Lost in the Fog: Is Cloud Computing the Future for Digital Information

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Presentation at Future Perfect Digital Continuity Conference 2010, 3-5 may 2010, Wellington, New Zealand

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Lost in the Fog: Is Cloud Computing the Future for Digital Information

  1. 1. Lost in the Fog: Is Cloud Computing the Future for Digital Information? Clifton Chan CROWN COPYRIGHT © 24 May 2010
  2. 2. What is cloud computing?
  3. 3. Undefinition “The network is the computer” -- John Gage, Sun Microsystems, 1982 “... computing may someday be organized as a public utility ...” -- John McCarthy, 1961
  4. 4. Definition “a computing capability that provides an abstraction between the computing resource and its underlying technical architecture (e.g., servers, storage, networks), enabling convenient, on- demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.” -- NIST
  5. 5. Characteristics  On-demand self-service  Broad network access  Resource pooling  Rapid elasticity  Measured service -- NIST
  6. 6. Services  Software as a Service  Platform as a Service  Infrastructure as a Service  “Stack” of services
  7. 7. Types  Public clouds  Community clouds  Private clouds  Hybrid clouds
  8. 8. Fad or Trend ? Peak of the Gartner Hype Cycle i.e. immature
  9. 9. And yet ... flicker twitter TradeMe Google Amazon App Eng EC2 On- demand      self-service Broad network      access Resource      pooling Rapid elasticity  ?    Measured service  Free   
  10. 10. Trend Becoming part of the landscape
  11. 11. Landscape  Mainframes  Mid-range computers  PC‟s  Internet  Cloud
  12. 12. Implications Implications for government
  13. 13. On-demand self-service  Easy to buy • T&Cs and costs upfront • rapid deployment   Easy to sign up and sign off • Low (un)deployment costs   Anyone can sign up • Proliferation - new access database
  14. 14. Broad network access  Internet / IP network for access • Geographic agility  • Wider range of access devices  Internet / Network usage increases • 24 x 7 access • Network security • Network costs will increase
  15. 15. Resource pooling  Multi-tenant: 102s, 103s, 106s • Potentially more attackers - security  Economies of scale - buying power • Sustainable professional expertise • Value for money   Standardised offerings • Drive standardisation and lower cost  • Less uniqueness • Who‟s standards?
  16. 16. Rapid elasticity  Provider manages capacity • Focus on adding value to business   Acquire and use what you need • No underutilised resources 
  17. 17. Measured service  Pay for what you use • No capital expenditure  • No money sitting around  • Low cost of entry   Cost visibility • Clear link between use and costs
  18. 18. Paradigm It is a form of outsourcing.
  19. 19. Why the fuss?  We outsource all sorts of things, e.g.: • Mainframe: timeshare bureaus • Payroll bureaus • Watering plants • Office cleaning • Helpdesks  Large body of knowledge on how to make outsourcing work
  20. 20. Fuss:  Biggest providers multi-nationals • Compatible records and archiving practises • Records and data in the „cloud‟  Data is likely to be overseas • Outside NZ jurisdiction • Data persistence
  21. 21. Summary  Utility computing on the network  Becoming part of the landscape  Form of outsourcing
  22. 22. Futures Cloud computing strategic issues clifton.chan@ssc.govt.nz
  23. 23. Questions CROWN COPYRIGHT ©

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