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ABOUT JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE
Named after Sir John Abbott, Canada's third prime minister, the College primarily serves Montr...
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Publication: Communications and Admissions Office
Production: John Abbott College Press
Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Québec
...
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Certifica...
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ADMISSIONS
GENERAL ADMISSIONS POLICY
John Abbott College accepts applicants who meet the minimum admission requirements ...
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International applicants may apply for the fall and winter semester. Note: Winter admissions are not always
possible due...
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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
Over the last fifty years the environment has increasingly
become important to all sectors of soci...
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PEACE STUDIES
Peace is multi-layered and multi-faceted. It is non-vio-
lence in thought, word and act; it is radical and...
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PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS / OPTIONS and PROFILES
PROGRAM NAMES SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES
PROGRAMS OFFERED AND ENTRANCE REQUIR...
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TRANSITION PROGRAM 081.03
The Transition Program is a one-semester program designed to give students an opportunity to ...
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PATHWAYS PROGRAMS
PREPARATORY PROGRAMS
John Abbott College offers a variety of programs for high school students whose ...
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PATHWAYS TO SCIENCE (200.14)
This one- or two-semester program is designed for stu-
dents who wish to pursue a diploma ...
PATHWAYS TO POLICE TECHNOLOGY (310.14)
PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2007 AND LATER
FIRST SEMESTER
4 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
___...
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PATHWAYS TO
A CAREER PROGRAM (800.14)
The Pathways to a Career Program is a one or
two semester integration program for...
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PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS
John Abbott College offers six pre-university programs in: Science, Social Science (including C...
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n Does not count towards a diploma
N Required Math courses for Science students. Students are advised to take the requi...
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SCIENCE (200.BO)
The Science Program is a pre-university program of the Ministry of Education intended to provide
stude...
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COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT AND
INTEGRATION IN THE SCIENCE PROGRAM
The Ministry of Education requires every student to pas...
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SCIENCE (200.BO)
FIRST SEMESTER
603- ENGLISH
345- HUMANITIES
109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION
_____-_____ Complementary Course
A...
SCIENCES PLACEMENT CHART
FALL 2007 or later
For SCIENCE (200.B0) and PATHWAYS TO SCIENCE (200.14) STUDENTS
Pathways to Car...
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PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
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LIST OF SCIENCE OPTION COURSES
Science students need 3 (2.66 credit) science option courses to meet
the minimum 8 credi...
BIOLOGY
Biology courses provide students with an
opportunity to develop an understanding
and appreciation of important bio...
molecular structure is emphasized.
Practical laboratory work, including
the use of chemical instrumentation,
is emphasized...
CALCULUS III
201-DDB-O5 (3.2.3)
P: 201-NYB WITH AT LEAST 65%.
This course is strongly recommended
for students who intend ...
inverse of a function, trigonometric
functions, identities, trigonometric
equations, sine law, cosine law, graphs
of trigo...
SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.A0)
Graduates of the John Abbott Social Science program will be prepared to enter university studies i...
28
SOCIAL SCIENCE -
PSYCHOLOGY PROFILE (300.A3)
The Psychology profile is designed for students interested in
preparing fo...
HONOURS SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.A5) AND
HONOURS SOCIAL SCIENCE WITH MATH (300.A6)
AND
HONOURS COMMERCE (300.A7)
Honours Social...
LEVEL 2 COURSES
PONDERATION: 3.0.3 OR 2.1.3 CREDITS: 2.00 HOURS: 45
30
Not all courses are offered every semester. Consult...
SOCIAL SCIENCE PROGRAM CERTIFICATE IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CERTIFICATE
Social Science students are ...
ANTHROPOLOGY
INTRODUCTION TO
ANTHROPOLOGY
381-100-AB (3.0.3)
Anthropology is the study of all
aspects of human life from t...
BUSINESS
The following courses - up to a maximum
of three - may be taken by SOCIAL SCI-
ENCE students. COMMERCE students a...
CEGEP JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE  MISSION AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
CEGEP JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE  MISSION AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
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CEGEP JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE  MISSION AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
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CEGEP JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE MISSION AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

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ABOUT JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE
Named after Sir John Abbott, Canada's third prime minister, the College primarily serves Montreal's
West Island community, although you can also meet students here from other parts of Quebec and
Canada. Located in historic Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, on the western tip of the Island of Montreal, John
Abbott’s distinctive red brick buildings and magnificent campus were originally deeded to McGill
University in 1906 by wealthy industrialist Sir William Macdonald.
Established in 1971, John Abbott offers five pre-university and eleven career programs, including
Quebec’s only English-language CEGEP training in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care, Dental Hygiene,
Information and Library Technologies, Engineering Technologies, Police Technology, and Youth and
Adult Correctional Intervention. Over 5000 students are enrolled in the Day Division and another 2000
in Continuing Education. Only a half hour drive from downtown Montreal, the College is easily
accessible by city bus or commuter train

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CEGEP JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE MISSION AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

  1. 1. 1 ABOUT JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE Named after Sir John Abbott, Canada's third prime minister, the College primarily serves Montreal's West Island community, although you can also meet students here from other parts of Quebec and Canada. Located in historic Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, on the western tip of the Island of Montreal, John Abbott’s distinctive red brick buildings and magnificent campus were originally deeded to McGill University in 1906 by wealthy industrialist Sir William Macdonald. Established in 1971, John Abbott offers five pre-university and eleven career programs, including Quebec’s only English-language CEGEP training in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care, Dental Hygiene, Information and Library Technologies, Engineering Technologies, Police Technology, and Youth and Adult Correctional Intervention. Over 5000 students are enrolled in the Day Division and another 2000 in Continuing Education. Only a half hour drive from downtown Montreal, the College is easily accessible by city bus or commuter train. CEGEP JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE MISSION AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE WE ARE COMMITTED TO: Learning • Foster in our students the ability to make and articulate informed intellectual, aesthetic and ethical decisions, while demonstrating skills needed for success in modern society. • Cultivate a love of learning, autonomy and responsible citizenship in our students, both in the classroom and through socio-cultural, leadership, recreational and sports activities. • Respect and learn from diverse world views and international perspectives, as reflected in our programs, our approach and our community. Quality • Provide well-rounded and balanced pre-university and career programs that meet high standards of quality and ethical consciousness, and respond to the requirements of universities, employers and society. • Value excellence in teaching and learning as dynamic and interactive processes. • Promote lifelong learning and continuous improvement in the College community, with a commitment to innovative pedagogy, effective administration and quality support services. • Deliver leading-edge training, tailored to the needs of business, industry and other sectors, through our continuing education services and specialized programs. Students • Cultivate a safe, caring and challenging learning environment that bolsters self-esteem and promotes a sense of belonging and purpose, mutual respect, and healthy lifestyles, leading students to attain academic, professional and personal success. • Ensure governance that reflects the active engagement of students, staff and faculty, and places student learning at the centre of our decisions and actions. • Establish effective partnerships with academic, professional and social communities, to maximize our students’ success and continued growth.
  2. 2. 2 Publication: Communications and Admissions Office Production: John Abbott College Press Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Québec Dépôt Légal: Bibliothèque nationale du Québec National Library of Canada May 2009 ISSN: 1710-3622
  3. 3. 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Certificates of Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 8 Programs Offered and Entrance Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 10 Preparatory Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Pre-University Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Career Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 General Education Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Complementary Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Fees and Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Library and Audiovisual Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Bursaries and Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167 Centre for Continuing Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Institutional Policy On The Evaluation of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Student Achievement (IPESA) General Policies and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Department Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 ABOUT THIS COURSE CALENDAR This Calendar provides general information on admission policies, programs and courses as well as on student services and activities. But, it is only an introduction. To learn more about John Abbott College’s many academic programs, prospective students and their parents are invited to call the College, talk to faculty and attend events such as our open houses which are held every February and October. Individual and school tours of John Abbott College are available and may be arranged through the Admissions Office. Students and parents are also invited to visit John Abbott College’s website at: www.johnabbott.qc.ca and discover the many links to Admissions, Registrar, Student Services and individual departments. For further information about our academic programs and student services, please contact high school guidance counsellors or: John Abbott College’s Admissions Office 514-457-6610, local 5355, 5361 or 5358 Come visit us, e-mail us, ask as many questions as you like and discover how you can get the most from your education at John Abbott College. The College reserves the right to make changes without prior notice to the information contained in this publication, including the alteration of various fees, schedules and the revision or cancellation of particular courses.
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 5 ADMISSIONS GENERAL ADMISSIONS POLICY John Abbott College accepts applicants who meet the minimum admission requirements as defined by the Ministry of Education and who, in the College's opinion, have a reasonable chance of succeeding in the program to which they apply. Permanent Quebec residents receive consideration over non-residents. Fulfillment of the minimum academic requirements does not guarantee acceptance. Program Selection Committees are responsible for admissions decisions and reserve the right to defer or refuse admission to any applicant whose qualifications are inappropriate to the demands of the program. A personal interview, audition, and/or portfolio may be required for admission to specific programs. The qualifications of applicants educated outside Quebec will be assessed on an individual basis by the appropriate selection committee. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Quebec High School Students To be admissible in a program leading to a Diploma of College Studies, applicants must have: a Secondary School Diploma which includes the following subjects: (1) Secondary V Language of Instruction; (2) Secondary V Second Language; (3) Secondary IV Mathematics; (4) Secondary IV Physical Science; and (5) Secondary IV History of Québec and Canada OORR A Secondary School Vocational Diploma which includes the following subjects: (1) Secondary V Language of Instruction; (2) Secondary V Second Language; and (3) Secondary IV Mathematics. Out-of-Province Applicants Applicants with Canadian secondary school certificates other than the Quebec Secondary V Diploma are required to have completed an equivalent high school diploma from their province. Non-Québec residents are subject to out of province fees of $990.00 per semester (fees subject to change). Advanced Standing Students who have accumulated credits from other post-secondary institutions – i.e., CEGEPs, community colleges or universities – may request that these credits be transferred to their program of study at John Abbott. All requests must be made through Academic Advising in the Student Services Department. Mature Students Applicants who obtained their high school diploma more than five years ago and have not attended any post-secondary institution, should contact the Admissions Office prior to applying. International Applicants Please contact the International Programs Office should you have any questions about the SRAM online application process. ee--mmaaiill: international@johnabbott.qc.ca or pphhoonnee: local 5469 The College will consider applicants who have attended school systems outside Canada if their certificates are equivalent to the Quebec Secondary V Diploma. Specific program prerequisites and all other requirements particular to John Abbott College must be met. Applicants whose language of instruction is not English must submit the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with their application. Information about TOEFL may be obtained at Consulates, Cultural Affairs Offices or, by visiting their website at: www.ets.org. All international students must submit their online application at: sram-international.omnivox.ca . Applications sent directly to the College will not be processed. You may contact the International Programs Office should you encounter difficulties with the online submission via SRAM. If your test TOEFL results are not available at the time of the SRAM application, please inform the International Programs Office accordingly. ADMISSIONS
  6. 6. 6 International applicants may apply for the fall and winter semester. Note: Winter admissions are not always possible due to time restrictions. Those requesting admission from outside the country must submit a French or English translation of their academic grades for the last two years of study and diplomas obtained (legible copies certified by the school). Equivalences will be processed through SRAM. International students must pay a non- refundable application fee of $75.00. All international applicants are advised of admission decisions by mail. Once notified of acceptance into a program, the applicant must confirm his/her decision by returning the confirmation form along with a confirmation fee payable to John Abbott College. The student is responsible for following immigration procedures to obtain a Quebec Certificate of Acceptance (CAQ - issued by the government of Quebec), a Study Permit (issued by the Government of Canada) and, if applicable, a student visa (issued by the Canadian embassy in the country of residence). The student must show proof of his/her immigration documents upon arrival. These documents must be presented to the Registrar’s office. If the student fails to do so, he/she will be prohibited from studying at John Abbott College. Information on procedures to follow may be obtained from the Canadian Embassy, Consulate or the Service d’immigration du Québec. Students should consult the websites below for application procedures for a CAQ and study permit. International students must pay tuition fees in addition to health and accident insurance before they register. Please note that John Abbott College is part of a mandatory group insurance plan for international students. Students must purchase health insurance through John Abbott College. The College does not accept any health insurance bought through other insurance providers. The insurance card will be distributed by the International Programs Office (Herzberg 416) upon arrival at John Abbott College. Please refer to the FEES AND FINANCIAL AID section of the Calendar for specific information on tuition fees and health insurance. Applicants with Foreign Certificates Applicants currently living in Canada who have completed high school leaving certificates in a foreign country must also submit a French or English translation of their academic grades and diplomas obtained (certified copies). SRAM will then proceed to a study of equivalence for which candidates must add an additional $45.00 to the admission fee (total $75.00). IMPORTANT WEB SITES FOR INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS Important information for international students can be found on the following web sites. Students should consult these prior to submitting their application: Government of Quebec: www.immigration-quebec.gouv.qc.ca/en/index.asp click on international students Government of Canada: www.cic.gc.ca/english click on to study APPLICATIONS TO JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE John Abbott College is affiliated with le Service régional d'admission du Montréal métropolitain (SRAM), which processes student applications. Applications to the College must be submitted to SRAM by March 1st for the Fall semester and November 1st for the Winter semester. The application fee of $30.00 payable to SRAM is non-refundable. Applications must be submitted online at http://sram.omnivox.ca. Students can print a copy of the Admissions Guide directly from this site or they may obtain one from the Admissions Office, or high school guidance departments. International students must submit their online application at: http://sram-international.omnivox.ca APPLICATIONS TO THE HONOURS PROGRAMS John Abbott College offers different honours or enriched programs. They are Honours Science, Honours Social Science and Honours Commerce. Admission into these programs requires students to complete a separate applica- tion. Contrary to their application to the College which must be sent to SRAM, applications to the honours pro- grams accompanied by the required documents, must be submitted directly to the College. For further information about the honours programs, or on how to access the application forms, please refer to the Pre-University Programs section of this Calendar or contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5358 or 5361. APPLICATION PROCEDURES
  7. 7. 7 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES Over the last fifty years the environment has increasingly become important to all sectors of society. Pollution, species extinctions, climate change, resource depletion, and a host of other environmental problems touch every- one now more than ever. Our basic life-support system is maintained by all the species that make-up the biosphere—from the smallest to the largest. The survival of these species are interconnect- ed and dependent on each other. The actual processes that take place between species and the environment are extremely complex and fragile. If humanity causes the extinction of one species—it inevitably means the extinc- tion of numerous species and the decline of our life-sup- port system for future generations and us. Unfortunately, our current economic models have neg- lected to factor into the equation the tremendous bene- fits nature provides. However, when economists and environmental scientists have tried to estimate in dollars what it would cost us to accomplish the services nature provides the results are staggering. Using multiple data- bases, they estimate that nature provides $33 trillion dol- lars worth of services every year—that's nearly twice the annual Gross National Product or GNP of all the coun- tries in the world combined. For example, forests pre- vent soil erosion, landslides, and flooding; maintain the purity of the air and water; affect local and global rainfall; temper climatic fluctuations; and promote watersheds and biodiversity. Other ecosystems like bogs, wetlands, grasslands, deserts, oceans, coral reefs, tundra-arctic regions, and so on similarly provide unique benefits. Learning to live in harmony with the natural environment and thinking critically about environmental issues requires an interdisciplinary approach. The Environmental Studies Certificate Option is an inter- disciplinary curriculum that seeks to improve the stu- dent’s understanding of key scientific, economic, and political issues that underlie environmental problems and their management. Students can address environmental issues from a variety of perspectives drawn from the natural sci- ences, the social sciences, physical education, the humanities, and the arts. Students in the certificate choose from a variety of courses that best suit their own personal approach to environmental studies. Perhaps the best reason for pursuing an environmental studies certificate is a student's own personal interest in learning more about the environment. In some cases, earning a certificate can also make a graduate more attractive to employers and to gaining entry into university programs. Problems encountered in the "real-world" often require understanding beyond that of a single academic discipline. For this reason, more and more employers seek people with interdisciplinary training. The Environmental Studies Certificate Option exposes students to a broad range of knowledge. It helps put other courses into perspective. The Environmental Studies Certificate is evidence to university departments and employers that the student has acquired not only depth in the major field, but breadth beyond that field—an out- standing combination. Students within any of the college's programs can receive an Environmental Studies Certificate. To achieve the Certificate students must take at least six courses designated as Environmental Studies courses, and complete a "Special Project", involving a self-designated assignment, in one of those courses. A list of eligible courses can be found semester by semester in the Schedule of Courses or on the John Abbott College web- site. Such courses can be taken as the student's General Education requirements, as well as within their program of study. The Certificate will be granted upon graduation. For more information, please contact Doris Miller, Coordinator of Environmental Studies, local 5167, or email: envirostudies@johnabbott.qc.ca CERTIFICATES Certificates can be earned with any regular DEC, without extra courses or workload. They allow students to focus on and explore topics of interest to them within “clusters” of courses. Certificates are the most self-directed learning option a student can register for at John Abbott, and they are accompanied by extra-curricular opportunities as well as academic rewards. CERTIFICATES
  8. 8. 8 PEACE STUDIES Peace is multi-layered and multi-faceted. It is non-vio- lence in thought, word and act; it is radical and reac- tionary, personal and political. It is urgent. As we attend to ourselves and personal interactions we reflect global problems. The Peace Studies Certificate brings together college courses which inform students about world issues and their impacts on our personal lives. It works to empower them to take action on their own, to allow them to state clearly, “Peace matters.” We are all involved in the exploitation and distribution of resources and services, and need to be aware of what our choices as consumers and civilians entail. The potential for widespread conflict is great in the interplay of global trade, consumption and aid. War is one of the least sus- tainable activities on earth, yet conflicts of ideology can result in violent confrontations bringing incalculable immediate and long-term human tragedy. Absolutism, the belief in the superiority of one set of ideas over all others, often the refuge of the powerless and sometimes the smokescreen of the powerful, charts a course towards conflict and interference in the autonomy of others. Charters, Conventions, pressure groups, individuals and international institutions attempt to define peace. The UN and the International Court of Justice are key institu- tions. Organizations of civil society struggle to help achieve goals of social and economic justice, human rights, education, health, environmental responsibility and peace, while others work in the opposite direction toward maximum exploitation and consumption. In Canada there is a project to develop a federal Department of Peace, and many initiatives responding to the UN millennium call for a culture of peace through peace education. John Abbott is a pioneer in peace teaching: the Peace Certificate is over 30 years old, the oldest in the country. The Peace Studies Certificate helps individuals to unfold their own courses toward peace and deal with the reper- cussions of others’ violence. Students can learn to identi- fy models which promote peace, and move in that direc- tion. To complete the Certificate, register with the cer- tificate co-ordinator, take at least six Peace Studies courses from the Schedule of Classes course list, and undertake a special project, which is a self-designated assignment in one of those courses. The list of eligible courses can also be found on the JAC website: www.johnabbott.qc.ca/student_zone/departments/ peacestudiescertificate/courseofferings These courses can be chosen among the student’s General Education requirements as well as within their program of study. If you wish to learn more about Peace Studies or wish to register as a Peace Studies student, please contact the Peace Studies Coordinator, local 5448, who will help you register for Peace Studies at any time of the year before your final term, and build ideas for your special project. Peacestudies@johnabbott.qc.ca WOMEN’S STUDIES AND GENDER RELATIONS Students involved in deciding upon a career, creating or maintaining a relationship, functioning in a work place, attending classes, or simply receiving messages of the vari- ous mass media can benefit from the awareness that seemingly personal feelings, actions, decisions and prob- lems are subtly influenced by society’s concepts of male and female. The Certificate in Women’s Studies and Gender Relations helps students attain this understanding, work carefully through its implications for their own lives, and thus increase their personal freedom, power, and ful- fillment. By providing a dynamic and comprehensive study of gender issues and women’s accomplishments placed within psychological, social, political, and historical contexts, the courses help students achieve personal growth and they promote their awareness of and partici- pation in social issues and change. Women’s Studies and Gender Relations courses span a wide variety of disciplines and include such offerings as Gender and Communication, Male/Female, Women in Film, Women and Literature, Human Relations, La Condition Féminine, Sociology and Philosophy of Sexuality, Physical Education, and Sociology of Women. Many courses are available for Women’s Studies and Gender Relations credit. This certificate is offered to both female and male students. Students choose a minimum of five specially designated courses. These courses fulfill the requirements of both the student’s diploma and the Women’s Studies and Gender Relations Certificate at the same time, and may also meet the requirements of the Environmental Studies Certificate, and/or the Peace Studies Certificate. For specific course offerings, please consult the Women’s Studies and Gender Relations Certificate course listing in the Schedule of Classes. For more information, please contact the Co-ordinator for Women’s Studies and Gender Relations, at feminism@johnabbott.qc.ca .
  9. 9. 9 PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS / OPTIONS and PROFILES PROGRAM NAMES SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES PROGRAMS OFFERED AND ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 200.12 Science and Social Science – Double-DEC Math 536 70% Physics 534 70% Chemistry 534 70% 700.B0 Liberal Arts No specific prerequisites 510.A0 Fine Arts No specific prerequisites 500.67 Creative Arts Literature & Languages Theatre Profile No specific prerequisites 500.48 Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Arts and Culture with Languages Profile No specific prerequisites 500.57 Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Languages Option No specific prerequisites 500.47 Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Arts and Culture Profile No specific prerequisites 500.27 Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Media Arts Profile No specific prerequisites 300.A2 Commerce Profile Math 526 or 536 300.A1 Social Science with Math Profile Math 526 or 536 300.A0 Social Science No specific prerequisites 200.B0 Science Math 536 70% Physics 534 70% Chemistry 534 70% PROGRAMSOFFEREDANDENTRANCEREQUIREMENTS 700.A0 Arts and Sciences Math 536 70% Physics 534 70% Chemistry 534 70% PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS and OPTIONS CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
  10. 10. 10 TRANSITION PROGRAM 081.03 The Transition Program is a one-semester program designed to give students an opportunity to pick up missing prerequisites to enter a selected program. New students may begin their studies in the Transition program in their second semester if their selected program is not available. Returning students should discuss their plans with an Academic Advisor, and submit a change of program request to the Admissions Office. To be eligible for the Transition program, students must be transitioning to another cegep program. Students can only be in Transition for one semester unless the program they are heading to is not offered in the Winter semester. PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS and OPTIONS PROGRAM NAMES SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES 561.C0 Professional Theatre (Acting) No specific prerequisites - Audition 561.A0 Professional Theatre (Production and Design Options) No specific prerequisites - Interview 420.A0 Computer Science Technology Math 526 412.A0 Publication Design & Hypermedia Technology No specific prerequisites 410.B0 Business Administration Math 436 or 526 *393.A0 Information & Library Technologies No specific prerequisites 310.B0 Youth and Adult Correctional Intervention No specific prerequisites 244.A1 Engineering Technologies Photonics Option Physics 534, Math 526 244.A2 Engineering Technologies Energy Management Profile Physics 534, Math 526 offered to students in 3rd year of 244.A1 *180.A0 Nursing Physical Science 436 Chemistry 534 Math 436 highly recommended 111.A0 Dental Hygiene Chemistry 534 Math 536 highly recommended *310.A0 Police Technology Math 514 Candidates must have a minimum of a proba- tionary drivers’s license at the March 1st application deadline. They must also pass pre-admission testing and once conditionally accepted, a medical exam, and be a Canadian citizen or landed immigrant. 181.A0 Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Candidates must have a minimum of a proba- tionary drivers’s license at the March 1st application deadline. They must also pass pre-admission testing and once conditionally accepted, a medical exam, and be a Canadian citizen or landed immigrant. PROGRAMS OFFERED AND ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS cont’d * Program also offered in a 2-year intensive format for students who have completed all of their CEGEP general education courses and the program prerequisites.
  11. 11. 11 PATHWAYS PROGRAMS PREPARATORY PROGRAMS John Abbott College offers a variety of programs for high school students whose preparation for CEGEP studies may not be complete. The aim of these one- or two-semester programs is to equip students with the skills required to be successful in their studies and to help them acquire any missing prerequisite courses for entrance into a particular program of study. Each program is individually designed to meet each student’s specific needs and combines a mix of regular program courses, general education courses, make-up and/or introductory courses, and a compulsory course in Learning Techniques or Career Explorations. Please note: 1) To be eligible for any of the Pathways programs, students must have a Quebec Secondary School Diploma and meet CEGEP entrance requirements or have an equivalent high school diploma. 2) Students must be applying directly from high school OR may never have attended CEGEP before. Students who successfully complete their Pathways Program will be eligible to apply to their intended program of study. Students will be required to submit a change of program request to the Admissions Office by the deadline: March 1st for the Fall semester and November 1st for the Winter semester. For further information about any of these programs, and their entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358, or the Pathways Coordinator, pathways@johnabbott.qc.ca. PATHWAYSPROGRAMSPROGRAMSOFFEREDANDENTRANCEREQUIREMENTS
  12. 12. 12 PATHWAYS TO SCIENCE (200.14) This one- or two-semester program is designed for stu- dents who wish to pursue a diploma in the Sciences, but who lack one or more of the Science prerequisites (Math 536, Chemistry 534 and Physics 534), or who have a grade of 60 - 69% in their Science prerequisites and require some improvement in their basic foundation in Science. In their first semester, students will take a science Learning Techniques course, along with regular Science courses, and any missing prerequisite course(s) and/or introductory courses in their weak Science subject(s). Successful completion of the Learning Techniques course and their missing prerequisite/introductory courses is a requirement to remain in Pathways to Science in their sec- ond semester, and/or for entrance into the Science pro- gram. (Note: “introductory” courses are make-up courses for students who have passed the prerequisite in high school or CEGEP, but who did not obtain a minimum grade of 70%.) Notes: 1) Students who are failing a Science prerequisite at the time of application will be refused admission to the program. 2) Admission to the Pathways to Science Program will be cancelled if a student fails a Science prerequisite at the end of the school year or during the summer. Should this be the case, students will be allowed to select another program of study at the College pending availability of space in the chosen program. PATHWAYS TO SCIENCE (200.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2005 AND LATER FIRST SEMESTER 2 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH (according to your placement test) ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 CONCENTRATION COURSES CHOSEN FROM: ___-___ 201-NYA or 912-015 Mathematics or *201-007 or *201-009 ___-___ 202-NYB or 912-016 Chemistry or *202-006 ___-___ 203-NYA or 912-017 Physics or *203-006 ___-___ 982-021 Physical Science * Students normally will be permitted to take no more than two Make-up or introductory courses per semester * Students must obtain a grade of 70% or greater to be eligible for science courses. 1 LEARNING TECHNIQUES COURSE ___-___ 360-902-85 Learning Techniques (for Sciences) Successful completion of this course, and the science prerequisite course(s) are required to either remain in Pathways to Science in the second semester, or to transfer into the regular Science Program. 6 = Regular Course Load Students will be pre-registered in their missing prerequisite and/or introductory courses and in their Learning Techniques course. PATHWAYS TO SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FIRST SEMESTER 3 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH (according to your placement test) ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 CONCENTRATION COURSES ___-___ 350-102-AB Psychology (co-requisite with Learning Techniques) OR ___-___ 330-910-AB History (co-requisite with Learning Techniques) ___-___ ___-___ PLUS ONE LEVEL 1 Social Science Course 1 LEARNING TECHNIQUES COURSE ___-___ 360-902-85 Learning Techniques (for Social Science) Successful completion of this course is a requirement for students to enrol in the regular Social Science Program in their second semester. 6 = Regular Course Load Students will be pre-registered in their Psychology or History course and in their Learning Techniques course. PATHWAYS TO SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.14) This one-semester program is designed to ease the transition into CEGEP for Social Science students with marginal Secondary V grades. The program concentrates on providing students with the necessary skills required to succeed in the Social Science program. In their first semester, students take a Learning Techniques course along with a reduced load of regular Social Science courses. Successful completion of the Learning Techniques course is a requirement for entrance into the Social Science program in the student’s second semester.
  13. 13. PATHWAYS TO POLICE TECHNOLOGY (310.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2007 AND LATER FIRST SEMESTER 4 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH (according to your placement test) ___-___ FRENCH ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Police section) 1 CONCENTRATION COURSE 310-112-AB Criminology & Judicial Process 1 CAREER EXPLORATIONS COURSE 360-103-AB Career Explorations plus Introduction to Driving Seminar (Theory) SECOND SEMESTER 3 OR 4 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH ___-___ FRENCH ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ Complementary Course 310-111-AB First Responder 310-610-AB Private Law A 7th course may be selected in consultation with an Academic Advisor This Pathways stream is designed exclusively for high school students to provide the opportunity to explore their career goals in policing, experience Cegep level courses, participate in physical fitness, and extra-curricular activities. Students will follow regu- lar application procedures for Police Technology as follows: 1. Pass the pre-admission testing. 2. Apply to SRAM by March 1st.. 3. Students accepted to Pathways will be waived out of the medical exam for one year. 4. Students will only be required to have a learner’s driving permit for the Pathways program. 5. Students will be required to sign a letter of understanding. 6. Students will be required to request a change of program by March 1st of the fol- lowing year, at which time they must present a probationary driver’s license. There is no guarantee of admission to the Police Technology program after the Pathways program is completed, as the admission process is competitive. If the stu- dent is given a conditional acceptance to the Police Technology program, a med- ical exam will be required. Students will be required to redo the pre-admission testing at a reduced fee of $35.00. Bilingualism (English/French) and computer lit- eracy are necessary. 13 PATHWAYS TO POLICE TECHNOLOGY (310.14) The Pathways to Police Technology is a two-semester inte- gration program for students wishing to enter into the Police Technology program at John Abbott College, but who may not meet all the requirements for immediate entrance. In their first semester students will take General Education courses, a sample of first year Police Technology courses, and a Career Explorations course. The aim of this last course is to help students explore their career interests and to improve upon their academic skills. Successful completion of the Career Explorations course is a requirement to remain in the Pathways to Police Technology Program in their second semester. PATHWAYS TO THE CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (C.A.L.L.) PROGRAM (500.14) This one-semester program provides a first semester integration into the general C.A.L.L. program. It is designed to ease the transition into CEGEP for C.A.L.L. students with marginal Secondary V grades. The pro- gram concentrates on providing students with the neces- sary skills required to succeed in the C.A.L.L program. In their first semester, students will take a Career Explorations course, along with a reduced load of regu- lar C.A.L.L. program courses. Successful completion of this course is a requirement for entrance into the C.A.L.L. program in the student’s second semester. PATHWAYS TO THE CREATIVE ARTS, LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (C.A.L.L.) PROGRAM (500.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FIRST SEMESTER 3 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 CONCENTRATION COURSES ___-___ 502-DCA-03 Exploring the Universe of the Arts and Letters PLUS ___-___ ___-___ ONE COURSE CHOSEN FROM THE LIST OF CREATIVE ARTS CONCENTRATION COURSES (see list below) 1 CAREER EXPLORATIONS COURSE ___-___ 360-103-AB Career Explorations Successful completion of this course is a requirement for students to enrol in the regular C.A.L.L. in their second semester. 6 = Regular Course Load Students will be pre-registered in their Career Explorations and Exploring the Universe of the Arts & Letters Course. CREATIVE ARTS CONCENTRATION COURSES: Painting and Drawing I Filmmaking I Darkroom Photography I Video Production I Radio I Animation I Journalism I Theatre Workshop:Techniques Theatre Workshop: Production I CREATIVE ARTS - LANGUAGES PROFILE COURSES Spanish I & II (607-SP1/607-SP2) Italian I & II (608-TL1/608-TL2) German I & II (609-GR1/609-GR2) PROGRAMSOFFEREDANDENTRANCEREQUIREMENTS
  14. 14. 14 PATHWAYS TO A CAREER PROGRAM (800.14) The Pathways to a Career Program is a one or two semester integration program for students wishing to enter into a Career program at John Abbott College. The program concentrates on preparing students for entrance into the Career program of their choice, and teaches stu- dents the necessary skills required to be successful. Students who are undecided about which Career program is right for them have the opportunity to explore a variety of Career programs before they make a choice. Students can also obtain missing prerequisites or improve their aca- demic record in order to meet entrance requirements for a particular Career program. In their first semester students will take General Education courses, a sample of first year Career program courses, any missing prerequisite courses, and a Career Explorations course. The aim of this last course is to help students explore their career interests and to improve upon their academic skills. Successful completion of the Career Explorations course is a requirement to remain in the Pathways to a Career Program in their second semester. For further information about any of these programs, and their entrance requirements or prerequisites, please con- tact the Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358, or the Pathways Coordinator, pathways@johnabbott.qc.ca. CAREER PROGRAM COURSE OFFERINGS FALL SEMESTER PROGRAM COURSE COURSE TITLE Business Administration 410-125-AB Global Vision Computer Science 420-126-AB Introduction to Computers Dental Hygiene 111-103-AB Introduction to the Profession Engineering Technologies No courses offered Information & Library 393-DCA-03 Profession of Documentation Technician Nursing 350-803-AB Developmental Psychology Publication Design & 412-100-AB Web Design 1 (HTML) Hypermedia Theatre 560-DCA-03 Introduction to Theatre – Techniques Youth & Adult 310-100-AB Analysis of the Profession Correctional Intervention CAREER PROGRAM COURSE OFFERINGS WINTER SEMESTER PROGRAM COURSE COURSE TITLE PRE-REQ Business Administration 410-235-AB Marketing Computer Science 420-226-AB Technical Support 420-126-AB Dental Hygiene 350-203-AB Communication & Teamwork Engineering TechnologiesNo courses offered Information & Library 393-DDJ-03 Communcation 393-DCA-03 and Teamwork Nursing 387-803-AB Sociology of Diverse Families &Communities Publication Design 412-202-AB OR Web Design II (Dreamweaver) & Hypermedia 412-203-AB Digital Photo Processing Theatre 560-DCC-03 Introduction to Theatre – Scenes Youth & Adult 310-200-AB Communication Techniques Correctional Intervention PATHWAYS TO A CAREER PROGRAM (800.14) PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 2004 AND LATER FIRST SEMESTER 3 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH ___-___ HUMANITIES ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION PREREQUISITE COURSE(S) Courses depend on choice of career program and which prerequisites the stu- dent is missing: in most cases this will include Math or Science courses. CAREER PROGRAM COURSE(S) Courses depend on the career program; students may explore more than one career program, as their schedule allows. 1 CAREER EXPLORATIONS COURSE ___-___ 360-103-AB Career Explorations Successful completion of Career Explorations is a requirement for students to continue in Pathways in their SECOND SEMESTER. 5 or 6 = regular course load Students will be pre-registered in their prerequisite, career program & Career Explorations courses. SECOND SEMESTER 3 OR 4 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ___-___ ENGLISH ___-___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION ___-___ HUMANITIES OR ___-___ FRENCH PREREQUISITE COURSE(S) Courses depend on choice of career program and which prerequisites the stu- dent is still missing after one semester in Pathways; in most cases this will include Math or Science courses. CAREER PROGRAM COURSE(S) Courses depend on choice of career program and the availability of SECOND SEMESTER career courses. OPTIONAL COURSES Students are encouraged to explore courses from other programs at the College, as their schedule allows. Students are encouraged to consult an Academic Advisor in the Student Services Department for help with these choices. STUDENTS MUST TAKE A MINIMUM OF 5 COURSES
  15. 15. 15 PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS John Abbott College offers six pre-university programs in: Science, Social Science (including Commerce), Creative Arts, Literature and Languages, Fine Arts and Liberal Arts double - DEC in Science and Social Science, and an DEC in Arts and Sciences. PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAM STRUCTURE Each pre-university program is made up of two components: GENERAL EDUCATION and CONCENTRATION courses. (Note: The Liberal Arts Program and Arts and Sciences does not have any complementary courses.) Please refer to the Diploma Requirement charts on the following pages to determine the diploma requirements for your program. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS GENERAL EDUCATION The compulsory subjects common to all CEGEP programs are English, French, Humanities, Physical Education and complementary. These subjects are referred to as GENERAL EDUCATION courses. General Education requirements are as follows: English (four courses); French (two courses); Humanities (three courses); Physical Education (three courses). The courses and requirements are listed in the course description section of the Calendar. Complementary courses, which also make up a part of the General Education requirements, provide an opportunity for students to explore subjects outside their field of concentration. For example, Science students may choose a Film course. CONCENTRATION COURSES Concentration courses are those courses which are directly related to your field of study. In the Science, Social Science, Creative Arts, Literature and Languages and Liberal Arts programs, the concentration component of the program is made up of both compulsory and optional credits. The Fine Arts Program is composed of compulsory concentration courses only. Please refer to the Diploma Requirement charts on the following pages for more details. COURSE TITLES AND NUMBERS Every course in the Course Description section of the Calendar is identified with a number, title and ponderation. For example: PONDERATION Ponderation specifies the weekly learning activities of the course. In the above example, ponderation is listed as: HOW TO CALCULATE CREDIT VALUE A credit is equal to three hours of learning activities (teaching, laboratory, stage or workshop and homework) per week. Credits for every course are determined by adding the total number of hours in the ponderation and dividing by three. For example: 2 + 2 + 4 = 8 hours ÷ 3 = 2-2/3 credits Understanding the pre-university program structure while trying to choose courses can be confusing. Academic Advisors are available throughout the year to provide assistance with course selection and diploma requirements. Make an appointment well before registration by dropping in to Herzberg, Room 148 or by calling, local 5290. IINNTTRROODDUUCCTTIIOONN TTOO CCOOLLLLEEGGEE EENNGGLLIISSHH ((CCoouurrssee TTiittllee)) 660033--110011--0044 ((22..22..44)) ponderation year number or number of contact hours identifies course content English - subject discipline code 2 . 2 . 4 homework hours laboratory, workshop hours teaching hours PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  16. 16. 16 n Does not count towards a diploma N Required Math courses for Science students. Students are advised to take the required courses first. * This course is a prerequisite for BA Psychology programs at universities in Quebec and requires 360-300-RE Quantitative Methods as a prerequisite. Mathematics/Academic Advising Departments SPRING 2006 PRE-UNIVERSITY MATHEMATICS SEQUENCE CHART 201-103-RE CALCULUS I (NON-SCIENCE) 201-DDB-05 CALCULUS III (SCIENCE) 201-DDC-05 LINEAR ALGEBRA II FOR SCIENCE STUDENTS HIGH SCHOOL COURSES PASSED GRADE JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE MATH COURSE YOU MAY REGISTER IN JAC MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 514, 574 LEVEL 2 426, 436, 526 LEVEL 4 534, 536 LEVEL 5 534, 536 201-NYA - 05 N CALCULUS I (SCIENCE) LEVEL 6 201-DDD-05 STATISTICS NO LEVEL 201-009-50 n ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY 201-007-50 n INTRO TO ALGEBRA 60% MIN 60% MIN 60% - 69% 70% OR HIGHER 201-NYB-05 N CALCULUS II (SCIENCE) 201-NYC-05 N LINEAR ALGEBRA I (SCIENCE) NO LEVEL FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE & COMMERCE STUDENTS HIGH SCHOOL COURSES PASSED GRADE JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE MATH COURSE YOU MAY REGISTER IN JAC MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 514, 574 LEVEL 2 426, 436 LEVEL 4 526, 534, 536 LEVEL 6 201-105-RE LINEAR ALGEBRA (NON SCIENCE) NO LEVEL 201-009-50 n ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY 201-007-50 n INTRO TO ALGEBRA 60% MIN 60% MIN 60% MIN 201-203-RE CALCULUS II (NON SCIENCE) 201-301-RE * ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE METHODS 912-015-94 n INTRO TO COLLEGE MATH 60% - 69% 70% OR HIGHER
  17. 17. 17 SCIENCE (200.BO) The Science Program is a pre-university program of the Ministry of Education intended to provide students with a balanced education, which integrates the basic components of a rigorous scientific and general education. The Science Program at John Abbott College provides a solid grounding in mathematics, chemistry, physics, biology and geology. The approach is competency-based and interdisciplinary, emphasizing the ways in which scientific problem-solving techniques can be applied to many other disciplines. It prepares students for a number of university science and professional programs. Students select their option courses according to their intention to enter either a Pure and Applied or Health Science program at university. Admission into the program requires a strong overall average and a minimum of 70% in the prerequisite courses, Math 536, Chemistry 534 and Physics 534. The John Abbott College Science Program graduate masters the knowledge and skills of a basic general education as detailed in the objectives of the General Education courses. The goals of general education are to provide students with a common cultural core, to help them acquire and develop generic skills and to foster desirable attitudes. As well, gradu- ates master the knowledge and skills of a basic scientific education as listed in the outcomes below. The program is organized according to objectives to be attained in each course. The following is a list of the Ministerial program objectives linked with Science courses. • To analyze the organization, functioning and diversity of living beings. • To analyze chemical and physical changes in matter using concepts associated with the structure of atoms and mole- cules. • To analyze the properties of solutions and reactions in solutions. • To apply the methods of differential calculus to the study of functions and problem solving. • To apply the methods of integral calculus to the study of functions and problem solving. • To apply the methods of linear algebra and vector geometry to problem solving. • To analyze various situations and phenomena in physics using the basic principles of classical mechanics. • To analyze various situations and phenomena in physics using the basic laws of electricity and magnetism. • To analyze various situations or phenomena associated with waves, optics and modern physics using basic principles. • To apply acquired knowledge to one or more subjects in the sciences. • To apply the experimental method in a scientific field. • (Optional) To analyze the structure and functioning of multi-celled organisms in terms of homeostasis and from an evolutionary perspective. • (Optional) To solve simple problems in organic chemistry. Agriculture Architecture Astronomy Biology Biochemistry Chemistry Computer Science Dentistry Dietetics Education Engineering Environmental Science Forestry Geology Mathematics Medicine Nursing Nutrition Occupational Therapy Optometry Pharmacy Physical Education Physics Physiotherapy Veterinary Medicine Graduates from the Science Program may pursue further studies at university in: PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  18. 18. 18 COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT AND INTEGRATION IN THE SCIENCE PROGRAM The Ministry of Education requires every student to pass a “program comprehensive assessment” and a program “inte- grating activity” (Exit Profile Competency 14: “to apply what has been learned to new situations” and Ministry objective 00UU: “To apply acquired knowledge to one or more sub- jects in the sciences”). The Ministry introduced these requirements because it recognized the importance of con- necting the various components within each program. Rather than impose a major exam or paper at the end of the program, or requiring a single course to fulfill these requirements, John Abbott College has integrated them into the ‘option’ courses taken late in the program. These cours- es have been designed so that by passing any three option courses a student will have met the above requirements of the program. The various competencies taught and assessed in the Science Program are outlined in the outcomes and stan- dards of the Science Program Exit Profile and listed below. They are divided into two groups: those competencies that are taught and assessed in virtually every course in the pro- gram, and those that will be the primary focus of the option courses. It is recognized, of course, that many of the former will also be included in the option courses. The following competencies are taught and assessed in most courses of the program: 3. To Apply (the) a scientific method. 4. To Apply a systematic approach to problem solving. 5. To Use appropriate data processing techniques. 6. To reason with rigour, i.e. with precision. 8. To learn in an autonomous manner. 13. To display attitudes and behaviour compatible with the scientific spirit and method. The following competencies will be the special focus of the option courses of the program: 7. To communicate effectively. 9. To work as a member of a team. 10. To recognize the links between science, technology and the evolution of society. 11. To develop a personal system of values. 12. To put into context the emergence and development of scientific concepts. 14. To apply what has been learned to new situations. Most, though not all, of these six competencies will be addressed in each option course. The requirement is that a combination of any three option courses will address them all. It is the responsibility of the Science Program that this requirement be met. Each option course will clearly state in its course outline which competencies are to be taught and how they are to be assessed. To prepare the student for formal assessment of the compe- tencies assigned to the option courses, these competencies will be introduced in the compulsory courses of the program according to the following grid: GRID OF COMPETENCIES TAUGHT AND ASSESSED IN COMPULSORY COURSES NNoottee:: 7a Written communication (reading/writing scientific material) 7b Oral communication of scientific material In these courses, the assigned competencies will be taught and assessed a grade as part of the course grade, but this grade will not be part of the formal assessment of the com- petency. The course outline for each of these courses will clearly outline how the competency is to be taught and assessed. HONOURS SCIENCE (200.16) The Honours Science Certificate program is designed for students interested in pursuing science-related careers and it focuses on interdisciplinary learning and student develop- ment. In their first year, Honours students take their required science courses as a group and share a common meeting time for science-related field trips and invited speakers. They also work on individual and team projects. To be considered for Honours Science, students must graduate from high school with an overall grade average of 85% or higher, and minimum marks of 80% in chemistry, mathematics and physics. In addition to the SRAM application, students must also submit a separate written application to Honours Science. For further information about John Abbott’s Honours Science program, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358; or the Honours Science Coordinator at: honours.science@johnab- bott.qc.ca. CCoommppeetteennccyy 77..aa 77..bb 99 1100 1111 1122 TTeerrmm aanndd CCoouurrssee FIRST SEMESTER Chemistry 202-NYB Math 201-NYA Physics 203-NYA X SECOND/THRID SEMESTER Biology 101-NYA X Chemistry 202-NYA X Math 201-NYB X X Physics 203-NYB X THRID/FOURTH SEMESTER Math 201-NYC Physics 203-NYC
  19. 19. 19 SCIENCE (200.BO) FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION _____-_____ Complementary Course AND 201-NYA-05 Calculus I 202-NYB-05 Chemistry of Solutions 203-NYA-05 Mechanics SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND THREE OF THE FOLLOWING: 101-NYA-05 General Biology I 201-NYB-05 Calculus II 202-NYA-05 General Chemistry 203-NYB-05 Electricity & Magnetism SCIENCE 200.B0 PROGRAM OF STUDY FALL 1999 OR LATER THIRD SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION ONE OF THE FOLLOWING NOT TAKEN IN THE SECOND SEMESTER 101-NYA-05 General Biology I 202-NYA-05 General Chemistry 201-NYB-05 Calculus II 203-NYB-05 Electricity & Magnetism AND TWO OF THE FOLLOWING: 201-NYC-05 Linear Algebra I or 203-NYC-05 Waves Optics & Modern Physics or _____-_____ Science Option course* FOURTH SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH _____-_____ Complementary Course AND Remaining 3 Science Courses _____-_____ Science Option course* _____-_____ Science Option course* _____-_____ Remaining Science Option or required course Complementary courses: Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for rules/restrictions on complementary courses. Students will be required to pass an English Exit Exam and a Program Comprehensive Assessment. PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS * Refer to Science Option Chart for choices
  20. 20. SCIENCES PLACEMENT CHART FALL 2007 or later For SCIENCE (200.B0) and PATHWAYS TO SCIENCE (200.14) STUDENTS Pathways to Career (800.14) Students should consult with an Academic Advisor regarding their program course selection/prerequisites. High School / Cegep course passed John Abbott College science course you may register in. 101 - BIOLOGY Biology recommended 101-NYA General Biology 202 - CHEMISTRY Final grade of 70% or higher in High School Chemistry 534 or 584 or Cegep Chemistry 202-006. Level 3 202-NYB Chemistry of Solutions Final grade of 60% - 69% in High School Chemistry 534 or 584 or Cegep Chemistry 202-006 Level 2 912-016 Introduction to College Chemistry * Physical Science 430, 436 Level 1 202-006 Make-up Chemistry * 201 - MATHEMATICS See Pre-University Mathematics Sequence Chart 982 - PHYSICAL SCIENCE No pre-requisite or Physical Science 416 982-021 Introduction to Physical Science* 203 - PHYSICS Final grade of 70% or higher in High School Physics 534 or 584 or Cegep Physics 203-006 and also have a Final Grade of 70% in Math 536. Level 3 203-NYA Mechanics Final grade of 60%-69% in High School Physics 534 or 584 or Cegep Physics 203-006. (Students must also have passed Math 536 or Cegep Math 009). Level 2 912-017 Introduction to College Physics* Math 536 passed or Cegep Math 201-009 in progress. Level 1 203-006 Make-up Physics Course* * Course does not count towards a College Diploma Questions – Please see an Academic Advisor for clarification. February, 2008 20
  21. 21. 21 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  22. 22. 22 LIST OF SCIENCE OPTION COURSES Science students need 3 (2.66 credit) science option courses to meet the minimum 8 credit optional science component. CHECK UNIVERSITY ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND DISCUSS YOUR EDUCATIONAL PLANS WITH AN ACADEMIC ADVISOR BEFORE YOU REGISTER Note: Not all courses are offered every semester BIOLOGY (101) 101-DCN-05 GENERAL BIOLOGY II 101-DDB-05 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 101-DDM-05 HUMAN GENETICS CHEMISTRY (202) 202-DCP-05 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 202-DDB-05 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 202-DDN-05 CHEMISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT 202-DDP-05 FORENSIC CHEMISTRY EARTH/OCEAN SCIENCE (205) 205-DDP-AB EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE 205-DDM-05 UNDERSTANDING PLANET EARTH 205-DDN-AB INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS (201) 201-DDB-05 CALCULUS III 201-DDC-05 LINEAR ALGEBRA II 201-DDD-05 STATISTICAL METHODS PHYSICS (203) 203-DDB-05 PHYSICS FOR ENGINEERS 203-DDC-05 ASTROPHYSICS 203-DDM-05 ASTRONOMY 203-DDN-05 PHYSICS OF SPORTS
  23. 23. BIOLOGY Biology courses provide students with an opportunity to develop an understanding and appreciation of important biological concepts. Students also develop an appre- ciation of the implications of technologi- cal developments on the biological world. All students should verify with Academic Advising which of the following Biology courses are required for admission to specif- ic university programs. GENERAL BIOLOGY I 101-NYA-05 (3.2.3) General Biology I is an introductory level course compulsory for all sci- ence students and is a prerequisite for all other Biology courses offered in the Science Program. This course offers students an intro- duction to the life sciences focusing on the organization, functioning and diversity of life forms . Upon comple- tion of General Biology I students will be able to: 1. Recognize the relationship between structure and function at different levels of organization; 2. Understand cell division and the genetic mechanisms important in inheritance; 3. Appreciate the mechanisms of evo- lution and understand how life forms adapt to their environment; 4. Develop a basic understanding of the principles of ecology and some of the environmental issues facing man. GENERAL BIOLOGY II 101-DCN-05 (3.2.3) General Biology II is the second level course in College Biology for students in the Science Program. This course is required for individuals planning to enter the Biological or Health Sciences (including Medicine) at university. This course builds upon the concepts introduced in General Biology I by analyzing how the structure and func- tioning of organisms at the chemical and cellular levels work to maintain homeostasis. Upon completion of General Biology II students will be able to: 1. Recognize the relationship between structure and function at different levels of organization; 2. Understand membrane transport systems; 3. Describe the transformation of mat- ter and energy that occurs during cell respiration and photosynthesis; 4. Explain how the regulation of gene expression occurs; 5. Understand and apply various techniques used in biotechnology; 6. Explain the contribution of various systems to the maintenance of homeostasis in plants and animals. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 101-DDB-05 (3.2.3) This is a science option course useful to students planning to enter the Biological or Health Sciences at university. This course may be taken before, concurrently with or after Biology DCN. Designed to introduce science stu- dents to the study of human anatomy and physiology, this course covers many of the human body systems by examining the anatomy of each sys- tem and studying how each system works to maintain the balanced func- tioning of the body. HUMAN GENETICS 101-DDM-05 (3.2.3) A Biology option course open to sci- ence students, this course is designed to present the principles of human genetics and to allow the student to understand some of the latest devel- opments in the field and how they are shaping and revolutionizing society. General course content includes: 1. The application of the laws of inher- itance to human characteristics; 2. The basic principles of molecular genetics and the significance of DNA; 3. Discussion of social and moral implications of genetic research on society; 4. Genetic counselling, genetic diseases, and the genetics of cancer 5. Modern DNA technology, cloning, reproductive technologies. After completing this course, students should have a basic knowledge of inheritance in humans and an aware- ness of modern developments in the field of genetics. CHEMISTRY PLACEMENT Students are placed in College Chemistry courses according to Secondary V provincial results. Please refer to the Science Placement Chart on page 20. Students should verify with Academic Advising which of the following Chemistry courses are required for admission to specific university programs. CHEMISTRY OF SOLUTIONS 202-NYB-05 (3.2.3) P: SEE SCIENCE PLACEMENT CHART Oriented towards understanding con- cepts, this course examines numerous macroscopic properties of solutions and chemical reactions. Major topics in this physical chemistry course include colligative properties, reac- tions, equilibrium (both general and solution equilibria), electrochemistry, kinetics, and acids and bases. GENERAL CHEMISTRY 202-NYA-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYB-05 This course introduces atomic and molecular structures. Topics covered include development of modern atomic theory; chemical bonding and its effect on the chemical and physical properties of matter. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 202-DCP-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYA-05 An introduction to the chemistry of organic molecules including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatic systems and their derivatives, this course employs a mechanistic approach to the under- standing of typical organic reactions. Laboratory work is an important part of the course. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 202-DDB-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-DCP-05 A continuation of 202-DCP, this course extends the study of mecha- nism, structure and synthesis in organ- ic chemistry. The methods introduced in 202-DCP are reviewed by applica- tion to the study of aromatic and car- bonyl compounds. The use of spectropic techniques for determining 23 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  24. 24. molecular structure is emphasized. Practical laboratory work, including the use of chemical instrumentation, is emphasized. FORENSIC CHEMISTRY 202-DDP-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYA-05 Is that blood on your hands? Did the urbane Claus von Bulow attempt to murder his rich socialite wife by sur- reptitiously injecting insulin into her medication? Remember the famous ‘Acid Experiments’ of the 1960’s con- ducted in our back yard at McGill University and secretly funded by the CIA? What role does a chemist play in the mysterious death of a woman - a death later uncovered as murder due to arsenic poisoning? From sensational high-tech cases like the O.J. Simpson trial to less well- known crimes, intriguing details are revealed in the course appropriately subtitled Arsenic Milkshake. In this course, which gives students a behind-the-scenes look at what moti- vates today’s new scientific sleuths, you’ll get a chance to play forensic detective, learn how to analyze gun- shot residues, detect fingerprints, check Breathalyzer test results, identi- fy different blood types and analyse drug poisonings. CHEMISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT: CHEMICALS AROUND US 202-DDN-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYA This course is designed for science students who want to learn more about the chemistry of a healthy envi- ronment, and techniques of assessing environmental uses and abuses. This course deals with: 1. environmental pollutants in water, air and soil; 2. their sources, effects on plants and humans and; 3. controls to minimize pollutants. Topics include acid rain, nuclear waste, radiation hazards, oil pollu- tion, effects of smoking on humans, toxic waste, pesticides, smog, nutrition, environment and physical fitness. EARTH & OCEAN SCIENCE EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE 205-DDP-AB (3.2.3) P: 202-NYB-05 & 203-NYA You probably already know that a feedback occurs when a guitar gets too close to an amp, but did you know that feedbacks also occur in Earth Systems? The geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and bios- phere on Earth are functioning sys- tems in and of themselves that also interact in complex ways with each other, creating the weather, rocks, ecosystems, and climate. What hap- pens when humans tinker with com- plex Earth systems that have been in place for millions of years? Learn the science behind the climate change headlines and examine the evidence for potential significant change in our lifetimes from a global geo-historic perspective. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY: 205-DDN-AB (3.2.3) P: 202-NYB-05 & 203-NYA Oceanography is truly an interdiscipli- nary science incorporating aspects of geology, chemistry, physics, and biolo- gy to study the present and past of the world ocean. Learn about the generation of tsunamis and tidal waves (not the same thing!), beaches and tides, surface ocean currents and global thermohaline ocean circula- tion. Learn why oceans exist in the first place, how their shapes are con- stantly changing, and explore the chemosynthetic communities of organisms that live at the birthplaces of oceans. Human impacts on the oceans and the potential resulting cli- mate changes will also be explored. UNDERSTANDING PLANET EARTH: 205-DDM-05 (3.2.3) P: 202-NYB-05 & 203-NYA Have you ever wondered why volca- noes erupt in Hawaii, but not in Quebec? Did you know that Montreal is moving away from Paris at about the same rate that your finger- nails grow? Why are mountain chains where they are? What makes earth- quakes tick? Follow the history of Earth from magma ocean to giant ice- ball; through super-continents and mountain-building episodes to ancient seas; from recent glaciation to modern-day global warming. Learn how geoscientists uncover Earth's 4- billion-year-story and decipher the deep-Earth and surface processes that continue to shape our home: it's all in the rocks. MATHEMATICS All students are placed into Mathematics courses according to their Secondary V Provincial results. Refer to the Math Sequence chart for Pre-University students on page 16. All students planning course selection to meet university entrance requirements should consult an Academic Advisor. CALCULUS I 201-NYA-05 (3.2.3) P: SEE MATH SEQUENCE CHART This course includes a review of algebra, functions, limits, continuity; differentiation of algebraic, trigono- metric, exponential and logarithmic functions; related rates, curve sketching, optimization, including word problems, antiderivatives, definite integrals and areas CALCULUS II 201-NYB-05 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYA This course covers inverse trigonomet- ric functions: graphs, differentiation, integrals involving inverse trigonomet- ric functions; integration techniques: substitutions, powers of trig functions, trig substitution, partial fractions, inte- gration by parts; physical applications of integration, areas between curves, volumes of solids of revolution, L’Hopital’s Rule and indeterminate forms, improper integrals, sequences, infinite series, power series, tests for convergence, plus the Maclaurin and Taylor series and applications. LINEAR ALGEBRA I 201-NYC-05 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYA This course covers the solution of sys- tems of linear equations, matrices, determinants; vectors in 2-space and 3-space, dot product, cross product, lines and planes, introduction to con- cepts of linear combinations, spans, subspaces, linear dependence and independence, basis, dimension, row space, column space, null space and applications. 24
  25. 25. CALCULUS III 201-DDB-O5 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYB WITH AT LEAST 65%. This course is strongly recommended for students who intend to study Engineering, Physics, or Mathematics at university. Among the topics dis- cussed are power series and Taylor series, parametric equations, graphs using polar co-ordinates, vector-valued functions, limits, continuity and graphs of multivariate functions, partial deriva- tives, optimization problems, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, cylindri- cal and spherical co-ordinates. LINEAR ALGEBRA II 201-DDC-O5 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYC Recommended for students who intend to pursue Engineering, Physics, or Mathematics in university, this course includes general vector spaces and subspaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization and selected applications (linear differen- tial equations, quadric surfaces, linear programming). STATISTICAL METHODS 201-DDD-05 (3.2.3) P: 201-NYA This introductory statistics course is especially recommended for all Science students. Topics covered include frequency distributions, prob- ability distributions of a discrete ran- dom variable, probability distributions of a continuous random variable using calculus, mathematical expecta- tions including moment generating functions, sampling and sampling dis- tributions, linear models, point and interval estimation and hypothesis testing of one and two parameters. PHYSICS PHYSICS PLACEMENT Students are placed in Physics courses according to their Secondary V provincial results. Please refer to the Science Placement Chart on p. 20. MECHANICS 203-NYA-05 (3.2.3) Topics covered in this basic mechan- ics course include linear and rotation- al kinematics, trajectories, Newton’s laws of motion, work, energy and momentum. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and laboratory work. Many laboratory exercises involve using computers for data acquisition, and stu- dents are encouraged to use computers to analyze data and plot graphs. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 203-NYB-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYA This course emphasizes the basic physical principles of electricity and magnetism, with calculus being intro- duced where necessary. Topics include Coulomb’s Law, electric field, electric potential, motion of charged particles in electric fields, capacitors, DC circuits, Kirchhoff’s Laws, RC cir- cuits, Biot-Savart Law, magnetic fields, motion of charged particles in mag- netic fields, torque on a current loop and Faraday’s Law. WAVES, OPTICS AND MODERN PHYSICS 203-NYC-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYA & 201-NYA C: 203-NYB (PASSED OR IN PROGRESS) Wave behaviour is fundamental to an astonishing list of physical phenomena. The student in this course will learn how to analyze waves in both a quali- tative and quantitative manner, and will come face-to-face with some of the bizarre and counterintuitive impli- cations of modern physics. Topics include simple harmonic motion, waves and sound, interference and diffraction of light, quantum mechan- ics, and special relativity. Students entering the course will be expected to have solid physics, math and labo- ratory skills. PHYSICS FOR ENGINEERS 203-DDB-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYC OR 203-NYB & 201-NYA Open to all science students, this course is primarily designed for stu- dents planning to study engineering or applied science at university and helps bridge the gap between CEGEP Physics and university engineering courses. Topics include data analysis using spreadsheets, simple electronic circuits, AC circuit theory, rotational motion and static equilibrium. Laboratory work includes projects which could include such things as building radios, popsicle bridges, small-scale robots, a fully functional wind turbine, and elec- tric soap-box go-cart, or something along those lines. ASTRONOMY 203-DDM-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYA This course is designed for science students as a general introduction to the fascinating world of Astronomy. We begin with the historical roots of the subject: the forecast of seasons for farmers; the desire to predict the future by astrologers; the many and varied religious beliefs; and finally the birth of modern science. Topics include: understanding the night sky, the evolution of the solar system, planetary motions and composition, the structure of the sun, the birth, life and death of stars, the origin of galax- ies, the “big bang” and the future evolution of the universe. There will be observation nights and students will be introduced to the use of tele- scopes. We plan trips to the Planetarium if time permits. ASTROPHYSICS 203-DDC-05 (3.2.3) P: 203-NYA Designed for science students, this course attempts to help the student understand why the universe is the way it is. Topics include: orbital theo- ry and Kepler’s laws, Newton’s Universal Law of Gravity, conservation of energy, the ideal gas law, black- body radiation, the solar system, plan- etary evolution, the minor bodies in the solar system such as comets and asteroids, stellar structure and lives including white dwarf stars, neutron stars and black holes, the “big bang” and the formation of galaxies and var- ious cosmological theories. There will be observation nights and, if time per- mits, a field trip to the Planetarium or other facility is a possibility. SCIENCE MAKE-UP COURSES BRIDGING For Pathways to Science students and students in the Transition Program. INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE MATHEMATICS 912-015-94 (3.2.3) P: SEE MATH SEQUENCE CHART This course is designed for students lacking a solid background in high school level math. Topics covered are: basic algebraic functions, factoriza- tion, equations, functional notation, 25 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  26. 26. inverse of a function, trigonometric functions, identities, trigonometric equations, sine law, cosine law, graphs of trigonometric functions. INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE CHEMISTRY 912-016-94 (3.2.3) The material covered in this course provides basic chemistry and prepares students with poor grades in Secondary V Chemistry for subse- quent chemistry courses. Emphasis is placed on nomenclature, types of bonding, meaning and inter- pretation of chemical equations, stoi- chiometry, concentration terminology, dilution, solution stoichiometry, titra- tion and pH. Laboratory work is included. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS 912-017-94 (3.2.3) P: MATH 526, 536 OR 201-009 This course, which provides the nec- essary background to students with poor Secondary V grades in Physics, considers fundamental concepts in electricity and motion. In dealing with these topics emphasis is placed on improving problem solving skills, col- lection and interpretation of data and use of graphs in the representation and interpretation of data. CHEMISTRY CHEMISTRY 202-006-06 (3.3.4) Equivalent to Secondary V Chemistry (051-534), this course is intended for students who wish to pursue science or technology programs and have passed Secondary IV Physical Science, or its equivalent (982-021-06), but lack Secondary V Chemistry. This course provides sufficient chemistry for entry into many technology pro- grams (such as Dental Hygiene) and subsequent Chemistry courses. MATHEMATICS INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA 201-007-06 (4.2.4) P: SEE MATH SEQUENCE CHART In this course, students learn expo- nents, polynomials, factoring, opera- tions with rational expressions, roots, products, quotients, adding, subtract- ing, rationalizing and simplifying, solv- ing linear equations, linear systems in two variables and quadratic equa- tions, trig ratios, law of sines and cosines. ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY 201-009-05 (3.2.3) P: SEE MATH SEQUENCE CHART In this course students learn algebra, radicals, polynomials, rational expres- sions, factoring, equations and inequalities, functions, graphs, com- position of functions, inverses, poly- nomials, multiplication, long division, rational functions, parabolas, expo- nential and logarithmic functions, properties, solving equations, applica- tions, trigonometry, angles, triangle trig, trig functions of any angle, identi- ties, evaluate inverse trig functions and applications. PHYSICAL SCIENCE PHYSICAL SCIENCE 982-021-06 (4.2.3) Equivalent to Secondary IV Physical Science (056-436), this course is intended for students who wish to pursue science or technology pro- grams, but lack the necessary Physical Science prerequisite. The course will provide sufficient chemistry to pre- pare students for the Secondary V equivalent, 202-006-06. PHYSICS PHYSICS 203-006-06 (4.2.4) P OR C: MATH 526, 536 OR 201-009 Designed for students with no previ- ous background in physics, this course is equivalent to Secondary V high school physics (534). It introduces kinematics (emphasizing graphing techniques), vector analysis, and Newton’s laws of motion. 26
  27. 27. SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.A0) Graduates of the John Abbott Social Science program will be prepared to enter university studies in fields related to social science, including law, education, and administration. This preparation will comprise both a general education and an education in the knowledge and skills specific to the various disciplines within Social Science. Students will have developed the following: • A scholarly respect for, and a foundation knowledge of, the large body of evidence and theory as it is evolving in social sciences • A critical, scientific style of thinking as it applies to social science • An understanding of basic research methods • Appropriate strategies for finding and evaluating reliable sources, including information technology • An appreciation of the moral and ethical dimensions of social science • A sense of informed, concerned, and active citizenship in the local, national and world community. • A transdisciplinary integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes throughout the program. • A commitment to ongoing personal development and an enthusiasm to know more. PPrreerreeqquuiissiitteess :: SSeeccoonnddaarryy VV CCeerrttiiffiiccaattee oorr eeqquuiivvaalleenntt For further information about the Social Science program entrance requirements or prerequisites, please contact the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358. NNOOTTEE:: Students are advised to consult with an Academic Advisor to learn how to build university entrance requirements into their program of study. 27 Socia l Science Paths to Your Car eer CriminalJustice Law Advertising Labour Relations Management MarketingBroadcasting PublicRelations Journalism Anthropology Communication Economics Geography History Accounting Political SciencePhilosophy Psychology Sociology Counselling EducationGeriatrics Recreation SocialWork NN..BB.. Graduates from any of the Social Science profiles will receive a diploma in Social Science regardless of the profile chosen. PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  28. 28. 28 SOCIAL SCIENCE - PSYCHOLOGY PROFILE (300.A3) The Psychology profile is designed for students interested in preparing for psychology studies at university. Students in this profile must take Advanced Quantitative Methods, Human Biology and two level 2 psychology courses. Students select this option in their third semester by com- pleting a Change of Program request available in the Registrar’s Office. Prerequisite: 360-300-RE Quantitative Methods FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 330-910 Western Civilization 350-102 Introduction to Psychology ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 360-300 Quantitative Methods 383-920 Macroeconomics ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course PSYCHOLOGY PROFILE 300.A3 SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.A0) Social Science is the study of all aspects of human life from many different perspectives. In addition to the compulsory courses in economics, history, methodology and psychology, students in John Abbott College’s Social Science program can choose courses in fields such as anthropology, business, classics, geography, mathematics, philosophy, political sci- ence, religion and sociology. The program’s greatest advan- tage lies in the depth and breadth of knowledge and understanding students acquire. Graduates gain invaluable university skills in methods of research, writing, analysis and the presentation of ideas. FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 330-910 Western Civilization 350-102 Introduction to Psychology ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 360-300 Quantitative Methods 383-920 Macroeconomics ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SOCIAL SCIENCE 300.A0 SOCIAL SCIENCE WITH MATHEMATICS PROFILE (300.A1) The Social Science with Mathematics profile is designed for students who enjoy Mathematics yet wish to select from a variety of Social Science subjects. Students in this profile must take Calculus I, Calculus II and Linear Algebra in their first three semesters in addition to the regular Social Science compulsory courses. Prerequisite: Math 526 or 536. FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-103 Calculus I 330-910 Western Civilization 383-920 Macroeconomics ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-203 Calculus II 350-102 Introduction to Psychology 360-300 Quantitative Methods ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SOCIAL SCIENCE WITH MATHEMATICS PROFILE 300.A1 SOCIAL SCIENCE - COMMERCE PROFILE (300.A2) The Commerce profile is primarily designed for students interested in preparing for business studies at university, however it also prepares graduates for a variety of other university programs. To complete the Commerce profile, students must pass Calculus I, Linear Algebra, Basics of Business, Microeconomics plus one additional business course or Money and Banking course in addition to the regular Social Science compulsory courses. Prerequisite: Math 526 or 536. FIRST SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 602- FRENCH 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-103 Calculus I 383-920 Macroeconomics 401-100 Introduction to Business ___-___ Level 1 Social Science course SECOND SEMESTER 603- ENGLISH 345- HUMANITIES 109- PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-203 Calculus II 330-910 Western Civilization 350-102 Introduction to Psychology 360-300 Quantitative Methods COMMERCE PROFILE 300.A2
  29. 29. HONOURS SOCIAL SCIENCE (300.A5) AND HONOURS SOCIAL SCIENCE WITH MATH (300.A6) AND HONOURS COMMERCE (300.A7) Honours Social Science students may follow the General Social Science profile, the Social Science with Mathematics profile or the Commerce profile. Students follow the same program and courses offered to all Social Science students with the following enhancements: • Over their four semesters at John Abbott, Honours students take common classes in Economics, History, Mathematics, Psychology and Social Science research courses. • Common meeting times to help promote peer support • Informal social activities, guest speakers, and field trips • Early registration privileges • Assistance with career exploration and university applications How to apply to Honours? • Apply to JAC on the SRAM application into: 300.30 Social Sciences 300.31 Social Sciences with Mathematics 300.32 Social Sciences - Commerce AANNDD • Apply to Honours Social Science by filling out the “John Abbott College Application for Honours Social Science”. The form is avail- able in high school guidance counsellor offices or by calling the John Abbott College Admissions Office, or on the John Abbott College web site. Students will receive an acceptance letter to John Abbott College based on their SRAM application and a letter regarding acceptance into the Honours Program. For further information about John Abbott’s Honours Social Science, Social Science with Math, and Commerce programs, please contact the Honours Social Science Coordinator, local 5717; or honours.socialscience@johnabbott.qc.ca; or the John Abbott College Admissions Office, local 5355, 5361 or 5358. 29 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  30. 30. LEVEL 2 COURSES PONDERATION: 3.0.3 OR 2.1.3 CREDITS: 2.00 HOURS: 45 30 Not all courses are offered every semester. Consult the Schedule of Classes. SOCIAL SCIENCE LIST OF COURSES COMPULSORY COURSES LEVEL 1 COURSES 330-910-AB History of Western Civilization 350-102-AB Introduction to Psychology 383-920-AB Macroeconomics METHODOLOGY COURSES 300-300-AB Social Science Research Methods 300-301-AB Integration in the Social Sciences 360-300-RE Quantitative Methods in Social Sciences UNIVERSITY PREREQUISITES Level 201-103-RE Calculus I 1 101-901-RE Human Biology 2 201-203-RE Calculus II 2 201-105-RE Linear Algebra 2 201-301-RE Advanced Quantitative Methods 2 LEVEL 1 COURSES PONDERATION: 3.0.3 OR 2.1.3 CREDITS: 2.00 HOURS: 45 320-100-AB Introduction to Geography 332-100-AB Introduction to Classics 340-101-AB Philosophical Questions 370-100-AB World Religions 381-100-AB Introduction to Anthropology 385-100-AB Introduction to Political Science 387-100-AB Introduction to Sociology 401-100-AB Introduction to Business ANTHROPOLOGY 381-250-AB First Civilizations 381-251-AB Peoples of the World 381-252-AB Human Evolution 381-253-AB Race & Racism 381-254-AB Amerindians 381-255-AB Anthropology & Contemporary Issues BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 401-251-AB Marketing 401-253-AB Business Law 401-254-AB Introduction to Accounting 401-255-AB International Business 401-256-AB e-Business & Strategic Management GEOGRAPHY 320-256-AB Geography of Tourism 320-257-AB The Middle East: A Regional Geography 320-258-AB Geography of the World Economy 320-259-AB Geographical Information Systems 320-260-AB Cities & Urbanization 320-261-AB A Global Crisis? 320-262-AB Environmental Geography 320-263-AB People, Places, Nations ECONOMICS 383-250-AB Microeconomics 383-251-AB Money & Banking 383-253-AB Economy of Quebec & Canada HISTORY 330-250-AB History of Canada & the World 330-251-AB History of the United States 330-252-AB Modern History 330-253-AB History of the Developing World 330-254-AB Lost Civilizations 330-255-AB Ancient Greece 330-256-AB Ancient Rome 330-257-AB History of Russia and the USSR PHILOSOPHY 340-252-AB Philosophy of Education 340-253-AB Social and Political Philosophy 340-254-AB Philosophy and the Crisis of Modernity 340-255-AB Environmental Philosophy POLITICAL SCIENCE 385-250-AB Modern Political Ideas 385-251-AB Introduction to International Politics 385-252-AB Political Ideologies & Regimes 385-253-AB Canadian Politics PSYCHOLOGY 350-250-AB Child Psychology 350-251-AB Interaction & Communication 350-252-AB Psychology of Mental Health 350-253-AB Social Psychology PSYCHOLOGY cont’d 350-257-AB The Human Brain 350-258-AB Psychology of the Paranormal 350-260-AB Evolutionary Psychology 350-261-AB Psychology of Learning & Memory 350-262-AB Psychology of Sport 350-263-AB Psychology Applied to Modern Life 350-264-AB Psychology of Sensation and Perception RELIGION 370-252-AB The Problem of Evil 370-253-AB Ritual and Tradition 370-254-AB New Spiritual Movements 370-255-AB Religion, Body and Myth SOCIOLOGY 387-251-AB Mass Media & Popular Culture 387-252-AB Love, Relationships & Family 387-253-AB Sociology of Sexual Relations/Gender Relations 387-254-AB Sociology of Education 387-255-AB Race, Ethnicity & Structured Inequality 387-257-AB Environmental Sociology 387-258-AB Crime & Social Control 387-259-AB Social Problems 387-260-AB Sociology of Cyberspace
  31. 31. SOCIAL SCIENCE PROGRAM CERTIFICATE IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CERTIFICATE Social Science students are offered a study option leading to a Certificate in International Studies. This option is open to all general Social Science students and is intended for those students who wish to enhance their Social Science Diploma (D.E.C.) with an international program of study. The International Studies Certificate combines cultural and multi-disciplinary learning with the option of choosing language acquisition via the complementary courses. International Studies Profile To receive a Certificate in International Studies the student must take at least six Social Science courses from the following list of eligible courses: Students in the International Profile are also encouraged to take courses in General Education which reflect the profile. They however, ddoo nnoott ccoouunntt towards the compulsory six Social Sciences courses. There are suitable courses in English and Humanities as well as complementary courses including foreign language courses. Please see the Coordinator of International Studies before starting the profile: Jim Vanstone, Hochelaga 131, local 5486, e-mail: international.studies@johnabbott.qc.ca The following five compulsory Social Science courses, required of every social science student, many not be counted as one of the six profile courses. However, both HHiissttoorryy ooff WWeesstteerrnn CCiivviilliizzaattiioonn ((333300--991100--RREE)) and MMaaccrrooeeccoonnoommiiccss ((338833--992200--RREE)) provide valuable information for the profile. All students learn essential research skills in the required courses QQuuaannttiittaattiivvee MMeetthhooddss ((336600--330000--RREE)) and RReesseeaarrcchh MMeetthhooddss ((330000--330000--9911)).. Profile students are expected to do their research project in the compulsory course Integration in the Social Sciences (300- 301-94) on a topic relevant to their chosen profile. 31 DDIISSCCIIPPLLIINNEE CCOOUURRSSEE NNUUMMBBEERR CCOOUURRSSEE TTIITTLLEE AAnntthhrrooppoollooggyy 381-251-AB Peoples of the World 381-253-AB Race and Racism BBuussiinneessss 401-255-AB International Business GGeeooggrraapphhyy 320-256-AB Geography of Tourism 320-257-AB The Middle East: A Regional Geography 320-258-AB Geography of the World Economy 320-261-AB A Global Crisis? 320-263-AB People, Places, Nations HHiissttoorryy 330-250-AB History of Canada and the World 330-251-AB History of the United States 330-252-AB Modern History: 20th Century International relations 330-253-AB History of the Developing World 330-257-AB History of Russia and USSR PPhhiilloossoopphhyy 340-101-AB Philosophical Questions PPoolliittiiccaall SScciieennccee 385-100-AB Introduction to Political Science 385-250-AB Modern Political Ideas: An Introduction 385-251-AB Introduction to International Politics 385-252-AB Political Ideologies & Regimes RReelliiggiioonn 370-100-AB World Religions SSoocciioollooggyy 387-100-AB Introduction to Sociology PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS
  32. 32. ANTHROPOLOGY INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 381-100-AB (3.0.3) Anthropology is the study of all aspects of human life from the distant past to the present and throughout all areas of the world. In this course you will be introduced to the methods and concepts of physical anthropolo- gy, archaeology, and cultural anthro- pology. Through lectures and labs you will learn about human evolution, the prehistory and history of ancient civi- lizations, and the diversity of cultures in the world today. This introductory course will provide you with general knowledge of anthropology as well as prepare you for more specialized courses in the field. FIRST CIVILIZATIONS 381-250-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Archaeology as a sub-dis- cipline of Anthropology and will learn about the transition from hunting- gathering to food production. The development of early civilizations in both the Old and New Worlds will be examined through a variety of case studies from Mesopotamia, Asia, Africa, Mesoamerica, and South America. Topics to be covered in this course will include the economic bases of early civilizations, the role of religion in early civilizations, the development of social stratification, and monumental architecture and art. PEOPLES OF THE WORLD 381-251-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Cultural Anthropology and of the diversity of cultures in the world. Studying others encourages us to look more critically at ourselves. In this way, cultures come to serve as mirrors in which we can perceive our own images, past and present. This, in turn, should foster critical thinking and a broader understanding of our- selves and the world we live in. Selected cultures from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and elsewhere will be used as case studies illustrating field- work techniques, aspects of culture, and adaptation. Topics to be covered in the course will include adaptation, exchange and economic systems, domestic life, gender, anthropology and the modern world, and selected aspects of culture theory. HUMAN EVOLUTION 381-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Physical Anthropology as a sub-discipline of Anthropology and will learn about human evolution from the early Primates through to modern Homo sapiens as well as about contemporary human biologi- cal diversity. Topics to be covered include mechanisms of evolution, Primates and Primate behaviour, the Australopithecines, Homo habilis, Homo erectus, the Neanderthals, early modern Homo sapiens, contem- porary human diversity, and the con- cept of race. RACE AND RACISM 381-253-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Anthropology as these address the concept of race and the sociocultural phenomenon of racism. We will look at the history and usage of the concept of race since it first came to prominence in the 18th cen- tury and how it is linked to the devel- opment of systems of racial stratification. The course has a theo- retical as well as a vital personal dimension: as we seek to understand the social meaning of race and racism we want to continually examine and reassess our own beliefs. Topics to be considered in this course include the Anthropological perspective on race relations, the contemporary Anthropological critique of traditional racial classifications, explanations of contemporary variation, case studies (including South Africa under Apartheid, Nazi Germany and Canada) to help explain the historical, social, economic, and political forces that create and sustain racism, and concepts of ethnicity, prejudice, stereotype, discrimination, and the multiple forms that racism takes. AMERINDIANS 381-254-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Cultural Anthropology and Archaeology in the study of Native Americans. This course will give students a better understanding of the history and contemporary sta- tus of aboriginal cultures. Topics to considered include the earliest peo- pling of the Americas, the cultural prehistory of North America, the diversity of cultures during the colo- nial period, the effects of coloniza- tion, and the contemporary issues facing Canadian Indians and Inuit. ANTHROPOLOGY AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES 381-255-AB (3.0.3) P: 381-100-AB In this course, students will further their knowledge of the methods and concepts of Anthropology in the study of a variety of contemporary issues. The course may address a different issue whenever it is offered. Topics which may be considered in this course include human sexuality in cross-cultural perspective, the anthro- pology of war and peace, and com- parative religion, among others. The specific description of the course will be available from the department each time the course is scheduled. NNoottee:: Some Anthropology courses are offered as complimentary courses. Consult the complimentary course section of the course calendar for a list of available courses. BIOLOGY HUMAN BIOLOGY 101-901-RE (2.1.3) Human Biology is a concentration course for Social Science students in the psychology profile. Focusing on cell physiology, human reproduction genetics and on the regulation of homeostasis by the nervous and endocrine systems, this course offers an opportunity to develop an under- standing of the biological concepts which play an important role in human behaviour. 32
  33. 33. BUSINESS The following courses - up to a maximum of three - may be taken by SOCIAL SCI- ENCE students. COMMERCE students are required to take Introduction to Business, one level two Business Administration course or Money and Banking (econom- ics). Accounting is recommended for stu- dents pursuing business at university. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 401-100-AB (3.0.3) This course introduces students to the primary functional areas of business study, including management, market- ing, accounting, finance, and law. Students acquire an extensive knowl- edge of business terms and concepts as well as an understanding of the role of business in society. MARKETING 401-251-AB (3.0.3) P: 401-100-AB This course introduces students to basic marketing concepts and phe- nomena. It focuses on the social impact of marketing practices, and defines marketing as the process of creating, distributing, promoting and pricing goods services and ideas to facilitate satisfying exchange relation- ships in a dynamic environment. INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING 401-254-AB (3.0.3) P: 401-100-AB This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and proce- dures of the “double-entry” book- keeping system as well as the vocabulary found in business docu- ments. Students learn correct meth- ods of recording and reporting financial data. The importance of cor- rect reporting of financial information for decision makers and its impact on society is stressed. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 401-255-AB (3.0.3) P: 401-100-AB This course focuses on the impact of International Business from the per- spective of the various stakeholders including business, consumers, gov- ernment, employees and the physical, social, and cultural environments in the trend toward a more integrated global economic system. Students learn about how business, consumer, and political objectives are played out in the global marketplace and how they impact on each other. E-BUSINESS 401-256-AB (3.0.3) P: 401-100-AB This course explores strategic manage- ment issues while simultaneously examining the rapidly developing area of business conduct on the Internet, referred to as e-business (e-commerce). Internet technology and globalization are only two social environmental forces that are greatly influencing strategic management decision-mak- ing. By examining these and other forces, students will better appreciate the strategic thinking that goes on within a variety of organizations. ECONOMICS IMPORTANT INFORMATION: Some universities require successful completion of both Macroeconomics and Microeconomics for entry into their Commerce programs. At some universi- ties students may receive an exemption for Microeconomics and Macroeconomics if their grade is 75% or more. Please check with an Academic Advisor to verify admission requirements. MACROECONOMICS 383-920-AB (3.0.3) This course familiarizes students with important concepts such as the deter- mination of gross domestic product, unemployment rate, consumer price index, business cycles, creation of money and balance of payments. Fiscal and monetary policies are examined within the context of the Canadian economy. Topics dealing with international trade and finance in relation to the Canadian experi- ence are also discussed. MICROECONOMICS 383-250-AB (3.0.3) P:383-920-AB This course acquaints students with the basic principles of microeconom- ics such as consumer theory, demand and supply, elasticity, production and costs, market structure and behavior, and the determination of factor incomes. Contemporary topics such as the environment, urban issues and government intervention in the mar- ket are discussed. Required course for the Commerce profile. MONEY AND BANKING 383-251-AB (3.0.3) P: 383-920-AB A continuation of Macroeconomics, Money & Banking involves a more detailed analysis of the money supply, commercial banking system, non- bank financial intermediaries and the functions and operations of the Bank of Canada. A more advanced Macroeconomic model is developed to give students greater insight into the workings of the Canadian econo- my. Economic policy is discussed in relation to current developments in Canadian and world economies. This course fulfills the additional Commerce level 2 course requirements. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS 383-252-AB (3.0.3) P: 383-920-AB This advanced course permits stu- dents to apply economic principles to a specific field of study. The pure the- ory of international trade, terms of trade, theory and applications of tar- iffs, balance of payments and exchange rates are discussed within the context of Canada’s substantial relation to other economies. The nature and effects of international economic institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund are also examined. Although Macroeconomics (383-920- RE) is the only prerequisite, students will find this course more rewarding if they have already taken both Macroeconomics and Microeconomics. GEOGRAPHY INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY 320-100-AB (2.1.3) This course introduces students to the main concepts, themes and methods of geography. It looks at the major subdisciplines of human and physical geography, including population, cul- tural and urban geography, climate, earth and water resources, as well as how maps can convey geographical information. The relationship between humans and their environments is stressed throughout the course. 33 PRE-UNIVERSITYPROGRAMS

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