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CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction
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CVA A&P - Chapter 6b: Muscle Contraction

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Copyright - Adapted from Glencoe - McGraw-Hill

Copyright - Adapted from Glencoe - McGraw-Hill

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
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  • 1. PowerPoint® Lecture Slide Presentation by Patty Bostwick-Taylor, Florence-Darlington Technical College Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings PART B 6 The Muscular System
  • 2. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Nerve Stimulus and Action Potential  Skeletal muscles must be stimulated by a motor neuron (nerve cell) to contract  Motor unit—one motor neuron and all the skeletal muscle cells stimulated by that neuron
  • 3. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Nerve Stimulus and Action Potential  Neuromuscular junction  Association site of axon terminal of the motor neuron and muscle
  • 4. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Nerve Stimulus and Action Potential Figure 6.5a
  • 5. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Nerve Stimulus and Action Potential  Synaptic cleft  Gap between nerve and muscle  Nerve and muscle do not make contact  Area between nerve and muscle is filled with interstitial fluid
  • 6. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Nerve Stimulus and Action Potential Figure 6.5b
  • 7. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Transmission of Nerve Impulse to Muscle  Neurotransmitter—chemical released by nerve upon arrival of nerve impulse  The neurotransmitter for skeletal muscle is acetylcholine (ACh)  Acetylcholine attaches to receptors on the sarcolemma  Sarcolemma becomes permeable to sodium (Na+)
  • 8. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Transmission of Nerve Impulse to Muscle  Sodium rushes into the cell generating an action potential  Once started, muscle contraction cannot be stopped
  • 9. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Sliding Filament Theory of Muscle Contraction  Activation by nerve causes myosin heads (cross bridges) to attach to binding sites on the thin filament  Myosin heads then bind to the next site of the thin filament and pull them toward the center of the sarcomere  This continued action causes a sliding of the myosin along the actin  The result is that the muscle is shortened (contracted)
  • 10. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings The Sliding Filament Theory of Muscle Contraction Figure 6.7a–b
  • 11. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Effect of Exercise on Muscles  Exercise increases muscle size (by increasing muscle fiber size, NOT increasing # of muscle fibers), strength, and endurance  Aerobic (endurance) exercise (biking, jogging) results in stronger, more flexible muscles with greater resistance to fatigue  Makes body metabolism more efficient  Improves digestion, coordination  Resistance (isometric) exercise (weight lifting) increases muscle size and strength
  • 12. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Effect of Exercise on Muscles Figure 6.11

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