IT Energy Waste - Green IT Expo 2009

1,348 views
1,236 views

Published on

Pat Tiernan, Executive Director of the Climate Savers Computing Initiative, presented at the 2009 Green IT Expo in London to address IT energy waste and the ROI on energy efficient computing.

Published in: Technology, Business
2 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • This is very well put together. Please send me this PPT.
    Thanks,
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • kindly send me this ppt, as i am voluntarily doing something of this kind...jaideeprawal@hotmail.com
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,348
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
17
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
2
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

IT Energy Waste - Green IT Expo 2009

  1. 1. Bottomline Benefits: Finding the ‘Quick Wins’ for Short-Term ROI November 10 and 11, 2009 Green IT Expo Presented by Pat Tiernan / Chris Bullock Climate Savers Computing Initiative
  2. 2. Agenda • Climate Savers Computing Overview • The Problem: IT Energy Waste • Energy-Efficient Computing: Hardware Advances and Power Management • Business Case for Energy-Efficient Computing • Case Studies • Next Steps
  3. 3. Climate Savers Computing Initiative’s Mission Objectives Board Members • Increase the energy efficiency of new computing equipment • Promote the use of power management to make an impact now • Shift user base to smart computing practices Desired results Sponsor Members • By 2010, improve computing energy efficiency by 50%  $5.5B savings • Reduce global CO2 emissions from computing platforms by 54 million tons per year Vision: smart computing practices - highest efficiency possible
  4. 4. Today’s Environment • The average desktop PC wastes 30 Watts 20 Watts nearly half the power it consumes 100 Watts AC power 50 Watts • Servers lose approximately one- DC Voltage third of their power as heat Power Supply Regulation Module CPU • 90 percent of desktops do not utilize power management Computer motherboard settings1 Addressing the problem makes fiscal sense! 1 Source: US EPA, http://enduse.lbl.gov/info/LBNL­53729_REV.pdf; see also  http://www.energystar.gov/ia/products/power_mgt/North_Thurston_Case_Study.pdf and  http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/prod_development/revisions/downloads/computer/Comp uter­PowerMnmt.pdf for additional comments on the extent of power management usage
  5. 5. The Problem: IT Energy Waste • Every day 156 million employees in the US, the UK and Germany decide whether or not to shut down their PCs • 1.3 million tonnes of unnecessary CO2 was emitted by UK businesses in 2009 by not turning off idle PCs wasting nearly £300 million • A UK company with 10,000 PCs wastes £168,000 and 828 tonnes of CO2 annually through not shutting down PCs • 67 percent of UK employees feel that their companies should be doing more to reduce power consumption • Only 2 percent of UK employees shut down their PCs at night because they were directed by their company to do so • 50 percent of those who use a PC at work typically choose not to shut down their PC at the end of the day • PC power costs are the biggest contributory factor to IT costs and can account for 25 percent of overall building costs
  6. 6. Energy Demand is Changing the Challenge for Data Center Operators Increasing Power Density is Shifting the Balance of Cost Yearly Cost 2010–2015 28x2U Servers 42x1U Servers 6 BladeCenters 6 BladeCenters 2kW Heat Load 6kW Heat Load 24kW Heat Load 30kW Heat Load Time Source: IDC Source: Emerson Network Power/Liebert Increasing energy demand, and increasing server rack power density, are shifting the sources of cost
  7. 7. Where Data Center Power Goes 7
  8. 8. Portfolio of Energy Savings Actions Available to Data Center Operators 27% facility related Lower Power Processors High Efficiency Power Supplies Power Management Features Blade Servers Server Virtualization 73% IT Supplemental Cooling 415V Power Distribution related Architecture Cooling Best Practices Variable Speed Fan Drives Monitoring and Optimiz - ing Cooling Controls Source: Emerson Network Power, “Energy Logic” 73 percent of savings potential comes from IT equipment improvements
  9. 9. Energy Savings by Replacing 4-Year-Old, Inefficient Servers with Fewer New Servers 2005 184 servers with single­ 2009  21 new servers  vintage vintage with quad­core  core CPUs.  4 years old CPUs By replacing 4­year­old,  Up to Annual energy cost 9X 92% relatively inefficient  servers with new servers Reduction in # of  servers required estimated reduction Source: Intel estimates as of Nov 2008. Performance comparison using SPECjbb2005 bops (business operations per second). Results  have been estimated based on internal Intel analysis and are provided for informational purposes only. Any difference in system hardware or software design or configuration may affect actual performance. For detailed calculations, configurations and  assumptions refer to the legal information slide in backup. 
  10. 10. Desktop Infrastructure Energy Efficiency Improvements Estimated Annual Energy Consumption Four­year­old PC,  Switch from CRT  Replacing  1015  to LCD Display KWh Consumed per Year Old Desktop  PC with New  938 Desktop PC (lower is better) 655 New,  Power­ Managed  Desktop New,  Power­ 229  Managed  Laptop 38  Unmanaged Pentium® D Unmanaged Pentium® D Unmanaged Intel® Managed Intel® Core™2  Managed Intel® Core™2 Duo  Processor 945 with CRT Processor 945 with LCD Core™2 Duo Processor  Duo Processor E6550 Processor T9400 mobile display display E6550 with LCD display with LCD display platform For system configuration details, please see Appendix. Performance tests/ratings are provided assuming specific computer systems and/or components and reflect the approximate performance of Intel products as measured by those tests. Any difference in system hardware or software design or configuration may affect actual performance. This data may vary from other material generated for specific marketing requests.
  11. 11. The business case for PC power management No power mgt. (-) With power mgt. = Annual savings Total assets 1 1 1 x x x Hours of operation 24 8 16 +60% x x x savings! Energy draw per hour (W) 89 89 5 = = kWh/day (1,000 W = 1kW) 2.13 .79 = 489 kWh/yr £/day (£0.073/kWh) £0.155 £0.057 = £35.69/yr CO2/day (0.55 kg./kWh) 1.17 0.43 = 269 Kg CO2/yr
  12. 12. CPM Offers a Compelling ROI • Labor costs: ~ £3 per seat o Identifying appropriate solutions o Testing & troubleshooting exceptions o Ensuring that sleeping computers do not interfere with administrative software updates • Software costs: ~ £0- 12 per seat o Some solutions are free o Commercial solutions range from roughly £2-12 per PC • Vs. benefits of ~ £24 per seat Assumptions: 1000 seats; labor costs = 2 weeks of work for one network administrator @ £1,508.60 per week
  13. 13. UK Case Studies: Significantly reduced energy consumption, less emissions, improved profitability UK Gov Department for Children, Schools and Families • 53,960 kWhr of electricity and reduction of 35,290 kg of CO2 emissions ADT • 36,200 KWhr, 23530 kg of CO2 emissions per month . Cadbury • in process of global rollout: 30% energy savings thus far! The UK Opportunity • Estimated: 2M Government PCs: 140,000 tonnes CO2 saved per year. + UK business: 700,000 tonnes: 10% of UK Carbon committment
  14. 14. Next Steps 1. Join Climate Savers Computing in their mission to reduce global CO2 emissions from the operation of computers by 54 million tons by 2010 − www.climatesaverscomputing.org/ 2. For more information and additional resources − www.climatesaverscomputing.org/lear n/information-and-resources/ 3. Also on the Climate Savers Computing site − Check out our Toolkit − Browse the Climate Savers Computing Product Catalog − Power Management Design Guide – coming in December
  15. 15. Thank you. Contact Pat Tiernan Executive Director, Climate Savers Computing admin@climatesaverscomputing
  16. 16. Backup
  17. 17. Energy Waste: Industry Level This waste adds up quickly. • The global information and LAN & Office Printers (6%) Telecoms (7%) communications technology industry accounts for approximately 2 percent of Mobile global CO2 emissions1 Telecoms (9%) PCs and Monitors • Energy costs will be 50 percent of the (39%) average IT budget in just a few years2 • By 2010, about half of the Forbes Fixed-Line Telecoms Global 2000 will spend more on energy (15%) than on hardware3 Servers, • There are 1 billion+ PCs worldwide, Source: Gartner including cooling (23%) projected to be 2.25 billion by 20154 1 Source: Gartner, May 2007 2 Source: Mark, Roy, House Green Lights EPA Data Centers Study, Internetnews.com (July 13, 2006) 3 Source: Source: Businessweek.com: CEO Guide To Green Computing. From Gartner 4 Source: Forrester Research
  18. 18. What We are Working to Achieve Objectives • Increase the energy efficiency of new computing equipment • Promote the use of power management to make an impact now • Shift user base to smart computing practices Desired results • Improve computing energy efficiency by 50 percent − $5.5B savings • Reduce global CO2 emissions from computing platforms by 54 million tons per year Vision: smart computing practices - highest efficiency possible
  19. 19. Taking Action: The CSCI Approach System, Software & Component Providers IT Departments & Consumers • High-efficiency components and • Drive policy & products implementation • Energy management • Embed in procurement capabilities • Turn on power • Product availability & management services • Drive savings • Power management solutions Climate Savers Computing Initiative • Create awareness and Alliances preference • Complementary • Recruit change agents programs • Drive demand and • Global influence deployment • Facilitate results • Develop and eliminate inhibitors • Harmonize globally
  20. 20. Defining PC Power Management ► Actively reducing the energy consumption of operating PCs and monitors by enabling lower power states during periods of inactivity — where the PC and monitor are drawing energy but no useful work is being performed (e.g., nights, weekends, holidays, and workday breaks).
  21. 21. Reducing Energy Costs Drives Green IT
  22. 22. Reducing Facilities Costs Is a Priority
  23. 23. PC Energy Consumption Is Just as Important Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions Printers (6%) LAN & Office Telecoms (7%) “Data centers  receive a  Mobile lot of attention because Telecoms PCs & they are an obvious (9%) Monitors concentration.”  (39%) “However, the real area  Fixed-Line Telecoms where the greatest (15%) overall effect can be made is at the desktop Servers, and with client devices.” including cooling (23%) Source Gartner Inc. “Tera­Architectures A Convergence of New Technologies” by Martin Reynolds July 26, 2007
  24. 24. Energy-Efficient PC Networks Comparison of the Energy-Usage of PC’s, Based Upon Their Age and  Technology Typical 4-year-old Typical new Desktop PC, Typical new Laptop PC, desktop PC with a CRT, both without and with with power then with LCD display, power management management both without power management
  25. 25. Entry Points to Network Power Management Sensitive users Less sensitive users Combination
  26. 26. CPM Offers a Compelling ROI • Labor costs: ~ $5 per seat o Identifying appropriate solutions o Testing & troubleshooting exceptions o Ensuring that sleeping computers do not interfere with administrative software updates • Software costs: ~ $0-15 per seat o Many solutions are free o Commercial solutions range from roughly $3-15 per PC • Vs. benefits of ~ $40 per seat Assumptions: 1000 seats; labor costs = 2 weeks of work for one network administrator @ $2,500 per week
  27. 27. Hardware Refresh ROI •  Moore’s Law + Design Innovations enable continuous,  relatively rapid improvements in computer energy-efficiency • As a consequence: “Vintage Does Matter.” Older computers  are highly wasteful of energy and very costly to run, compared to new models that might replace them – PCs as well as data center servers • Power management technology should be used on old and new computers alike
  28. 28. Reducing Your Carbon Footprint •  For every 1,000 PCs your company begins using aggressive  power management, that equates to a savings of £9,000 per year, plus air conditioning costs.1 • Savings will be even greater if you are currently committed to carbon neutrality or reduction because you will reduce the number of carbon offset credits needed by participating in CSCI. • Employing aggressive power management on 1,000 PCs can save approximately 118.26 tons CO2 per year.2 • 1 carbon credit = 1 ton of CO2 • 1 carbon credit costs ~ £11.12 • 118.26 tons X £11.12 ~ £1,315 savings in carbon offset credits per year 1 Assumes system is powered on 2,000 hours per year (40 hrs/week X 50 weeks) 2Aggressive power management can save 157.62 KW hours per year. 1 KW hour is equivalent to 0.00075 tons CO2. 3$19.42 USD according to current rate as of 8/15/2007 from www.carbonplanet.com

×