• Save
Lean product development for startups
 

Lean product development for startups

on

  • 3,685 views

Cloud Elements CEO, Mark Geene's presentation for Startup Founder 101 event. July 9, 2013 at Galvanize Denver, CO. Lean product management principles, Startup Metrics for Pirates, Agile MVP planning ...

Cloud Elements CEO, Mark Geene's presentation for Startup Founder 101 event. July 9, 2013 at Galvanize Denver, CO. Lean product management principles, Startup Metrics for Pirates, Agile MVP planning and using Pivotal Tracker.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,685
Views on SlideShare
2,057
Embed Views
1,628

Actions

Likes
21
Downloads
0
Comments
0

15 Embeds 1,628

http://fi.co 812
http://community.galvanize.it 347
http://www.cloud-elements.com 264
http://www.style3.com 103
https://www.rebelmouse.com 30
https://twitter.com 23
https://www.linkedin.com 17
http://cloud.feedly.com 11
http://www.fi.co 7
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com 4
http://www.feedspot.com 3
http://www.newsblur.com 3
http://newsblur.com 2
http://reader.aol.com 1
http://www.linkedin.com 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Lean product development for startups Lean product development for startups Presentation Transcript

  • Lean product development for startups mark geene @mgeene
  • Confidential & Proprietary Common MISTAKES 1. Include too many features; start new ones too soon 2. Lack timely visibility to development progress 3. Not quantitatively capturing feedback from users and customers 4. Focused on “your solution” and not on “their problems” 5. Your development team is too optimistic leading to too many commitments 6. Lack of a product roadmap leads to any client being a good client 7. Chasing the competition
  • Confidential & Proprietary LEAN Product Management PRINCIPLES 1. Build the right thing; By iterating 2. Discover problems by talking to customers 3. Determine Problem/Solution Fit with an MVP 4. More features are not the answer 5. Measure Results … AARRR
  • Confidential & Proprietary BUILD-MEASURE-LEARN FEEDBACK LOOP* *Lean Startup, Eric Ries
  • Confidential & Proprietary Problem/solution fit • Is this a problem worth solving? • Must-Have (Is it something customers/users need?) • Viable (Will they pay for it?) • Feasible (Can it be solved with available resources?) • Minimum Viable Product (MVP) • Purpose is to address problem/solution fit • Minimum set of features that a user will accept • “Do the smallest thing possible to learn” • Test your hypothesis, learn and iterate Running Lean, Ash Maurya
  • Confidential & Proprietary product/market fit • Is this something (lots of) people want? • How well does my product solve the problem? • What value does it deliver over other alternatives? • Will they pay for it? • Qualitative Discovery • Quantitative Discovery Running Lean, Ash Maurya
  • Confidential & Proprietary STARTUP METRICS FOR pirates* • Acquisition – How do users find you? • Activation – Do users have a great first experience? • Retention – Do users come back? • Referral – Do users like it enough to tell others? • Revenue – Are users willing to pay for it? * Dave McClure, 500 Startups
  • Confidential & Proprietary Sleep machine example Problem: Help people who live in noisy areas to sleep better • 90+ Sounds Available • Mix your own sleep tracks • Beautiful digital clock • Alarm with favorite songs • Captures sleep data and analytics
  • Confidential & Proprietary AGILE MVP PLANNING 1. Who are the users?  Define user personas 2. What are all of the key features that I can think of?  Identify the Epics 3. Which Epics are required for my MVP?  Prioritize Epics 4. What do these prioritized features/epics need to do?  Identify all of the user stories you can think of  INVEST (Independent, Negotiable, Valuable, Estimated, Small, Testable)  Assign each one to an Epic or create new Epics
  • Confidential & Proprietary AGILE MVP PLANNING 5. Is this story required to determine Problem/Solution Fit?  MVP Test Every Story 6. How long will it take to develop my MVP  Estimate “points” for each user story  Estimate “capacity” for your development team 7. What should we work on next?  Organize stories into 2-Week Sprints  Groom each story with acceptance criteria 8. How are we doing?  Sprint Demo Reviews after every Sprint
  • Confidential & Proprietary AGILE MVP PLANNING 9. What if my priorities change?  Every 2 weeks prioritize stories for the next sprint  Take into account market feedback 10. Release, Get Feedback, Repeat
  • Confidential & Proprietary Epics in Pivotal tracker Hint: Once entered you can drag and drop them to prioritize.
  • Confidential & Proprietary Stories In Pivotal tracker Hint: Once entered you can drag and drop them to prioritize.
  • Confidential & Proprietary Writing user stories • As a [Persona]. I want to [capability or function], so that [result or benefit] • INVEST • Independent • Negotiable • Valuable • Estimated • Small • Testable
  • Confidential & Proprietary Summary • Apply Lean Product Management Principles from Day 1 • Don’t over-engineer; get to MVP in two months or less • Manage your priorities at the Epic level downward to focus and save time in managing your backlog • Your priorities and plan WILL change … Embrace it
  • Confidential & Proprietary Gary Gaessler VP Sales & Marketing PHONE t 1(303) 570 0003 EMAIL gary@cloud-elements.com Social @ggaessler Contact us %" 