Generation gap power point2

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Presentation of 4 generation groups in to-days workplace

Presentation of 4 generation groups in to-days workplace

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  • 1. The Generation Gap
  • 2. Today’s Workforce
  • 3. Today’s WorkforceTraditionalists (1922 - 1945)✤ Aliases: Veterans, Silent Generation, Greatest Generation✤ Lived through WWII and were taught core values, respect for authority✤ Traditionalists enjoy sharing their knowledge and history✤ High value on loyalty and hard work✤ Want to provide more opportunity to their children than they had
  • 4. Today’s WorkforceTraditionalists (1922 - 1945)✤ Aliases: Veterans, Silent Generation, Greatest Generation✤ Lived through WWII and were taught core values, respect for authority✤ Traditionalists enjoy sharing their knowledge and history✤ High value on loyalty and hard work✤ Want to provide more opportunity to their children than they hadBaby Boomers (1946 - 1964)✤ The most educated generation in history✤ Making sacrifices to get ahead✤ Take on big projects, want to make an impact✤ Loyal to colleagues and employers✤ Prefer face-to-face communication
  • 5. Today’s WorkforceGeneration X (1965 - 1980)✤ Aliases: Gen X, Xers✤ Latchkey generation, watched their parents forge a new work environment✤ First generation to grow up with computer technology✤ Care more about productivity than hours put into the position✤ Good balance in work and family✤ Requires minimal supervision
  • 6. Today’s WorkforceGeneration X (1965 - 1980)✤ Aliases: Gen X, Xers✤ Latchkey generation, watched their parents forge a new work environment✤ First generation to grow up with computer technology✤ Care more about productivity than hours put into the position✤ Good balance in work and family✤ Requires minimal supervisionGeneration Y (1981 - 2000)✤ Aliases: Gen Y, Millennial, Echo Boomer✤ Continually connected, speak their own language✤ Skeptical of authority, influenced by peers✤ Seek recognition and fame, enjoy off humor and absurdity✤ Skim information and text quickly✤ Easily bored, expressive and digitally creative
  • 7. Perspective
  • 8. Perspective
  • 9. Approach
  • 10. ApproachFacebook Emailing Texting Twitter Mobile Vs. Faxing Memo Telephone Office Meeting
  • 11. Facebook & Twitter
  • 12. Workplace Behavior
  • 13. Workplace BehaviorTraditionalists (Age 65 - 88) ✤ Seniority and age correlate ✤ Climb the ladder by hard work and perseverance ✤ Understand value and money (conservative) ✤ Not uncommon to have only one or two positions throughout their career ✤ Respects authority
  • 14. Workplace BehaviorTraditionalists (Age 65 - 88) ✤ Seniority and age correlate ✤ Climb the ladder by hard work and perseverance ✤ Understand value and money (conservative) ✤ Not uncommon to have only one or two positions throughout their career ✤ Respects authorityBaby Boomers (Age 46 - 64) ✤ Team Oriented ✤ Interested in health and wellness ✤ Always learning, and always loyal ✤ Workaholics ✤ Espouse value of ‘inclusive’ relationships
  • 15. Workplace Behavior
  • 16. Workplace BehaviorGeneration X (Age 30 - 45) ✤ Change Agents ✤ Prefer flexible work hours and informal work environment ✤ Started 80% of new businesses in the last 3 years ✤ Easy to recruit, hard to retain ✤ High value on ‘having fun’ at work ✤ Require minimal supervision
  • 17. Workplace BehaviorGeneration X (Age 30 - 45) ✤ Change Agents ✤ Prefer flexible work hours and informal work environment ✤ Started 80% of new businesses in the last 3 years ✤ Easy to recruit, hard to retain ✤ High value on ‘having fun’ at work ✤ Require minimal supervisionGeneration Y (Age 10 - 29) ✤ Goal setting is a priority ✤ Can-do attitude of traditionalist ✤ Teamwork attitude of Boomers ✤ Technological savvy of X’ers ✤ Think DIFFERENTLY than any other member of the workforce
  • 18. Generational Motivators
  • 19. Generational MotivatorsTraditionalist Motivators ✤ Loyalty is valued and rewarded ✤ Plaque for the wall ✤ Formal meetings or lunches ✤ Letting them know that their experience is appreciated and respected
  • 20. Generational MotivatorsTraditionalist Motivators ✤ Loyalty is valued and rewarded ✤ Plaque for the wall ✤ Formal meetings or lunches ✤ Letting them know that their experience is appreciated and respectedBaby Boomer Motivators ✤ Expand public profile (feature in company newsletter or on website) ✤ Make clear the objectives and desired results ✤ Make sure the steps toward the defined goals are very visible
  • 21. Generational Motivators
  • 22. Generational MotivatorsGeneration X Motivators ✤ Regular, honest feedback and mentoring ✤ Informal recognition (a day off) ✤ Effective leadership ✤ Let them set priorities on tasks
  • 23. Generational MotivatorsGeneration X Motivators ✤ Regular, honest feedback and mentoring ✤ Informal recognition (a day off) ✤ Effective leadership ✤ Let them set priorities on tasksGeneration Y Motivators ✤ Provide opportunities for continuous training ✤ Explain how your goals for them fit into the “big picture” ✤ Use email and ad hoc hall conversations for alternative communication ✤ Be more of a coach, less of a ‘boss’
  • 24. Bridging The Gap Traditionalists and Baby Boomers need:
  • 25. Bridging The Gap Traditionalists and Baby Boomers need:✤ To feel important — they are the “stars” of the organization✤ To be treated fairly✤ To see that their knowledge is valued✤ They need to be heard
  • 26. Bridging The Gap Traditionalists and Baby Boomers need:✤ To feel important — they are the “stars” of the organization✤ To be treated fairly✤ To see that their knowledge is valued✤ They need to be heard Gen X and Gen Y are looking for:
  • 27. Bridging The Gap Traditionalists and Baby Boomers need:✤ To feel important — they are the “stars” of the organization✤ To be treated fairly✤ To see that their knowledge is valued✤ They need to be heard Gen X and Gen Y are looking for:✤ Constant learning and growth✤ Flexibility to try new things or voice new ideas✤ Access to information and people (want to be kept in the loop)✤ Ways to link what they do to the bigger goals of the company or firm
  • 28. What You Can Do Mentorship Programs
  • 29. What You Can Do Mentorship Programs✤ Make an effort to implement mentorships for older members to share and younger members to learn.
  • 30. What You Can Do Mentorship Programs✤ Make an effort to implement mentorships for older members to share and younger members to learn.✤ Make this a selective process to ensure profitable mentorships.
  • 31. What You Can Do Mentorship Programs✤ Make an effort to implement mentorships for older members to share and younger members to learn.✤ Make this a selective process to ensure profitable mentorships.✤ Most senior partners received much more informal mentoring. They were taken to court more frequently; partners debriefed a big transaction upon completion; colleagues had more time to teach younger lawyers because business moved at a slower pace.
  • 32. What You Can Do Mentorship Programs✤ Make an effort to implement mentorships for older members to share and younger members to learn.✤ Make this a selective process to ensure profitable mentorships.✤ Most senior partners received much more informal mentoring. They were taken to court more frequently; partners debriefed a big transaction upon completion; colleagues had more time to teach younger lawyers because business moved at a slower pace.✤ Younger lawyers receive much less mentoring today. This means more stress and longer hours as they struggle to teach themselves the law without the benefit of senior lawyer guidance.
  • 33. What You Can Do Listen
  • 34. What You Can Do Listen✤ Whether your firm implements a quarterly ‘ideas for forward progress’ meeting or sends out a periodic internal survey on ideas improve business, employees want to be heard and love to express their ideas.
  • 35. What You Can Do Listen✤ Whether your firm implements a quarterly ‘ideas for forward progress’ meeting or sends out a periodic internal survey on ideas improve business, employees want to be heard and love to express their ideas.✤ They should be encouraged, not afraid, to share. Create a time and place for them to do just that. You never know, you might just find that new marketing push you’ve been looking for.
  • 36. What You Can Do Emphasize Value
  • 37. What You Can Do Emphasize Value✤ Celebrate the successes along the way, big and small. If an individual contribution has helped the team move forward, make sure your firm or company has a policy that addresses this.
  • 38. What You Can Do Emphasize Value✤ Celebrate the successes along the way, big and small. If an individual contribution has helped the team move forward, make sure your firm or company has a policy that addresses this. Enhance Culture
  • 39. What You Can Do Emphasize Value✤ Celebrate the successes along the way, big and small. If an individual contribution has helped the team move forward, make sure your firm or company has a policy that addresses this. Enhance Culture✤ Make sure your firm’s culture is appealing to all generations. If you are a growing firm looking to attract top talent, even on a senior level, only firms or companies with a culture that appeals to every generation will be able earn candidate loyalty. Do you need a culture adjustment?
  • 40. What You Can Do Sharing Knowledge and Social Media
  • 41. What You Can Do Sharing Knowledge and Social MediaWhat intellectual property, knowledge, and “know-how” is walking out the door when traditionalists and baby boomers retire?
  • 42. What You Can Do Sharing Knowledge and Social Media What intellectual property, knowledge, and “know-how” is walking out the door when traditionalists and baby boomers retire?✤ How do we retain the traditionalists and baby boomer IP?
  • 43. What You Can Do Sharing Knowledge and Social Media What intellectual property, knowledge, and “know-how” is walking out the door when traditionalists and baby boomers retire?✤ How do we retain the traditionalists and baby boomer IP?✤ How might we keep them engaged to continue to provide valuable insights and information?
  • 44. What You Can Do Sharing Knowledge and Social Media What intellectual property, knowledge, and “know-how” is walking out the door when traditionalists and baby boomers retire?✤ How do we retain the traditionalists and baby boomer IP?✤ How might we keep them engaged to continue to provide valuable insights and information?✤ How might we capture, extract, glean what they know before they leave?
  • 45. What You Can Do Sharing Knowledge and Social Media What intellectual property, knowledge, and “know-how” is walking out the door when traditionalists and baby boomers retire?✤ How do we retain the traditionalists and baby boomer IP?✤ How might we keep them engaged to continue to provide valuable insights and information?✤ How might we capture, extract, glean what they know before they leave?✤ How might we use social technologies to bridge the gap between baby boomers and next generation leaders?
  • 46. What You Can Do Sharing Knowledge and Social Media What intellectual property, knowledge, and “know-how” is walking out the door when traditionalists and baby boomers retire?✤ How do we retain the traditionalists and baby boomer IP?✤ How might we keep them engaged to continue to provide valuable insights and information?✤ How might we capture, extract, glean what they know before they leave?✤ How might we use social technologies to bridge the gap between baby boomers and next generation leaders?✤ How might we leverage Gen X & Y’s comfort and mastery of technology and social media to bridge the information gap between both generations?
  • 47. The Generation Gap