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CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101
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CVA Biology I - B10vrv3101

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Copyright - Adapted from Pearson

Copyright - Adapted from Pearson

Published in: Technology, Education
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  • 1. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionLesson OverviewLesson Overview10.1 Cell Growth, Division,10.1 Cell Growth, Division,and Reproductionand Reproduction
  • 2. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionTHINK ABOUT ITWhen a living thing grows, what happens to its cells?What is there about growth that requires cells to divide and reproducethemselves?
  • 3. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionLimits to Cell SizeWhat are some of the difficulties a cell faces as it increases in size?
  • 4. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionLimits to Cell SizeWhat are some of the difficulties a cell faces as it increases in size?The larger a cell becomes, the more demands the cell places on its DNA.In addition, a larger cell is less efficient in moving nutrients and wastematerials across its cell membrane.
  • 5. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionInformation “Overload”Living cells store critical information in DNA.As a cell grows, that information is used to build the molecules neededfor cell growth.As size increases, the demands on that information grow as well. If acell were to grow without limit, an “information crisis” would occur.
  • 6. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionInformation “Overload”Compare a cell to a growingtown. The town library has alimited number of books. Asthe town grows, these limitednumber of books are ingreater demand, which limitsaccess.A growing cell makes greaterdemands on its genetic“library.” If the cell gets toobig, the DNA would not beable to serve the needs of thegrowing cell.
  • 7. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionExchanging MaterialsFood, oxygen, and water enter a cell through the cell membrane. Wasteproducts leave in the same way.The rate at which this exchange takes place depends on the surfacearea of a cell.The rate at which food and oxygen are used up and waste products areproduced depends on the cell’s volume.The ratio of surface area to volume is key to understanding why cellsmust divide as they grow.
  • 8. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionRatio of Surface Area to VolumeImagine a cell shaped like a cube. As the length of the sides of a cubeincreases, its volume increases faster than its surface area, decreasingthe ratio of surface area to volume.If a cell gets too large, the surface area of the cell is not large enough toget enough oxygen and nutrients in and waste out.
  • 9. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionTraffic ProblemsTo use the town analogy again, asthe town grows, more and moretraffic clogs the main street. Itbecomes difficult to getinformation across town andgoods in and out.Similarly, a cell that continues togrow would experience “traffic”problems. If the cell got too large,it would be more difficult to getoxygen and nutrients in and wasteout.
  • 10. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionDivision of the CellBefore a cell grows too large, it divides into two new “daughter” cells in aprocess called cell division.Before cell division, the cell copies all of its DNA.It then divides into two “daughter” cells. Each daughter cell receives acomplete set of DNA.Cell division reduces cell volume. It also results in an increased ratio ofsurface area to volume, for each daughter cell.
  • 11. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Division and ReproductionHow do asexual and sexual reproduction compare?
  • 12. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Division and ReproductionHow do asexual and sexual reproduction compare?The production of genetically identical offspring from a single parent isknown as asexual reproduction.
  • 13. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Division and ReproductionHow do asexual and sexual reproduction compare?The production of genetically identical offspring from a single parent isknown as asexual reproduction.Offspring produced by sexual reproduction inherit some of their geneticinformation from each parent.
  • 14. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionIn multicellular organisms, cell division leads to growth. It also enablesan organism to repair and maintain its body.In single-celled organisms, cell division is a form of reproduction.Asexual Reproduction
  • 15. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionAsexual ReproductionAsexual reproduction is reproduction that involves a single parentproducing an offspring. The offspring produced are, in most cases,genetically identical to the single cell that produced them.Asexual reproduction is a simple, efficient, and effective way for anorganism to produce a large number of offspring.Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic single-celled organisms and manymulticellular organisms can reproduce asexually.
  • 16. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionExamples of Asexual ReproductionBacteria reproduce by binary fission.Kalanchoe plants form plantlets.Hydras reproduce by budding.
  • 17. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionSexual ReproductionIn sexual reproduction, offspring are produced by the fusion of two sexcells – one from each of two parents. These fuse into a single cellbefore the offspring can grow.The offspring produced inherit some genetic information from bothparents.Most animals and plants, and many single-celled organisms, reproducesexually.
  • 18. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Cell Growth, Division, and ReproductionCell Growth, Division, and ReproductionComparing Sexual and AsexualReproduction

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