CVA A&P - Chapter 3: Connective Tissue

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CVA A&P - Chapter 3: Connective Tissue

  1. 1. PowerPoint® Lecture Slide Presentation by Patty Bostwick-Taylor, Florence-Darlington Technical College Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings PART D 3 Tissues
  2. 2. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue  Found everywhere in the body  Includes the most abundant and widely distributed tissues  Functions  Binds body tissues together  Supports the body  Provides protection
  3. 3. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Characteristics  Variations in blood supply  Some tissue types are well vascularized  Some have a poor blood supply or are avascular  Extracellular matrix  Non-living material that surrounds living cells
  4. 4. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Extracellular Matrix  Two main elements  Ground substance—mostly water along with adhesion proteins and polysaccharide molecules  Fibers  Produced by the cells  Three types  Collagen (white) fibers  Elastic (yellow) fibers  Reticular fibers
  5. 5. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types  Bone (osseous tissue)  Composed of  Bone cells in lacunae (cavities)  Hard matrix of calcium salts  Large numbers of collagen fibers  Used to protect and support the body
  6. 6. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types Figure 3.19a
  7. 7. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types  Hyaline cartilage  Most common type of cartilage  Avascular  Composed of  Abundant collagen fibers  Rubbery matrix  Locations  Larynx  Entire fetal skeleton prior to birth
  8. 8. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types Figure 3.19b
  9. 9. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types  Elastic cartilage  Provides elasticity  Avascular  Location  Supports the external ear  Fibrocartilage  Highly compressible  Avascular  Location  Forms cushion-like discs between vertebrae
  10. 10. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types Figure 3.19c
  11. 11. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types  Dense connective tissue (dense fibrous tissue)  Main matrix element is collagen fiber  Fibroblasts are cells that make fibers  Poor blood supply  Locations  Tendons—attach skeletal muscle to bone  Ligaments—attach bone to bone at joints  Dermis—lower layers of the skin
  12. 12. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types Figure 3.19d
  13. 13. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types  Loose connective tissue types  Areolar tissue  Most widely distributed connective tissue  Soft, pliable tissue like “cobwebs”  Functions as a packing tissue  Contains all fiber types  Can soak up excess fluid (causes edema)
  14. 14. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types Figure 3.19e
  15. 15. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types  Loose connective tissue types  Adipose tissue  Matrix is an areolar tissue in which fat globules predominate  Many cells contain large lipid deposits  Functions  Insulates the body  Protects some organs  Serves as a site of fuel storage
  16. 16. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types Figure 3.19f
  17. 17. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types  Loose connective tissue types  Reticular connective tissue  Delicate network of interwoven fibers  Forms stroma (internal supporting network) of lymphoid organs  Lymph nodes  Spleen  Bone marrow
  18. 18. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types Figure 3.19g
  19. 19. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types  Blood (vascular tissue)  Blood cells surrounded by fluid matrix called blood plasma  Fibers are visible during clotting  Functions as the transport vehicle for materials
  20. 20. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Connective Tissue Types Figure 3.19h

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