studies by a course with similar objectives and standards. SUBSTITUTIONS MAY BE GIVEN IN TWO INSTANCES: 1. When a program revision has resulted in the discontin- uation of certain courses. In order to obtain the num- ber of credits necessary for the granting of a diploma, the discontinued courses can be replaced by courses in the new program; 2. When a student changes programs and has already achieved essentially the same learning objectives in a course of the previous program that are required in the subsequent program. For example, a student changing from the Social Science program to the Science pro- gram would be able to substitute a Social Science course passed in the previous program for the comple- mentary course in the Science program. The substitution of a course may be granted to a student under the following conditions: 1. The student has already attained essentially the same learning objectives of the course or courses concerned in one or several college courses which have been previ- ously passed; 2. There is no other course which can be taken because of program revision; 3. For students who transfer from a French language CEGEP to John Abbott College, the mother tongue French courses completed at a French CEGEP will be substituted for an English course (Language of Instruction and Literature); 176
  • 177. 4. Second Language English courses completed at a French CEGEP will be substituted for a French second language course. EQ - EQUIVALENCE An equivalence is given when the College, after consulta- tion with the appropriate Department and Program, recog- nizes that an individual has previously attained the objectives of a course. An equivalence gives the student the credit for a course which need not then be replaced by another course. This measure is applied when a student demonstrates to the satisfaction of the College that he/she has attained the objectives and standards of the course for which the “equiv- alence” is requested. Such attainment can be demonstrated in two ways: 1. By previous studies: studies outside of a college, in courses at either the secondary or post-secondary level and given by an institution from either inside or out- side Quebec; 2. By previous learning experiences: recognition of prior learning. The conditions required to be granted an equivalence for a course are as follows: 1. Equivalences may be granted for secondary school courses if the student has acquired the competency at the level expected, usually those which cover material present in an area of collegial technical training; 2. Equivalences may be granted for post-secondary cours- es other than CEGEP taken outside Quebec which have learning objectives closely corresponding to those of the student’s collegial program; Equivalences may be granted for prior learning acquired outside an educational institution. The evaluation may require the student to present a portfolio or to take a chal- lenge examination. PROCEDURES Some substitutions are carried out automatically for students transferring from a French language CEGEP or when pro- grams are revised. To request a substitution (SU), an equivalence (EQ), or an exemption (DI) a student must meet with an Academic Advisor who will complete the Request for Course Evaluation Form. If necessary, the student will be referred to the appropriate department chair for the evaluation and approval. The department chair, or his/her delegate, will evaluate the requests and render a decision. The student is obliged to furnish copies of marks, course outlines or other documents in support of his/her request if requested by the chair. The student is obliged to present the completed form to the Registrar’s Office and pay any fees. As well, the student must have the prior institution forward an official copy of marks to the Registrar’s Office. If the request is not approved by the chair, the student may appeal to the appropriate Associate Dean who will consult with the chair and advisor as appropriate. The department chair will be informed in writing by the Associate Dean of any decision that is contrary to his/her recommendation. 22. AUTO-EVALUATION OF THIS POLICY Problems with this Policy can be directed at any time to the Academic Council or its designated committees. Department chairs should also mention any problems encountered with the IPESA to the Academic Dean on an annual basis. Academic Council, after advice from a designated commit- tee, will report on the suitability of this Policy to the Board of Governors at least once every three years and the Board will authorize changes as required. 23. REVISION OF THIS POLICY All of the practices and procedures set forth in this docu- ment are open to review and re-evaluation. Taking into account recommendations from Academic Council and the departmental chairs’ annual reports, the Academic Dean will report to the Board at least every three years on the extent of compliance with the Policy and recommend any necessary changes. 24. RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE APPLICATION OF THE POLICY The Academic Dean is responsible for this policy. 177 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 178. GENERAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ATTENDANCE VALIDATION After September 20th in the Fall and after February 15th in the Winter all students must confirm their attendance in each of their courses. To do this, students must access the Attendance Validation module on Omnivox at the following Internet address: johnabbott.intraflex.ca NB: Failure to confirm their attendance in one or more courses does not mean that the student will be deregistered from the course (s). All non-confirmed attendances will mean that the student receives whatever grade they have earned until that point in time. If applicable, students who are no longer full time as a result of non-confirmed attendance will be required to pay tuition fees. CHANGE OF PROGRAM Requests for a change of program must be made the semes- ter preceding the change. November 1st is the deadline for the Winter semester and March 1st for the Fall semester. Requests are made to the Admissions Office and studied by the Admissions Selection Committee. Students are notified of the Committee’s decision on Omnivox. Late requests are considered on an individual basis as space permits. Change of program forms are available in the Registrar’s Office. CLASS TIME Classes begin on the hour or half hour and end 10 minutes prior to the hour or half hour. CONVOCATION In June, John Abbott College formally honours the graduates of all programs who have completed their studies during the past academic year. Individual students who have excelled in a particular academic area are recognized by way of departmental awards or scholarships. There is a fee for all students who participate in the Convocation ceremo- ny, as well as those students who request a John Abbott College Ceremonial Diploma Certificate. COURS COMMANDITES (Taking courses at another CEGEP) Full-time John Abbott College students must obtain permis- sion if they wish to follow a course at another CEGEP. Failure to obtain the required commandite (permission) may result in the student not obtaining credit for the course taken at the other CEGEP. Commandites are granted by an Academic Advisor. COURSE AUDITING POLICY DDaayy DDiivviissiioonn Definition: An “auditor” is a student officially registered in the College who wishes to audit a course without seeking to obtain credits or certificate of studies. Procedure: The student may be admitted as an auditor at the discretion of the teacher (if space permits). The student must obtain a “Request to Audit” form from the Registrar’s Office. The form must be completed both by the student and teacher and returned to the Registrar’s Office prior to the course drop deadline for each semester. No credit of any kind will be granted under any circum- stances for an audited course and the course content may not be submitted as a prerequisite for any advanced course. COURSE CORRECTION/COURSE EXCHANGE Course corrections for pedagogical reasons are processed during the first week of classes. Preferential course change/course exchange is permitted at the end of the first week of classes. A student will receive credit only for a course in which he/she has been officially registered. COURSE DROPS Students may drop courses between the first day of classes and the deadline to drop for each semester. These dead- lines are published in the Academic Calendar and Schedule of Classes each semester. EDUCATION TAX DEDUCTION FORMS Tax Deduction Forms are available on Omnivox by the end of February. (Form T2202A and Form TP697V). INTENSIVE, INTER-SESSION AND DOUBLE CREDIT COURSES The drop deadline for these courses is up to and including the first 20% of the course. In the case of double credit courses, the 20% applies to each portion of the double credit. These deadlines are published by the Registrar’s Office each semester. GRIEVANCE POLICY The grievance policy exists to help a student or group of students resolve complaints about or conflicts with teachers. Grievances may include, but are not limited to, issues such as the following: • Treatment of students • Coverage of course material • Adherence to the printed course outline • Adherence to College policies Informal Level Dealing directly with the Teacher The student should attempt, if possible, to resolve the issue directly with the teacher. Seeking the Chairperson’s Assistance If the issue remains unresolved, the matter should be brought to the attention of the department chairperson. It is the chairperson’s responsibility (or that of a department del- egate) to help resolve the complaint/conflict by acting as a mediator and proposing solutions. Formal Level If no agreement is reached at the Informal Level, the stu- dent may file a formal grievance by completing the appro- priate form available at the offices of the Academic Dean, Associate Deans, SUJAC or the Registrar. The Associate Deans are responsible for hearing grievances and reaching decisions regarding the complaints/ conflicts. The Associate Dean shall treat each case on its individual merits, and will assure confidentiality. 178
  • 179. Formal grievances may be submitted at any time but not later than: • March 15 for grievances arising in the preceding Fall semester • October 15 for grievances arising in the preceding Winter and Summer semesters Within five working days of receipt of the Grievance Form, the Associate Dean will notify the teacher and the student involved as to the time, place, and date of interviews which may be required. The Associate Dean will gather information pertaining to the complaint from all parties involved as quickly as possi- ble. This will be done by interviewing the student, the teacher, as well as any witnesses. If both the student and teacher agree, the Associate Dean may hold a meeting between both parties. After all pertinent information has been gathered, a written decision will be made and submitted to the student and the teacher within five working days. The Associate Dean will retain a confidential record of the grievance and its resolution for a period of five years. It is the Associate Dean’s responsibility to see to it that his/her decision has been implemented and is being respected. RIGHT OF APPEAL Both the student and the teacher have the right to appeal the decision and may do so by submitting a written request to the Academic Dean. LATE REGISTRATION Students who do not register during the regular registration period will be considered subject to space availability. Students will be asked to pay a late registration fee and courses will not be guaranteed. Contact the Registrar’s Office for an appointment. MY JAC PORTAL My JAC Portal is a bilingual, interactive intranet service available to the College’s internal community. It groups all services available to students including Omnivox services, which provides them with access to their student records, allows them to register and verify their grades. Students use their student i.d. number and select a P.I.N. number to access their portal account. OUT OF PROGRAM COURSES Students taking courses which are not part of their program will be charged tuition fees. PRE-REGISTRATION All students in 3-year career programs are pre-registered in all of their courses. PROOF OF REGISTRATION Forms requiring proof of registration will be certified upon request at the Registrar’s Office. REGISTRATION Students register once each semester using the Omnivox serv- ice. Information about registration is provided to each student by the Registrar’s Office on Omnivox under Information Intended for You or via a message in Omnivox (MI0). REGISTRATION BY PROXY In extenuating circumstances only, the Registrar’s Office will act as your Proxy. A request for “Proxy Registration” can be made at the Registrar’s Office. A fee of $50.00 will be required. RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS The Academic Calendar of the College is fixed by the Board of Governors. At certain times of the year, students may be absent from classes or other College activities to observe their religious holidays. It is the students’ responsibility to advise their teachers in advance and to make appropriate arrangements for missed assignments, tests, etc. SEMESTERS An academic year is composed of 2 semesters - Fall and Winter. Each semester is 15 weeks in length. Although not considered part of the regular academic year, the Summer semester, which is approximately 7.5 weeks long, provides an opportunity for students to accelerate their program or catch up on courses previously failed. SEXUAL HARASSMENT The College has endorsed a policy on sexual harassment and a set of procedures for handling complaints of this nature. Sexual Harassment is defined as follows: Persistent unwanted attention of a sexually-oriented nature that interferes with the performance or environment of an individual, and/or Implied or expressed promise of reward for complying with a sexually-oriented request, and/or Implied or expressed threat of reprisal, actual reprisal, or the denial of opportunity for refusal to comply with a sexu- ally-oriented request. This definition is broad enough to include various forms of harassment (leering, inappropriate questions or remarks, fondling, phone calls at home, requests for dates, subtle or overt pressures for sexual activity, etc.) At the same time, the definition underlines the two essential features of harassment: the sexual attention is persistent and unwant- ed, and/or involves the use of a position of power over another person. For further information on sexual harassment and/or how to proceed with a complaint, see the handout entitled “WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE HARASSED”, available in Student Services H-148. SOCIAL DATA-CHANGE OF ADDRESS Students are expected to notify the Registrariat of any change of address and/or telephone number, using Omnivox. 179 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 180. GOVERNANCE BOARD OF GOVERNORS The College is governed by a 19-member Board of Governors appointed by the Minister of Education. The membership categories are: 5 - Socio-Economic, including one member chosen from the school boards, one from the universities, and one from the Société régionale de développement de la main d’oeuvre 2 - Business representatives 2 - Alumni (one pre-university; one technology) 2 - Parents of current students 2 - Students (one pre-university; one technology) 2 - Faculty 1 - Non-teaching professional 1 - Support staff 1 - Director General 1 - Academic Dean THE ADMINISTRATION Ginette Sheehy Director General Eric Schmedt Academic Dean/Director of Studies Gerald Stachrowski Director of Administrative Services/ Secretary General Léonce J. Boudreau Director of Student Services Steve Avram Director of Facilities Diane McGee Director of Continuing Education Pierre Assein Director, Communications & Information Technology Services Vacant Dean of Science, Dental Hygiene, Engineering Technologies, and Nursing programs Thomas McKendy Dean of General Education, CALL, Fine Arts, Liberal Arts, and Professional Theatre Programs Margaret Leech Dean of Social Science, Business Admin., Correctional Intervention, ILT, Pathways, Police Technology and PDHT programs Donna Yates Dean of Academic Systems Daniel Nyisztor Coordinator of Financial Services, Comptroller Francine Arbec Coordinator of Human Resources Services Stephanie Hygate Coordinator, International Programs Daniel Boyer Coordinator of Student Services ACADEMIC COUNCIL A consultative and advisory body to the Board of Governors, Academic Council’s principal responsibility involves advising the College on the organization and devel- opment of instruction. Academic Council sets its own objectives and priorities for each academic year and addresses issues brought to Council’s attention. Examples of topics discussed by previ- ous Councils include academic freedom, introduction of new programs and certificates of study, recommendations regarding the effects and implications of restructuring pre- university programs, grievance procedures as they concern teachers and courses, academic calendar, library policies and teaching space. The Membership of Academic Council is comprised of rep- resentatives from various sectors – faculty, administration, non-teaching professionals, support staff and students. These individuals are voted to Council by the groups they represent. Meetings are held every two weeks during the academic year and are open to the College community. Inquiries may be directed to Dr. James Vanstone, Chair of Academic Council. THE STUDENT UNION The Student Union of John Abbott College (SUJAC) is the officially recognized student voice based on the concept that organized and informed student input into the College’s operations is a vital part of the John Abbott community. The Student Union consists of a five-member Executive: a President and four Vice-presidents (VP Internal, VP Academic, VP Finance, and VP External). There is also a Congress elected at the beginning of the Fall semester, with each Congress member representing 125 John Abbott College students. SUJAC also oversees various student clubs and organizations through the Student Activity Committee (SAC). The objectives of SUJAC are: • to promote the academic and social interests of its members • to protect student rights and to act as students’ advocate in grievance cases • in its role as a student government, to participate in and monitor the College’s decision-making process. POLICY ON STUDENT CONDUCT Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities As citizens, John Abbott College students enjoy the same basic rights as do all citizens and are bound by the same responsibilities to respect the rights of others. In joining the John Abbott community, students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with College standards designed to perpetuate its educational mission and purpose. Free inquiry, expression and assembly are guaranteed to all students. Students have the right to freely pursue their respective educational goals and functions. It is the College’s responsibility to assure, as far as possible, the resources and atmosphere which these require. Students are also free to organize their personal lives and behaviour, subject only to the law, established College policies and rules, and the stipulations of the Student Code of Conduct. Willful or irresponsible damage, loss of College, student or staff property, and all disruptive, offensive or irresponsible behaviour by students, shall be considered detrimental to or acting against the rights of the College community. All stu- dents involved in such acts shall be dealt with according to the provisions of this policy. Breaches of College policies, rules or violations of the Student Code of Conduct which are also breaches of the law may be dealt with in the courts. It is understood that any individual who is victim of a crime on College premises or at College functions may, independently, file a police report. The Director General, on behalf of the College, also reserves the right to lay charges or refer the matter to the proper law enforcement agency. However, if the College is involved or affected internally, these breaches of College policies, rules or violations of the Student Code of Conduct will be dealt with by the Director of Student Services or the Student Conduct Committee in accordance with the provi- sions of this policy regardless of whether or not individuals are charged in the courts. A copy of the Policy on Student Conduct and Discipline Procedures is available in Student Services and SUJAC. 180
  • 181. 181 GENERAL INFORMATION DIRECTORY Here are the listings for Student Services, Registrariat and the College’s academic departments. If you wish to locate a teacher or office not listed here, inquire at Student Services, Herzberg 148. The directory can be accessed on our home page: www.johnabbott.qc.ca Academic Advising Academic Dean Accounting Admissions Anthropology Biology Business Administration Business Training Services Chemistry Computer Science Continuing Education Counselling Creative Arts, Literature and Languages Daycare Centre Dean, Arts and Nursing, Dental, Theatre Dean, Social Science, General Education, Police and Correctional Dean, Science and all other Career programs Dental Hygiene Dental Hygiene Clinic Director General Engineering Technologies English Financial Assistance Fine Arts Foreign Languages (German, Italian, Spanish) French Geoscience Health Services History/Economics/Political Science Housing Services Humanities/Philosophy/Religion Information and Library Technologies International Programs Learning Centre Legal Advisory Services Liberal Arts Library Mathematics Media Services Nursing Nursing, Intensive Nutrition Pedagogical Computer Centre Physical Education Physics Police Technology Psychology Publication Design & Hypermedia Technology Registrariat Social Science Methods Sociology Special Needs Student Advisor Sports and Recreation Student Activities Student Employment Centre Student Services Student Success Animator Student Union (SUJAC) Theatre/Music Youth and Adult Correctional Intervention Herzberg 148 Herzberg 102 (106) Stewart Hall SH-209 Herzberg 128 Hochelaga 106 Herzberg 349 Hochelaga 210 Brittain Hall 118 Herzberg 225 Penfield 227 Brittain Hall 101A Herzberg 148 Penfield 021B 1 Maple Avenue Hochelaga 240 Hochelaga 240 Herzberg 102 Stewart East SE - 207 Stewart East SE - 114 Herzberg 102 (110) Penfield 247 Penfield 118 Herzberg 139 Casgrain 108 Herzberg 235 Penfield 137 Jones Building Herzberg 139 Hochelaga 131 Stewart Apts. 113 Hochelaga Annex 104 Hochelaga 134 Herzberg 416 Herzberg 117 Herzberg 176 Hochelaga Annex 205 Library 101 Herzberg 202B Library 201 Herzberg 407 Herzberg 411 Hochelaga 304 Penfield 315 Casgrain 118 Herzberg 319 Hochelaga 311 Hochelaga 316 Penfield 214A Herzberg 128 Hochelaga 113 Hochelaga 106 Herzberg 117 Casgrain 128 Herzberg 159 Herzberg 138 Herzberg 148 Herzberg 119 Penfield 101 Casgrain 0056 Hochelaga 325 457-6610 “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ 398-7951 457-6610 “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ DEPARTMENT LOCATION TELEPHONE LOCAL 5290 5283 5211 5355/5361/5358 5492 5188 5052/5053 5562 5399 5820 5266 5292 5164 — 5513 5520 5282 5442 5645 5283 5796 5955 5540 5780 5927 5215/5917 5844 5308 5486 5234 5178 5472 5469/5544 5285 5290 5170/5140 5330 5840 5337 5376 5633 5328 5538 5407 5815 5464 5456 5933 5902 5817 5492 5285 5322 5320 5314 5290 5286 5397 5425 5770 GENERALINFORMATION
  • 182. 182 StewartHall StewartHall Residence BrittainHall ContinuingEducation CasgrainCentre Penfield RHochelaga LairdHall-SecurityLairdHall-Security Herzberg Dental HygieneClinic RE RE REREStewartHall StewartHall Residence BrittainHall ContinuingEducation CasgrainCentre Penfield R Arena Hochelaga Herzberg Dental HygieneClinic LairdHall-Security BusStop BusStop BusStop RE LakeshoreRoad toSte-Anne-de-Bellevue M aple Ave. to H w y. 20 Hwy.20 RE toHwy.40 RERE ParkingAreas RERampEntrance RReceiving HandicappedParking Roads Paths 40 20 SAINTE-ANNE-DE-BELLEVUE EXIT41 EXIT39 BAIE-D'URFÉ JOHNABBOTT COLLEGE 210 211 200 221 ➡ ➡ ➡ ➡ 21,275LAKESHORERd.,SAINTE-ANNE-DE-BELLEVUE TEL:514457-6610FAX:514457-4730 InternetHomePage:http://www.johnabbott.qc.ca
  • 183. 183 A Aboriginal Student Resource Centre 164 Academic Advising . . . . . . . . . . 162 Academic Council . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Accident Insurance. . . . . . 160, 165 Accueil Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Admission Requirements . . . . . . 5, 6 Advanced Standing . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Agora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Anthropology. . . . . . . . . . . . 32, 154 Applicants with Foreign Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Application Procedures . . . . . . . . . 6 Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . 9, 55 Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . 174, 178 B Biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 32,154 Board of Governors . . . . . . . . . . 180 Bookstore/Sports Store. . . . . . . . 164 Bursaries and Scholarships. . . . . 167 Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 154 Business Administration. . . . . 10, 66 C Campus Daycare Centre . . . . . . 164 Career Counselling . . . . . . . . . . 162 Career Information . . . . . . . . . . 162 Career Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Casgrain Centre. . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Centre for Continuing Education 168 Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Change of Program . . . . . . . . . . 178 Cheating and Plagiarism . . . . . . 175 Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 26, 154 Classics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Clubs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 College Information. . . . . . . . . . 162 Complementary Courses . . . . . . 153 Comprehensive Assessment. . . . 171 Computer Science. . . . . . . . . . . 155 Computer Science Technology10, 70 Conference/Rentals . . . . . . . . . . 164 Convocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Counselling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Cours commandites. . . . . . . . . . 178 Course Auditing Policy. . . . . . . . 178 Course Correction/ Course Exchange. . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Course Drops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Course Outlines. . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Creative Arts, Literature . . . . . 9, 42 & Languages (C.A.L.L.) C.A.L.L. Pathways to.. . . . . . . . . . 13 Credit System or Value . . . . . . . . 15 Cultural Diversity. . . . . . . . . . . . 163 D Dental Hygiene . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 73 Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Double DEC Science and . . . . . . 41 Social Science E Economics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Educational Counselling. . . . . . . 162 Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Engineering Technologies. . . . 10, 78 Environmental Studies Certificate. . 7 English. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 English Exit Exam (Ministerial) 138, 173 F Fees and Financial Assistance. . . 160 Film, Radio and Television . . . . 158 Final Exams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Final Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . 160 Financial Assistance Services . . . 163 Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 52, 155 Food Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Foreign Languages. . . . . . . . 42, 156 Français/French . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 G General Admissions Policy. . . . . . . 5 General Education. . . . . . . . . . . 122 Geography/Geo-Science . . . . . . . 33 Geology/ Oceanography . . . . . . . 24 Governance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Grade Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Graduate Evaluation . . . . . . . . . 173 for Diplomas Grievance Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 H Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 History and Classics. . . . . . . . . . . 34 Honours Programs. . . . . . . 6, 18, 29 Honours Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Honours Social Science / . . . . . 289 Commerce Housing Services . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 How to Calculate Credit Value . . 15 Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 I ID Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Information & Library Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 82 Institutional Policy on The Evaluation of Student Achievement (IPESA) . . 169 Intercollegiates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 International Applicants . . . . . . . 5-6 International Student Fees . . . 6, 160 Inter-session courses . . . . . . . . . 178 Intramurals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 L Late Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Learning Centre. . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Legal Advisory Service . . . . . . . . 164 Liberal Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 59 Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Collection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 M Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Marking System. . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Mathematics . . . . . . 26, 24, 25, 36 Mathematics Sequence Chart . . . 16 Mature Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Media Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Methodology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 N Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 87 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Non-Quebec Resident Fees. . . . 161 O Omnivox. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Out-of-Program Courses . . . . . . 179 Out-of-Province Applicants . . . . . . 5 P Payment of Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Pathways Programs . . . . . . . . 11-14 Peace Studies - Certificate . . . . . . . 8 Personal Counselling . . . . . . . . . 162 Philosophy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Physical Education. . . . . . . . . . . 151 Physical Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 26, 157 Police Technology . . . . . . . . . 10, 91 Policies and Procedures. . . . . . . 178 Police Technology, Pathways to . . 13 Policy on Evaluation of Student Achievement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Political Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Ponderation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Pre-Hospital Emergency Care 10, 97 Preparatory English Courses. . . . 123 Preparatory Programs . . . . . . . . . 11 Pre-Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Pre-university Programs. . . . . . 9, 15 Pre-university Program Structure . 15 Probation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 (see Standing and Advancement) Probation Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Professional Theatre . . . . . . 10, 101 Programs Offered and Entrance Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 10 Proof of Registration . . . . . . . . . 179 Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 152 Publication Design & Hypermedia Technology . . . . . . . . . 10, 112, 153 Q Quebec High School Students. . . . 5 R Radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Recognition of Academic . . . . . 169 Achievement Recreation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Registration by Proxy. . . . . . . . . 179 Registration Validation . . . . . . . 178 Religion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39, 159 Religious Holidays . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Replacement of Identification Cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 S Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 17 Science, Pathways to . . . . . . . . . 12 Science Option Courses . . . . . . . 22 Science Program Chart . . . . . . . . 21 Semesters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Services for Learning . . . . . . . . . 165 Disabled Students Services for Students . . . . . . . . . 165 with Special Needs Sexual Harassment . . . . . . . . . . 179 Social Data - Change of Address 179 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 27 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 28 with Math Profile Social Science - Commerce Profile9, 28 Social Science, Pathways to . . . . . 12 Social Science - Psychology Profile28 Sociology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39, 159 Sports and Recreation . . . . . . . . 163 Standing and Advancement. . . . 175 Student Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Student Employment Centre . . . 163 Student Fees . . . . . . . . . . . 160, 165 Student’s Rights and . . . . . . . . . 171 Responsibilities regarding evaluation Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Student Success Services . . . . . . 163 Student Union. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Students with Outstanding Debts160 Summer Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 T Table of Contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Television . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Transcript Notation . . . . . . . . . . 176 Transcripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Transition Program. . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Transportation and Parking . . . . 164 Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Tuition Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 U University and Career . . . . . . . . 162 Information Centre University Information. . . . . . . . 162 W Women’s Studies and Gendre . . . 8 Relations - Certificate Y Youth & Adult . . . . . . . . . . 10, 118 Correctional Intervention INDEX GENERALINFORMATION
  • 184. 184