CVA A&P - Chapter 5b: Honors Axial Skeleton

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CVA A&P - Chapter 5b: Honors Axial Skeleton

  1. 1. PowerPoint® Lecture Slide Presentation by Patty Bostwick-Taylor, Florence-Darlington Technical College Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings PART B 5 The Skeletal System
  2. 2. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Axial Skeleton  Forms the longitudinal axis of the body  Divided into three parts  Skull  Vertebral column  Bony thorax
  3. 3. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Axial Skeleton Figure 5.6a
  4. 4. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Axial Skeleton Figure 5.6b
  5. 5. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Skull  Two sets of bones  Cranium  Facial bones  Bones are joined by sutures  Only the mandible is attached by a freely movable joint
  6. 6. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Human Skull, Lateral View Figure 5.7
  7. 7. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Human Skull, Inferior View Figure 5.9
  8. 8. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Human Skull, Anterior View Figure 5.11
  9. 9. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Paranasal Sinuses  Hollow portions of bones surrounding the nasal cavity  Functions of paranasal sinuses  Lighten the skull  Give resonance and amplification to voice
  10. 10. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Paranasal Sinuses Figure 5.10a
  11. 11. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Paranasal Sinuses Figure 5.10b
  12. 12. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Hyoid Bone  The only bone that does not articulate with another bone  Serves as a moveable base for the tongue  Aids in swallowing and speech
  13. 13. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Hyoid Bone Figure 5.12
  14. 14. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Fetal Skull  The fetal skull is large compared to the infant’s total body length  Fontanels—fibrous membranes connecting the cranial bones  Allow the brain to grow  Convert to bone within 24 months after birth
  15. 15. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Fetal Skull Figure 5.13a
  16. 16. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Fetal Skull Figure 5.13b
  17. 17. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Vertebral Column  Each vertebrae is given a name according to its location  There are 24 single vertebral bones separated by intervertebral discs  Seven cervical vertebrae are in the neck  Twelve thoracic vertebrae are in the chest region  Five lumbar vertebrae are associated with the lower back
  18. 18. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Vertebral Column  Nine vertebrae fuse to form two composite bones  Sacrum  Coccyx
  19. 19. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Vertebral Column Figure 5.14
  20. 20. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Vertebral Column  The spine has a normal curvature  Primary curvatures are the spinal curvatures of the thoracic and sacral regions  Present from birth  Secondary curvatures are the spinal curvatures of the cervical and lumbar regions  Develop after birth
  21. 21. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Vertebral Column Figure 5.15
  22. 22. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Vertebral Column Figure 5.16
  23. 23. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings A Typical Vertebrae, Superior View Figure 5.17
  24. 24. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Regional Characteristics of Vertebrae Figure 5.18a
  25. 25. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Regional Characteristics of Vertebrae Figure 5.18b
  26. 26. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Regional Characteristics of Vertebrae Figure 5.18c
  27. 27. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Regional Characteristics of Vertebrae Figure 5.18d
  28. 28. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Sacrum and Coccyx  Sacrum  Formed by the fusion of five vertebrae  Coccyx  Formed from the fusion of three to five vertebrae  “Tailbone,” or remnant of a tail that other vertebrates have
  29. 29. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Sacrum and Coccyx Figure 5.19
  30. 30. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Bony Thorax  Forms a cage to protect major organs  Consists of three parts  Sternum  Ribs  True ribs (pairs 1–7)  False ribs (pairs 8–12)  Floating ribs (pairs 11–12)  Thoracic vertebrae
  31. 31. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Bony Thorax Figure 5.20a

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