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  • 1. Instructor’s Manual Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance DSCLS202A August 2006
  • 2. Client Casework:Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 3. DSCLS202AClient Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance© Copyright August 2006 The American National Red CrossLearning and Development, Training and Leadership Development
  • 4. Table of ContentsAcknowledgements................................................................................................................... viPART 1: About This CourseCourse Purpose...................................................................................................................................... 1Course Objectives.................................................................................................................................. 2Course Design........................................................................................................................................ 2Course Overview................................................................................................................................... 2Course Schedule.................................................................................................................................... 3 .Course Materials and Supplies.............................................................................................................. 3 .Instructor’s Manual................................................................................................................................ 4PowerPoint Presentation........................................................................................................................ 5Newsprint............................................................................................................................................... 5Participant’s Workbook.......................................................................................................................... 5Instructor Requirements......................................................................................................................... 6Instructor Responsibilities..................................................................................................................... 6Sponsor or Host Chapter Responsibilities............................................................................................. 7Course Participants................................................................................................................................ 8Course Documentation.......................................................................................................................... 8 .PART 2: Course ContentIntroduction.................................................................................................................................. I-1Instructor Introductions. ........................................................................................................................ I-1 .Participant Introductions........................................................................................................................ I-2Course Objectives.................................................................................................................................. I-2Course Overview................................................................................................................................... I-3Participant’s Workbook.......................................................................................................................... 1-4Segment 1: Overview of Client Casework................................................................ 1-1Objectives.............................................................................................................................................. 1-1The Disaster Services Human Resources (DSHR) System................................................................... 1-2DSHR Positions..................................................................................................................................... 1-2Individual Client Services Group.......................................................................................................... 1-3 .DSCLS202A iiiAugust 2006
  • 5. Table of ContentsThe Role of Client Casework. ............................................................................................................... 1-5 .The Responsibilities of Client Casework. ............................................................................................. 1-5 .The Commitment and Values of Client Casework. ............................................................................... 1-6 .Addressing Disaster-caused Emergency Needs..................................................................................... 1-10Providing Standardized Assistance........................................................................................................ 1-11Welfare Information and Family Reunification..................................................................................... 1-13Collaboration between DSHR Groups and Activities. .......................................................................... 1-14 .Summary................................................................................................................................................ 1-15Segment 2: The Interview. ................................................................................................... 2-1Objectives.............................................................................................................................................. 2-1Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 2-1Conducting Effective Interviews........................................................................................................... 2-2Providing Assistance.............................................................................................................................. 2-6Documenting the Interview and Assistance Provided........................................................................... 2-9Client Assistance System....................................................................................................................... 2-9Completing a Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901)....................................................... 2-10Forms Used with Form 901................................................................................................................... 2-20Client Assistance Cards ........................................................................................................................ 2-22Disbursing Orders (Form 140C) .......................................................................................................... 2-28Issuing Disbursing Orders..................................................................................................................... 2-29Voiding and Cancelling Disbursing Orders........................................................................................... 2-32Segment 3: Assignment Settings....................................................................................... 3-1Objectives.............................................................................................................................................. 3-1Introduction............................................................................................................................................ 3-1Office Settings....................................................................................................................................... 3-1 .Field Settings......................................................................................................................................... 3-3Shelters.................................................................................................................................................. 3-4 .iv Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 6. Table of ContentsSegment 5: Let’s Get Started............................................................................................5-1Objectives.............................................................................................................................................5-1Introduction...........................................................................................................................................5-1Developing an Action Plan...................................................................................................................5-1Getting Involved...................................................................................................................................5-2Next Steps.............................................................................................................................................5-2Summary...............................................................................................................................................5-3PART 3: Instructor ResourcesA. Course Materials List..................................................................................................................... IR-3B. Course Schedule . .......................................................................................................................... IR-5C. PowerPoint Presentation................................................................................................................ IR-7D. Suggested Newsprints.................................................................................................................... IR-55E. DSHR Groups and Activities Chart............................................................................................... IR-57 .F. Participant Resources...................................................................................................................... IR-59DSCLS202A August 2006
  • 7. AcknowledgementsThis course and the accompanying materials for Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistancewere developed through the dedicated combined efforts of many American Red Cross employees andvolunteers. The supportive, technical and creative suggestions from a number of individuals made theseprint materials possible.Responsible for the instructional design and writing of this course and accompanying materials wereNancy Edmonds, Senior Associate and S. Elizabeth White, Senior Consultant of the Learning andDevelopment unit, Training Development and Delivery, American Red Cross, Washington, DC. Thefollowing American Red Cross volunteers and employees were responsible for the technical input andguidance: Jack Ferguson, Volunteer, Dallas Area Chapter, Dallas, TX; Joni Eaton, Volunteer, SoutheastLouisiana Chapter, New Orleans, LA; Janet Lee Hensley, Volunteer, Centennial Chapter, Fort Collins,CO; Chris Manning, Volunteer, San Diego Imperial Counties Chapter, San Diego, CA; Charlotte Simp-son, Volunteer, Madison-Marshall County Chapter, Huntsville, AL; Norma Crowder, Senior Associateand Charade Jackson, Associate, of Individual Client Services, American Red Cross National Headquar-ters, Washington, DC.vi Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 8. About This Course ..................................................................................Course PurposeThe purpose of this basic Disaster Services’ course is to prepare Red Cross volunteers and employeesto perform the tasks of an Individual Client Services Client Casework Service Associate (CLS/CC/SA)on chapter, multi-chapter and national disaster operations. The focus of this course is on the commonsystems, processes and terminology that enable the Red Cross to provide efficient and effective servicedelivery to individuals and communities affected by disaster, using disaster workers who have notworked together previously.This course provides the learner with the essential skills and information needed to conduct clientcasework. This includes the correct application of the principle methods and tools used by the RedCross to conduct Client Casework, with one important the exception—the web-based Client AssistanceSystem (CAS). The limitations of time and available computers in sufficient quantities to accommodateall participants do not allow you to teach how to use the Client Assistance System during this course.However, because the Client Assistance System is now the standard method of documenting, issuingand reporting Red Cross assistance for clients, it is important that you and the course participants enrollin a CAS class as soon as possible. The chapter training administrator can provide information aboutfuture intructor-led or online courses that are available. All Red Cross Client Caseworkers and ClientCasework Supervisors must be CAS proficient!The course content is structured to ensure a meaningful learning experience that will prepare RedCross volunteers and employees to work in concert with our disaster clients and in collaboration withother agencies to ensure the client’s immediate emergency disaster-caused needs are met. Where it isimportant that client caseworkers know how to provide Red Cross financial assistance competently usingthe appropriate tools and resources, it is just as important that they have an appreciation for the value of“soft” assistance in the client’s recovery process. Working collaboratively with our community partnershelps to ensure a coordinated response and results in more effective service delivery to the disaster-affected members of the community.This course is NOT intended to prepare participants to function as a member of the chapter DisasterAction Team (DAT). Rather in order to maintain a uniformly trained workforce, the emphasis remainsfocused on the procedures used on disaster relief operations. So as not to confuse the learners, it isrecommended that chapter-specific procedures used during DAT responses be taught at a different time,such as when conducting the chapter’s program for orienting DAT members.DSCLS202A August 2006
  • 9. About This Course ..................................................................................Course ObjectivesAs a result of this training you will be able to— ■ Demonstrate the skills needed to perform an effective client interview. ■ Identify and demonstrate the correct use of the basic forms and tools needed to provide assistance to clients on chapter, multi-chapter and national disaster relief operations. ■ Make appropriate decisions regarding the use of Red Cross resources and agency referrals when providing assistance to clients.Course DesignThis course consists of a series of instructor and video presentations coupled with interactive discussionswhich are designed to support participants learning of the key concepts, knowledge and skills requiredof anyone who conducts Red Cross Client Casework. The instructor is encouraged to convey the coursecontent in a straight-forward manner using the key points provided in the instructor’s manual and, to theextent possible, provide relevant examples from your own experience which support the principles beingtaught.Because a considerable part of learning to conduct Red Cross client casework is experiential, the courseculminates in a Skills Drill which provides participants with an opportunity to apply the basic conceptsto a real world example involving a family who has been displaced from their home as a result of adisaster. Because the example reflects many of the “work-related” challenges experienced by clientcaseworkers, it provides ample opportunity for all course participants to experience conducting a clientinterview and providing the appropriate “soft” and “hard” assistance necessary to help the family begintheir recovery. Therefore, it is important that instructors conduct the Drill in its entirety allowing theexercise the full amount of time allotted in the course schedule.Course OverviewThis course is divided into five segments: ■ Segment 1: Overview of Client Casework - Introduces the learner to the roles and responsibilities of the Red Cross Client Caseworker and the Disaster Services Human Resource System within which they will work. ■ Segment 2: The Interview - Presents the essential skills used to conduct effective client casework interviews and describes the means by which client caseworkers will assist clients. Because Red Cross Client Caseworkers interact with members of the community, they represent our organization to the public we serve. Because of this important role, a renewed emphasis is placed on the importance of the Red Cross Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 10. About This Course .................................................................................. Values and Guiding Behaviors, the Client Casework Commitment and Values and the Concern Connection Line. ■ Segment 3: Assignment Settings - Provides an orientation to the work settings client caseworkers are assigned. ■ Segment 4: Skills Drill - Provides an opportunity to apply the information and skills learned to a real-world example of a client case. During this role-play exercise, the participant will interview and provide assistance to George and Edith Robinson who have been affected by a disaster, using the tools and resources learned about during the course. ■ Segment 5: Let’s Get Started - Provides the information needed to get started as a client caseworker in the local chapter.Each segment begins with a video introducing the segment content. The video shows caseworkersperforming interviews with clients. The interviewers also share their experiences with the audience.Please note that the video has not yet been updated to the terminology of the new Disaster ServicesHuman Resources System and therefore does not in all cases match the terms presented in theparticipant’s workbook. It is important that you point out these differences when this is the case.However, avoid lengthy explanations of the meaning of outdated terms. Instead, focus on the newterminology the participants are to learn.Course ScheduleThis course consists of 7.5 hours of instruction, including two fifteen-minute breaks and a one-hourlunch, to comprise a 9-hour training day. Attendance for the entire time and active participation in classdiscussions and activities is required by all participants. A breakdown of the time allotment for eachsegment of the course is provided in Instructor Resource B.Course Materials and SuppliesWhen you prepare to teach this course, review the course content in its entirety as there are a number ofupdated procedural changes reflected in the course content. As a matter of practice, instructors shouldalways check CrossNet to determine whether there are any additional changes which may need to beincluded in the course.The sponsoring Red Cross unit will provide much of your supplies and equipment, but you and yourco-instructor will need to ensure everything is in order prior to your scheduled class. Use the CourseMaterials List on page IR-3 in Instructor Resource A as a reference.DSCLS202A August 2006
  • 11. About This Course ..................................................................................Instructor’s ManualThe Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual provides the course contentand methods of instruction as well as identifies the accompanying resources to be used during theinstruction.The manual is divided into three sections. This section, About This Course, provides an overview ofthe learning experience and all of its component parts. The main body of the manual, the IntroductionSegment through Segment 5, contains the learning objectives for each lesson, the key points to beconveyed to participants during the instruction and helpful notations which alert the instructor to certainaspects of the course content or activities. The Instructor Resources provide reference materials tosupport you in the preparation and delivery of the course. A copy of the Participant Resources are alsoincluded at the back of this section, in Instructor Resource F.The right column of the Course Content section consists of the key points to be conveyed during theinstruction. Where appropriate, you may want to change the statements to better suit your presentationstyle or the classroom situation, but be sure to stay within the context of the material and the frameworkof the learning methods.NOTE: You will also find instructor notes presented in italics in the right column. Examples of thesenotes include prompts for questions and instructions for an exercise or activity. Instructor notes will alsoserve to emphasize points to convey that may not otherwise be obvious or prompt you to reinforce keycontent at the appropriate time. These notes are provided to assist you in with course delivery and arenot intended to be presented to participants.The left column uses icons to indicate the methods of instruction to be used or the resources availableto support a particular part of the lesson. Present the content using lecturettes unless an icon indicatesotherwise. Typical icons are presented at the top of the next page. Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 12. About This Course .................................................................................. Refer to Record Notes Refer to an Ask a Participant’s Record in Participant’s Instructor questions Workbook participant Workbook Resource responses on newsprint Play video Provide a Conduct an Show slide Take a break handout activityPowerPoint PresentationThis course uses a PowerPoint Presentation designed for use with this course. Copies of the PowerPointslides can be found in Instructor Resource C at the back of this manual. The PowerPoint presentationfile can be found on the Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance course CD-ROM, whichis available from the General Supply Division (GSD). The PowerPoint file can also be located on theCrossNet Disaster Training page under the course title, along with other information about pertaining tothe this course.If instructors would like to use the PowerPoint presentation but are restricted to the use of overheadtransparencies, the PowerPoint slides may be printed directly to transparency film. Follow theinstructions on the course CD-ROM to determine the most effective method to use to obtain the bestquality output.NewsprintAt times you will be prompted to record participant responses on newsprint. When temporary newsprintis to be used you will see the “newsprint” icon in the left column. These newsprint sheets can beprepared ahead of time. The text headings are shown in Instructor Resource D.Participant’s WorkbookThe Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook is divided into threesections: About This Course, the course content (Segments 1-5) and the Participant Resources. AboutThis Course provides the learner with an overview of the learning experience. Segments 1 through5 provide the “meat” of the course content presented in a logical learning sequence. The ParticipantDSCLS202A August 2006
  • 13. About This Course ..................................................................................Resources provide samples of completed forms, sample narrative statements and additional informationabout Welfare Information and the Client Assistance System (CAS) the participant will be sure to finduseful.Part of your role as an instructor is to focus participants on those features of the workbook providedto support learning during the course. Participants should be informed that they need not attempt toread every page while you are instructing. All course content, except that which they generate throughactivities and discussion, has been detailed for their future reference.Because the workbook contains the essential information and resources needed to perform effectiveclient interviews and provide assistance to clients, as well as provides sufficient space for participants totake notes, it will prove to be a useful field guide. New client caseworkers will benefit from having thisworkbook with them to refer to when conducting client casework. You should encourage them to make ita part of their personal client casework “toolbox.”Instructor RequirementsThis training course is to be taught by a team of authorized Disaster Services instructors who have recentexperience in providing emergency assistance to families on a chapter-level disaster or larger. The levelof experience must be sufficient to accurately convey the course content, provide relevant examples andanswer the participants’ questions.Instructors must be familiar with the— ■ Current Client Casework disaster regulations and procedures. ■ Red Cross agreements with other agencies that provide disaster relief. ■ Disaster plan of the local service delivery unit.The concepts addressed by this course can only be placed in the necessary and relevant Disaster Servicescontext by instructors possessing direct personal experience pertaining to conducting Red Cross clientcasework and coordinating with our Red Cross community partners and other agencies to ensure theimmediate emergency disaster-caused needs of our clients are met.Instructor ResponsibilitiesYour responsibilities as an authorized Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance instructor areto— ■ Be familiar with instructor and participant course training materials, and effectively use them to enhance learning. ■ Plan, coordinate and manage the course with the sponsoring Red Cross unit. ■ Request and review the completed Application for Training (Form 5898H) for Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 14. About This Course .................................................................................. participants to identify their experience level (learning needs) and ensure they meet the course pre-requisites. ■ Inform participants of the course purpose and how it relates to the requirements for participation in the DSHR System and local chapter activities. ■ Create a positive and supportive environment conducive to the participant’s achievement of course objectives. ■ Adapt your teaching style and methods to the knowledge, experience and needs of participants. ■ Be prepared to answer questions; however, do not attempt to discuss content with which you are unfamiliar. Be willing to solicit input from participants on those questions where the participants may have greater technical knowledge than you. For example, questions about Health Services or Disaster Mental Health may be answered more effectively by another participant with first-hand knowledge and experience of such. Additionally, record all such questions to which there is no known answer, seek out the correct response and then follow-up with participants to share it. ■ Issue course completion certificates. ■ Submit completed course records and reports to the sponsoring Red Cross unit within the required time.Client Casework Instructors should also be familiar with the guidance and procedural documents thatapply to Individual Client Services Group and the Client Casework Activity. Instructors are responsiblefor keeping their knowledge up to date by routinely visiting CrossNet to review new information whichis made available.Sponsor or Host Chapter ResponsibilitiesThe sponsor or host chapter plays an important role in ensuring participants have a positive learningexperience and are able to transfer their learning to the field work they conduct on the chapter’s behalf.Course sponsors are responsible for— ■ Collecting and approving the participants’ submitted Applications for Training (Form 5898H), ensuring course pre-requisites are met and the applications are easily accessible for instructors to review prior to the training. ■ Providing the instructional materials outlined in the Course Materials List in Instructor Resource A on page IR-3.DSCLS202A August 2006
  • 15. About This Course .................................................................................. ■ Providing adequate classroom space, materials and supplies. ■ Arranging for provision of audiovisual equipment to support the use of the course PowerPoint Presentation. ■ Identifying instructors who meet the criteria for conducting the course. ■ Monitoring participant feedback.Course ParticipantsParticipants will be volunteers and employees with an interest in working directly with clients to meettheir immediate, emergency disaster-caused needs. These may be client caseworkers, Health Servicesworkers, Disaster Mental Health workers or Response Center Enterprise Call Agents who work with theclients that contact the 1-800-GET-INFO phone line. Others who may demonstrate an interest in takingthis course are those who require an understanding of the Client Casework process, to include anyone inOperations Management or in Financial Statistical Information Management.Instructors should be aware of the potential for varying levels of experience among participants and,to the extent possible, be prepared to make the course content relevant to all learners. Participantsmay be taking the course with as little experience as Fulfilling Our Mission or possess many years ofexperience, albeit in a different activity. Instructors should carefully review the Application for Training:Disaster Training System (F5898H) when available and listen closely to participants’ responses duringthe introduction exercise to assess experience levels. This way, experienced participants may be spreadevenly throughout the class, maximizing the learning benefit for all less experienced participants.Course participants should be encouraged to apply their new knowledge and skills as soon as possiblefollowing the training in order to enhance retention. Any DSHR System member should complete ClientAssistance System training through their local chapter prior to deployment.Course DocumentationSponsoring chapters will acknowledge a participant’s completion of this training by issuing Cert. 108Afor Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance (DSCLS202A).Instructors are required to submit a completed Course Record Addendum (F6418AR) and InstructorReport: Disaster Training System (F5898A) to the sponsoring red Cross unit. It is recommended thatinstructors complete the Instructor Self-Assessment and Development (F5898J) as well. Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 16. Introduction .................................................................................. Time: 20 minutes Instructor Introductions Welcome to Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance. We are very happy to have you with us and want to thank you for coming today.Slide 1Welcome The Red Cross appreciates your interest in assisting clients through the casework process and we look forward to working with you. I am (_________________) and this is (Co-instructor) and we will be your instructors for this course today. Note: Record your name(s) on newsprint. Tell the class a little about yourself, such as your job, your time with the Red Cross, Disaster Action Team/DSHR experience and any other relevant information that may be of interest. GiveInstructors’ this a little thought. You want to make a good first impression on potential newNames volunteers and to set the stage for a successful learning experience. Housekeeping Items Note: Review specific housekeeping items with participants at this time. Be sureSlides 2Housekeeping to include the information below.Items Before we begin our class today I would like to go over some housekeeping items with you: ■ Location of rest rooms ■ Breaks ■ Lunch (places to eat) ■ Location of emergency exits, AED and first aid equipment ■ Cell phones/pagers ■ Sign-in procedures - Course Record Addendum (Form 6418A) ■ Course evaluation sheet ■ OtherDSCLS202A Intro-1August 2006
  • 17. Introduction .................................................................................. Participant Introductions Now we would like to hear about you. Would you please introduce yourself by telling us your name; three facts about yourself and why you chose to take this Slide 3 Participant course. Include any Red Cross experience, if appropriate. Introductions Course Purpose The purpose of this basic Disaster Services course is to prepare you to perform the tasks of an Individual Client Services Client Casework Service Associate on a Slide 4 Course Purpose disaster relief operation. During this course, you will learn the essential skills and information needed to conduct client casework when providing assistance to individual clients. This Page 1 includes the correct application of the principle methods and tools used by the Red Cross to conduct Client Casework, with one important the exception—the web-based Client Assistance System (CAS). The limitations of time and available computers in sufficient quantities to accommodate all participants do not allow an opportunity to learn how to use the Client Assistance System during this course. However, because the Client Assistance System is now the standard method of documenting, issuing and reporting Red Cross assistance for clients, it is important that you enroll in a CAS class as soon as possible, if you have not already done so. Your chapter training administrator can link you to the intructor-led or online courses that are available. All Red Cross Client Caseworkers must be CAS proficient! This course is not intended to provide all of the details necessary for a participant to function as a member of a local Disaster Action Team (DAT). It is recommended that you participate in the program at your chapter for orienting DAT members. Course Objectives As a result of this training you will be able to— ■ Demonstrate the skills needed to perform an effective client Slide 5 interview. Course ObjectivesIntro-2 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 18. Introduction .................................................................................. ■ Identify and demonstrate the correct use of the basic forms and tools needed to provide assistance to clients on chapter, multi- chapter and national disaster relief operations. ■ Make appropriate decisions regarding the use of Red Cross resources and agency referrals when providing assistance to clients. Course Overview This course consists of seven hours of instruction to comprise an 8-hour training day. Your attendance and participation for the entire time is required. Slide 6 Course Overview The course is divided into five segments. These segments are: ■ Segment 1: Overview of Client Casework - Introduces you to the role of the caseworker and the Red Cross system within which you will work. Page iii - iv ■ Segment 2: The Interview - Presents the essential skills of the casework interview process and the means by which you will provide assistance. ■ Segment 3: Assignment Settings - Provides an orientation of the settings in which you will work. ■ Segment 4: Skills Drill - Provides an opportunity for you to apply the information and skills you’ve learned in a real-world context. ■ Segment 5: Let’s Get Started - Provides you with the information you will need to get started as a Client Caseworker in your local chapter. Each segment begins with a video introducing the segment content. The video shows caseworkers performing interviews with clients. In some instances, the interviewers also share their experiences with us. Please note that the video has not yet been updated to the terminology of the new DSHR System. The terminology you hear in the video may not match the terms in your workbook. We will draw your attention to these terms.DSCLS202A Intro-3August 2006
  • 19. Introduction .................................................................................. During the first part of the course, Segments 1-3, we will focus on the basics—the essential knowledge, skills and abilities you will need to demonstrate when working as a Red Cross Client Caseworker. During Segment 4, you will have an opportunity to assume the role of a client caseworker during a role play exercise. During this part of the course you will practice your interview skills, document the client’s information, determine what assistance is needed and complete the process for providing it. Participant’s Workbook The Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook is organized to follow the course flow. It also contains the essential information you Slide 7 Participant’s will need when conducting client casework. Workbook Each segment includes space for you to take notes during the videos and at other times during the course to support your learning. It is yours to keep. Page 1-1 Toward the back of your workbook, you will find a set of Participant Resources. These resources contain samples of properly completed forms and other useful documents. Participant Resources Page A-1 Because your workbook contains the essential information you will need when conducting client casework, it will make a useful field guide. You will benefit from having it with you when conducting client casework to use as a reference. We cannot possibly tell you everything there is to know about performing in the role of a client caseworker. You will continue to learn as you gain experience. Although the essential client casework knowledge and skills are the same, sometimes your supervisor will instruct you to conduct the process a little differently. For instance, when working on a disaster relief operation—commonly referred to as a DRO—you may be instructed to use a different form, to conduct a procedure a little differently or to share specific information with the clients. That is why during this course we will frequently remind you to check with your supervisor.Intro-4 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 20. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. You will be advised to take additional training after completing this course. For instance, where this course focuses on the basics of providing client assistance, other training may focus on the tools you will use to provide it. Taking Client Assistance System training is a good example of tools training you must learn to be a client caseworker. You may also be asked to take training once you arrive on a disaster relief operation. Each disaster relief operation often has unique aspects depending on what is required to meet the needs of the affected community. When you are asked to take additional training, it is important that you be flexible and open-minded.DSCLS202A Intro-5August 2006
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  • 22. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Time: 70 minutes (includes a 15-minute break) Objectives After completing this segment the participants will be able to— ■ Identify the role of the Client Caseworker within the Disaster Services Human Resource System. ■ Identify six values of Client Casework that enable the Red Cross to provide quality service. ■ Identify the ways in which Client Casework Activity provide emergency assistance to disaster-affected individuals. Introduction In this segment of the course, we will look at the role of the Red Cross Client Caseworker in a disaster and how emergency assistance is provided to the clients. During this first segment you will see and hear a client tell the story of a disaster that affected his family and how they began their recovery. This video will refer to five “direct services”. The Red Cross still provides these services, however, no longer refers to them using this term. We will discuss these terms and any additional ones after the video. Page 1-1 Note: Show Segment 1 of the video, “Overview of Client Casework”. After viewing the video, explain that the Red Cross no longer provides all the assistance Arturo receives in this video. The Red Cross works closely with our community Segment 1: partners to meet the emergency, disaster-caused needs of those residing in the Overview of Client Casework affected area. It is important that we do not duplicate services whenever possible. (8:00) Reinforce the importance of— ■ Working with the client to determine how best to meet their needs. ■ Consistency with the assistance Red Cross provides. Ask: What questions might you have at this point? Note: Pause and respond to participant’s questions.DSCLS202A 1-1August 2006
  • 23. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Disaster Services Human Resources (DSHR) System Slide 8 The American Red Cross manages its disaster-related human resources needs DSHR System through the Disaster Services Human Resource (DSHR) System. There are three key terms with which you will want to become familiar: groups, activities and tasks. The DSHR System is divided into seven groups, which are organized by the constituents each serves. Slide 9 Activities are the main actions conducted by those within each group. DSHR Groups, Activities and Tasks are the specific jobs that need to be performed within each activity. Tasks The DSHR Groups and the Activities within each are detailed on the chart on page 1-3 of your workbook. Page 1-3 DSHR System Positions There are four positions within each DSHR System group: Slide 10 ■ Service Associate DSHR Positions ■ Supervisor ■ Manager ■ Administrator Service Associates perform basic services within the DSHR Group. Service Associates are often the first person to interact with individuals affected by a disaster. Supervisors oversee a work unit composed of service associates. Supervisors are familiar with the activities and tasks performed by the unit staff and are able to answer questions on a day-to-day basis. Managers oversee the work of the supervisors and are the subject matter experts within the group or specific activity within the group.1-2 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 24. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Administrators are responsible for leading the DSHR Group. Administrators must have extensive supervisory and leadership experience and be able to work as part of the operations management team providing oversight of the disaster relief operation. Note: Refer participants to Section 3.1 of the American Red Cross DSHR System Handbook to learn more about these positions. Individual Client Services Group The Individual Client Services Group is responsible for providing financial, counseling and health-related services to individuals affected by a disaster. It uses Slide 11 Individual Client the casework process to do so. Services Group The group consists of four activities: Client Casework, Welfare Information, Health Services and Disaster Mental Health. The chart in your workbook on page 1-4 outlines the responsibilities of each. Page 1-4 Note: Briefly review the descriptions of each activity listed on page 1-4 in the participant’s workbook. Respond to any questions participants may have. Client Casework Activity: ■ Helps identify and meet immediate, disaster-caused individual needs by providing emergency assistance. Slide 12 Client Casework ■ Provides recovery planning and assistance that addresses a client’s Activity longer-term needs. ■ Assistance may be provided in two forms: – “Soft” (intangible; e.g., listening, guidance, advocacy, etc.) – “Hard” (tangible; e.g., sheltering, feeding, personal care items, limited financial assistance, etc.) Welfare Information Activity: ■ Works in partnership with Client Casework, Health Services and Slide 13 Disaster Mental Health to meet the family “linking” needs of Welfare vulnerable populations, such as children, the elderly and those with Information Activity special medical or mental health needs.DSCLS202A 1-3August 2006
  • 25. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. ■ Uses tools, such as the Red Cross Safe and Well Web Site, to assist individuals inside the disaster-affected area contact their loved ones. ■ Provides guidance and family linking resources to chapters so they may assist callers from outside the affected area who inquire about family members or loved ones inside the affected area. Note: We will talk more about Welfare Information and the Safe and Well Web Site in a few minutes. ■ Provides guidance and family linking resources to chapters so they may assist callers from outside the affected area to inquire about family members or loved ones who are inside the affected area.. Slide 14 Health Services Health Services Activity: Activity ■ Provides Red Cross Health Services to clients on disaster relief operations of all sizes. ■ Assists clients in meeting individual or family health needs, such as lost medications, eyeglasses, dentures, and health equipment. ■ Provides basic health services in Red Cross shelters and other service delivery sites. ■ Supports Staff Health in providing care for volunteer and paid staff assigned anywhere on a disaster relief operation. Slide 15 Disaster Mental Disaster Mental Health Activity: Health Activity ■ Delivers Red Cross Disaster Mental Health to clients. ■ Works with and assists local community mental health providers to meet the emotional needs of the affected individual, families, and communities. ■ Identifies and meets the disaster-related mental health needs of disaster workers.1-4 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 26. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. The Role of Client Casework As you saw in the video, when disaster strikes, individuals and families may not Slide 16 have the resources available to begin their recovery and are unable to resume a Role of Client more normal state of living. Casework Client Casework is the activity within the Individual Client Services Group that provides immediate emergency assistance to those individuals who are impacted by any type of disaster. Client Caseworkers respond to single-family home incidents as part of a chapter’s Disaster Action Team (DAT) as well as to major events, including catastrophic incidents. Client Caseworkers provide two forms of assistance: ■ Hard assistance ■ Soft assistance Hard assistance is tangible. Examples of hard assistance include mass sheltering, feeding and the bulk distribution of personal care and clean-up items. Hard assistance provided by client caseworkers includes the limited emergency financial assistance that helps clients to purchase the items they need to begin their recovery. Soft assistance is less tangible, but no less important. Examples of soft assistance include listening, guidance, providing information, advocacy, counseling and referrals. The Responsibilities of Client Casework The Red Cross is responsible for working with individuals and families to address their disaster-caused emergency needs. In doing so, the Red Cross Slide 17 Responsibilities of considers the emotional, physical, and material needs created or aggravated by the Client Casework disaster and provides the assistance that is essential to the individual’s or family’s continuing recovery. Note: Refer participants to page 1-5 of their workbook. Page 1-5DSCLS202A 1-5August 2006
  • 27. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Client Casework interviewers meet with families to identify their immediate disaster-caused needs. The interviewer may help the family by— ■ Listening actively to the client’s story. ■ Providing needed assistance. The assistance provided may be a combination of: ■ Providing financial assistance. ■ Making appropriate internal referrals to health or mental health services. ■ Making appropriate external referrals to the services of other agencies. ■ Directing the client towards Red Cross Mass Care assistance. ■ Providing Welfare Information and other accurate information that assists the client’s recovery. A Client Caseworker is expected to perform these responsibilities both competently and sensitively. However, the responsibilities of the Red Cross Client Caseworker do not stop here. When you represent the Red Cross you must conduct yourself in a manner that reflects the commitment and values of the organization you now represent. In Slide 18 Representing the the eyes of everyone you encounter as a Client Caseworker, you are the Red Red Cross Cross! The Commitment and Values of Client Casework The Red Cross Fundamental Principles and its Core Values and Guiding Behaviors form the foundation for the commitment and values of Client Casework, so it is important to know what they are. Let’s take a few minutes to review our organization’s Core Values and Guiding Behaviors. Note: Ask participants to turn to Participant Resource G-1 at the back of the workbook and take a few minutes to review the content. Participant Resource G Page G-11-6 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 28. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. The purpose of the Client Casework Activity is summarized by the commitment statement at the top of the second paragraph on page 1-6: Slide 19 Client Casework “...to support individuals and families in the recovery process by addressing their Commitment immediate disaster-caused emergency needs.” Values To meet this commitment, Client Casework interviewers must make every effort to incorporate these six values into the interview process: Note: Ask participants to turn to page 1-6 of their workbook. Ask the class to identify why each of the following values is important. Provide further explanation as necessary, using the content below each value. Page 1-6 ■ Respect all clients - Treat all clients the way that you would want to be treated. The Red Cross values diversity and differing cultures among all clients. Privacy is another aspect of respect. We do not share information with other agencies about our clients unless the client signs a Release of Confidential Information. ■ Promote the client’s best interest - The interviewer’s responsibility is to provide the client with all resources and referrals that benefit the client’s own recovery on the basis of their individual needs. The interviewer and client work as a team to determine and develop a list of the client’s immediate needs. These needs are matched with the best assistance for the client. ■ Obtain and provide accurate information - It is the interviewer’s responsibility to be familiar with all information helpful to the client’s recovery. It is also important that this information is communicated accurately to the client. If you are uncertain about the information, ask your supervisor for clarification before sharing it with the client. ■ Provide standardized assistance - Each individual is provided with relief supplies, items of assistance, and/or services that are similar in quantity, quality, and type with variations only on theDSCLS202A 1-7August 2006
  • 29. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. basis of need and family composition. For example, we do not send one family to a church to receive used clothing and then provide the next family with the financial means to buy new clothing. A referral should not be used in lieu of services that would normally be provided by the Red Cross, e.g., clothing and food, but may be used in conjunction with our financial assistance. ■ Identify and use resources wisely - We are not a government agency—all of our resources come from donated dollars. Therefore, it is important to be good stewards of the donated dollar by identifying the best resources and matching them with the needs of the family. While it is important to provide the client standardized assistance, it is equally important to tell the client which needs may be beyond the scope of Red Cross assistance. The client should be referred to other agencies for assistance in these areas. ■ Work as a team - You will work as a team with the client and the other internal Individual Client Services and external workers to assist the client. Treat your co-workers with the same respect that you give the client. Go out of your way to smile and be friendly to co-workers who may also be under stress and working long hours. By implementing these values in your work you will ensure the professional image and positive reputation of the American Red Cross is protected. Remember, to the client you are the Red Cross! We will be referring back to the commitment and values statements throughout the course. Think back to what you saw in the video. Let us discuss how the Client Casework interviewers fulfilled the Client Casework Commitment and Values. Ask: Can someone define the term “immediate need?” Note: Allow time for participants to answer the question. Bring out the point that immediate needs are items necessary to maintain a client’s safety, security1-8 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 30. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. and basic sanitary requirements (e.g., potable water, toiletries, etc.). After the discussion, refer participants to page 1-8 of their workbook for a list of immediate needs that are covered under the category of “immediate emergency Page 1-8 assistance.” Ask: What type of needs did the family have? Note: Create two columns. Record participant responses to this question about “needs in the left column. Leave space in between each item to allow room to write next to it. Bring out these “needs” if participants do not: ■ Someone to listen to their story Needs (Right Column) ■ Housing/Shelter ■ Clothing ■ Toiletries ■ Food Note: Explain that cooking and eating utensils are no longer provided by the Red Cross. Toiletries (comfort kits) are provided in the form of a bulk item. Ask: How did the Client Caseworkers support the family’s recovery? Note: Record their answers to this question about assistance in the right column. Try to align the assistance with the corresponding need on the left. Bring out if participants do not: ■ Financial assistance (Client Assistance Cards Disbursing Assistance (Left Column) Orders) ■ Referrals (to government agencies, volunteer agencies, etc.) All Red Cross assistance is free. It is a gift of the American people through their generous donations of money, goods and time. No repayment or reimbursement for any assistance provided by the Red Cross is sought or knowingly accepted.DSCLS202A 1-9August 2006
  • 31. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Red Cross Code of Conduct So it is understandable that the American public has high expectations for the American Red Cross and of anyone who wears its emblem. Our Fundamental Principles bring us together with a common purpose and the Red Cross values provide the foundation for standards of ethical behavior. Each of us is responsible for upholding the organization’s values in all our actions as well as adhering to the Red Cross Code of Conduct. Anyone who works on behalf of the Red Cross is expected to sign a Code of Conduct. Concern Connection Line It is everyone’s job to be a protector of our Red Cross values. This responsibility extends to the prompt reporting of any fraud, waste, abuse or other ethical Slide 21 Concern concerns that may compromise our values or diminish the trust of the American Connection Line people. The Concern Connect Line is a 24-hour, anonymous, confidential toll-free number. It is available to employees, volunteers and members of the general public for reporting for reporting concerns about illegal, unsafe or unethical conduct. It is staffed by independent, third-party communications specialists, not Red Cross employees. Addressing Disaster-Caused Emergency Needs The Client Casework interviewer’s main job is to help bridge the gap between what each individual or family is able to accomplish alone and what is actually Slide 22 Addressing needed to get them to resume a more normal life. We obtain this information by Disaster Needs interviewing the client. As a not-for-profit organization, we must ensure that we use the donated dollars entrusted to us wisely. To fulfill this responsibility, it is very important that we verify the following information before providing assistance: ■ Client identification: Individuals and families requesting emergency assistance are required to provide identification that1-10 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 32. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. proves they resided in the affected area at the time the disaster struck. ■ Disaster-caused needs: Emergency assistance is given for items of legitimate disaster-caused or -aggravated needs — not for preexisting conditions. If you have any questions about disaster-caused or aggravated needs and pre- existing conditions, consult your supervisor. Once the needs are verified, the Red Cross then gives assistance for items that address a client’s immediate needs. Immediate emergency assistance is designed to make sure clients have— ■ Two sets of clothing (including what they are wearing). ■ Something to eat. ■ A safe, dry place to sleep. ■ Something on which to sleep. ■ Basic critical medical needs met. ■ A short-term and a long-term recovery plan. It is important to remember that emergency assistance is not designed to replace all of the client’s losses. It is designed to meet the client’s immediate emergency needs. Providing Standardized Assistance By providing standardized assistance, we help ensure that all clients have access to the resources necessary to begin recovery. This means that the Red Cross Slide 23 makes every effort to ensure all assistance and services are similar in quality, Providing Standardized quantity and types. In order to do so, the Red Cross takes into account the cultural Assistance and geographical differences in the affected area. In order to ensure standardized assistance, the Red Cross has developed a document titled Individual Client Casework Activity Handbook.. This serves as a Slide 24 Sample reference tool for the policies, procedures, and regulations within the Red Cross Standardized Individual Client Services that pertain to the Client Casework Activity. Price ListDSCLS202A 1-11August 2006
  • 33. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. One important policy is that of providing standardized assistance to all clients. The Standardized Emergency Assistance Price List (or in a few cases, the local price list) provides specific guidance on the financial resources which can be provided to clients. Although the Standardized Emergency Assistance Price List may change, it remains the same in principle. Let’s now go over the current list to see what Red Handout: Cross assistance is now available. Standardized Price List Note: When you review the Standardized Price List, be sure to cover items and classifications. Briefly highlight and define the features of the price list, such as class of assistance. Explain that the price list used by chapters and on disaster relief operations may be different. The right side of the form contains the procedures for disbursing items of assistance. You are not expected to memorize these, and it is important to read the procedures each time you disburse an item. If a client has a disaster-caused need that is not addressed on the price list, the Red Cross still may be able to help. Speak with your supervisor about possible options for the client such as making a referral to another agency. There are a few things we need to remember about the Standardized Emergency Assistance Price List: ■ It is not a shopping list for the clients; they do not need to see it. ■ The interviewer and client must determine the immediate needs of the family and then, according to the need, disburse to the family the appropriate items to meet those needs. Ask: What questions do you have? Note: Pause and respond to participant’s questions.1-12 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 34. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Welfare Information and Family Reunification Helping family – members communicate with loved ones after a disaster has been Slide 25 an important service provided by the Red Cross for many years. The Red Cross Welfare will continue to concentrate its Welfare Information efforts on serving individuals Information Reunification and families within the disaster-affected areas, facilitating communication from inside the disaster-affected area to outside the affected area. To be most effective, this Welfare Information notification approach will require that everyone in the field during a disaster becomes a “de facto” welfare information agent—encouraging, reminding and tangibly helping clients to contact family and friends. As a Client Caseworker, your contact with clients within the affected area provides an opportunity to promote Welfare Information services. You can do so in three important ways: 1. Ask ■ Have you contacted your loved ones? ■ Do they know where you are? ■ Do they know what your plan is? 2. Offer ■ Can I help you contact your loved ones? ■ Would you like access to a phone? ■ Would you like access to register on the Red Cross Safe and Well Web Site? ■ Would you like Red Cross to contact your loved ones for you? 3. Connect ■ Provide cell phone access or direct client to nearest phone access. ■ Direct client to nearest web access ■ Provide client with reverse notification form (ARC 2079-1); collect and route form. The Red Cross Safe and Well Web Site provides a way for those who are affected Slide 26 Safe and Well Web by a disaster to notify loved ones of their whereabouts and their “safe and well” Site status. Clients can register themselves in the database by entering their personalDSCLS202A 1-13August 2006
  • 35. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. information into a simple-to-use screen. Concerned family and friends can search for those who have registered themselves using either a pre-disaster phone number or address. Note: Refer participants to Participant Resource E beginning on page E-1 of their workbook for more information about Welfare Information and the Safe And Well Participant Web Site. Resource Page E-1 Collaboration with Other DSHR Groups and Activities Close coordination between activities from different DSHR groups allows us to Slide 27 Collaboration - provide seamless service delivery. In addition to the other CLS activities, you will Mass Care (MC) be closely involved with workers from Mass Care and Information Management Support Services. Mass Care (MC) The Mass Care group provides congregate services to communities as a whole. These services include the bulk distribution of supplies, sheltering and feeding. There are four activities within this group: ■ Bulk Distribution (BD) ■ Feeding (FF) ■ Sheltering (SH) ■ Community Programs Client caseworkers must stay current with what mass care services are being provided within the affected community and the points of service locations. Knowing this information allows you to provide accurate information to the clients with whom you work.1-14 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 36. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Information Management Support Services (IMS) The IMS group is responsible for gathering, processing and disseminating information about the scope and effectiveness of relief efforts conducted by the Slide 28 Collaboration Red Cross. There are four activities within IMS: - Information ■ Disaster Assessment (DA) Management Support (IMS) ■ Financial and Statistical Information Management (FSI) ■ Analysis and Planning (AP) ■ Information Dissemination (ID) You will work closely with FSI as they are responsible for tracking and accounting for the distribution of Client Assistant Cards and Disbursing Orders as well as ensuring these and the clients’ Case Records are kept in a secure location. Ask: What questions do you have? Note: Pause and respond to participants questions. Summary Now that you have learned about the role of Client Casework, its commitment and values, ways you can provide assistance that address the client’s needs, let’s see how conducting Client Casework brings all this information together to serve the client. Before we begin, we will take a 15-minute break. Break: 15 minutesDSCLS202A 1-15August 2006
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  • 38. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Time: 3 hours and 50 minutes (includes one 15-minute break and a 60-minute break for lunch.) Objectives After completing this segment the participants will be able to– ■ Explain how to conduct an effective client interview. ■ Explain how to document client information using the Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901) during the interview process. ■ Identify and complete the additional forms used in conjunction with the Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901). ■ Describe the process in which Client Assistance Cards and Disbursing Orders are issued to the client. PART 1 Time: 80 minutes (to include a 15 minute break) Introduction In Segment 2 of the video you will hear Client Casework interviewers describe the importance of the interview, the skills needed to interview clients, and the tools used to collect information and provide assistance. Page 2-1 provides space to take notes and jot down any questions you may have. Page 2-1 Note: Show Segment 2 of the video. Segment 2 “The Interview” (7:00) Ask: Are there any questions or comments about the video? Note: Pause and respond to participants’ questions.DSCLS202A 2-1August 2006
  • 39. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Conducting Effective Interviews As a Client Casework interviewer, you will be one the front-line workers who Slide 29 deal directly with the public. You will interview clients, determine the client’s Conducting needs and take steps to provide assistance. As an interviewer, your role in the Effective Interviews interview process includes— ■ Climate setting. ■ Listening and consoling. ■ Providing emergency financial assistance. ■ Providing information and referrals. Climate Setting Because an interview is often the first encounter a client has with the Red Cross, it is important that it is conducted in a professional and effective manner. To instill Slide 30 Climate Setting a sense of confidence in the client, you should always remember to— ■ Welcome the client warmly. ■ Treat the client with courtesy. ■ Speak softly and with a smile. ■ Tell the client that your conversation will be confidential. ■ Tell him or her the Red Cross is there to try to help them with their recovery. Listening and Consoling Listening with empathy to understand the client’s losses and needs is the first step to building a trusting relationship. Effective listening and consoling the client is Slide 31 Listening one of the most important services we provide. Consoling Active Listening Active listening is one of the most important skills we use in client casework. When practicing active listening you are focused on the person who is speaking in Slide 32 order to understand what he or she is saying. You should then be able to express, Active Listening in your own words, what the person said to his or her satisfaction.2-2 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 40. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Listening Challenges Many people think active listening is easy. In fact, active listening is one of the hardest skills to master. Some common listening challenges include: Slide 33 Listening ■ Not paying attention - Listeners may allow themselves to be Challenges distracted or to be thinking about something else. ■ Pseudo-listening - Listeners are thinking about something else, but deliberately try to look as though they are listening. An example is when you feel like you are looking right through the person. ■ Rehearsing - Some people listen until they want to say something; they stop listening, start rehearsing what they will say, and wait for an opportunity to respond. ■ Interrupting - The listener does not wait until the complete meaning can be determined, but interrupts the speaker so that the speaker stops in mid-sentence. ■ Hearing what is expected - People frequently think that they heard speakers say what they expected them to say. Effective Listening Skills These challenges can be overcome by first becoming aware of your own habits and then making a conscious effort to change them. The better listener you Slide 34 Effective Listening become, the easier the interview will be for both you and the client. We can become more effective listeners by practicing the suggestions located on page 2-3 in your workbook. ■ Minimizing distractions - You may conduct the interview in Page 2-3 less-than-ideal surroundings. There may be noise and distracting activity. Tuning out distractions is essential. ■ Focusing on the other person - Try to understand his or her viewpoint, assumptions, needs, and belief systems. ■ Paying attention to non-verbal language - A shrug, a smile, a nervous laugh, gestures, facial expressions, and body position speak volumes about how a person is feeling. Studies have shown that in many cases body language is more important than the actual words used in a conversation.DSCLS202A 2-3August 2006
  • 41. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. ■ Asking questions that clarify what the speaker is saying - As an interviewer your role is to listen to the client’s story and provide assistance based on what he or she has said. Therefore, obtaining accurate information from the client is critical. By asking clarifying questions you can help the client to identify his or her needs and provide appropriate assistance. ■ Paraphrasing what the speaker has said - Using your own words, confirm what the client is saying by repeating what you heard. Ask the client if your statements are accurate. Showing Empathy A skill that goes hand-in-hand with listening is listening with empathy. During the interview it is important to stress to the client that you understand their Slide 35 Showing Empathy emotions and the challenges they face. Ask: What does empathy mean to you? Note: Discuss and record their answers on newsprint. After they have shared their answers, refer participants to page 2-3 of the workbook. “What does Empathy is the ability to respond to the client in a way that shows that you have empathy mean to you?” listened to and understood how he or she feels. To listen with empathy, you see the world from the other person’s point of view, rather than your own. Using the space provided on page 2-3 of your workbook, jot down a few examples of how you can show empathy for the client during the interview process. Page 2-3 Note: Ask the participants to share their answers. While interviewing, you will likely encounter a number of situations in which you may need to comfort the client. Acknowledging the client’s feelings and emotions by using the phrase “It sounds like you are very concerned about...” is a good way to show the client that you are in tune with his or her situation.2-4 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 42. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. If appropriate, place a hand on the client’s shoulder or pat his or her arm. Use appropriate eye contact. Always be culturally sensitive when comforting clients. For example, some cultures have strict rules regarding physical contact between men and women. Talk to your supervisor if you have any questions regarding appropriate behavior. Give the client time to recover if they become emotional or began to cry. Do not tell the client that you know how they feel nor insist on continuing the interview if the client becomes emotional. If small children are present, try to offer stuffed animals or have someone take care of the children during the interview. Asking Questions As an interviewer, your role is to listen to the client’s story and provide assistance based on what he or she has said. You need to ask the right questions to get the Slide 36 Asking Questions right information from the client. Use both close-ended (directive) and open- ended questions or statements during the interview. Close-ended (Directive) Questions Close-ended or directive questions are those that can be answered with “Yes”, “No” or a brief phrase. Use this type of question when you need to gather basic information about the client. Examples of a closed-ended question include: ■ Please tell me your current address. ■ Do you have insurance coverage? ■ Where were you at the time of the disaster? Open-ended Questions or Statements Open-ended questions or statements encourage longer, more in-depth responses. Use open-ended questions or statements when you want to determine the needs of the client. Examples of open-ended questions or statments include: ■ Please tell me about the damage to your home. ■ Can you tell me what happened after the tornado destroyed your home? ■ What other financial resources do you have?DSCLS202A 2-5August 2006
  • 43. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Note: Remind participants that it is important to stop writing at this point to make sure they hear the whole story. This is the time to use active listening skills and empathy. Do this because you don’t want to appear uninterested or preoccupied while the client is sharing what can sometimes be a very emotional story. Activity: (10 minutes) ■ Break participants into groups of two. ■ Instruct participants that they are to find something they have in common with their partner. One partner must only use close- ended questions to find out this information while the other partner must use open-ended questions or statements ■ Ask participants to share their experiences. Ask: What questions do you have? Note: Pause and respond to participants’ questions. Slide 37 Questions Providing Assistance After obtaining the correct information, you will need to determine the amount and type of emergency financial assistance the client may receive. Use the Disaster Program Guidance and Standardized Emergency Assistance Price List Slide 38 Emergency for guidance. Financial Assistance ProvidingEmergency Financial Assistance The Red Cross typically offers two methods of delivering emergency financial assistance to people who have been affected by a disaster: a Client Assistance Card (CACs) and a Disbursing Order (Form 104C). A Client Assistance Card (CAC) is a stored-valued card similar to a debit or gift card. The client can use the card to shop with any merchant that accepts MasterCard®.2-6 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 44. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Disbursing Orders function like a check. They can be used to purchase merchandise and services from vendors such as, contractors, landlords, doctors and hotels. Both Client Assistance Cards and Disbursing Orders— ■ Add a measure of dignity to the recovery process by enabling individuals to purchase specific items from the merchant of their choice, and select the color, size, style, etc., of the items. ■ Provide a boost to the local economy by putting money back into the disaster-affected community. ■ Enable Red Cross to be accountable for its financial commitments, which leads us to be good stewards of the donated dollar As a Client Casework interviewer you are responsible for issuing these types of financial assistance to the client. You will learn more about how to issue each of them later in the course. Providing Information, Referrals and Resources To Disaster Clients Besides asking the right questions, it is also important to have the right Slide 39 Providing information about the resources available to the client. This means providing the Information, client with complete and accurate information about Red Cross services and other Referals and Resources community resources that may be available to him or her. One of the most valuable roles the Red Cross plays is to connect disaster-affected individuals with external organizations that can help. When making a referral it is important that you know something about the agency and the assistance it provides. If possible, give the clients the following information: ■ How to access the resource (e.g., business hours, location of office, contact information) ■ What documentation the client may need (e.g., written referral, photo identification, insurance papers) ■ Eligibility requirements (e.g., age, income, residency)DSCLS202A 2-7August 2006
  • 45. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. There are many community agencies that assist people affected by disaster. Talk to your chapter or supervisor for a list of community agencies (local, state, and national) to which clients can be referred. Examples of community agencies that often assist people who have been affected by a disaster include: ■ Clothing: – Seventh-Day Adventist Church ■ Clothing, linens, housewares, furniture: – St. Vincent de Paul – Salvation Army ■ Rent, prescription drugs, food stamps: – Department of Social Services ■ Housing locations: – Housing Authority ■ Eyeglasses: – Lions Club – Optometrists Association ■ Occupational supplies: – Trade unions Note: Make participants aware of the additional resources which may be available for individuals under the age of 5 years and over the age of 62 years. These programs include Meals on Wheels and Women Infants and Children (WIC). Talk to your supervisor or chapter for more information Ask: What agencies do you know about in our community who can help? Note: Record participants responses on newsprint and post where it can be viewed. Community Agencies Who Can Help Break: 15 minutes2-8 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 46. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Documenting the Interview and Assistance Provided Slide 40 A case record must be established for every client you interview. This record Documetning the contains all the information you gather about the client during the interview, such Interview as their name, information about their pre-disaster address, information about the family, their status and emerging needs, their contact information, as well as details of any assistance you provde. Client case records are confidential and are maintained in a centralized and secure location where follow-up interviews and assistance can be documented. A case record can be established using two methods: ■ Computer-based in the Client Assistance System (CAS) ■ Paper-based using a Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901) Regardless of the method used to document the interview, it is critical that you record all of the client’s information and the assistance you provide accurately. Client Assistance System (CAS) The Client Assistance System (CAS) is a web-based application used to document a client’s information and the assitance provided. Using a computer and special Slide 41 Client Assistance software allows client information to be entered and stored in a single, centrally- System (CAS) located system of record where it can be retrieved using an assigned log in and password. Centrally-located electronic data provides the ability to generate reports that reveal important information about the status of a relief operation and the clients being served. It also enables the Red Cross to esnure accountability to our donors and the public. Because of these features, CAS is now the standard method of documenting, issuing and reporting Red Cross assistance for clients.DSCLS202A 2-9August 2006
  • 47. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. The Client Assistance is relatively easy to learn. Once you become familiar with the Form 901 today, you will be able to transfer this knowledge to the data you will enter in CAS. It requires only basic knowledge and computer skills. Note: Ask participants to turn to Participant Resource F on page F-1 in their workbook. Particpant Resource F The charts on pages F-2 and F-3 in Participant Resource F at the back of your Page F-2 F-3 workbook compares data entry points on the Form 901 to that of the CAS data entry screens. Staff assigned to the Client Casework Activity are required to learn CAS, preferably prior to deployment either at your chapter or online. Note: Inform participants of available CAS training at the local chapter. Encourage participants to self register for online training using the link noted on the slide. Completing a Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901) As you saw in the video the first form an interviewer is likely to encounter is the Slide 42 Disaster Disaster Registration and Case Record, known in the field as “the 901.” Registration and Case Record Note: Ask participants to locate the Form 901 in their packet. Orient participants to the parts of the Form 901. Handout: Form 901 Form 901 has four parts, each of which are lettered A through D. Parts A through C (also known as “flimsies”) are the quarter-page portions at the top of the form. Each part (or flimsy) is of a different color; white (Part A), pink (Part B) and yellow (Part C). Part D—also known as the “hard copy” or “case file”—is the last page of the form and measures 11” x 17 3/4”. All client information is recorded on the front of the form. It is important to use a ball-point when entering information. Be sure to press hard so that the information is recorded on all the copies. Print one capital letter in each block.2-10 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 48. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. You can fold Part D just below the supervisors name block (with the printing on the outside) to create a folder where you can place copies of other forms related to the case. Completing the Flimsy (Parts A-C) Let’s take a few minutes to look at how to enter information properly on this portion of the Form 901. Slide 43 Completing Form 901 - Note: Ask participants to turn to page 2-8 in their workbook. Point out that the Parts A-C numbers in the workbook correspond to those in the slide. 1. Check Client Identification Page 2-8 One important criteria for receiving Red Cross assitance is for a person to establish their identity along with their pre-disaster address. The most useful and common form of identification is a non-expired state driver’s license with a current address. Record the following information from the license number in the block labeled “Family Identified By:” ■ State of issue ■ Last four digits of the license number ■ Month and year of expiration. Verify whether the name and address on the license matches the name and address provided earlier by the client. If the name and address recorded on the Form 901 matches, note that the information is verified as follows: “VA 6789 / exp. 09/09 (name/address verified)” If the name on the license matches the Form 901 but the address is different record that the information is different: “VA 6789 / exp. 09/09 (name verified/address different)” If the address does not match, the client must provide an alternate form of identication showing the client resides at the address in the disaster-affected area. Record the form of additional identification used to verify the address as described below. If a driver’s license is not available, the client may use a current utility bill or the testimony of a professional individual, such as a policeman, social worker, clergy or landlord to establish identity. Include the utility company’s name and theDSCLS202A 2-11August 2006
  • 49. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. last four digist of the account number (“VEPCO utility bill; 0002”) or the name and position of the individual who establishes their identification. Notify your supervisor if the client’s identity cannot be verified. Note: A Social Security Number is not normally required to complete Form 901. Check with your supervisor to find out when the use of a Social Security Number is appropriate. 2. Record Client’s Name and Address Record the client’s name and pre-disaster address (including zip code) in the appropriate spaces. Be sure to include the name of the client’s spouse. Note: Remind participants of the importance of always being culturally sensitive to the way in which people identify themselves. For example, in Spanish-speaking cultures individuals use the last names of both parents to identify themselves. 3. Record Household Demographics Demographic information is recorded in two separate areas on the form. On the left-hand side of the form are four spaces. The information required in this area includes: ■ Number of people living in the household ■ Number of people age 62 years or older ■ Number of people under the age of 5 years ■ Number of household members unemployed as a result of the disaster This information is important because it allows you to determine if there are any household members who are eligible for additional assistance. On the far right-hand side of the form you record the name, ages and sex of all the members in the household. Print the first name of each person living in the home at the time of the disaster. Include the last name if it is different, from the head of household.2-12 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 50. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. You must also indicate the current status of each household member in the block labeled “K/I/H/M/NA” (Killed, Injured, Hospitalized, Missing, Not Affected) When two or more cases are related (two individuals or families live within one housing unit but maintain separate households) both cases should be cross- referenced. Each case will contain the case number of the other household so that the caseworker can review both cases when working with the families. Talk to your supervisor when this situation occurs. 4. Record Red Cross Disaster Relief Information This information includes the Disaster Relief Operation (DRO) number, type of event, the day the event happened, chapter code and service center codes. You can get this information from your supervisor. 5. Record Property Damage and Income Information In this area you record information about the property, the type of damage it sustained, insurance coverage and personal income range. Income information is not used to provide Red Cross emergency assistance; rather, it is used to more accurately plan the client’s recovery. Asking about a person’s income is sometimes a sensitive question to answer. A good way to approach this situation is to allow the client to check the box. 6. Record Contact Information The information recorded in these blocks includes: ■ Pre-disaster telephone number ■ Alternative telephone number ■ Contact at the alternative telephone number ■ Post-disaster address of client Even if the service has been disconnected, the client should be able to provide you with a pre-disaster telephone number. If the client does not have a phone, write “NONE” in the appropriate box.DSCLS202A 2-13August 2006
  • 51. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Always try to get at least two current and active phone numbers at which a client can be reached. Enter the name and telephone number and relationship of the person who will most likely be answering the phone. Make sure that this information is correct. It may be the only reliable way in which to contact the client. 7. Record Your Name and Date Print your name legibly and the date in the appropriate box. Use the information that follows to complete the remaining portion of Part D of the Form 901. Note: Ask participants to review the completed Flimsy on page A-1 in Participant Particpant Resource A. Resource A Page A-1 Ask: What questions do you have about the flimsy? Note: Pause and respond to participants’ questions. Completing Part D Let’s now take a look at Part D. Slide 44 Completing Form 1. Brief Statement of How the Family Was Affected in Disaster 901 - Part D This section provides the road map to the client’s story. Only document the information that is needed to assist the disaster client with his or her recovery. Red Cross client case files are important documents. You are required to keep the client’s information confidential. Cleint information may not be shared unless the client signs the Release of Confidential Information form. We will discuss client confidentiality in more detail in a few minutes Both the Red Cross and other agencies rely upon the information in the case files in making decisions about what, if any assistance, to provide to the client. The case file should only contain information related to the needs of the individual or family, the nature of the request for assistance, and the assistance provided to meet the client’s emergency disaster related needs and help the client begin the recovery process.2-14 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 52. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. If you are suspicious about the legitimacy of the client’s eligibility for assistance: ■ Tell you supervisor ■ Do not make any notations in the narative about your suspicions ■ Do not investigate your suspicions–that is not your role as a caseworker ■ If your supervisor tells you to make a notation in the narrative, write “Case being reviewed by Supervisor” There are some specific “do’s” and “don’ts” that all Red Cross workers documenting information in the narrative section of a case file are expected to follow: Do Do Not Write a narrative. Include personal opinions or rumors . Be brief. Make comments on the client’s Focus on information relevant to the character. case. Make comments on possible legal Be accurate; stick to the facts. issues. The narrative should start with the phrase “Client states...”. When completing this section ask the client the following questions and record their responses: ■ What date did the damage occur? ■ What was the cause of the damage? ■ Where were you or other household members during the time the damage occurred? ■ What is the degree of damage to your residence? ■ What type of needs have been caused by this disaster? ■ What are your immediate needs? If assistance is provided, write in the method and items that are provided. Examples of the type of information you should include are: ■ CAC for food/groceries ■ DO for rent ■ Referral to Salvation Army for additional clothingDSCLS202A 2-15August 2006
  • 53. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Note: Refer particiants to the sample narrative statments in Particpant Resource B. Provide a few minutes to review the samples. Particpant Resource B Ask: Participants if there are any questions prior to begining of the next topic. Page B-1 Note: Pause and respond to participants’ questions. 2. Medical Information The purpose of this section is to determine whether the clients have any medical needs. Do not document any physical or mental medical conditions when completing this section. the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-Privacy Regulations (HIPPA) does not allow the release of confidential medical information. This includes statements regarding specific mental or health conditions. Therefore, you should only record the medical needs, such as “lost glasses,” “lost prescription,” “destroyed walker,”, etc.; “needs replacement” and “1475 issued.” If a client or household member requires immediate medical attention or first aid, take him or her to an Emergency Medical Technician or a Health Services (HS) worker on the scene and finish the interview at a later time. If the client or household member is being assisted by HS, record on Form 901 that a “1475 was issued.” Give the Form 901 to the HS worker. 3. Client Casework Supervisor’s Name Write in the name of your supervisor in the space provided. Note: Remind participants to not fill out this section until the Form 901 is completed and both you and the client have signed the form. 4. Family Recovery Plans - Immediate and Long-range The purpose of this section is to record the client’s immediate and long-range plans for recovery. Make sure you include the following information when completing this section: ■ Does the client intend to return to his or her previous living quarters?2-16 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 54. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. ■ Does the client need temporary housing until repairs are made or until another home is found? ■ Does the client have insurance coverage? What type of damages are covered? – What is the maximum amount of coverage for each category? – What is the name and contact information of the insurance company or local agent? – What is the status of the claim? ■ Does the client have any other financial resources in addition to the Red Cross? (e.g., personal savings or government assistance) Note: Convey that the status of an insurance claim is not known, obtain an information release for the insurance company. 5. Directions to the Residence The purpose of this section is to record specific directions from the chapter or service center to the pre-disaster address. In urban areas you can use standardized map coordinates or major street intersections to locate the residence. In rural areas, include distances and prominent landmarks. 6. Referrals Referrals to other relief agencies are a valuable service that the Red Cross can provide to clients. This is especially true when the client’s needs go beyond the scope of Red Cross services. The agencies listed in this section of Form 901 are only used on larger disasters when the President of the United States issues a formal disaster declaration. Your supervisor will let you know when you can make these referrals. 7. Signatures Ask the head of the household or another responsible adult member of the family to sign in the box labeled “Signature of Family Representative.” Have him or her date the form. If no one in the family can write, have the head of the household mark an “X” and have it witnessed by another adult besides the interviewer.DSCLS202A 2-17August 2006
  • 55. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Place your signature in the box labeled “Signature of Interviewer” to the immediate right of the family representative’s signature. Date the form as well. 8. Release of Confidential Information The purpose of this section is to ask for written permission from the client to allow the Red Cross to obtain or exchange information with any agencies listed in the referral section of the Form 901. The decision to sign or not to sign the release rests entirely with the client. Check with your supervisor to determine if you need to obtain any additional releases from the client. On a federally declared disaster, you may need to obtain additional releases from the client, other than this one on Part D. Your supervisor will be able to advise you. Follow these steps when completing this section: 1. Read and explain the purpose of the release to any individual or family that is applying for Red Cross Assistance, including those who do not receive financial assistance. 2. Ask the family representative if he or she would like to sign the release. a) If the client chooses to sign the release, instruct him or her to place his or her signature and the date in the appropriate area. b) If the client chooses not to sign the release, the interviewer should: – Explain to the client that the Red Cross cannot exchange information with any of the agencies listed in the referral section if he or she applies for assistance. – Ask the client why he or she chose not to sign and record that reason in the space below the release section. – Write “CLIENT DECLINED TO SIGN” in the designated client signature line and sign your name on the designated interview line to the right. Place the date next to both. Print2-18 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 56. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. your name legibly below your signature. The American Red Cross is a member of the disaster relief network, which has the ability to share client’s case files with other member agencies utilizing a common network referred to as the Client Assistance Network (CAN). Sharing client information can only be shared when the client provides express written consent to do so., on a case-by-case basis. Your supervisor will provide guidance about how to obtain release of confidential information when CAN is being used. Participant 9. Information from Home Visits and Other Contacts Resource A Page A-2 This section is used to record follow-up communications regarding the case. Note any correspondence or documents exchanged between the Red Cross, the client and organizations to whom referrals have been made. When recording information in this section— ■ Review previous entries to ensure that all disaster-caused needs are identified and addressed. Talk to your supervisor if you have any questions or concerns. ■ Document what type of assistance was provided. ■ Record the date and time of the entry. ■ Record if this is a Home Visit (HV) or the client is in the Service Center (SC). ■ Sign your full name at the end of the entry. Ensure it is written legibly. Note: Ask participants to review the completed hard copy on page A-2 in Participant Resource A. After a few minutes, ask if their are any questions. Pause and respond to participants’ questions. Slide 45 Questions We will not take the time to practice completing a Form 901 at this time. You will have ample opportunity to put your skills to during the Skills Drill in the second half of this course. Lunch Break: 60 minutesDSCLS202A 2-19August 2006
  • 57. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. PART 2 Time: 90 minutes Forms Used with Form 901 Slide 46 Note: Refer participants to page 2-16 of the workbook. Briefly review each of the Forms Used with Form 901 forms listed in the chart. Ask particpants to follow along using their workbook and the form in their participant packet. Explain that they will have an opportunity to use these forms Page 2-16 later in the course, during the Skills Drill in Segment 4. Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030) The Client Assistance Card Authorization is written to provide financial assistance when a Client Assistance Card is issued for the purchase of goods and services. Handout: Form 1030 The white copy goes to the client, the pink copy goes into the client’s case file, and the yellow copy goes to Financial Statistical Information Managment (FSI). Note: Inform participants that you will cover this form in more detail in a few minutes. Client Assistance Memorandum (Form 1475) The Client Assistance Memorandum is a communciation tool used by Health Handout: Services (HS), Client Casework (CC), and Disaster Mental Health (DMH) Form 1475 to exchange and record information about a client. No confidential health information should be documented on this form. Disbursing Order (140 C) A Disbursing Order is another means by which the Red Cross provides financial Handout: assistance to clients for the purchase of goods and services. the Disbursing is From 140C like a check, written to a specific vendor for a specific purpose. The white and the green copy go to the client. The pink copy goes into the client’s case file and the yellow copy goes to Financial Statistical Information Management (FSI).2-20 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 58. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Note: Inform participants that you will cover this form in more detail in a few minutes. Disaster Referral (Form 5855) The Disaster Referral is a communication tool used to inform disaster-affected Handout: individuals and families of other public and private agencies and organizations Form 5855 that provide disaster assistance. The original copy goes to the client and the second copy goes into the client’s case file. Landlord Verification (Form 6615) The Landlord Verification—also known as an LLV—this form is to be completed Handout: for all individuals and families who may request Red Cross assistance for rent or Form 6615 security deposits. The original copy goes to the client and the second copy will go into the client’s case file. Release of Confidential Information A signed Release of Confidential Information represents the client’s written Handout: permission to release and/or acquire confidential information to/from an agency Release of not listed on Form 901. The original copy is sent to the agency and the second Confidential Information copy is placed in the client’s case file. No release should be signed without completing Section D of Form 901. Release of Confidential Information forms may change periodically. Verify with your supervisor which forms are to be used and for what purposes. You will become more familiar with how to use these forms when you are on assignment. Ask: Befor we move on to the next segment, what questions do have about the Form 901 or any of the other forms? Note: Pause and respond to participants’ questions.DSCLS202A 2-21August 2006
  • 59. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Client Assistance Cards As mentioned earlier, one method the Red Cross uses to provide financial Slide 47 assistance is the Client Assistance Card (CAC). Client Assistance Cards The Client Assistance Cards can be used to make purchases and to withdraw money from an ATM or receive cash back when making a purchase by using a four-digit personal identification number (PIN). The pin number is provided along with the card. Just like a credit or debit card, there is a raised 16-digit number that is unique for each card. Cards also display an expiration date, the date after which a merchant will not accept the card. Cards expire 120 days after activation. Unlike a credit Slide 48 Client Assistance or debit card, there is no name on the front. There is, however, a signature space Cards - Features on the back. All cards have a signature space that the shopper signs. (The shopper is the client or someone the client designates to make purchases for him or her.) Both cards also have a warning on the back of the card stating that the funds cannot be used to purchase alcohol, tobacco, or weapons. Benefits of Using a Client Assistance Card Using a Client Assistance Card benefits our clients, Red Cross caseworkers, merchants, and donors: Slides 49-52 Benefits of Using a ■ Because a Client Assistance Card can be used like a debit card, a Client Assistance client can make purchases less conspicuously and therefore, with Card more dignity. ■ For the American Red Cross caseworker, using the card reduces the preparation of multiple disbursing orders, making the process of providing assistance quicker and more efficient. ■ For merchants, accepting the Client Assistance Card facilitates faster receipt of payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT). ■ A Client Assistance Card allows the Red Cross to track the use of donated dollars in a quick and efficient manner.2-22 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 60. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Issuing Client Assistance Cards Issuing a Client Assistance Card on a disaster relief operation is a six-step process. Slide 53 Issuing Client Assistance Cards Note: Identify each of the steps presented in the slide. Then discuss each in detail as indicated by the subsequent slides. The steps may be different when issuing a CAC at your local chapter. For instance, how a caseworker obtains and activates a card may be different. Teach how the cards are issued on a disaster relief operation FIRST, before conveying any chapter-specific variations. 1. Receive Client Assistance Cards When reporting for your shift, you’ll provide photo identification to the Financial and Statistical Information Management (FSI) worker. Preferred forms of Slide 54 1. Receive Client identification are your driver’s license or a Red Cross ID. Assistance Cards You’ll then receive the Client Assistance Cards from the FSI worker in sealed, numbered envelopes. The envelopes protect the card number and provide security for the PIN. The envelopes should not be opened until the CAC is being issued to the client. In addition to the Client Assistance Cards, the FSI worker will also provide you with the forms and additional items you need to issue the card, along with the necessary documentation the client is to receive. These include: ■ Client Assistance Charge-Out Record (Form 1032) - Used to keep track of the CACs assigned to you. ■ Client Assistance Authorization (Form 1030) - Used to record a description of the type of assistance provided to the client. ■ Client Assistance Card protective sleeves - Used to protect the card from becoming demagnetized, which can happen if the card is placed near a cell phone or other magnetized device. ■ Register of Purchases - Is an envelope with spaces on the front for tracking card use. You’ll give it to the client who then uses it to keep a running balance of expenditures on the front and put purchase receipts inside.DSCLS202A 2-23August 2006
  • 61. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Note: Ask participants to retrieve the Client Assistance Card forms reviewed earlier and to keep them nearby during this section. Your chapter may not provide protective sleeves or Register of Purchases to clients. If they are available, circulate one of each so that participants may see what they look like. In addition, you should also receive the following forms from the FSI worker or your supervisor: ■ Merchant Letter - Describes the card and lists the regulations that Slide 54 Additional Forms apply to all merchants accepting the card. You give a copy of the letter to the client to present to the merchant if there is a question regarding the use of the CAC. ■ Client Instructions - Provide a reference for the client when Handout: Merchant Letter he or she starts using the card. The instructions include phone Client Instructions numbers and a web site the client can use for questions and more information. Before you accept responsibility for the cards you must— ■ Match the serial numbers on the envelope with the serial numbers written on the Charge-Out Record (Form 1032). Slide 56 Client Assistance ■ Verify there are sufficient quantities of cards and supporting Card Charge- documentation and materials. out Records ■ Verify with your supervisor how the card is being activated. When the card is not being activated through the Client Assistacne System, verify the activation phone number. This is the number Handout: you will use to activate the card as you issue it to the client. Client Assistance Card Charge-out Record The last thing you’ll do is sign and date the Charge-Out Record and make sure the FSI worker does so as well. When you sign the Charge-Out Record, you’re accountable for the cards in your possession. Let the FSI worker know if there is a discrepancy between the numbers on the envelopes and the numbers on the Charge-Out Record before you sign. You may be instructed that card activation will be completed by someone other than the caseworker.2-24 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 62. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. 2. Interview Clients As you will recall, one of the primary purposes of the client interview is to determine immediate, emergency, disaster-caused financial needs. Once you’ve Slide 57 2. Interview determined a client’s disaster-caused needs, you and the client will decide which the Client types of financial assistance are most appropriate for those needs. This could be a Disbursing Order, a Client Assistance Card, or a combination of the two. 3. Complete the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030) The next step is to complete the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030). This form is used to describe the amount and type of assistance for which Slide 58 the Client Assistance Card can be used. 3. Complete CAC Authorization When completing the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030)— ■ Determine whether the client and the shopper (the person making Handout: the purchases) are the same. CAC Authorization If someone other than the client is doing the shopping, provide that person’s name and contact phone number. The pre-disaster address should be the client’s. ■ Complete the appropriate fields. ■ Ask the shopper to choose a confidential, easy-to-remember 4-digit access code, this number should not match pin number Slide 59 3. Complete CAC generated by the bank. This code created by the client/shopper is Authorization (cont.) for identification purposes only. ■ Review the Client Instruction Letter in detail. Note: Refer particpants to Participant Resource C for a sample of a completed Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030). Participant Resource C Page C-1DSCLS202A 2-25August 2006
  • 63. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. 4. Complete Card Activation You must activate the card before you, issue it to the client. In CAS this is done in the CAC tab section. Slide 60 4. Complete Card Activation When you are not using the CAS, follow these steps to activate the card— ■ Inform the client you need to make a phone call and move a discreet distance away from the client to make the phone call. ■ Call the designated phone number. ■ Provide the activator with the essential information needed: 1. Client name and pre-disaster address 2. Card number Slide 61 4. Complete Card 3. Case number Activation (cont.) 4. Chapter incidence or DR number 5. Contact number for the shopper 6. Total amount of assistance 7. Access code; NEVER the PIN 8. Name of person who authorized the assistance 9. Name of activator 10. Chapter and county codes 11. Date To ensure the card was properly activated, ask the activator to read all the information back to you, including the spelling of the client or shopper’s name. It’s important to activate the card at the time you issue the card rather than waiting until the end of your shift. Clients need to be able to use the card as soon as possible. 5. Issue Card and Obtain Client Signature Review the following information with the client before giving him or her the activated Client Assistance Card: Slide 62 5. Issue Card and ■ If the client withdraws cash or gets a cash return on a purchase, Obtain Signature they will lose the tax-free advantage of using a CAC; pay a fee for the cash withdrawal; and the Red Cross will not be able to replace any cash that is lost or stolen.2-26 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 64. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. ■ Advise the client or shopper to check the card balance before making a purchase, inform the merchant of the tax-exempt status of the purchases and avoid returns and credits. A card without funds to fully cover a purchase will be declined. ■ Explain to the client that purchases are monitored. Cards can be suspended at any time if misuse is suspected, so it’s very important to use the card for only approved items. Approved items are the ones listed on the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030). Give the client a copy of the Merchant Letter and explain its purpose. Since clients only have one copy of the letter, they should not give it to the merchant. The merchant may see it, read it and photocopy it, but they cannot keep it. Explain how the client can use the Register of Purchases envelope to document card transactions and keep up with the funds remaining on the card. (It’s similar to the check register for a checking account.) Emphasize to the client that using the Register of Purchases envelope can help them avoid the embarrassment of attempting to make purchases that exceed the remaining value on the card. Ask the client to sign the back of the card in front of you. If someone other than the client is shopping, the shopper’s signature must be on the back of the card. This is a MasterCard® requirement and is not negotiable. Point out the Customer Service number on the back of the card and remind clients that this is the number to call for card balances or to report a lost or stolen card. If clients will use the cash-back option on the card, they can change their PIN through Customer Service. Ask the client to sign and date the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030) in front of you.DSCLS202A 2-27August 2006
  • 65. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Distribute copies: ■ Original (white) copy of the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030) goes to the client or shopper. ■ Pink copy goes in the case file. ■ Yellow copy is returned to Financial and Statistical Information Management at the end of your shift. 6. Account For and Return Unused Client Assistance Cards At the end of your shift, you must account for all the listed cards on the Charge- Out Record. Slide 63 6. Account for and Return Unused Cards ■ Return any unused cards and submit the completed Client Assistance Card Authorization forms (yellow copies). ■ Inform the FSI worker whether or not you’ll be returning for another shift. If so, any unused CAC’s will be reassigned to you at the beginning of your next shift. ■ If you are out-processing from the disaster relief operation, you will sign the Client Assistance Card Charge-Out Record. Ask: Before we move on to the next section, what questions do you have? Note: Pause and respond to participants’ questions. Disbursing Orders (Form 140C) As mentioned earlier a Disbursing Order (DO) works like a check or voucher. It can be used to purchase goods and services from vendors. In addition, a Slide 64 Disbursing Orders Disbursing Order is the only method you can use when providing the client with assistance for housing. Features A Disbursing Order has four copies: an Original Copy (blue), a Merchant’s Copy (green), an Accountant’s Copy (yellow) and a Case File Copy (pink). 2-28 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 66. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Types of Disbursing Orders Disbursing Orders are categorized by the type of transaction for which the DO is written. Two common categories are non-cash grants and cash grants. Slide 65 Types of Disbursing Orders A non-cash grant is a DO that has been written directly to the vendor. The client gives the DO to the merchant in exchange for goods and services. A cash grant refers to a DO that is written by the interviewer but processed by Shared Services and issued to the client in the form of a check. The check is mailed directly to the client to cover or reimburse disaster-related expenditures. To issue a cash grant, you must have authorization from a client casework supervisor. This type of DO should be rarely used. Specific procedures for managing the different color copies of a disbursing orders are determined by the scope of the disaster (chapter vs. national response) and the type of financial assistance provided (non-cash grant or cash grant). In most cases, the Original and Merchant’s copies (blue and green) are given to the client, the Case File copy (pink) is placed in the client’s case file and the Accountant’s copy (yellow) is sent to Financial and Statistical Information Management (FSI) for processing. Talk to your chapter or supervisor to find out the specific procedures being used at your DRO. Note: Ask participants to retrieve the the Disbursing Order Charge-out Record and a Disbursing Order and keep them nearby during this section of the course. Handout: Your chapter may not provide protective sleeves or Register of Purchases to Form 140C clients. If they are available, circulate one of each so that participants may see Form 5740 what they look like. Issuing Disbursing Orders There are five steps you must take in order to issue a Disbursing Order to a client. Slide 66 Issuing Note: Identify each of the steps presented in the slide. Then discuss each in detail Disbursing as indicated by the subsequent slides. The steps may be different when issuing a OrdersDSCLS202A 2-29August 2006
  • 67. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. DO at your local chapter. For instance, how a caseworker obtains DOs may be different. Teach how DOs are issued on a disaster relief operation FIRST, before conveying any chapter-specific variations. 1. Receive Disbursing Orders When reporting for your shift, you’ll provide photo identification to the Financial and Statistical Information Management worker. Preferred forms of identification are your driver’s license or Red Cross ID. You’ll then receive the Disbursing Orders from FSI. At this time you should also receive a— ■ Disbursing Order Charge-Out Record (Form 5740) – Used to track Slide 67 Charge-Out Record the Disbursing Orders assigned to you and; (Form 5740) ■ Merchant Letter - Lists the regulations that apply to all merchants accepting Disbursing Orders. You will give a copy of the letter to the client to present to the merchant. Before you accept responsibility for the DOs you must match the serial numbers on the DOs with the serial numbers written on the Charge-Out Record (Form 5740) . Let the Financial and Statistical Information Management worker know Slide 68 1. Receive if there is a discrepancy between the numbers on the DOs and the numbers on the Disbursing Orders Charge-Out Record before you sign. The last thing you’ll do is sign and date the Charge-Out Record and make sure the Financial and Statistical Information Management worker does so as well. Note: Reinforce that once you sign the Charge-out Record, you are accountable for all Disbursing Orders assigned to you. Do not share or exchange Disbursing Orders with another caseworker. 2. Interview the Client Slide 69 Interview the client to determine his or her immediate, emergency, disaster-caused 2. Interview the financial needs. Once you’ve determined a client’s disaster-caused needs, you Client and the client will decide which types of financial assistance are most appropriate2-30 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance2-2-30 Instructor’s Manual
  • 68. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. for those needs. This could be a Disbursing Order, a Client Assistance Card or a combination of the two. 3. Complete the Disbursing Order (Form 140C) The next step is to complete the Disbursing Order (Form 140 C). This form is used to describe the specific items of assistance and the dollar amount allotted for Slide 70 3. Complete the the purchase. Disbursing Order Include the essential information when completing this form: 1. Date. 2. Merchant name and address. 3. Clinet name and pre-disaster address. 4. DO number. 5. Chapter incidence or DR number. 6. Total amount of assistance. 7. “Red Cross pays no other charges” statement. 8. Name of person who authorized assistance (print/signature). 9. Signature of beneficiary. 10. Case number. 11. Chapter and county codes. When completing a Disbursing Order, it is critical that you do not— ■ Strike through test. ■ Use white out. ■ Erase or over-write. Note: Ask the participants to locate the instructions for completing a Disbursing Order on the back of the blue copy of the form. Once you’ve reviewed the information on the slide with the participants, refer them to the sample of a completed Disbursing Order (Form 140C) in Participant Participant Resource D on page D-1 in their workbooks. Resource D Page D-1DSCLS202A 2-31August 2006
  • 69. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. 4. Give the Disbursing Order and Merchant Letter to the Client Review the following information with the client before giving him or her a Disbursing Order: Slide71 4. Give Disbursing ■ Disbursing Orders are nontransferable. Payment will only be Order to Client made to the merchant to whom it is issued. ■ Clients should inform the merchant that the Red Cross is exempt from state and local taxes. ■ Clients may only purchase the items listed on the Disbursing Order. Payments will not be made for substitute items. 5. Account For and Return Unused Disbursing Orders and Documentation At the end of your shift, you must account for all the listed Disbursing Orders on the Charge-Out Record as is required with the Client Assistance Cards. Slide 72 5. Account for and Return Inform the client that vendor instructions for how to process the Disbursing Order Unused DOs and Documentation are written on the back of the blue form. Return any unused DOs and submit the completed Disbursing Order Authorization forms. Inform the FSI worker whether or not you’ll be returning for another shift. If so, any unused DOs will be reassigned to you at the beginning of your next shift. If you are out-processing from the disaster relief operation, you will sign the Disbursing Order Charge-Out Record. Voiding and Cancelling Disbursing Orders Under certain circumstances a Disbusing Order may be voided or cancelled. A Disbursing Order is “voided” when the Red Cross has all four copies. Cancelled Disbursing Orders are those invalidated after the yellow copy has been processed through Financial and Statistical Information Management (FSI). Voiding Disbursing Orders ■ Entries on a DO may not be erased, struck through or written over. Slide 73 ■ If a mistake is made, write “VOID” in large letters across the face Voiding Disbursing of the DO making sure the letters go through all four copies. Orders2-32 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 70. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. ■ Record it as VOID on the Disbursing Order Charge-out Record (Form 5740), and return it to FSI when you return the Charge-Out Record (Form 5740) at the end of your shift or when you need more DOs. Never discard or destroy a voided DO. Cancelling Disbursing Orders Cancelled Disbursing Orders are those invalidated after the yellow copy has been processed by FSI. Slide 74-76 Cancelling Disbursing To cancel a Disbursing Order you must— Orders ■ Obtain the Original Copy (Blue) and Merchant Copy (green) of the Disbursing Order from the client. ■ Pull the pink copy from the client’s case file. ■ Write one of the following two phrases, as applicable, across the face of all three copies: – “Cancelled. Replaced by DO No.” if the cancelled DO is replaced by a new one. – “Cancelled. Not replaced” if the cancelled DO is not replaced. ■ Return the pink copy of the cancelled DO to the client’s case file . ■ Send the Original Copy (blue) and Merchant Copy (green) to FSI. If the cancelled Disbursing Order has been replaced by another, be sure to include the yellow copy of the replacement Disbursing Order when you send the green and white copies to FSI. Ask: What questions do you have about Disbursing Orders? Note: Pause and respond to participants’ questions. We have discussed all of the elements that are associated with the interview. We discussed the interview process and reviewed the most common tools used to Slide 77 Questions provide assistance. Let’s now consider the assignment settings in which you will be conducting casework.DSCLS202A 2-33August 2006
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  • 72. 3 Assignment SettingsSegment .................................................................................. Time: 35 minutes (includes a 15 minute break) Objectives After completing this segment the participants will be able to— ■ Describe the various assignment settings in which Client Casework activities are conducted. Introduction As a caseworker you may find yourself in a variety of working environments. Let’s watch video Segment 3, “Assignment Settings,” and gather some insight into how some of these assignment settings will look. If you turn to page 3-1 in your workbook, you will find a place to take notes and jot down any questions you may have. Page 3-1 Note: Show video Segment 3. Segment 3 “Assignment Settings” (7:00) Ask: Does anyone have any questions or comments on this segment of the video? Note: Pause and respond to any questions or comments participants may have. There are three basic settings in which you are likely to conduct client casework: office settings, field settings and shelters. Slide 78 Assignment Office Settings Settings In these settings, you will most likely have access to electrical power, telephones, fax machines, forms and office supplies. You will also have access to yourDSCLS202A 3-1August 2006
  • 73. 3 Assignment SettingsSegment .................................................................................. supervisor and other Client Casework activities and groups that will make communications easier. Common tasks you will perform in an office setting are— ■ Conducting initial interviews with disaster-affected individuals who are referred to the Red Cross by other agencies, such as the local fire department. ■ Following up on cases initiated by Red Cross workers out in the field. ■ Making referrals. ■ Issuing Client Assistance Cards and Disbursing Orders to clients. There are three common types of office settings: chapter settings, Service Centers and Response Centers. Note: Not all three settings were portrayed in the video. Chapter Setting The chapter setting is most common when dealing with small events, such as a single-family house fire or apartment fire. In a chapter setting you may be asked to perform a variety of tasks such as conducting an initial interview, issuing a Client Assistance Card or Disbursing Order or following up on cases that have been initiated in the field. Service Delivery Site The service delivery site setting is most common when dealing with larger events that affect communities, such as a flood or tornado. In a Service Center setting clients or disaster-affected individuals come to a central location to meet with Red Cross workers. These central locations can include schools, community centers or shelters. The tasks you perform in this type of setting are more specific and the client may interact with more than one worker. For example, a receptionist may greet the client and complete the first portion of the Disaster Case Registration (Form 901)3-2 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 74. 3 Assignment SettingsSegment .................................................................................. and then send the client to you or another Red Cross worker who is responsible for completing the narrative portion of the form. Call Center When a disaster is too large or extensive to meet client needs through normal means, a Red Cross call center will handle calls from individuals affected by a disaster. You may be assigned to a Call Center to conduct casework by phone. Field Settings When you are assigned to work in a field setting, you travel within the disaster- affected area to work with clients. Field settings often provide you with greater challenges because of limited direct access to office technology and other resources, such as your supervisor. It is important to be prepared when you are going into a field setting. Bring plenty of disaster forms and office supplies with you. Dress appropriately for the conditions and always wear your Red Cross identification. There are three common types of field settings: Disaster Action Team (DAT), Outreach and Home Visits. The Disaster Action Team (DAT) The basic organizational unit in a field setting is the Disaster Action Team (DAT). As a member of the DAT, you are responsible for responding and meeting the immediate emergency needs of clients at the local level. Like when working in a chapter setting, you may be asked to perform a variety of tasks while responding to a disaster as part of a DAT, such as conducting casework and meeting client’s immediate mass care needs.DSCLS202A 3-3August 2006
  • 75. 3 Assignment SettingsSegment .................................................................................. Outreach Activities Outreach activities may be organized when there is no disaster assessment (DA) information and disaster-affected individuals or clients cannot come to a centralized facility, such as a chapter or service delivery site. Outreach teams provide services and written information specific to the disaster. Home Visits Home visits are made to specific clients who already have a case open. American Red Cross client caseworkers help verify losses, evaluate living conditions and determine what assistance may be needed. You may also make a Home Visit to follow up on a case or meet clients who cannot make it to a service delivery site for some reason, such as an injury. Shelters Opening and operating a shelter is one way the Red Cross takes care of the interim eating and sleeping needs of people affected by a disaster while they make other living arrangements. Conducting client casework in a shelter is a convenience to clients, but more importantly, it hastens their recovery. The recovery of shelter residents and the community is hindered the longer shelters remain open. Conducting client casework in a shelter ensures timely and successful closing of shelters with the least stress to individuals and families. Most often, client casework procedures are the same for interviewing shelter residents as they are for interviewing clients in any service delivery site. One distinct difference is that casework is typically conducted during CLIENT convenient hours, often 4 - 9:30 PM. When it is necessary for shelters to remain open for long periods of time, casework procedures may be modified to more efficiently and effectively meet the remaining clients’ specific needs, enabling them to find alternative living arrangements and facilitating shelter closing.3-4 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 76. 3 Assignment SettingsSegment .................................................................................. In this segment, we have talked about the various assignment settings in which Client Caseworkers provide services. Next, we will have an opportunity to practice all the skills we learned today in Segment 4: Skills Drill. We’ve covered a lot of material thus far. Ask: Are there any questions before we begin the Skills Drill? Slide 79 Questions Note: Pause and respond to participants’ questions. It is important to clarify any misconceptions at this point before moving on to the Skills Drill. Break: 15 minutesDSCLS202A 3-5August 2006
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  • 78. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Time: 2 hours and 45 minutes Objectives After completing this segment the participant will be able to— ■ Demonstrate the ability to obtain client information through the use of the interview process. ■ Demonstrate the ability to accurately record client information obtained through the interview process onto the Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901). Introduction During this segment, you will have an opportunity to practice your interview skills and apply the information you have learned to assist our hypothetical clients—George and Edith Robinson—through the real-world situation in which they find themselves as a result of a disaster. You will work in pairs (or 3-person groups as necessary) as Red Cross caseworkers during this exercise. Each of you will have an opportunity to interview them, assess their needs and provide assistance using the forms needed Slide 80 Skills Drill to provide it. You will have an opportunity to apply what you have learned to assist our Red Cross clients— George and Edith. The Skills Drill exercise is divided into four parts: ■ Part 1 – Conducting an Initial Client Interview ■ Part 2 – Recording a Narrative Statement ■ Part 3 – Providing Assistance ■ Part 4 – Follow-up Interview Assistance During certain parts of the exercise you will play the role of either the caseworker or the client, using the information provided in your workbooks. Ask: Are there any questions?DSCLS202A 4-1August 2006
  • 79. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Note: Prepare the class to conduct the Skills Drill. ■ Divide the participants into groups of two. Match those with more experience with someone who is less experienced. When there are an uneven number of participants, assign someone to work with another pair to form a group of three. ■ Ask the participants to determine who will play the role of the caseworker first. When they have done so, ask the caseworkers to raise their hand. Explain that the other partner will play the role of the client, George, for this first round. If there is a group with three, ask the third person to play the role of a family member. In this capacity, they are to observe the caseworker and be prepared to offer suggestions that will assist them in improving their skills. Part 1 - Conducting an Initial Client Interview Time: 45 minutes Slide 81 Skills Drill — Note: Ask participants to remove the following forms from their packet: Part 1 ■ Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901) ■ Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030) ■ Client Assistance Memorandum (Form 1475) ■ Landlord Verification (Form 6618) ■ Release of Confidential Information ■ Disbursing Order (Form 140C) ■ Emergency Assistance Price List (Form 4416) ■ Disaster Referral (Form 5855) Explain that they will not require all of the forms at this time. Once you determine what you need, set the others aside where you can access them when you do. Take a few minutes to review the Skills Drill Overview on page 4-3. Look up when you are done so that I know you are finished. Page 4-54-2 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 80. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Read the Instructions and the Setting for Part 1: Initial Client Interview on page 4-4. Again, when you are finished, please look up so that I will know Page 4-4 that you are ready to continue. Interviewers Use the information on page 4-5 to prepare for your interview with the client. Use closed-ended questions to obtain the additional information you require Page 4-5 to complete the top part of the Form 901 (Parts A-C). Be sure to use all of your interview skills. Demonstrate empathy using appropriate body language and expressions of concern as you would if this were an actual client interview. Clients Read the instructions page 4-6 and review the information that follows. Use this client information during your client casework interview. Page 4-5 4-6 Ask: Are there any questions before we begin? Begin when you are ready. You have 30 minutes to complete your interview. Stop when you have completed this part of the exercise. Please do not work ahead. Remember to press hard on the Form 901 so the information is legible Slide 82 Begin Role Play on Parts A-C. Print using block letters. Note: After 30 minutes, declare that time is up for Part 1 of the drill. Instruct participants to review together the completed Form 901 (A-C). Remind them to be sure to check the bottom copy. Take a few minutes to review the completed part of the form together with your partner. Check each of the entries for accuracy. Check the bottom copy to be sure it is legible.DSCLS202A 4-3August 2006
  • 81. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Note: Provide the participants with an opportunity to reflect on their experience. First, ask the interviewers to share any observations made as a result of their experience. Then, ask the client to share his or her feelings about the interview process and whether or not he or she felt comforted by the interviewer. Be supportive. Focus first on the things participants did well before offering suggestions for improving performance. Draw from your personal experience to convey “best practices.” Address any questions or concerns the participants may identify. Ask: Are there any additional questions or concerns you would like to pose before we move on to Part 2 of the Skills Drill? Part 2 - Recording a Narrative Statement Time: 25 minutes Slide 83 Skills Drill — We are now going to see a video of our clients—George and Edith—as they might Part 2 respond to your next question, “Tell me what happened to you in the tornado.” While watching this video, take notes on page 4-8 of your workbook. Record the facts of the event as explained to you by the client you feel should be included in Page 4-8 a narrative statement.. Also identify how you will respond to their concerns as an interviewer. After the video, you will each have an opportunity to practice writing a narrative statement, documenting George and Edith’s story about what happened. Note: Show Segment 4 of the video, “Skills Drill.” Segment X “Assignment Settings” (7:00)4-4 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 82. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Now, take approximately 10 minutes to write a brief narrative description for the next part of the Form 901 in the space provided on page 4-9 in your workbook. Document George and Edith’s story about “How the Family Was Affected in the Disaster,” their “Medical Information” and “Family Recovery Plan.” You Participant can write directly on the Form 901 or in your workbooks. You may also want Resource B Page B-1 to reference the sample narrative statements located in Participant Resource B beginning on page B-1 in you workbook to help get you started. Note: Reinforce that each participant is to write a narrative statement. After approximately 10 minutes, declare that time is up. Ask for a volunteer to read aloud the narrative statement he or she recorded. Once the volunteer is done, thank him or her for volunteering. Then, invite the participants to put themselves in the shoes of another caseworker who might have to follow up on this case at a later time. Evaluate the narrative statement using the following questions. Ask: ■ What aspects of this statement do you think are particularly effective? ■ Does anyone have anything they might add? ■ Does anyone have anything they might have expressed differently? If time permits, you may choose to have one or more participants read their statements and have the class evaluate the results. Learners will improve their own abilities by evaluating the work of others. Ask: What questions might anyone have about writing narrative statements? Let’s move on to Part 3, where we will determine what assistance the Red Cross will provide to the Robinsons.DSCLS202A 4-5August 2006
  • 83. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Part 3 - Providing Assistance Time: 55 minutes Slide 84 Skills Drill — For this part of the exercise, we will continue in your same roles as in Part 1. Part 3 Note: Instruct the interviewers and clients to read their instructions on pages 4-10 and 4-11 respectively. When there is a group of three in the class, you might suggest that a different participant play the role of the caseworker during this next part. You can rotate the role of the caseworker again in Part 4, allowing each member of the group to experience the role of the caseworker. Interviewers Read the instructions on page 4-10 of your workbook and review the information that follows. Do not read page 4-11 as that information is for the client. Page 4-10 Interviewers, you must determine what assistance George and Edith will require to meet their immediate disaster-caused needs, now that you have heard their story. Based on the information provided to you by George and Edith, you must determine the appropriate assistance they need at this time. Remember that information, advocacy and community referrals are often as valuable to the client as the financial assistance the Red Cross provides. You must also complete the forms necessary to provide the assistance you determine is needed. First, use your workbooks to make a list of what assistance is needed. Then identify the forms you will need to provide it. You will have 30 minutes for Participant this part of the exercise. You may refer to the sample completed forms in the Resource A Page A-1 Participant Resources beginning on page A-14-6 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 84. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Clients Prepare for your interview by reading your instructions on page 4-11 and the information that follows. In order to maintain the “real-life” feel of the activity, do Page 4-11 not read the information intended for the interviewer. Note: Allow the participants 30 minutes to complete this task. Move around the room to ensure the participant’s do not get off track or bogged down in unnecessary details and to be available for questions. Start whenever you are ready. Slide 85 Begin Role Play Note: When time is up, discuss the activity. Begin by providing both the “interviewers” and “clients” an opportunity to share any observations they may have. Address the concerns they identify. Ask: ■ Interviewers, do you have any observations you would like to share with the class? ■ Clients, do you have any observations you would like to share? Note: Lead the participants through a two part discussion. First, ask the participants to identify what it is that George and Edith need for their family. Record participant responses as a list on the left side of the newsprint. Ask participant to keep in mind the complete needs of the client, whether or not the Red Cross provides it. Reinforce that information, advocacy and community referrals are often as valuable to the client as the financial assistance the Red Cross provides. It’s important for a Red Cross Client Caseworker to be aware of available community resources.DSCLS202A 4-7August 2006
  • 85. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Ask: What assistance did you determine George and Edith need at this point? Note: Suggest if the participants do not: ■ Someone to listen to their story ■ A place to live once they leave the shelter Initial Interview - ■ Rent Needs/Forms ■ Clothing/shoes (Column 1) ■ Comfort Kit ■ Storage container for possessions ■ Appropriate food and formula for 11-month old ■ Referral to Mental Health ■ Information about what Red Cross provides, other available agencies to whom referrals can be made, where meals are being served and how to initiate their recovery. ■ Reminder to contact their loved ones. (Ask-Offer-Connect) Once you have completed your first list, ask participants to identify what forms are needed to provide each of the items listed in column 1. Record their responses in a second column across from the corresponding need. Ask: What forms did you use to provide each of the items you’ve identified? Include if the participants do not: ■ Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901) ■ Standardized Emergency Price List (Form 4416) ■ Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030) Follow -Up Interview ■ Client Assistance Memorandum (Form 1475) Needs/Forms (Column 2) ■ Client Assistance Card Merchant Letter ■ Disaster Referral (Form 5855) ■ Landlord Verification Form (Form 6618)4-8 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 86. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Ask: Did anyone consider anything else? Note: Respond to the other considerations participants offer. Now I want both partners to take a moment to see if the “interviewer” has accurately completed the documentation. Note: Allow participants approximately 5 minutes to review the documents they have just completed. To encourage discussion, ask each group to evaluate their performance by sharing comments on the level of accuracy they achieved to the class. Check the last page of the flimsy to be sure it is written legibly. Ask: What questions do you have? Part 4 – Follow-up Interview Assistance Time: 50 minutes Slide 86 Skills Drill — I would like you to switch roles with your partner. In other words, the person who Part 4 was the interviewer in the first part of the exercise will now be the client and the person who was the client is now the interviewer. We will now complete our role play exercise by conducting a follow-up interview. Read the section titled, “Second Interview Information.” Please look up when you are done reading. Note: Refer participants to page 4-12 of their workbooks. Allow participants a few minutes to read the Setting for the Follow-up Interview and Assistance. Page 4-12 Now that you have read the information in your workbook, we are ready to continue.DSCLS202A 4-9August 2006
  • 87. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Interviewers Read the Instructions and the additional information provided on page 4-13 of your workbook. Page 4-13 Once you begin, remember to greet George and Edith as they arrive at your station. Be sure to ask them how they are and how it is you can assist them today. Remember to use your open- and closed-ended questions and appropriately demonstrate care and concern for their situation. Interviewers, you are responsible for providing the client (George and Edith) with the appropriate assistance they need at this time, based on the information the Robinsons have provided. You must also complete all of the necessary forms to do so. First, use your workbooks to record what assistance is needed. Then identify the forms you will need to provide it. You have 30 minutes for this part of Participant the exercise. You may refer to the sample completed forms in the Participant Resource A Page A-1 Resources beginning on page A-1. Note: Allow the participants 30 minutes to complete this task. Move around the room to ensure the participant’s do not get off track and to be available for questions. When time is up, discuss the activity. Begin by providing both the “interviewers” and “clients” an opportunity to share any observations they may have. Address any concerns they identify. Clients Read the instructions along with the information that follows on page 4-14 of your workbook. Do not read the information on page 4-13 and remember to remain in Page 4-14 character as much as possible. Ask: Are there any questions about this part of the exercise?4-10 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 88. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. You may begin when you are ready. Slide 87 Note: Use the same method for this discussion as described in Part 3 of the Skills Begin Role Play Drill. First ask participants what assistance is needed and then what forms were needed to provide it. Record their responses on newsprint using the two-column format. Ask: What assistance did the Robinsons need at this point? Include if the participants do not: ■ Listening to their story ■ Hotel for 3 Days (DO) ■ Food (CAC) Initial Interview - ■ Rent and Security Deposit (DO) Assistance/Forms (Column 1) ■ Household Furnishings (CAC) ■ Health Services - Eye glasses (Referral, CAC or DO) ■ Information about any additional agencies that may be providing assistance since last interview ■ Reminder to contact loved ones if they have not already done so. (Ask-Offer-Connect) Ask: What forms did you use to provide it? Include if the participants do not: ■ Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901) ■ Landlord Verification Form (Form 6618) ■ Standardized Emergency Price List (Form 4416) Follow -Up ■ Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030) Interview Assistance/Forms ■ Client Assistance Memorandum (Form 1475) (Column 2) ■ Client Assistance Card Merchant Letter ■ Disbursing Order (Form 140C) ■ Referral for pots, pans, bed and cribDSCLS202A 4-11August 2006
  • 89. 4 Skills DrillSegment .................................................................................. Ask: Did anyone consider anything else? Note: Respond to the other considerations participants offer. Now I want both partners to take a moment to see if the “interviewer” has accurately completed the documentation. Note: Allow participants approximately 5 minutes to review the documents they have just completed. To encourage discussion, ask each group to evaluate their performance by sharing comments on the level of accuracy they achieved to the class. Ask: Are there any questions about conducting interviews or completing any of the forms. Note: Pause and respond to any questions participants may have. Congratulations! We have just completed the skills practice portion of this course. You all did very well! Always remember that listening to the client’s story is one of the most important tasks you will perform in your role as a Red Cross Caseworker. Now that you know the basics of client casework, let’s consider what the next steps are?4-12 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 90. 5 Let’s Get StartedSegment .................................................................................. Time: 20 minutes Objectives After completing this segment, the participants should be able to— ■ Explain how they can get involved with their local chapter. Introduction Now that you have learned what an interviewer’s role is and how the interview is Slide 88 performed, you probably are eager to find out how to begin doing client casework. Let’s Get Started Before we discuss ways you can begin to work in client casework, let’s hear a few interviewers from other chapters explain what their roles are and why they love what they do! If you turn to page 5-1 in your workbook, you will see a place to take notes and jot down questions. Page 5-1 Note: Show Segment 5, “Let’s Get Started,” of the video. Segment 5 “Let’s Get Started” (4:00) Ask: Are there any questions about the video? Note: Pause and respond to any questions participants may have. Developing An Action Plan In order to realize your desire to becoming a Red Cross Client Casework Service Associate, you must have a plan. Developing an Action Plan is the first step. There are a number of opportunities available at your local chapter for you to apply your new knowledge and skills. This course cannot possibly teach you everything there is to know about conducting client casework. Much ofDSCLS202A 5-1August 2006
  • 91. 5 Let’s Get StartedSegment .................................................................................. your learning will come from the experience of working with clients under the guidance of an knowledgeable coach. Getting Involved A Client Caseworker may perform many duties. It is important to ask each Slide 89 chapter what opportunities are available in the Client Casework Activity and then Getting Involved determine which of them you would like to do. Experiment with a variety of tasks to broaden your experience and to determine which ones you like to do. It is to our clients’ benefit when you enjoy what you are doing. Opportunities at your chapter may include some of these listed on the slide. However, you must consult with your chapter to determine which ones are available and are a good match for your availability and schedule. Conducting follow-up interviews and completing the data entry in the Client Assistance System are two ways you can keep your skills sharp and continue to expand your knowledge and assistance. Note: List on newsprint (or provide as a handout) the opportunities that are available at your chapter. Use those on the slide as a point of reference and add any additional ones the chapter may have. Available Opportunities Next Steps If time allows, expand on your chapter’s opportunities for Client Caseworkers. Slide 90 For example— Next Steps ■ Discuss the procedures your chapter uses to sign people up to be on a DAT and, once signed up, what being a member of the DAT involves (time and location of meetings, beeper assignments, length of time required). ■ Discuss the procedures for signing up for additional training.5-2 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 92. 5 Let’s Get StartedSegment .................................................................................. ■ Record the name and phone number of the person in charge of placing volunteers. ■ Provide the contact names and phone numbers. To Learn More About Volunteer Opportunities Contact: Summary Thank you for taking the time to participate in this course. Ask: Do you have any questions or concerns about material covered during this Slide 88 Summary class? Note: Take a few minutes to address any questions or concerns that may be of interest to everyone. Otherwise, invite participants to speak with you after class. Distribute the course evaluation if you have not already done so. Please take a few minutes to complete the course evaluation. Your thoughtful responses will be appreciated. Your candid feedback is one way we as instructors improve our skills. You are not required to sign the feedback form. When you are done, please place your feedback forms face down (indicate where) and in exchange, I will provide you with your course completion card. Note: If the course completion cards are not available, indicate how the participants will receive them. I hope it has been a valuable experience for you. Remember to use your workbook and the Disaster as Operations Guide as resource on all Client Casework assignments. We look forward to seeing all of you in future disaster courses. It has been a pleasure teaching you. Please take some time now to complete the Course Evaluation. When you have finished, please bring it forward to receive your Certificate of Completion. If you have any further questions, I will be available after class.DSCLS202A 5-3August 2006
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  • 94. InstructorResource Table of Contents ................................................................................A. Course Materials List...................................................................................................................IR-3B. Course Schedule...........................................................................................................................IR-5C. PowerPoint Presentation..............................................................................................................IR-7D. Suggested Newsprint...................................................................................................................IR-55 .E. DSHR Groups Activities Chart................................................................................................IR-57F. Participant Resources....................................................................................................................IR-59 Sample Disaster Registration and Case File (Form 901) Parts A-C............................................IR-61 Sample Disaster Registration and Case File (Form 901) Part D.................................................IR-62 Sample Narrative Statements........................................................................................................IR-63 Sample Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030).........................................................IR-65 Sample Disbursing Order (Form 140C)........................................................................................IR-67 Welfare Information Overview.....................................................................................................IR-69 Form 901 and CAS Data Entry Quick Finder...............................................................................IR-73 Red Cross Values and Guiding Behaviors....................................................................................IR-77 .DSCLS202A IR-1August 2006
  • 95. A Course MaterialsInstructorResource ................................................................................DSCLS202A IR-3August 2006
  • 96. A Course MaterialsInstructorResource ................................................................................IR-4 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 97. B Course ScheduleInstructorResource ................................................................................ Topic Time Introduction and Purpose of Training.........................................20 minutes Segment 1: Overview of Client Casework. ............................... 55 minutes . Break........................................................................................... 15 minutes Segment 2: The Interview (Part 1)............................................. 80 minutes Lunch Break................................................................................ 60 minutes Segment 2: The Interview (Part 2)............................................. 90 minutes Segment 3: Assignment Settings................................................ 20 minutes Break............................................................................................15 minutes Segment 4: Skills Drill................................................................ 2 hours 45 minutes Segment 5: Let’s Get Started...................................................... 20 minutes TOTAL: 9 hours DSCLS202A IR-5August 2006
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  • 99. C Powerpoint PresentationInstructorResource ................................................................................This instructor resource contains the Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance PowerPointPresentation slides. The PowerPoint slides can be found on the Client Casework Providing EmergencyAssistance CD-ROM (DSCLS202CD) in the folder “For LCD Projector.” The presentation is savedas a PowerPoint Show with a .pps file extension. The presentation in this format will always open asa slide show, allowing you to run the presentation, even when the PowerPoint software application isnot installed on the computer you are using. You will require both a computer and an LCD Projector topresent the slides.When a computer and an LCD projector are unavailable, or if you prefer, you can choose to useoverhead transparencies or newsprints. To make transparencies, print the slide presentation directly ontotransparency film using the file in the “For Printing Transparencies” folder on the CD-ROM. To accessthe files you must use the most current version of Adobe Acrobat Reader. If you are not currently usingAcrobat Reader you can download a free copy from www.adobe.com. Instructions are provided on thesite for how to download the software.You may also print the presentation onto paper and then photocopy the slides onto transparency film.When using a black and white printer or photocopier, select the grayscale option in the print menu, toprint the PowerPoint Presentation in order to achieve the best quality.DSCLS202A IR-7August 2006
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  • 101. C Powerpoint PresentationInstructorResource ................................................................................DSCLS202A IR-9August 2006
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  • 146. C Powerpoint PresentationInstructorResource ................................................................................IR-54 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Instructor’s Manual
  • 147. D Suggested NewsprintsInstructorResource ................................................................................Newsprint TitlesWelcome! Your Instructors Are: Insert instructor’s name(s).Needs/Support Provided (2 Columns)Empathy =Community AgenciesInitial Interview — Assistance / Forms (2 Columns)Follow-up Interview — Assistance / Forms (2 Columns)Available OpportunitiesTo Learn More About Volunteer Opportunities Contact: Insert name and contact informationDSCLS202A IR-55August 2006
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  • 149. E DSHR Groups Activities ChartInstructorResource ................................................................................DSCLS202A IR-57August 2006
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  • 151. F Participant ResourcesInstructorResource ................................................................................A. Sample Disaster Registration and Case File (Form 901) Parts A-C.............................................IR-61 Sample Disaster Registration and Case File (Form 901) Part D..................................................IR-62B. Sample Narrative Statements.........................................................................................................IR-63C. Sample Client Assistance Authorization (Form 1030)...................................................................IR-65D. Sample Disbursing Order (Form 140C)........................................................................................IR-67E. Welfare Information Overview. .....................................................................................................IR-69 .F. Form 901 and CAS Data Entry Quick Finder................................................................................IR-73G. Red Cross Values and Guiding Behaviors.....................................................................................IR-77DSCLS202A IR-59August 2006
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  • 171. Disaster Services DSCLS202IM August 2006

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