Claude Resources Inc. 2011 Annual Report
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Claude Resources Inc. 2011 Annual Report Document Transcript

  • 1. TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 2. Annual Report 2011 1
  • 3. 2 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 4. Annual Report 2011 3
  • 5. 4 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 6. Annual Report 2011 5
  • 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS The following Management’s Discussion and Analysis (“MD&A”) of the consolidated operating and financial performance of Claude Resources Inc. (“Claude” or the “Company”) for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 is prepared as of March 30, 2012. This discussion is the responsibility of Management and has been prepared using International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”). This discussion should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto. The Board of Directors has approved the disclosure presented herein. All amounts referred to in this discussion are expressed in Canadian dollars, except where otherwise indicated. OVERVIEW Claude Resources Inc., incorporated pursuant to the Canada Business Corporations Act, is a gold producer with shares listed on both the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX-CRJ) and the NYSE Amex (NYSE Amex- CGR). The Company is also engaged in the exploration and development of gold mineral reserves and mineral resources. The Company’s entire asset base is located in Canada. Its main revenue generating asset is the 100 percent owned Seabee Gold Operation, located in northern Saskatchewan. Claude also owns 100 percent of the Amisk Gold Project in northeastern Saskatchewan, as result of the acquisition of St. Eugene Mining Corporation Limited (“St. Eugene”) completed on February 1, 2012, and owns 100 percent of the 10,000 acre Madsen Property located in the Red Lake gold camp of northwestern Ontario. FINANCIAL, OPERATING AND EXPLORATION HIGHLIGHTS • Net profit of $9.5 million, or $0.06 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2011 (December 31, 2010 - $10.3 million, or $0.08 per share). • Cash flow from operations (1) before net changes in non-cash operating working capital of $22.2 million, or $0.14 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2011, up 12 percent from $19.8 million, or $0.15 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2010. • Gold sales during the fourth quarter of 11,855 ounces at an average price of $1,678 (U.S. $1,641) for revenue of $19.9 million, up 34 percent from fourth quarter 2010 revenue of $14.9 million. • For the twelve months ending December 31, 2011, gold sales were 44,632 ounces at an average price of $1,561 (U.S. $1,578) for revenue of $69.7 million, up 24 percent from revenue of $56.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. These less than expected sales volumes were due primarily to equipment availability, including the Company’s Central Milling Facility (which had its output impacted during the third quarter due to a lightning strike) and development constraints at Seabee Deep (requiring the Company to sequence more lower grade ore from Santoy 8 than anticipated). • $35.7 million of cash, cash equivalents and short term investments and working capital of $42.4 million as at December 31, 2011. • On February 2, 2012, the Company announced the closing of the previously announced transaction whereby Claude would acquire all of the outstanding shares of St. Eugene (TSXV: SEM) that it did not already own. The transaction was accomplished pursuant to the terms of a court approved plan of arrangement completed under the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia) (the “Arrangement”). Under the Arrangement, Claude acquired all of the outstanding common shares of St. Eugene in exchange for the issuance of approximately 8.7 million common shares of Claude. In addition to Claude shares, former shareholders of St. Eugene also received 0.25 of a common share of Satori Resources Inc. (“Satori”). As part of the Arrangement, Claude also exchanged all outstanding warrants of St. Eugene for warrants of Claude and reduced its existing net smelter return royalty on the Tartan Lake Mine Project from a sliding scale to 2 percent. Upon closing of the transaction, Claude received the same pro-rata stake in Satori that it had in St. Eugene. • Positive Metallurgical results at the Amisk Gold Project. Initial metallurgical testing indicates that gold and silver mineralization is amenable to conventional cyanide leaching. Results from testing on three composite samples from the Amisk Gold Deposit have returned an average of 89.4 percent recovery for gold, ranging from 85.2 percent to 91.7 percent and an average of 80.86 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 8. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 2 percent recovery for silver, ranging from 66.4 percent to 92.8 percent. • Inferred resource base at Seabee Gold Operation increased 236 percent. The inclusion of the L62 Zone and Santoy Gap deposits into Mineral Reserves and Mineral Resources came only six and nine months after their respective discoveries. More importantly, these discoveries are in close proximity to current mining infrastructure and will be integrated into an updated life of mine plan anticipated during the third quarter. The increase in resource ounces in 2011 demonstrates the potential that exists at the Seabee Gold Operation. • Drill program at the Seabee Gold Operation is anticipated to be 130,000 metres for 2012. • Seabee Mine Shaft Extension Project to be completed in second half of 2012. • Expansion to Mill and Camp Facilities ongoing. (1) Denotes a non-IFRS performance measure. For an explanation of non-IFRS performance measures refer to the “Non-IFRS Performance Measures” section of this MD&A.MISSION AND VISIONThe Company’s mission is to create and deliver significant stakeholder value through the exploration,development and mining of gold and other precious metals. Its vision is to be valued by all stakeholdersfor its ability to discover, develop and produce gold and other precious metals in a disciplined, safe,environmentally responsible and profitable manner.GOALS AND KEY PERFORMANCE DRIVERS – MEASURING THE COMPANY’S RESULTSThe Company’s goals and key performance drivers include: • Increasing its resource base through aggressive exploration programs; • Improving operating margins at the Seabee Gold Operation; • Strengthening the Balance Sheet and maintaining liquidity in order to reduce financial risk; • Consider strategically attractive opportunities and accretive transactions; and • Ensuring that the Company’s share price reflects underlying value.Increasing Claude’s Resource Base Through Aggressive Exploration ProgramsDuring 2011, the Company continued with its objective of increasing its resource base through aggressiveexploration programs at its Seabee Gold Operation, Amisk Gold Project and Madsen Property.Seabee Gold OperationAt the Seabee Gold Operation, exploration targets include the Seabee Gold Mine, Santoy 8 Gold Mine,Santoy Gap, L62 Zone and Neptune. During 2011, the Company focused its gold exploration efforts ondrilling at Seabee Deep, at L62, at the Santoy Gap and on continued development of satellite ore bodies.This includes the Santoy 8 Gold Mine which achieved commercial production during the first quarter of2011.The newly discovered L62 Zone is located approximately 200 metres from existing development andoperations on multiple levels in the hanging wall of the Seabee Mine. High grade results from the L62Zone will have a positive impact on the Seabee Mine’s production profile during 2012.The Santoy Gap drill program has intercepted multiple high-grade intervals, significantly expanding thestrike length and width of the mineralized system. Drilling has intercepted multiple high-grade intervals,significantly expanding the strike length and width of the mineralized system and has expanded the SantoyGap and Santoy 8 system to in excess of 1.8 kilometres long.During 2011, the Company expanded the 2011 Seabee exploration program to include 44,000 metres ofsurface drilling; 33,000 of those metres were focused at Santoy Gap. The three rig program aggressivelyexplored the Santoy Gap target and its relationship to the Santoy 8 ore body to depths in excess of 600Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 7
  • 9. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 3 metres. Total drilling at the Seabee Gold Operation for 2011 was 100,000 metres. Amisk Gold Project The Amisk Gold Property is located 20 kilometres southwest of Flin Flon, Manitoba and hosts the Amisk Gold Deposit, the past-producing Monarch Mine, as well as a large number of gold occurrences and prospects. Subsequent to December 31, 2011, Claude completed an acquisition of all of the outstanding shares of St. Eugene that it did not already own. As a result, Claude now owns 100 percent of the Amisk Gold Project. At 23,450 hectares, this gold and silver exploration property is one of the largest land positions in the Flin Flon mineral district. In 2010, SRK Consulting (Canada) Inc. (“SRK”) was engaged to prepare an independent mineral resource evaluation and Technical Report for the Amisk Gold Project. The independent mineral resource statement was released in the first quarter of 2011 and outlined an Indicated Resource of 921,000 ounces of 0.95 grams of gold equivalent (“Au Eq”) per tonne and an Inferred Resource of 645,000 ounces at 0.70 grams of Au Eq per tonne. This geological model and open pit resource estimate was generated through the successful integration of the Company’s 2010 exploration program with historic drilling and was the culmination of an aggressive 12 month exploration program and is a major milestone for the Amisk Gold Project and Claude. During the second half of 2011, positive metallurgical and engineering results were reported from the Amisk Gold Project. Initial metallurgical testing indicates that gold and silver mineralization is amenable to conventional cyanide leaching. Results from testing on three composite samples from the Amisk Gold Deposit have returned an average of 89.4 percent recovery for gold, ranging from 85.2 percent to 91.7 percent and an average of 80.8 percent recovery for silver, ranging from 66.4 percent to 92.8 percent. In addition to positive metallurgical testing, a total of 20 holes and 6,480 metres were drilled during 2011. The program tested from surface to in excess of 700 metres depth and was designed to expand the limits of the Amisk Gold Deposit as well as infill within the northern and eastern portion of the deposit. The 20 drill holes successfully confirmed continuity of gold mineralization within the northern and eastern portion of the deposit as well as demonstrated the potential for expansion to the east and southeast. During 2012, the Company will update Amisk’s National Instrument 43-101 resource calculation, conduct an external Preliminary Economic Assessment and will plan further exploration programs on the property, including further evaluation of the underground potential. Madsen Property At the Madsen Property, the system remains open in all directions and shows strong similarities to high grade mineralization characteristic of the Red Lake Belt. Claude’s objective is to fully assess the potential for high grade gold mineralization while continuing to de-water the Madsen shaft to provide additional underground exploration access. Phase I underground drilling of the 8 Zone program, from the 10th level, confirmed high grade mineralization 450 feet (1) down plunge of the historic stopes within the 8 Zone as well as confirming the existence of a sub-parallel footwall target. Phase I underground drilling demonstrated that the 8 Zone is a series of high-grade, quartz-vein systems and silicification associated with a complexly-folded package of mafic and ultramafic lithologies. (1) Historically, Madsen results have been reported in ounces per ton and feet (imperial). At Madsen, the Company believes that success from the Phase II drill program has the potential to significantly grow the Company’s existing resource base at the fully-permitted and infrastructure-rich Madsen property. Phase II of the underground 8 Zone drill program continued to be a top priority for Management with underground 8 Zone drilling from the 16th level commencing early in the second quarter of 2011 through to the end of 2011. Phase II drilling in 2011 included 14,800 metres (41,656 feet) in 9 holes, targeting the plunge and strike continuity as well as sub-parallel footwall structures of the 8 Zone. Drilling during 2011 successfully extended the 8 Zone plunge to approximately 250 metres down plunge of previous drilling as well as discovered significant depth extensions to the McVeigh Tuff. Based on these encouraging results, the Company has budgeted a 29,000 metre, underground and surface-based drill Claude Resources Inc.8 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 10. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 4program for 2012. The program will include two underground rigs and one surface rig, targeting tocomplete 40 to 50 holes.De-watering was ongoing throughout 2011 with water levels below the 17th level (there are a total of 24levels in the Madsen Shaft).2012 Exploration ProgramContinued success from the Company’s exploration programs should serve to: • further extend the mine life at Seabee; • potentially improve the project economics at the Company’s Amisk and Madsen Projects; and • further increase the Company’s total resource base.As a follow-up to the Company’s 2011 exploration programs, Claude has budgeted approximately $15.5million to support the continuation of its extensive exploration programs at the Seabee, Amisk and MadsenProperties during 2012. At the Seabee Gold Operation, the Company plans to drill 130,000 metres (70,000metres regionally and 60,000 metres underground) during 2012. At Madsen, Claude has approved a 29,000metre underground and surface exploration program. The program will include two underground rigs andone surface rig, targeting to complete 40 to 50 holes. Exploration will focus on continued testing of the 8Zone Trend as well as the McVeigh and Austin Tuff depth continuity. Finally, at the 23,450 hectare AmiskGold Project, Claude will update its National Instrument 43-101 resource calculation, conduct an externalPreliminary Economic Assessment and an evaluation of the underground potential.Improving Operating Margins at the Seabee Gold OperationThe combination of strong average realized gold prices per ounce during 2011 has offset the increasedmine operating costs, year over year, resulting in improved operating margins for the Company. During2011, net cash margin (1) improved to $653 per ounce from $564 per ounce in 2010.For the year ended December 31, 2011, Claude realized a gold price of $1,561 (U.S. $1,578); December31, 2010 - $1,273 (U.S. $1,236). For the year ended December 31, 2011, total cash cost per ounce (1) wasCDN $908 (U.S. $918), up 28 percent from the cash cost per ounce of CDN $709 (U.S. $688) for the yearended December 31, 2010. (1) Denotes a non-IFRS performance measure. For an explanation of non-IFRS performance measures refer to the “Non-IFRS Performance Measures” section of this MD&A.Figure 1: Average Gold Price Realized (CDN$) Figure 2: Cash Cost and Margin Realized (CDN$) Per Ounce Sold Per Ounce Sold (1) (1) Denotes a non-IFRS performance measure. For an explanation of non-IFRS performance measures refer to the “Non-IFRS Performance Measures” section of this MD&A.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 9
  • 11. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 5 Table 1: Calculation of Net Cash Margin per Ounce December 31 December 31 2011 2010 Revenue (thousands) $ 69,659 $ 55,998 Divided by ounces sold 44,632 44,003 Average Realized Price per Ounce $ 1,561 $ 1,273 Production costs (thousands) $ 40,542 $ 31,217 Divided by ounces sold 44,632 44,003 Total cash costs per ounce $ 908 $ 709 Net Cash Margin per Ounce Sold $ 653 $ 564 During 2012, the Company will continue to focus on the profitability of the Seabee Gold Operation through a combination of improved grade control, cost controls and developing the production profile at lower cost satellite ore bodies, including Santoy 8. The Santoy Region is located approximately 14 kilometres east of the Seabee Gold Operation’s central Milling Facility and is accessed via an all-weather road. The Company anticipates the Santoy 8 Project to provide up to 50 percent of the overall feedstock to the Seabee Gold Operation’s central Milling Facility and anticipates this contribution to be a positive catalyst in improving production and lowering overall unit operating costs at the Seabee Gold Operation. The Santoy 8 Gold Project achieved commercial production during the first quarter of 2011. This accomplishment is a major milestone for the Company and represents a real opportunity for the Seabee Gold Operation to grow its production profile. Financial Capacity and Highlights During 2011, the Company continued its focus on further improving its balance sheet. At December 31, 2011, the Company had total Cash and cash equivalents of $2.5 million and short-term investments of $33.2 million. Working capital at December 31, 2011 was $42.4 million (December 31, 2010 - $4.3 million). For the year ended December 31, 2011, net cash provided by operating activities was $19.6 million (December 31, 2010 - $24.3 million). For the year ended December 31, 2011, cash flow from operations (1) before net changes in non-cash operating working capital increased 12 percent to $22.2 million, or $0.14 per common share, from $19.8 million, or $0.15 per common share, for the year ended December 31, 2010. (1) Denotes a non-IFRS performance measure. For an explanation of non-IFRS performance measures refer to the “Non-IFRS Performance Measures” section of this MD&A. Strategically Attractive and Accretive Transactions The Company completed the sale of its 46 percent minority interest in the Nokomis property to Auriga Gold Corp. (“Auriga Gold”). Under the terms of the transaction, Auriga Gold issued Claude 3,428,571 common shares at an issue price of $0.35 per share (approximately 7.8 percent of the outstanding shares of Auriga Gold), thereby allowing the Company to participate in any future successes of Auriga Gold. Early in the third quarter, the Company announced that it had approached the Board of Directors of St. Eugene with a proposal to enter into a letter of intent for a share exchange transaction for 100 percent of St. Eugene at a significant premium to its trading price. On October 25, 2011, Claude and St. Eugene jointly announced that they had entered into a definitive agreement pursuant to which Claude would acquire, by way of a court-approved plan of arrangement, all of the shares of St. Eugene that it did not already own. The acquisition closed on February 1, 2012 and is the logical consolidation of the Amisk Gold Project. Claude issued 8.7 million shares as consideration for the purchase of 100 percent of the shares. Claude Resources Inc.10 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 12. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 6Looking forward, Management remains focused on executing strategically attractive and accretivetransactions that are consistent with the strategic plan and focus of the Company.Shareholder ValueAt December 31, 2011, shares of Claude closed at $1.36 (December 31, 2010 - $2.20), a decrease of 38percent year over year; on the NYSE Amex, Claude’s shares closed at U.S. $1.32 on December 31, 2011(December 31, 2010 – U.S. $2.19). Notwithstanding Claude’s share price performance during 2011,Management believes that shareholder value has been created by: (1) improving the treasury of theCompany; (2) significantly increasing its resource base; and (3) taking steps to complete accretive andstrategically attractive transactions. Management is confident that the combination of the Company’sSeabee, Amisk and Madsen properties are a strong production and asset base in the politically safejurisdiction of Canada. During 2012 and beyond, the Company will continue to advance these projects inorder to further develop shareholder value.The Company intends to further build shareholder value by: • advancing the Companys exploration programs at its Seabee (L62, Santoy Gap, Neptune), Amisk and Madsen properties; • investing in capital infrastructure development programs at the Seabee Gold Operation including an extension of the Seabee Mine shaft, an expansion to the Seabee Central Milling Facility, an expansion to Camp Facilities and additional production equipment; and • continuing dewatering and rehabilitation programs at the Companys Madsen Project.With the continued support of a strong gold price and expanding resources, Claude is well positioned tofurther execute its strategy of discovering, developing and producing gold in established politically safeCanadian mining and exploration districts.EXPLORATION RESULTSClaude advanced its exploration and development strategy during 2011. Exploration at the Seabee GoldOperation focused on drill testing of the newly discovered L62 Zone, drill testing at Neptune, Santoy Gapand near-mine targets as well as reconnaissance geochemical surveys in the Pine Lake area. At the AmiskGold Project, exploration drilling continued to expand and confirm the National Instrument 43-101 open-pit resource estimate. At Madsen, the Company completed rehabilitation of the 16th level and Phase II ofunderground drilling of the 8 Zone commenced, with a two-rig 15,000 metre Phase II underground drillingprogram which ramped up early in the second quarter and continued throughout the year.All exploration activities were carried out under the direction of Qualified Person, Brian Skanderbeg, P.Geo., Vice President Exploration.Seabee Gold OperationThe Seabee Gold Operation includes 14,400 hectares and is comprised of four mineral leases and extensivesurface infrastructure. During 2011, exploration efforts focused on drill testing of the newly discovered L62Zone, the Santoy Gap, Neptune and near-mine targets as well as reconnaissance geochemical surveys in thePine Lake area.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 11
  • 13. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 7 Figure 3: Seabee Property regional map showing significant gold deposits and occurrences. L62 Zone The L62 Zone is located approximately 200 metres from existing Seabee Underground infrastructure on multiple levels. Recent drilling was completed between September and December of 2011, with the results incorporated into an updated National Instrument 43-101 resource calculation announced in the first quarter of 2012 (please see Claude news release “Claude Resources Inc. Increases Inferred Resource Base 236 Percent at Seabee Gold Operation” dated March 14, 2012). Highlights of recent drilling of the L62 results include: • 27.06 grams of gold per tonne over 4.83 metres true width (U11-382); • 12.81 grams of gold per tonne over 6.70 metres true width (U11-649); • 14.83 grams of gold per tonne over 5.19 metres true width (U11-650); • 195.06 grams of gold per tonne over 2.29 metres true width (U11-651); • 22.03 grams of gold per tonne over 4.41 metres true width (U11-661); and • 24.16 grams of gold per tonne over 5.71 metres true width (U11-663). Drilling intercepted economic grades and widths approximately 25 metres along strike and 125 metres up- dip from previous high grade intercepts. The L62 Zone is now interpreted to have an estimated strike length of up to 85 metres and a dip length of 400 metres. Drilling immediately down plunge encountered sporadic economic grades, with the geological structure considered open in all directions. Table 2: Highlights of L62 Discovery MIDPOINT Au TRUE HOLE # COORDINATES GRADE g/T WIDTH NORTH EAST ELEV (uncut) (m) U11-345 937 1086 -555 6.13 4.8 U11-347 935 1080 -538 4.11 3.3 U11-348 936 1083 -493 4.31 2.5 Claude Resources Inc.12 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 14. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 8Table 2: Highlights of L62 Discovery MIDPOINT Au TRUEHOLE # COORDINATES GRADE g/T WIDTH NORTH EAST ELEV (uncut) (m)U11-349 951 1055 -513 8.81 4.9U11-350 949 1057 -559 5.33 4.8U11-351 913 1111 -514 0.09 4.6U11-352 918 1118 -549 0.14 4.8U11-629 942 1057 -399 39.75 10.0including 528.10 0.7U11-630 929 1080 -403 0.34 3.9U11-631 928 1082 -423 0.46 4.2U11-632 932 1091 -476 1.78 5.3U11-642 973.7 1020.2 -326.1 5.59 4.0U11-649 955.0 1032.2 -356.4 12.81 6.7U11-650 954.6 1030.8 -330.2 14.83 5.2U11-651 953.0 1025.7 -306.1 195.06 2.3including 567.34 0.8U11-652 940.2 1051.5 -350.6 18.52 3.7U11-654 939.3 1055.3 -373.1 30.35 2.4U11-655 947.1 1066.6 -437.2 15.39 2.7U11-657 946.5 1065.6 -528.9 10.49 5.5including 108.13 0.5U11-660 919.7 1109.9 -415.1 4.66 4.5U11-661 923.3 1109.6 -446.0 22.03 4.4including 100.40 0.9U11-663 964.1 1044.1 -446.2 24.16 5.7including 96.13 0.9U11-665 959.9 1041.4 -509.1 5.60 1.8U11-666 972.0 1028.8 -428.3 5.88 4.7U11-364 941.5 1064.8 -667.2 10.96 1.9U11-380 953.8 1041.8 -230.0 7.47 1.6U11-382 938.8 1060.6 -360.3 27.06 4.8Note: Intervals noted are true width, have been composited across the entire structureand are uncut. Composites presented herein meet a minimum 10 gram-metre productand 3 g/T gold. Locations referenced are midpoint of the composite.Since discovery during the second quarter of 2011, the L62 Zone has been the focus of an aggressiveexploration program and has grown rapidly. The Company commenced underground development towardsthe L62 Zone in October and looks forward to incorporating the L62 Zone into Seabee’s production profilein the second half of 2012. The high grade results from the L62 Zone had a material impact on the SeabeeMine’s Mineral Reserves and Mineral Resources and augment its production outlook in the coming years.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 13
  • 15. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 9 Figure 4: Seabee Mine Composite Longitudinal Section (L62 Zone Discovery) Santoy Region The Santoy Region is located approximately 14 kilometres east of the Seabee Gold Operation’s central Milling Facility and is accessed via an all-weather road. Gold mineralization is hosted in siliceous, shear structures with sulfide-chlorite-quartz veins and in silicified granitoid sills. The mineralized lenses dip moderately to steeply eastward and are interpreted to be amenable to bulk mining techniques. Gold mineralization of the Santoy 8 ore lens occurs over a strike length of 600 metres, a depth of 400 metres and remains open along strike and down plunge to the north. The Santoy 8E ore lens has been intercepted over a strike length of 200 metres, depth of 250 metres and remains open along strike and down plunge to the north. The true thickness of the Santoy 8 deposits varies from 1.5 metres to 15 metres. Underground infill and exploration drilling continues to confirm and expand the Santoy 8 system. The Santoy Gap target is located 300 to 900 metres north of underground infrastructure, immediately on strike and adjacent to the Santoy 8 Mine. The Santoy Gap program was designed to test the Santoy shear system between the Santoy 7 and Santoy 8 Deposits and follow up on results of up to 17.33 grams of gold per tonne over 4.0 metres returned in 2010 (please see Claude news release “Claude Resources Inc. Continues to Outline Gold Mineralization at Santoy Region” dated March 21, 2011). During 2011, 33,000 metres of drilling was completed in 82 holes. Drilling has intercepted multiple high-grade intervals, significantly expanding the strike length and width of the mineralized system and has expanded the Santoy Gap and Santoy 8 system to in excess of 1.8 kilometres long. Significant assays from the 2011 program are highlighted below in Table 3. Claude Resources Inc.14 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 16. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 10 Table 3: Highlights from 2011 Santoy Gap Drilling Au Grade Width Hole ID Easting Northing From (m) To (m) (g/t) (m) JOY-11-565* 599043 6170888 396.22 397.68 27.65 1.46 JOY-11-588 599021 6170706 222.16 231.94 35.00 9.78 Incl 231.44 231.94 533.00 0.50 JOY-11-589 599237 6170826 468.66 470.63 46.44 1.97 JOY-11-594 598995 6170771 289.42 291.70 14.75 2.28 And 301.17 305.21 16.14 4.04 JOY-11-600 598968 6170808 290.36 291.77 56.23 1.41 JOY-11-606 599247 6170665 395.33 403.13 12.95 7.80 Incl 397.08 400.14 23.44 3.06 JOY-11-611 599292 6170777 455.13 458.95 9.74 3.82 Incl 456.67 457.81 23.24 1.14 JOY-11-535 599349 6170487 310.57 316.00 10.30 5.43 JOY-11-549 599178 6170745 330.38 336.62 6.73 6.24 JOY-11-551 599205 6170769 405.77 408.59 22.06 2.82 JOY-11-554 599146 6170803 413.20 415.44 41.94 2.24 JOY-11-555 599146 6170803 377.40 397.65 12.79 20.25 Incl 377.40 378.40 144.00 1.00 JOY-11-556 599146 6170803 323.00 343.48 19.10 20.48 Incl 331.00 331.59 524.00 0.59 JOY-11-580 599097 6170891 364.06 365.78 36.51 1.72 Note: * Partial result, certain assays within zone are pending. Composites calculated at 3.0 g/t cut-off and may include internal dilution. True width is interpreted to range from 70 to 95 percent drilled width..The Santoy Gap drill program has expanded the gold-bearing structure to a strike length of over 600metres, to depths in excess of 600 metres and has expanded the Companys National Instrument 43-101resource base at the Seabee Project.Based on the encouraging results from Santoy Gap, the Company has approved the 2012 Seabeeexploration program to include 70,000 metres from surface, focusing largely on the Santoy Gap. The threeto four rig program will focus on aggressively exploring the Santoy Gap target and its relationship to theSantoy 8 ore body to depths in excess of 750 metres.Figure 5: Santoy Region Composite Longitudinal Section.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 15
  • 17. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 11 Neptune The Neptune target is approximately six kilometres north of the Seabee Minesite. Exploration in this area is focused on the Pigeon Lake region utilizing geological, geochemical and geophysical surveys and historical drill data. The gold-in-soil anomaly exists along three sub-parallel trends spanning a width of at least 200 metres. Peak soil values of 111 parts per billion were obtained from minus 80 mesh soil samples obtained over and adjacent to outcropping mineralization. Prospector channel and grab samples from outcropping quartz vein-hosted mineralization returned values of up to 18.23 grams per tonne (please see Claude news release “Claude Resources Inc. Drills 13.6 Grams of Gold per Tonne Over 3.0 Metres at Neptune Target” dated March 23, 2011). Figure 6: Neptune target showing significant gold intercepts and soil anomaly. Initial drilling revealed high gold grades associated with sheeted quartz veins within several prospective zones of alteration and veining hosted within both arenite and basalt-derived, biotite-chlorite schist. The 2011 drill program confirmed the gold-bearing structure over a strike length of 1,200 metres to depths in excess of 250 metres and intersected high-grade gold within multiple structures with assay results of up to 84.66 grams of gold per tonne across 3.20 metres. Results from the 2011 winter drill program are presented in Table 4 below. Table 4: Neptune Target Drill Results from 2011 Winter Drill Program From Grade Width Visible Hole ID Easting Northing Az/dip (m) (g/t) (m) Gold NEP-11-003 587984 6177748 130/-45 60.00 3.78 1.00 YES And 112.00 Anomalous 2.90 YES And 124.00 Anomalous 1.00 YES NEP-11-004 587950 6177671 130/-45 108.81 4.37 0.81 Claude Resources Inc.16 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 18. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 12 Table 4: Neptune Target Drill Results from 2011 Winter Drill Program From Grade Width Visible Hole ID Easting Northing Az/dip (m) (g/t) (m) Gold NEP-11-005 587938 6177652 130/-45 114.00 Anomalous 4.00 NEP-11-006 587865 6177584 130/-45 90.39 Anomalous 0.61 YES NEP-11-007 587963 6177692 130/-45 4.05 Anomalous 2.95 YES And 48.30 10.65 0.50 YES And 84.80 84.66 3.20 YES Incl. 84.80 218.00 1.20 YES And 111.11 24.70 0.82 YES NEP-11-008 588016 6177912 130/-45 159.00 8.38 1.00 YES NEP-11-009 588113 6178080 130/-45 290.65 Anomalous 2.35 NEP-11-010 587933 6177839 130/-45 181.00 3.01 0.89 YES NEP-11-011 587812 6177841 130/-58 308.82 Anomalous 2.00 YES NEP-11-012 588067 6177801 130/-45 39.94 5.82 3.06 YES NEP-11-013 588131 6177878 130/-45 NSI NEP-11-014 587374 6177159 130/-45 419.91 Anomalous 1.00 YES NEP-11-015 587722 6177373 130/-45 NSI Note: Intercepts calculated using a 3 g/t Au cut-off, Anomalous (0.1-3 g/t Au), No Significant Intercepts (“NSI”)To date, the Neptune target has only been tested on widely spaced centres, the limits of which are yet to bedetermined. These results demonstrate the potential for significant new discoveries and resource definitionat the Seabee Operation. At Neptune, exploration efforts in 2011 included the completion of a 28 hole,9,550 metre drill program designed to test the 1.8 kilometre strike length of the soil anomaly to verticaldepths of up to 250 metres. Based on these encouraging results from Neptune, Claude anticipates furtherdrilling in the first and second quarters of 2012.Amisk Gold ProjectThe Amisk Gold Project (Figure 7) is located in the Flin Flon-Snow Lake Greenstone Belt. The project ishost to the Amisk Gold Deposit, the past-producing Monarch Mine as well as a large number of goldoccurrences and prospects. Extensive historic exploration from 1983 through 1998, including significantsurface and underground drilling and bulk sampling, was completed by Saskatchewan MiningDevelopment Corporation, Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting, Husky Oil and Claude. The propertyremained largely dormant from 1998 through 2009.Subsequent to its acquisition of St. Eugene, Claude now owns 100 percent of the 23,450 hectare project.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 17
  • 19. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 13 Figure 7: Amisk Gold Project Results from a summer historic core sampling program and 2011 drilling expanded the mineralized system and confirmed grade continuity of the resource model. Gold and silver mineralization is associated with a sequence of quartz porphyritic, rhyolitic lapilli tuffs and flows hosting disseminations and stringers of pyrite, sphalerite, galena, tetrahedrite and chalcopyrite. Drilling has intercepted the mineralized system over a strike length of 1,200 metres, width of 400 metres and depths of in excess of 600 metres. The system remains open to the southwest, southeast, northwest and at depth. Figure 8: Cross Section A-A’ of the Amisk Gold Property On February 17, 2011, Claude completed a National Instrument 43-101 compliant resource calculation which included results of all drilling to date, inclusive of historic core. The independent mineral resource Claude Resources Inc.18 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 20. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 14statement was released in the first quarter of 2011 and outlined an Indicated Resource of 921,000 ounces of0.95 grams of gold equivalent (“Au Eq”) per tonne and an Inferred Resource of 645,000 ounces at 0.70grams of Au Eq per tonne.Table 5: Amisk Gold Project Consolidated Mineral Resource Statement*(100 Percent) Quantity Grade (g/tonne) Contained Ounces (000’s)Resource Class (000’s tonnes) Au Ag Au Eq Au Ag Au EqIndicated 30,150 0.85 6.17 0.95 827 5,978 921Inferred 28,653 0.64 4.01 0.70 589 3,692 645* Reported at a cut-off of 0.40 grams of gold equivalent (Au Eq) per tonne using a price of U.S. $1,100 perounce of gold and U.S. $16 per ounce of silver inside a conceptual pit shell optimized using metallurgicaland process recovery of 87 percent, overall ore mining and processing costs of U.S. $15 per tonne andoverall pit slope of 50 degrees. All figures are rounded to reflect the relative accuracy of the estimates.Mineral resources are not mineral reserves and do not have demonstrated economic viability.During the third quarter of 2011, the Company reported positive metallurgical testwork results at the AmiskGold Project. Initial metallurgical testing indicates that gold and silver mineralization is amenable toconventional cyanide leaching. Results from testing on three composite samples from the Amisk GoldDeposit have returned an average of 89.4 percent recovery for gold, ranging from 85.2 percent to 91.7percent and an average of 80.8 percent recovery for silver, ranging from 66.4 percent to 92.8 percent.Detailed results are presented in the table below.Table 6: Metallurgical Testwork Results, Amisk Gold Project Recovery Size Grade (Cyanidation) Fraction Au Ag Au (%) Ag (%) P 80 (um)*Composite ID (g/T) (g/T)Low Grade 0.50 7.4 89.8 70.9 72Medium Grade 0.85 9.2 85.2 88.9 146Medium Grade 0.85 9.2 89.1 84.8 117Medium Grade 0.85 9.2 91.0 92.8 72High Grade 1.68 8.4 91.7 66.4 92* Denotes size fraction of grind that 80 percent of material passed.Based on the Metallurgical testwork work completed thus far, it is recommended that Amisk ore should betreated by conventional SAG and ball mill grinding to achieve a final grind not finer than 80 percentpassing 75 microns. Further economic studies and tests need to be done to optimize the grind required. It issuggested that this optimized grind will lie between 72 and 117 microns. The correct process to recovergold and silver is direct whole ore cyanidation with carbon-in-pulp technology used to recover the leachedgold and silver values. Reagent consumption in cyanidation was reasonable. Approximately 1 kilogram pertonne of NaCN (sodium cyanide) and 0.5 kilogram per tonne of lime will be required. Further cyanidationtest work was recommended to identify optimum operating conditions.The initial metallurgical and grinding mill engineering tests were conducted on 215 kg collected from halfsplit core. Representative core intervals from eight drill holes were combined to create low, medium andhigh grade composites that assayed 0.50, 0.85 and 1.68 grams of gold per tonne and 7.4, 9.2 and 8.4 gramsof silver per tonne. This mineralization is representative of the Amisk Gold Deposit and consists of trace to10 percent disseminated pyrite and stringers with minor sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena and tetrahedritehosted in a sericitized quartz porphyry.During 2011, a 20 hole, 6,480 metre drill program was completed on the Amisk Gold Project. This programfocused specifically on testing the limits of the mineralized footprint north of the current pit outline,targeting depth extension below the pit bottom and infill drilling to evaluate potential upgrade of categoriesin the resource estimate completed by SRK Consulting (Canada) Inc. Twenty drill holes successfullyClaude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 19
  • 21. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 15 confirmed continuity of gold mineralization within the northern and eastern portion of the deposit as well as demonstrated the potential for expansion to the east and southeast. Table 7: 2011 summer and fall drill results from the Amisk Gold Project. From Length Au Ag Hole Easting Northing Az/Dip To (m) (m) (m) (g/t) (g/t) AL-11-300 676827 6066224 80/-45 50.00 59.00 9.00 1.50 9.2 and 188.00 244.50 56.50 0.58 3.5 AL-11-301 676875 6066233 80/-45 150.00 171.00 21.00 1.15 6.7 and 205.00 229.61 24.61 1.88 12.4 AL-11-302 676910 6066380 80/-45 96.00 104.51 8.51 1.14 4.5 AL-11-303 676910 6066380 283/-45 18.00 44.00 26.00 1.02 4.3 AL-11-304 676910 6066380 0/-90 93.41 131.00 37.59 0.55 2.8 AL-11-305 676900 6066330 80/-45 175.47 183.50 8.03 1.16 6.2 AL-11-306 676885 6066283 80/-45 40.25 130.00 89.75 0.51 2.5 AL-11-307 676921 6066430 80/-45 NSI AL-11-308 676921 6066430 285/-45 NSI AL-11-309 676900 6066480 283/-45 18.92 19.92 1.00 5.31 13.1 AL-11-310 676900 6066480 0/-90 NSI AL-11-311 676900 6066480 283/-60 NSI AL-11-312 676877 6066141 70/-45 69.50 96.00 26.50 0.44 1.5 and 108.00 132.00 24.00 0.51 0.9 and 191.15 220.00 28.85 0.67 2.8 AL-11-313 676838 6066035 105/-45 37.85 54.00 16.15 1.02 7.4 and 125.00 147.00 22.00 0.54 7.6 and 185.00 204.50 19.50 0.65 2.3 and 239.47 276.00 36.53 0.61 2.9 AL-11-314 676835 6066052 90/-45 141.00 164.00 23.00 0.76 2.8 Note: Intervals noted are intercepted width not true width, have been calculated using a 0.3 g/tonne cut-off and are uncut. True width is variable between 80 and 100 percent of drilled width. They may include internal dilution intervals of up to 6 metres. No significant Intercepts (“NSI”). Mineralization intercepted in the drilling is consistent with the current resource model and is associated with a sequence of quartz porphyritic, rhyolitic lapilli tuffs and basaltic tuffs hosting disseminations and stringers of pyrite, sphalerite, galena, tetrahedrite and chalcopyrite. The remaining holes are presented in Table 8 below. The program tested from surface to in excess of 700 metres depth and was designed to expand the limits of the Amisk Gold deposit as well as infill within the northern and eastern portion of the deposit. Highlights of the drilling include: 6.24 grams of gold per tonne and 23.5 grams of silver per tonne over 12.00 metres and 3.39 percent zinc and 0.91 percent lead over 1.81 metres in hole AL-11-318, and 1.95 grams of gold per tonne and 14.9 grams of silver per tonne over 18.95 metres in AL-11-319. Mineralization intercepted in the drilling is consistent with the current resource model and is associated with a sequence of quartz porphyritic, rhyolitic lapilli tuffs and basaltic tuffs and argillite hosting disseminations, stringers and semi-massive intervals of pyrite, sphalerite, galena, tetrahedrite, pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite. Drill hole AL-11-319 confirmed continuity of gold mineralization within the southeastern portion of the deposit as well as demonstrated the potential for expansion to the east and southeast. Four holes were completed evaluating the continuity of the system to depths in excess of 700 metres. Claude Resources Inc.20 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 22. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 16Table 8: 2011 Amisk Gold Project Fall Drill Results From Length Hole Easting Northing Az/Dip Au (g/t) Ag (g/t) Zn (%) Pb (%) (m) (m) AL-11-315 676999 6066416 184/-62 87.94 12.22 1.32 6.7 - - Incl 95.08 1.92 5.42 30.8 - - AL-11-316 676868 6066443 177/-58 92.00 37.00 0.49 2.2 - - AL-11-317 676769 6066515 178/-58 256.00 16.50 1.37 5.7 - - incl 257.00 3.00 5.28 22.4 - - AL-11-318 676444 6066436 166/-66 69.00 1.81 0.17 11.5 3.39 0.91 and 311.00 12.00 6.24 23.5 - - incl 313.85 1.15 62.00 224 - - and 643.5 71.74 0.6 4.0 - - incl 699.5 14.00 1.64 11.8 - - and 728.00 37.00 0.61 2.2 - - incl 763.00 2.00 5.71 22.0 - - and 809.39 10.61 1.65 2.6 - - incl 809.39 2.21 6.06 8.5 - - AL-11-319 676744 6065948 97/-47 53.00 32.00 0.98 7.1 - - incl 68.00 1.00 8.95 39.7 - - and 159.5 29.00 0.59 5.6 - - and 206.5 21.00 1.28 8.5 - - incl 223.00 1.50 11.3 45.3 - - and 339.00 18.95 1.95 14.9 - - incl 348.00 3.01 7.38 57.7 - - AL-11-320 676709 6065787 105/-47 NSI - - Note: Intervals noted are intercepted width not true width, have been calculated using a 0.3 g/tonne cut-off and are uncut. True width is variable between 60 and 100 percent of drilled width. They may include internal dilution intervals of up to 10 metres. No Significant Intercepts (“NSI”). The 2011 Amisk drill program confirmed mineralization within the current resource model and to depths of 700 metres. In addition to focusing on growth of the gold and silver resource base, the presence of significant grades of zinc and lead in the hangingwall will be evaluated during 2012. Looking forward at Amisk, exploration will focus on expansion of the open pit resource, completion of preliminary economic studies and further evaluation of the underground potential. Madsen Project The Madsen Project comprises over 10,000 acres (4,000 hectares) and, having produced in excess of 2.4 million ounces, is the third largest gold producer in the Red Lake camp in Ontario, Canada. Infrastructure includes a fully functional 500 ton per day mill, a 4,125 foot deep shaft and permitted tailings facility. Initiated from the 10th level in December of 2008, the Phase I underground program included testing of the plunge extension of the 8 Zone as well as conceptual targets along the 8 Zone shear system. Results from Phase I deep drilling of the 8 Zone Trend demonstrated down plunge continuity to 450 feet below the 27th level with multiple holes returning strong visible gold associated with intensely silicified, biotite-altered basalt. See Table 9 for highlights of Phase I of the 8 Zone drill program. Step-out drilling to the east and west confirmed the development of favorable 8 Zone structure and stratigraphy. The system remains open down plunge and along strike to the east and west. Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 21
  • 23. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 17 Table 9: Highlights from Phase I of the 8 Zone drill program at the Madsen Mine, Ontario. Hole ID From To Au Length Au Length Visible (m) (m) (g/t) (m) (oz/ton) (ft) Gold Noted MUG-08-01 883.00 883.75 127.12 0.75 3.71 2.46  MUG-09-02b 891.25 891.70 21.52 0.45 0.63 1.48  MUG-09-03 915.40 917.89 33.39 2.49 0.97 8.17  (incl) 58.18 1.25 1.70 4.10  MUG-09-04 909.55 917.45 25.77 7.90 0.75 25.92  (incl) 141.80 0.95 4.14 3.12  MUG-09-05 943.51 946.90 24.30 3.39 0.71 11.45  (incl) 62.09 1.22 1.81 4.00  Figure 9: Madsen Mine Cross Section During 2010, SRK finalized an independent National Instrument 43-101 mineral resource evaluation for the Madsen Mine. This mineral resource evaluation was based on historical exploration and mining data, Phase I underground drilling results up to September 27, 2009 and geological and resource modeling. The resource evaluation was undertaken on the four separate zones, Austin, South Austin, McVeigh and 8 Zone that comprise the Madsen Gold Mine. The National Instrument 43-101 Technical Report was filed on January 20, 2010. Claude Resources Inc.22 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 24. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 18Table 10: Consolidated Mineral Resource Statement (1) for the Madsen Mine, Ontario Resource Grade Grade Contained Zone Tonnes Class (g/tonne) (oz/ton) Gold (oz) Indicated Austin 1,677,000 7.92 0.23 427,000 South Austin 850,000 9.32 0.27 254,000 McVeigh 374,000 9.59 0.28 115,000 8 Zone 335,000 12.21 0.36 132,000 Total 3,236,000 8.93 0.26 928,000 Inferred Austin 108,000 6.30 0.18 22,000 South Austin 259,000 8.45 0.25 70,000 McVeigh 104,000 6.11 0.18 20,000 8 Zone 317,000 18.14 0.53 185,000 Total 788,000 11.74 0.34 297,000(1) Mineral resources are not mineral reserves and do not have demonstrated economic viability. All figures have been rounded to reflect the relative accuracy of the estimates. Reported at a cut-off grade of 5.0 g/t gold based on U.S. $1,000 per troy ounce of gold and gold metallurgical recoveries of 94 percent.Figure 10: Madsen Property OverviewIn the second quarter of 2011, rehabilitation of the 16th level was completed and the second drill chamber tosupport Phase II drilling was completed. The 8 Zone Trend hosts the past-producing 8 Zone and is highlyprospective for future high grade discoveries. The 16th level provides the ideal drill platform to explore bothat depth as well as the strike potential of this 8 Zone Trend.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 23
  • 25. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 19 During 2011, Phase II underground drilling completed 14,800 metres and 9 holes, targeting the 8 zone plunge and strike continuity as well as sub-parallel footwall structures. Drill holes targeting the plunge continuity of the 8 Zone include MUG-11-12, 14 (14b) and 16. Drill hole 14b and drill hole 16, the deepest hole ever completed on the Madsen property, intercepted silicified and visible gold-bearing, basalt and returned 8.06 grams of gold per tonne over 2.02 metres and 5.69 grams of gold per tonne over 2.14 metres, respectively. These intercepts extend the 8 Zone system 250 metres down plunge from previous drilling to approximately 1,600 metres below surface. The system continues to remain open down plunge and will be the target of future drilling. Drill holes targeting the strike continuity of the 8 Zone include MUG-11-10, 11, 13, 15, 17 and 19. Drill hole 13 and drill hole 17 intercepted silicified, biotite-altered basalt and returned 15.70 grams of gold per tonne over 2.00 metres and 53.70 grams of gold per tonne over 0.70 metres, approximately 950 metres below surface. These intercepts are in the hanging-wall of the 8 Zone system and interpreted to correlate with and be an extension of the McVeigh Tuff, located approximately 650 metres up-dip. The McVeigh Tuff hosts a current Indicated Resource of 115,000 ounces at 9.59 grams of gold per tonne and has seen very limited drill testing below 350 metres. In addition to the McVeigh mineralization, the 8 Zone structure is developed in all holes completed along strike and is characterized by anomalous gold associated with biotite-altered, variably silicified basaltic and ultramafic lithologies. Table 11: Highlights from Phase II of the Madsen Underground 8 Zone Drill Program Hole ID Width (m) Au (g/t) Elevation * Zone MUG-11-13 2.00 15.70 927 McVeigh MUG-11-14 2.00 6.27 1,051 McVeigh MUG-11-14b 2.02 8.06 1,543 8 Zone MUG-11-16 2.14 5.69 1,595 8 Zone FW MUG-11-17 0.70 53.70 927 McVeigh and 2.00 5.64 1,079 McVeigh ∗ Elevation presented as metres below surface. Composites calculated using a 3 grams per tonne Au cut-off grade. Reported width is drilled length and interpreted to represent 75 - 85 percent of true width. Note, hole MUG-11-14 was lost with hole MUG-11-14b wedged off and completed. Figure 11: Madsen Longitudinal Section These latest results provide encouragement for the Company’s 2012 program and continue to demonstrate that the 8 Zone is a high grade gold system that has strong vertical continuity and remains open at depth and along strike to the northeast. Furthermore, the discovery of economic grades and widths hosted within the depth continuity of the McVeigh Tuff opens up significant exploration potential. Claude Resources Inc.24 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 26. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 20 Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedures Rigorous quality assurance and quality control procedures have been implemented including the use of blanks, standards and duplicates. Geochemical analyses were submitted to ALS Chemex in Vancouver, British Columbia and or the Seabee minesite lab. The former laboratory is ISO approved. Core samples were analyzed by a 30 gram gold fire assay with an atomic absorption and gravimetric and or screen fire finish. 2011 MINING OPERATIONS RESULTS Seabee Gold Operation During 2011, mining operations at the Seabee Gold Operation produced feedstock from the Seabee Mine and from the Santoy 8 Mine, which achieved commercial production during the first quarter of 2011. Additional details are provided in Table 12 below.Table 12: Seabee Gold Operation Gold Production Results (2011 versus 2010) Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Total Seabee Santoy 7 Santoy 8 DeepTonnes Milled – 2011 50,501 65,502 66,722 74,456 257,181 160,811 - 96,370Tonnes Milled – 2010 (1) 38,490 46,071 62,242 57,155 203,958 181,935 966 21,057Grade - 2011(grams of gold per tonne) 6.20 6.26 5.51 4.97 5.68 6.39 - 4.50Grade - 2010(grams of gold per tonne) 7.79 8.44 6.76 7.54 7.55 7.75 21.86 5.21Milled Ounces – 2011 10,064 13,173 11,826 11,903 46,966 33,014 - 13,952Milled Ounces – 2010 (1) 9,637 12,494 13,536 13,852 49,519 45,315 679 3,525Gold Recovery % - 2011 94.78% 95.83% 95.76% 94.68% 95.29% 95.25% - 95.39%Gold Recovery % - 2010 95.69% 95.26% 95.53% 95.40% 95.46% 95.44% 95.70% 95.61%Ounces Sold – 2011 9,461 12,418 10,898 11,855 44,632 31,270 - 13,362Ounces Sold – 2010 (2) 8,890 12,188 12,081 10,844 44,003 43,002 1,001 -Ounces Produced – 2011 9,539 12,624 11,324 11,269 44,756 31,448 - 13,308Ounces Produced – 2010 (1) 9,221 11,902 12,931 13,216 47,270 43,250 650 3,370 (1) 2010 statistics include pre-production ounces produced and tonnes milled from Santoy 8. (2) 2010 statistics exclude ounces sold from Santoy 8 as that project had not yet achieved commercial production. For the year ended December 31, 2011, Claude milled 257,181 tonnes at a grade of 5.68 grams of gold per tonne (2010 – 203,958 tonnes at 7.55 grams of gold per tonne). Gold sales volume for the year ending December 31, 2011 increased one percent to 44,632 ounces from 44,003 during the year ended December 31, 2010. For the year ended December 31, 2011, produced ounces were 44,756 (December 31, 2010 – 47,270), down five percent year over year. Mill recoveries were relatively unchanged year over year. These results are attributable to increased throughput from the lower grade Santoy 8 ore body due to development constraints at Seabee Deep. Table 13: Seabee Gold Operation Annual Production and Costs Statistics Dec 31 Dec 31 2011 2010 Tonnes Milled (1) 257,181 203,958 Head Grade (grams per tonne) 5.68 7.55 Recovery (%) 95.3% 95.5% Gold Produced (ounces) (1) 44,756 47,270 Gold Sold (ounces) (2) 44,632 44,003 Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 25
  • 27. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 21 Table 13: Seabee Gold Operation Annual Production and Costs Statistics Dec 31 Dec 31 2011 2010 Production Costs (CDN$ million) $40.5 $31.2 Cash Cost per Ounce (CDN$/oz) (3) $908 $709 Cash Cost per Ounce (US$/oz) (3) $918 $688 (1) 2010 statistics include pre-production ounces produced and tonnes milled from Santoy 8. (2) 2010 statistics exclude ounces sold from Santoy 8 as that project had not yet achieved commercial production. (3) For an explanation of non-IFRS performance measures, refer to the “Non-IFRS Performance Measures” section of this MD&A. During 2011, Claude completed over 60,000 metres of underground drilling to sustain Mineral Reserves at the Seabee Gold Mine. At L62, the series of intercepts with above average true widths and economic gold grades represent a near term opportunity to improve operating margins at the Seabee Operation during 2012 and beyond due to their proximity to existing underground infrastructure. A thorough review of the Company’s historical geological database and models is ongoing and has generated new targets that can be accessed economically within the present mine infrastructure. Claude also views the Santoy 8 Project as a key driver in the expansion of the Seabee Gold Operation and in lowering unit operating costs and increasing production over the life of mine plan. Forecast production from the Santoy 8 Mine is expected to gradually increase to 500 tonnes per day by 2013. With the Santoy 8 Project achieving commercial production during 2011 and the addition of resource ounces from Santoy Gap in the Company’s National Instrument 43-101 resource estimate, the Company is continuing to demonstrate its capacity to effectively grow the Seabee Gold Operation from discovery, to development and then to production. During 2012 and beyond, Claude is well positioned to execute on the expansion of its production profile and lowering unit costs over the next several years by maximizing gold output from the near surface Santoy 8 deposit as well as increasing margins at the Seabee Mine via a shaft extension project. Figure 12: Seabee Gold Operation Annual Production and 2012 Forecast Production Notes: (1) 2009 production includes ounces produced and tonnes milled from the Porky Lake bulk sample; and (2) 2010 production includes ounces produced and tonnes milled from the Santoy 8 Project. At December 31, 2011, proven and probable reserves in the Seabee Gold Operation were 2,059,000 tonnes, grading 5.37 grams per tonne or 355,600 ounces of gold. Compared to December 31, 2010, this represents a five percent increase in reserve tonnage and one percent increase in reserve ounces. This modest increase Claude Resources Inc.26 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 28. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 22is attributable to L62 resource growth into the probable reserve classification offset by productionactivities.The Company’s mineral resources at its Seabee Gold Operation included Measured and Indicated MineralResources of 70,600 ounces and Inferred Mineral Resources totalling 873,400 ounces. Compared toDecember 31, 2010, this represents a 206 percent increase in contained gold within the Company’s mineralresources which is mainly attributable to inferred growth relating to further drilling and discovery atSeabee, Santoy Gap and Santoy 8. Table 14: Seabee Gold Operation Mineral Reserves and Mineral Resources Proven and Probable Reserves December 31, 2011 December 31, 2010 Projects Tonnes Grade (g/t) Ozs Tonnes Grade (g/t) Ozs Seabee 1,062,900 6.58 224,900 887,100 6.69 190,800 Santoy 8 997,100 4.08 130,600 1,079,900 4.66 161,900 Totals 2,059,900 5.37 355,600 1,967,100 5.58 352,600 Measured and Indicated Mineral Resources Projects Tonnes Grade (g/t) Ozs Tonnes Grade (g/t) Ozs Seabee 127,400 4.65 19,000 - - - Santoy 8 12,600 5.04 2,000 - - - Porky Main 160,000 7.50 38,600 160,000 7.50 38,600 Porky West 111,000 3.10 11,000 111,000 3.10 11,000 Totals 410,900 5.35 70,600 271,000 5.70 49,600 Inferred Mineral Resources Projects Tonnes Grade (g/t) Ozs Tonnes Grade (g/t) Ozs Santoy Gap 2,321,000 6.63 495,000 - - - Seabee 813,900 6.83 178,800 705,500 6.33 143,600 Santoy 8 850,000 5.46 149,300 384,800 5.35 66,200 Porky Main 70,000 10.43 23,500 70,000 10.43 23,500 Porky West 138,300 6.03 26,800 138,300 6.03 26,800 Totals 4,193,200 6.48 873,400 1,298,600 6.23 260,100For the above table of reserves, the following mining and economic factors have been applied: • Mineral reserves and mineral resources were estimated by Claude personnel and audited by SRK Consulting (Canada) Inc. in 2011. • Mineral reserves and mineral resources estimates have been completed in accordance with CIM Standards and are reported in accordance with Canadian Securities Administrators’ National Instrument 43-101. Mineral resources are exclusive of mineral reserves. • Seabee reserves and resources are estimated at a cut-off grade of 4.57 grams of gold per tonne and Santoy 8 and Santoy Gap reserves and resources are estimated at a cut-off grade of 3.0 grams of gold per tonne. • Cut-off grades were calculated using a two year trailing price of Can. $1,400 per ounce of gold, a U.S./CDN$ exchange rate of 1:1 and overall ore mining and processing costs based on actual historical operating costs. • All figures are rounded to reflect the relative accuracy of the estimates. Totals may not represent the sum of the parts due to rounding. • Mineral resources are not mineral reserves and do not have demonstrated economic viability. • L62 mineral reserves and mineral resources are included in the Seabee totals.Claude is planning in excess of 56,000 metres of underground drilling to replace 2011 production and toreplace Mineral Reserves and Mineral Resources at the Seabee Gold Mine.The Mineral Reserves and Mineral Resources estimates are conducted under the direction of QualifiedPersons Brian Skanderbeg, P.Geo., Vice President Exploration and Peter Longo, P.Eng., Manager CapitalProjects.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 27
  • 29. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 23 Safety, Health and the Environment Throughout 2011, the Company continued with its stated goal of “Mission Zero” in matters related to Safety, Health and the Environment. Claude has expanded its Safety, Training and Environmental Departments as well as retained leading external professionals to conduct regular external reviews of its work practices, workplaces and Management Systems. As part of Claude’s commitment towards “Zero Injury” and “Zero Environmental Exceedence”, the Company established operational objectives of reducing these incidents by 25 percent annually since 2008. Management believes having success in these critical areas will place Claude in a position to be recognized as a leader in matters related to Safety, Health and the Environment. FINANCIAL RESULTS OF OPERATIONS On January 1, 2011, the Company adopted International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) for Canadian publicly accountable enterprises and its financial statements have been prepared using IFRS. Amounts relating to the year ended December 31, 2010 in this MD&A and the related financial statements have been revised using IFRS for comparative purposes. Amounts for periods prior to January 1, 2010 are presented in accordance with Canadian GAAP. All references to per share amounts pertain to diluted net earnings per share. FINANCIAL Highlights Table 15: Highlights of Consolidated Financial Results Canadian Percent Thousands of CDN$ Dec 31 Dec 31 GAAP Change (except per share amounts) 2011 2010 2009 2010 to 2011 Revenue $69,659 $55,998 $48,525 24 Profit from mining operations 17,710 13,452 (1,559) 32 Profit (loss) from continuing 9,454 8,762 (7,461) 8 operations Net profit (loss) 9,454 10,313 (6,257) (8) Earnings (loss) per share 0.06 0.08 (0.06) (25) (basic and diluted) Revenue In the discussion below, gold revenues for the comparable figures in 2010 and 2009, net of expenditures, from projects not yet in commercial production have not been included in earnings; rather, these amounts have been offset against the carrying value of the assets. Gold revenue from the Company’s Seabee Gold Operation for the year ended December 31, 2011 increased 24 percent to $69.7 million from $56.0 million reported for the year ended December 31, 2010. Three-year trend The increase in gold revenue in 2011 was attributable to a 23 percent improvement in Canadian dollar gold prices realized (2011 - $1,561 (U.S. $1,578); 2010 - $1,273 (U.S. $1,236); and 2009 $1,112 (U.S. $975)) offset by stable gold sales volume (2011 – 44,632 ounces; 2010 – 44,003 ounces; 2009 - 43,631). Claude Resources Inc.28 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 30. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 24Figure 13: Average Gold Price (London PM Fix – US$)Net ProfitFor the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company recorded net profit of $9.5 million, or $0.06 pershare. This compares to a net profit of $10.3 million, or $0.08 per share, in 2010. This decrease wasattributable to an increase in the price of gold year over year offset by derivative losses and increasedproduction costs, general and administrative costs and a write-down of a non-core exploration property.Three-year trendThe Company’s profit trends with changes in revenue, which has been significantly impacted by the priceof gold and offset by increasing production costs attributable to increasing labour and input costs.Production CostsFor the year ended December 31, 2011, mine production costs of $40.5 million (2010 - $31.2 million) were30 percent higher year over year. This increase was attributable to increased spending on consumablesupplies and labour.Total Canadian dollar cash cost per ounce of gold (1) for 2011 increased 28 percent to CDN $908 (U.S.$918) per ounce from CDN $709 (U.S. $688) during 2010. During 2011, cash operating cost per ouncewas negatively impacted by the 14 day shut down during the first quarter of 2011, increased throughputfrom the lower grade Santoy 8 ore body and development constraints at Seabee Deep.(1) Denotes a non-IFRS performance measure. For an explanation of non-IFRS performance measures, refer to the “Non-IFRS Performance Measures” section in this MD&A.Depreciation and DepletionFor the year ended December 31, 2011, depreciation and depletion was $11.4 million, relatively unchangedfrom the comparable period of 2010. This result is attributable to a large increase in the reserve base withSantoy 8 coming into commercial production in 2011 offset by an increase in tonnes milled year over year.General and Administrative ExpenseGeneral and administrative expense in 2011 increased to $6.8 million, up 39 percent from the $4.9 millionreported in 2010. This variance primarily relates to increased stock compensation expense resulting from ahuman resource initiative to grant additional stock options in order to improve recruitment and retention offront line supervisors.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 29
  • 31. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 25 Finance Expense Finance expense includes interest, accretion expense and derivative losses. For the year ended December 31, 2011, Finance expense of $3.1 million was $1.5 million greater than the $1.6 million of Finance expense reported for the year ended December 31, 2010. This result was attributable to the Company settling certain out of the money derivative instruments during the third quarter of 2011. Finance and Other Income For the year ended December 31, 2011, finance and other income of $0.5 million was relatively unchanged year over year. Write-down of Exploration Property Write-down of exploration property of $0.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 related to the Company’s write-down of certain non-core assets. A similar write-down did not occur for the year ended December 31, 2010. (Gain) on Sale of Exploration Property Gain on sale of exploration property of $1.1 million related to the Company’s sale of its 46 percent minority interest in the Nokomis property to Auriga Gold. A similar transaction did not occur in the year ended December 31, 2010. Deferred Income Tax Expense (Recovery) During the 2010 year $3.1 million of other comprehensive income was recognized resulting in a deferred tax liability of $0.4 million. Deferred tax assets were available to off-set this deferred tax liability and the deferred tax recovery was recorded through the income statement. At December 31, 2011 it was determined that the company had sufficient support for the recognition of its deferred tax asset. IFRS accounting requires that deferred tax recoveries or expense must follow the presentation of the items that gave rise to the deferred tax asset or liability. As a result a net deferred tax expense of $0.4 million was recorded through income in the current year. Profit from Discontinued Operation During 2010, the Company sold its remaining oil and natural gas assets. As such, there were no results or cash flows from operations for the year ended December 31, 2011. Liquidity and Financial Resources The Company monitors its spending plans, repayment obligations and cash resources on a continuous basis with the objective of ensuring that there is sufficient capital within the Company to meet business requirements, after taking into account cash flows from operations and the Company’s holdings of cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments. The Company’s typical cash requirement over the first and second quarters of each year is significant because of the Seabee Gold Operation’s winter ice road resupply, which includes restocking diesel, propane and other large consumables as well as the continued upgrading of the mining fleet and mine infrastructure. The Company had cash and cash equivalents of $2.5 million and short-term investments of $33.2 million at December 31, 2011 (December 31, 2010 - $10.8 million, including $4.4 million of Restricted cash). The Company monitors its positions with, and the credit quality of, the financial institutions and government instruments in which it invests its excess cash and cash equivalents. Other than balances maintained in various bank operating accounts, the Company’s investment policy limits investments to government- backed financial instruments, bank certificates of deposit and bankers acceptances. Claude Resources Inc.30 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 32. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 26At December 31, 2011, the Company had working capital of $42.4 million (December 31, 2010 - $4.3million). Included in the working capital calculation at December 31, 2011 are demand loans of $0.9million; these loans have been classified as current liabilities due to their demand feature. Included in theworking capital calculation at December 31, 2010 are demand loans of $2.5 million (due to their demandfeature) and the Company’s debenture of $9.3 million (due to the Company’s offer to prepay outstandingdebentures during the fourth quarter of 2010). The increase in working capital was attributable to: theclosing of the equity issue in the second quarter, a decrease in demand loans attributable to the regularrepayment of the loans and the reclassification of non-redeemed debentures from current to long-term loansand borrowings.Table 16: Working Capital and Current RatiosIn thousands of CDN dollars Canadian Percent Dec 31 Dec 31 GAAP Change 2011 2010 2009 2010 to 2011Current assets 52,004 23,285 45,258 123Current liabilities 9,606 19,035 16,727 (50)Working capital 42,398 4,250 28,531 898Current ratio 5.4 1.2 2.7 350EBITDA (1) for the year ended December 31, 2011 was $22.7 million (December 31, 2010 - $19.7 million). (1) Denotes a non-IFRS Performance Measure. For an explanation of non-IFRS performance measures, refer to the “Non- IFRS Performance Measures” section in this MD&A.InvestingMineral property expenditures during the year were $51.2 million, a $16.3 million increase from 2010.Expenditures during 2011 were comprised of Seabee Mine and Shaft development of $20.8 million,exploration costs (focusing on the Santoy Gap, Seabee North, Amisk and Madsen exploration projects) of$13.6 million and property, plant and equipment additions of $16.8 million. Property, plant and equipmentadditions include mining equipment, camp infrastructure and tailings management facility expansion.FinancingFinancing activities during 2011 included the issuance of 20,000,000 common shares of the Company at aprice of $2.50 per share; in addition, the underwriters of the offering exercised their overallotment option inrespect of an additional 3,000,000 common shares at a price of $2.50 per common share. The aggregategross proceeds raised under the offering were $57.5 million. Financing activities also included the issuanceof 235,614 common shares (2010 – 430,395) and 648,667 common shares (2010 – 422,414) pursuant to theCompany’s Employee Share Purchase Plan and the Company’s Stock Option Plan, respectively. Anadditional 1,577,000 common share purchase warrants expiring on November 16, 2012 were exercised. Inaddition, 116,300 of the warrants expiring on May 22, 2013 were exercised. Finally, 139,321 commonshare purchase warrants expiring on April 9, 2011 were exercised.During the year, the Company repaid $1.6 million of its demand loans outstanding. The proceeds andrepayments of capital lease obligations relate primarily to production equipment.Capital StructureThe Company’s objective when managing capital is to safeguard its ability to continue as a going concern so thatit can continue to provide adequate returns to shareholders and benefits to other stakeholders. The Companymanages the capital structure and makes adjustments to it in light of changes in economic conditions and the riskcharacteristics of the underlying assets. In order to maintain or adjust the capital structure, the Company mayissue new shares, sell assets or incur debt. The Company is not subject to externally imposed capitalrequirements.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 31
  • 33. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 27 The Company utilizes a combination of short-term and long-term debt and equity to finance its operations and exploration. The Capital structure of the Company is as follows: Table 17: Schedule of Capital Structure of the Company Capital Structure DEC 31 DEC 31 Interest Maturity 2011 2010 Demand loan # 1 Prime + 1.50% Aug/2011 $ - $ 667 Demand loan # 2 4.575% Nov/2012 896 1,832 Debenture 12.00% May/2013 9,452 9,344 Total debt $ 10,348 $ 11,843 Shareholders’ equity 172,895 106,068 Debt to equity 5.99 % 11.17% Financial and Other Instruments In the normal course of its operations, the Company is exposed to gold price, foreign exchange, interest rate, liquidity, equity price and counterparty risks. The overall financial risk management program focuses on preservation of capital and protecting current and future Company assets and cash flows by reducing exposure to risks posed by the uncertainties and volatilities of financial markets. The Company may use derivative financial instruments to hedge some of its exposure to fluctuations in gold prices and foreign exchange rates. The Company does not acquire, hold or issue derivatives for trading purposes. The Company’s management of financial risks is aimed at ensuring that net cash flows are sufficient to meet all its financial commitments as and when they fall due and to maintain the capacity to fund its forecast project development and exploration strategies. The value of the Company’s mineral resources is related to the price of gold and the outlook for this mineral. Gold and precious metal prices historically have fluctuated widely and are affected by numerous factors outside of the Company’s control, including, but not limited to, industrial and retail demand, central bank lending, forward sales by producers and speculators, levels of worldwide production, short-term changes in supply and demand because of speculative hedging activities and certain other factors related specifically to gold. The profitability of the Company’s operations is highly correlated to the market price of gold. If the gold price declines below the cost of production at the Company’s operations, for a prolonged period of time, it may not be economically feasible to continue production. The Company’s revenues from the production and sale of gold are denominated in U.S. dollars. However, the Company’s operating expenses are primarily incurred in Canadian dollars and its liabilities are primarily denominated in Canadian dollars. The results of the Company’s operations are subject to currency risks. The operating results and financial position of the Company are reported in Canadian dollars in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. At December 31, 2011, the Company did not have any derivative instruments outstanding. At December 31, 2010, the Company had outstanding derivative instruments in the form of forward gold sales relating to 2011 production totaling 4,500 ounces. These contracts were settled in February 2011, resulting in a gain of $0.1 million. The Company’s main interest rate risk arises from interest earning cash deposits that expose the Company to interest rate risk. No hedging programs were implemented by the Company to manage interest rate risk during the quarter. The Company invests its cash and cash equivalents and short term investments with the Government of Canada and major banks according to its investment policy. Claude Resources Inc.32 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 34. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 28The Company’s liquidity position is managed to ensure sufficient liquid funds are available to meet itsfinancial obligations in a timely manner. The Company manages liquidity risk by continuously monitoringforecast and actual cash flows and ensuring that the Company has the ability to access required funding.The Company is exposed to equity securities price risk arising from investments classified on the balancesheet as available-for-sale. Investments in equity securities are approved by the Board on a case-by-casebasis. All of the Company’s available-for-sale equity investments are in junior resource companies listed onthe TSX.The Company is exposed to counterparty risk which is the risk that a counterparty will not complete itsobligations under a financial instrument resulting in a financial loss for the Company. The Company doesnot generally obtain collateral or other security to support financial instruments subject to credit risk;however, the Company only deals with credit worthy counterparties. Accounts receivable compriseinstitutions purchasing gold under normal settlement terms of two working days. Counterparty risk underderivative financial instruments is to reputable institutions. All significant cash balances are on deposit witha high-rated banking institutions. The carrying amount of financial assets recorded in the financialstatements represents the Company’s maximum exposure to credit risk without taking account of the valueof any collateral or other security obtained.Contractual ObligationsThe Company’s contractual and other obligations as at December 31, 2011 are summarized as follows:Table 18: Schedule of Payments / Commitments due by Period(in thousands of Canadian dollars) Less than 2-3 4-5 More than Total 1 year years Years 5 yearsContractual ObligationDemand loans 896 896 - - -Interest on demand loans 21 21 - - -Debenture 9,751 - 9,751 - -Debenture interest 1,629 1,170 459 - -Capital lease obligations 3,905 2,119 1,786 - -Interest on capital leases 212 154 58 - -Office lease 311 114 197 - - 16,725 4,474 12,251 - -STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITIONTable 19: Highlights from Statements of Financial Position Canadian Percent DEC 31 DEC 31 GAAP Change 2011 2010 2009 2010 to 2011Total assets 207,887 136,369 229,421 152Long-term financial liabilities 25,386 11,266 102,599 225The Company’s total assets were $207.9 million at December 31, 2011, compared to $136.4 million atDecember 31, 2010. The $71.5 million net increase was comprised primarily of increases of: $24.9 million incash and cash equivalents and short-term investments, attributable to the financing completed during the secondquarter; $4.1 million in Inventories; $43.3 million in Mineral properties attributable to Seabee Minedevelopment and Shaft extension, exploration costs (focusing on the Santoy Gap, Seabee North, Amisk andMadsen exploration projects) and additions to property, plant and equipment; and a $1.0 million increase inClaude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 33
  • 35. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 29 deferred tax asset. These increases were offset by a decrease of $1.5 million in Investments due to a reduction in fair value of certain of the Company’s available-for-sale securities. In 2011 and 2010, total asset and long-term financial liability balances decreased due to the net presentation of the Company’s restricted promissory notes and royalty obligations (which were reported on a gross basis under the Company’s previous GAAP). Total liabilities were $35.0 million at December 31, 2011, up $4.7 million from December 31, 2010. This result was attributable to: $1.0 million increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities, attributable to the timing of payments associated with the Company’s annual winter road for the Seabee Gold Operation; a $10.3 million increase in long-term loans and borrowings attributable to the Company’s debentures being re-classed from current to long-term (due to the expiry of the Company’s offer to prepay debentures outstanding during the first quarter of 2011); and a $4.9 million increase in Decommissioning and reclamation attributable to revisions to the Company’s Seabee and Madsen decommissioning and reclamation plans. These increases were offset by: a decrease of $1.6 million in Demand loans, attributable to the normal repayment of the loans; a $10.4 million decrease in current loans and borrowings due to the Company’s re-class of outstanding debentures from current to long-term noted above, and a decrease of $1.1 million in the Company’s net royalty obligation, attributable to the timing and receipt of interest and royalty payments. Shareholders’ equity increased by $66.8 million to $172.9 million at the end of 2011, from $106.1 million at December 31, 2010. This variance is attributable to an increase in Share capital of $57.8 million due to the equity financing completed during the second quarter and the exercise of stock options and warrants, an increase of $1.7 million to contributed surplus, a $9.5 million decrease to Accumulated deficit; and a $2.1 million decrease to Accumulated other comprehensive income. Comprehensive income consists of net income, together with certain other economic gains and losses that are collectively referred to as “other comprehensive income (loss)” or “OCI” and are excluded from the income statement. During the year ended December 31, 2011, other comprehensive income decreased to $0.6 million (December 31, 2010 – $2.8 million) due to mark to market losses relating to certain of the Company’s available- for-sale investments. KEY SENSITIVITIES Earnings from Claude’s gold operation are sensitive to fluctuations in both commodity and currency prices. The key factors and their approximate effect on earnings, earnings per share and cash flow, based on assumptions comparable to 2011 actuals, are as follows: Gold For a U.S. $10 movement in gold price per ounce, earnings and cash flow will have a corresponding movement of CDN $0.4 million, or $0.00 per share. For a $0.01 movement in the US$/CDN$ exchange rate, earnings and cash flow will have a corresponding movement of $0.7 million, or 0.00$ per share. SELECTED QUARTERLY FINANCIAL DATA For the quarter ended December 31, 2011, the Company recorded a net loss of $0.2 million, or $0.00 per share, compared to a net profit of $4.1 million, or $0.03 per share, for the comparable period in 2010. For the three months ended December 31, 2011, EBITDA (1) was $4.2 million, or $0.03 per share, compared to $6.7 million, or $0.05 per share, for the comparable period last year. (1) Denotes a non-IFRS Performance Measure. For an explanation of non-IFRS performance measures, refer to the “Non- IFRS Performance Measures” section in this MD&A. Gold revenue generated during the fourth quarter was $19.9 million, a 34 percent increase over the $14.9 million reported for the same period in 2010. This was a result of increased gold sales volume compared to 2010 (Q4 2011 – 11,855 ounces; Q4 2010 – 10,844 ounces) and improved Canadian dollar gold prices realized Q4 2011 - $1,678 (U.S. $1,641); Q4 2010 - $1,378 (U.S. $1,361). Claude Resources Inc.34 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 36. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 30 For the three months ended December 31, 2011, total mine operating costs were $13.4 million, up $6.9 million period over period. This variance is attributable to increases in manpower, salaries, maintenance and supplies and resulted in the 89 percent increase in Canadian dollar cash operating cost per ounce: Q4 2011 – CDN $1,130 (U.S. $1,105); Q4 2010 – CDN $597 (U.S. $589). During the fourth quarter of 2011, depreciation, depletion and accretion of the Company’s gold assets of $3.9 million represented a 56 percent increase compared to the $2.5 million reported during the comparable period in 2010. These results are attributable to a greater number of tonnes being milled during the quarter, period over period.Table 20: Summary financial and operating data for the Company’s last eight quarters IFRS Dec 31 Sept 30 Jun 30 Mar 31 Dec 31 Sept 30 Jun 30 Mar 31 2011 2011 2011 2011 2010 2010 2010 2010Gold sales ($ millions) 19.9 18.2 18.2 13.3 14.9 15.7 15.2 10.2Net profit (loss) ($ millions) (0.2) 2.6 5.2 1.8 4.1 5.6 2.2 (1.6)Net profit (loss) per share (1) 0.00 0.02 0.03 0.01 0.03 0.04 0.02 (0.01)Average realized gold price (CDN$ per ounce) 1,678 1,670 1,469 1,408 1,378 1,296 1,247 1,147Average realized gold price (US$ per ounce) 1,641 1,704 1,518 1,428 1,361 1,247 1,213 1,103Ounces sold (2) 11,900 10,900 12,400 9,500 10,800 12,100 12,200 8,900Tonnes milled (3) 74,456 66,722 65,502 50,501 57,155 62,242 46,071 38,490Ounces produced (3) 11,300 11,300 12,600 9,500 13,200 12,900 11,900 9,200Grade processed (grams per tonne) 4.97 5.51 6.26 6.20 7.54 6.76 8.44 7.79Cash cost per ounce (CDN$ per ounce) (4) 1,130 871 717 924 597 642 704 946Cash cost per ounce (US$ per ounce) (4) 1,105 888 741 938 589 618 685 909EBITDA ($ millions) (4) 4.2 7.5 7.7 3.2 6.7 6.9 5.4 0.6EBITDA per share (basic) (4) 0.03 0.05 0.05 0.02 0.05 0.05 0.04 0.01Weighted average shares outstanding 164,351 163,911 155,275 140,361 136,081 131,245 130,925 126,414(basic)CDN$/US$ Exchange 1.0230 0.9804 0.9676 0.9861 1.0128 1.0391 1.0276 1.0404 (1) Basic and diluted, calculated based on the number of shares issued and outstanding during the quarter. (2) Statistics in 2010 exclude ounces sold from the Santoy 8 Project, which was not yet in commercial production. (3) Includes ounces produced and tonnes milled from the Santoy 8 Project in 2010. (4) For an explanation of non-IFRS performance measures, refer to the “Non-IFRS Performance Measures” section in this MD&A. The financial results for the last eight quarters reflect the following general trends: improved average realized gold price (which has improved gold revenue, net profit (loss) and EBITDA); lower grade attributable to more feedstock from the Santoy 8 ore body; and increasing cash cost per ounce. Results of the first quarter of 2011 and the first quarter of 2010 were impacted by interruptions to operations as a result of required major maintenance to the Company’s mining fleet and Mill facilities. OUTLOOK For 2012, and looking forward, the Company will continue to: i) Pursue best practices in the areas of safety, health and the environment; ii) Increase production and improve operating margins at the Seabee Gold Operation by investing in capital projects and equipment to further develop satellite deposits; iii) Sustain or increase reserves and resources at the Seabee Gold Operation through further exploration and development; Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 35
  • 37. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 31 iv) Advance surface and underground exploration drill programs at the Companys 100 percent owned Madsen Exploration Project with continuation of Phase II of underground drilling from the 16th level drill platform; and v) Expand the scope of the Amisk Gold Project, and complete a preliminary economic assessment. For 2012, forecast gold production at the Seabee Operation is estimated to range from 50,000 to 52,000 ounces of gold. Unit costs for 2012 are estimated to be similar to 2011. Capital expenditures are expected to increase significantly with continued investment at Madsen and expected upgrades at the Seabee Gold Operation, including the extension of the Seabee Shaft. As a follow-up to the Company’s 2011 exploration programs, Claude has budgeted approximately $15.5 million to support the continuation of its extensive exploration programs at the Seabee, Amisk and Madsen Properties during 2012. Continued success from the Company’s exploration programs should serve to: • further extend the mine life at Seabee; • potentially improve the project economics at the Company’s Amisk and Madsen Projects; and • further increase the Company’s total resource base. During the first half of each year, the Company’s cash outflow is significant because of the Seabee Gold Operation’s annual winter ice road resupply which includes restocking diesel, propane and other large consumables as well as the continued upgrading of the mining fleet and mine infrastructure. At current gold prices and forecast production, Management believes that, when combined with cash on hand and short-term investments, operating cash flows will be sufficient to fund the continued exploration at the Seabee, Amisk and Madsen Properties over the next 12 months. In May 2013, the Company’s debenture matures at which point it is expected that operating cash flows combined with a debt or equity financing, should market conditions warrant, will provide sufficient funding for 2013. ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES Certain of the Company’s accounting policies require that Management make decisions with respect to the formulation of estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. Claude’s significant accounting policies are contained in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements. The following is a discussion of the accounting estimates that are critical in determining the Company’s financial results. Reserves Estimation of reserves involves the exercise of judgment. Forecasts are based on geological, geophysical, engineering and economic data, all of which are subject to many uncertainties and interpretations. The Company expects that, over time, reserve estimates may be revised upward or downward based on updated information. Such information may include revisions to geological data or assumptions, a change in economic data, and the results of drilling and exploration activities. Reserve estimates can have a significant impact on net earnings, as they are a key component in the calculation of depreciation and depletion. In addition, changes in reserve estimates, commodity prices and future operating and capital costs can have a significant impact on the impairment assessments of the applicable assets. Valuation of Properties Claude assesses the carrying values of its properties at the end of each reporting period, or more frequently if warranted by a change in circumstances, to determine whether any indication of impairment exists. If it is determined that carrying values of assets cannot be recovered, the unrecoverable amounts are written off against current earnings. Recoverability is dependent upon assumptions and judgments regarding future prices, costs of production, sustaining capital requirements and economically recoverable ore reserves. A change in assumptions may materially impact the potential impairment of these assets. Claude Resources Inc.36 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 38. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 32Decommissioning and ReclamationClaude’s mining, exploration and development activities are subject to various levels of Federal andProvincial Law as well as environmental regulations, including requirements for closure and reclamation.Management’s judgment and estimates are used when estimating reclamation and closure costs. In somecases, these costs will be incurred many years from the date of estimate. Estimates may be revised as aresult of changes in government regulations or assumptions.FUTURE ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTSCertain new accounting standards and interpretations have been published that are not mandatory for theDecember 31, 2011 reporting period: • IFRS 9, Financial Instruments: effective for accounting periods commencing on or after January 1, 2015. The Company does not expect the adoption of this standard to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements. • IFRS 10, Consolidated Financial Statements, was issued by the IASB in May 2011 and is effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013 with early adoption permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of this standard to have a material impact on its financial statements. • IFRS 11, Joint Arrangements, was issued by the IASB in May 2011 and is effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013 with early adoption permitted. The extent of the impact of adoption of IFRS 11 has not yet been determined by the Company. • IFRS 12, Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities, was issued by the IASB in May 2011 and is effective for the Company beginning on January 1, 2013. It is expected that IFRS 12 will increase the current level of disclosure related to the Company’s interests in other entities upon adoption. • In May 2011, the IASB published IFRS 13, Fair Value Measurement, which is effective prospectively for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013. The extent of the impact of adoption of IFRS 13 has not yet been determined. • In June 2011, the IASB issued IAS 1, Presentation of Items of OCI: Amendments to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements. Amendments to IAS 1 are effective for the Company beginning on January 1, 2012 with retrospective application and early adoption permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of the amendments to this standard to have a material impact on its financial statements. • In May 2011, the IASB issued amendments to IAS 28, Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures, which are effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013 with early adoption permitted. The Company does not expect the amendments to IAS 28 to have a material impact on the financial statements. • In December 2011, the IASB published Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities and issued new disclosure requirements in IFRS 7, Financial Instruments: Disclosures. The amendments to IAS 32 clarify that if an entity currently has a legally enforceable right to set-off if that right is not contingent on a future event, and enforceable both in the normal course of business and in the event of default, insolvency or bankruptcy of the entity and all counterparties. The amendments to IAS 32 also clarify when a settlement mechanism provides for net settlement or gross settlement that is equivalent to net settlement. The amendments to IFRS 7 contain new disclosure requirements for financial assets and liabilities that are offset in the statement of financial position, or subject to master netting arrangements or similar arrangements. The effective date for the amendments to IAS 32 is annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2014. The effective date for the amendments to IFRS 7 is annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013. These amendments are to be applied retrospectively. The Company does not expect the amendments to have a material impact on the financial statements.BUSINESS RISKSThe profitability and operating cash flow of the Company is dependent on several factors: the quantity ofClaude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 37
  • 39. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 33 gold produced, related gold prices, foreign exchange, operating costs, capital expenditures, exploration levels and environmental, health and safety regulations. These and other risk factors listed below relate to the mining industry in general while others are specific to Claude. A complete list of risk factors is contained within the Company’s Annual Information Form. Whenever possible, the Company seeks to mitigate these risk factors. Inherent Exploration and Mining Risks The exploration for and development of mineral deposits involves significant risks, which even the combination of careful evaluation, experience and knowledge may not eliminate. It is impossible to guarantee that current or future exploration programs on existing mineral properties will establish reserves. The level of profitability of the Company in future years will depend mainly on gold prices, the cost of production at the Seabee Gold Operation and whether any of the Company’s exploration stage properties can be brought into production. Whether an ore body will continue to be commercially viable depends on a number of factors, some of which are the particular attributes of the deposit such as: size, grade and proximity to infrastructure; precious metal prices, which cannot be predicted and which have been highly volatile in the past; mining costs; and government regulations, including regulations relating to prices, taxes, royalties, land tenure, land use, importing and exporting of minerals, environmental protection and reclamation and closure obligations. The effect of these factors cannot be accurately predicted, but the combination of these factors may cause a mineral deposit that has been mined profitably in the past, such as the Seabee Mine, to become unprofitable. The Company is subject to the risks normally encountered in the mining industry, such as unusual or unexpected geological formations, cave-ins or flooding. The Company may become subject to liability for pollution, cave-ins or other hazards which it cannot insure against or which it may elect not to insure against. The development of gold and other mineral properties is affected by many factors, including the cost of operations, variations in the grade of ore, fluctuations in commodity markets, costs of processing equipment and other factors such as government regulations, including regulations relating to royalties, fluctuations in the U.S. dollar versus Canadian dollar exchange rate, importing and exporting of minerals and environmental protection. Gold Price Volatility The economics of developing gold properties is affected by many factors, including the cost of operations, variations in the grade of ore mined and the price of gold. Depending on the price of gold, the Company may determine that it is impractical to commence or continue commercial production. The price of gold has fluctuated in recent years. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the market price for gold ranged from a low of U.S. $1,319 to a high of U.S. $1,895, with an average price of U.S. $1,572. Any significant drop in the price of gold adversely impacts Claude’s revenues, profitability and cash flows. Also, sustained low gold prices can: 1. Reduce production revenues as a result of cutbacks caused by the cessation of mining operations involving deposits or portions of deposits that have become uneconomic at the prevailing price of gold; 2. Cause the cessation or deferral of new mining projects; 3. Decrease the amount of capital available for exploration activities; 4. Reduce existing reserves by removing ore from reserves that cannot be economically mined at prevailing prices; or, 5. Cause the write-off of an asset whose value is impaired by the low price of gold. Gold prices may fluctuate widely and are affected by numerous industry factors, such as demand for precious metals, forward selling by producers and central bank sales and purchases of gold. Moreover, gold prices are also affected by macro-economic factors such as expectations for inflation, interest rates, currency exchange rates and global or regional political and economic situations. The current demand for Claude Resources Inc.38 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 40. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 34and supply of gold affects gold prices, but not necessarily in the same manner as current demand andsupply affects the price of other commodities. The potential supply of gold consists of new mineproduction plus existing stocks of bullion and fabricated gold held by governments, financial institutions,industrial organizations and individuals. If gold prices remain at low market levels for a sustained period,the Company could determine that it is not economically feasible to continue mining operations orexploration activities.There can be no assurance that the price of gold will remain stable or that such price will be at a level thatwill prove feasible to continue the Company’s exploration activities, or if applicable, begin development ofits properties, commence commercial production or continuation of commercial production.Foreign Exchange RiskThe price of gold is denominated in U.S. dollars and, accordingly, Claude’s revenue from operations aredenominated and received in U.S. dollars. As a result, fluctuations in the U.S. dollar against the Canadiandollar could result in unanticipated changes in the Company’s financial results, which are reported inCanadian dollars. During the year ended December 31, 2011, CDN$/US$ exchange rate ranged from a lowof $0.9558 to a high of $1.0257, with an average of $0.9893.Access to FundingClaude’s ability to continue or expand its production, exploration and development activities depends inpart on its ability to generate revenue from its operations and / or to obtain financing through joint ventures,debt financing, equity financing, production sharing arrangements or other means.The failure of the Company to meet its ongoing obligations on a timely basis could result in the loss orsubstantial dilution of its interest in its properties. In addition, management estimates that approximately$18.0 million is the minimum annual expenditure required to fulfill the Company’s intended explorationand dewatering programs in 2012.At current gold prices and forecast production, Management believes operating cash flows will besufficient to fund the continued exploration on the Seabee, Amisk and Madsen Properties over the next 12months. In May 2013, the Company’s debenture matures at which point it is expected that operating cashflows combined with a debt or equity financing, should market conditions warrant, will provide sufficientfunding for 2013.Unfavourable Government Regulatory ChangesClaude’s exploration activities and mining operations are affected to varying degrees by governmentregulations that relate to mining operations, the acquisition of land, pollution control, environmentalprotection, safety, production and expropriation of property. Changes in these regulations or in theirapplication are beyond the control of the Company and may adversely affect its operations, business andresults of operations. Failure to comply with conditions set out in any permit or failure to comply withapplicable statutes and regulations may result in orders to cease or curtail operations or to install additionalequipment. The Company may be required to compensate those suffering loss or damage by reason of itsoperating or exploration activities.Currently, all of the Company’s properties are subject to the federal laws of Canada and, depending uponthe location of the Company’s properties, may be subject to provincial laws as well as local municipal laws.Mineral exploration and mining may be affected in varying degrees by government regulations relating tothe mining industry. Any changes in regulations or shifts in political conditions are beyond the control ofthe Company and may adversely affect its business.Operations may also be affected by government regulations with respect to price controls, export controls,foreign exchange controls, income taxes, expropriation of property, environmental legislation and mine safety.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 39
  • 41. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 35 Aboriginal rights, Title Claims and Duty to Consult Exploration, development and mining activities at the Company’s Saskatchewan and Ontario properties may affect established or potential treaty or Aboriginal rights, title or other claims held by Aboriginal groups, in these circumstances, First Nation and Métis, with related duty to consult issues. The Company is committed to effectively managing any impacts to such rights, title and claims and any resulting consultation requirements that may arise. However, there is no assurance that the Company will not face material adverse consequences because of the legal and factual uncertainties associated with these issues. Failure to Effectively Manage the Company’s Tailings Facilities could Negatively Impact Gold Production The Company’s Seabee Mill produces tailings. Managing these tailings is integral to gold production. The Seabee Operation’s East Lake and Triangle Lake tailings management facilities have the capacity to store tailings from milling ore from the Seabee Gold Operation’s Central Milling Facility until approximately 2016. The Company is currently in the process of planning TMF capacity beyond 2016. This will support the extension of Seabee’s mine life and provide additional tailings capacity to process ore from other potential sources such as Santoy 8 and Santoy Gap. If the Company does not receive regulatory approval for new or expanded tailings facilities, gold production could be constrained. Safety, Health and Environmental Risk Safety, health and environmental legislation affects nearly all aspect of the Company’s operations including exploration, mine development, working conditions, waste disposal, emission controls and protection of endangered and protected species. Compliance with safety, health and environmental legislation can require significant expenditures and failure to comply with such safety, health and environmental legislation may result in the imposition of fines and penalties, the temporary or permanent suspension of operations, clean-up costs resulting from contaminated properties, damages and the loss of important permits. Exposure to these liabilities arises not only from the Company’s existing operations, but from operations that have been closed or sold to third parties. Generally, the Company is required to reclaim properties after mining is completed and specific requirements vary among jurisdictions. In some cases, the Company may be required to provide financial assurances as security for reclamation costs, which may exceed the Company’s estimates for such costs. The Company could also be held liable for worker exposure to hazardous substances and for accidents causing injury or death. There can be no assurances that the Company will at all times be in compliance with all safety, health and environmental regulations or that steps to achieve compliance would not materially adversely affect the Company’s business. Safety, health and environmental laws and regulations are evolving in all jurisdictions where the Company has activities. The Company is not able to determine the specific impact that future changes in safety, health and environmental laws and regulations may have on its operations and activities, and its resulting financial position; however, the Company anticipates that capital expenditures and operating expenses will increase in the future as a result of the implementation of new and increasingly stringent safety, health and environment regulation. For example, emissions standards are poised to become increasingly stringent as are laws relating to the use and production of regulated chemical substances. Further changes in safety, health and environmental laws, new information on existing safety, health and environmental conditions or other events, including legal proceedings based upon such conditions or an inability to obtain necessary permits, may require increased financial reserves or compliance expenditures or otherwise have a material adverse effect on the Company. Environmental and regulatory review is a long and complex process that can delay the opening, modification or expansion of a mine, extend decommissioning at a closed mine, or restrict areas where exploration activities may take place. Claude Resources Inc.40 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 42. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 36Decommissioning and Reclamation ObligationsEnvironmental regulators are demanding more and more financial assurances so that the parties involved,and not the government, bear the costs of decommissioning and reclaiming sites. Decommissioning planshave been filed for the Seabee and Madsen properties. These plans are reviewed, as necessary, or at thetime of an amendment or renewal of an operating license. Regulators may conduct a further review of thedetailed decommissioning plans, and this can lead to additional requirements, costs and financialassurances. It is not possible to predict what level of decommissioning and reclamation and financialassurances regulators may require in the future.Ore Reserves and Ore Grade EstimatesClaude has assessed its Mineral Reserves and Mineral Resources, and while the Company believesthat the calculation methods used are appropriate, such calculations are estimates. As well, estimatesof Mineral Reserves and Mineral Resources are inherently imprecise and depend to some extent onstatistical inferences drawn from limited drilling, which may prove unreliable. The indicated level forthe recovery of gold or other minerals may not be realized. Market price fluctuations of commoditiesmay render reserves and deposits containing relatively lower grades of mineralization uneconomic.Moreover, short-term operating factors related to the mineral reserves, such as the need for orderlydevelopment of the deposits or the processing of new or different grades, may cause mining operationsto be unprofitable in any particular period.Personnel RiskMany of the projects undertaken by the Company rely on the availability of skilled labour and the capitaloutlays required to employ such labour. The Company employs full-time and part-time employees,contractors and consultants to assist in executing operations and providing technical guidance. In the eventof a skilled labour shortage, various projects of the Company may not become operational due to increasedcapital outlays associated with labour. Further, a skilled labour shortage could result in operational issuessuch as production shortfalls and higher mining costs.Shareholder DilutionAs of December 31, 2011, there were directors’, officers’ and key employees’ stock options outstanding topurchase 5,484,250 common shares and 2,716,200 share purchase warrants. These options and warrants, iffully exercised, would constitute approximately 4.7 percent of the Company’s resulting share capital. Theexercise of such options and the subsequent resale of such shares in the public market could adverselyaffect the prevailing share market price and the Company’s ability to raise equity capital in the future at atime and price which it deems appropriate. The Company may also enter into commitments in the futurewhich would require the issuance of additional common shares and the Company may grant additionalshare purchase warrants and stock options. Any share issuances from the Company’s treasury could resultin immediate dilution to existing shareholders.Industry CompetitionClaude’s business is intensely competitive. The Company competes with other mining companies, some ofwhich have greater resources and experience. Competition in the precious metals mining industry isprimarily for mineral-rich properties that can be developed and produced economically. There is alsocompetition for the technical expertise to find, develop and produce such properties, the labour to operatethem and the capital to finance their development.If the Company is unable to compete with other mining companies for these mineral deposits, it could havea material adverse effect on Claude’s results of operations and business.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 41
  • 43. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 37 Extreme and Persistent Weather Conditions The Company’s mining and exploration properties are all located in the northern portions of Saskatchewan and Ontario. Access to these properties and the ability to conduct work on them can be affected by adverse weather conditions. Adverse weather conditions can also increase the costs of both access and work on the Company’s properties. Title to Company Properties Acquisition of title to mineral properties is a very detailed and time-consuming process. Claude has investigated title to all of its mineral properties and has obtained title opinions with respect to its most significant properties. To the best of the Company’s knowledge, titles to all such properties are in good standing. For the Amisk and Madsen properties, Claude has searched title records for any and all encumbrances. For the Seabee properties, the Company has examined property search abstracts from Saskatchewan Energy and Resources as well as made inquiries and reviewed lease files from the Ministry. It has also received confirmation of title from Saskatchewan Environment. The title to the Company’s properties could be challenged or impugned. The properties may have been acquired in error from parties who did not possess transferable title, may be subject to prior unregistered agreements or transfers, and title may be affected by undetected defects. Insurance In the course of exploration, development and production of mineral properties, certain risks may occur, in particular, unexpected or unusual operating conditions such as rock bursts, cave-ins, fire, flooding and earthquakes. It is not always possible to fully insure against such risks and Claude may decide not to insure as a result of high premiums or other reasons. Should such liabilities arise, they could reduce or eliminate any future profitability and result in increased costs and a decline in the value of the Company. Flow-Through Securities Flow-through securities are securities of the Company which meet certain criteria and qualify for flow- through tax treatment for the purposes of the Income Tax Act (Canada) (“ITA”). Qualification as a “flow- through share” enables the Company to renounce certain eligible resource expenditures incurred by the Company for the benefit of any investor who is a Canadian taxpayer. Once issued, the shares are common shares of the Company and are not differentiated from shares which were not flow-through shares. Under the ITA, companies are permitted to issue flow-through shares pursuant to a written agreement under which the issuer agrees to incur certain eligible Canadian exploration expenses within the time frame specified in the agreement (generally 12 to 24 months) and to flow-through or “renounce” the related tax deduction to the investor. The proceeds from the issuance of flow-through shares must be expended on “qualifying expenditures,” which are related to mineral exploration in Canada. Evolving Corporate Governance and Public Disclosure Regulations that have Increased the Cost of Compliance and the Risk of Non-compliance The Company is subject to changing rules and regulations promulgated by a number of Canadian and U.S. governmental and self-regulating organizations, including the Canadian Securities Administrators, the Toronto Stock Exchange, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the NYSE Amex and the International Accounting Standards Board. These rules and regulations continue to evolve in scope and complexity making compliance more difficult and uncertain. Efforts to comply with new regulations have resulted, and are likely to continue to result in, increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of Management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. Claude Resources Inc.42 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 44. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 38Canadian Jurisdiction of the CompanyThe Company is incorporated under the laws of Canada. All of the Company’s directors and officers areresidents of Canada and all of the Company’s assets and its subsidiaries are located in Canada.Consequently, it may be difficult for U.S. investors to affect service of process in the U.S. upon theCompany’s directors or officers or to realize in the U.S. upon judgments of U.S. courts predicated uponcivil liabilities under the United States Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).A judgment of a U.S. court predicated solely upon such civil liabilities may be enforceable in Canada by aCanadian court if the U.S. court in which the judgment was obtained had jurisdiction, as determined by theCanadian court, in the matter. There is substantial doubt whether an original action could be broughtsuccessfully in Canada against any of such persons or the Company predicated solely upon such civilliabilities.Internal ControlsThe Company has invested resources to document and assess its system of internal controls over financialreporting and it is continuing its evaluation of such internal controls. Internal controls over financialreporting are procedures designed to provide reasonable assurance that transactions are properly authorized,assets are safeguarded against unauthorized or improper use, and transactions are properly recorded andreported. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, notabsolute, assurance with respect to the reliability of financial reporting and financial statement preparation.The Company is required to satisfy the requirement of Section 404 of the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002(the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), which requires an annual assessment by management of the effectiveness ofthe Company’s internal control over financial reporting and an attestation report by the Company’sindependent auditors addressing the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financialreporting.If the Company fails to maintain the adequacy of its internal control over financial reporting, as suchstandards are modified, supplemented, or amended from time to time, the Company may not be able toensure that it can conclude on an ongoing basis that it has effective internal controls over financialreporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The Company’s failure to satisfy therequirement of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act on an ongoing, timely basis could result in the lossof investor confidence in the reality of its financial statements, which in turn could harm the Company’sbusiness and negatively impact the trading price of its common shares. In addition, any failure toimplement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation, couldharm the Company’s operating results or cause it to fail to meet its reporting obligations.Although the Company intends to devote substantial time and incur substantial costs, as necessary, toensure ongoing compliance, the Company cannot be certain that it will be successful in complying withSection 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.LitigationAll industries, including the mining industry, are subject to legal claims, with and without merit. TheCompany is currently involved in litigation of a non-material nature and may become involved in legaldisputes in the future. Defence and settlement costs can be substantial, even with respect to claims thathave no merit. Due to the inherent uncertainty of the litigation process, there can be no assurance that theresolution of any particular legal proceedings will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’sfinancial position or results of operations.Conflicts of InterestCertain of the directors of the Company are also directors and officers of other companies engaged inmineral exploration and development and mineral property acquisitions. As such, situations may ariseClaude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 43
  • 45. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 39 where such directors are in a conflict of interest with the Company. The Company will resolve any actual conflicts of interest if and when the same arise in accordance with the Company’s Code of Ethics Policy. OUTSTANDING SHARE DATA The authorized share capital of the Company consists of an unlimited number of common shares and two classes of unlimited preferred shares issuable in series. At December 31, 2011, there were 164,630,231 common shares outstanding. This compares to 138,913,329 common shares outstanding at December 31, 2010. During 2011, the Company issued 235,614 and 648,667 common shares pursuant to the Company’s Employee Share Purchase Plan and the Company’s Stock Option plan, respectively. An additional 1,832,621 common share purchase warrants were exercised. Finally, an additional 23,000,000 common shares were issued upon the completion of a private placement. Subsequent to December 31, 2011, the Company issued 378,676 common shares pursuant to the Company’s Employee Share Purchase Plan and the Company’s Stock Option plan. An additional 8,701,255 shares were issued as consideration for Claude’s acquisition of St. Eugene. At March 30, 2012, there were 173,710,162 common shares of the Company issued and outstanding. OUTSTANDING STOCK OPTIONS AND WARRANTS At December 31, 2011, there were 5.5 million director, officer and key employee stock options outstanding with exercise prices ranging from $0.50 to $2.38 per share. This compares to 3.9 million director, officer and key employee stock options outstanding at December 31, 2010 with exercise prices ranging from $0.50 to $2.10 per share. This increase was mainly attributable to issuances to operations personnel, a human resources initiative to improve employee recruitment and retention. Table 21: Schedule of Outstanding Stock Options and Weighted Average Exercise Price December 31, 2011 December 31, 2010 Weighted Weighted Average Average Number Exercise Price Number Exercise Price Beginning of period 3,916,737 $ 1.15 3,259,028 $ 1.08 Options granted 2,478,768 2.06 1,166,546 1.15 Options exercised (648,667) 0.75 (422,414) 0.66 Options forfeited (241,876) 1.86 (79,756) 1.01 Options expired (20,712) 1.04 (6,667) 0.98 End of period 5,484,250 $1.57 3,916,737 $ 1.15 Claude Resources Inc.44 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 46. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 40 For options outstanding at December 31, 2011, the range of exercise prices, the number vested, the weighted average exercise price and the weighted average remaining contractual life are as follows: Table 22: Schedule of Outstanding Stock Options by Price Range Options Outstanding Options Exercisable Weighted Weighted Weighted Weighted Average Average Average Average Option Price Per Remaining Exercise Remaining Exercise Share Quantity Life Price Quantity Life Price $0.50 - $0.99 690,247 6.76 $0.79 690,247 6.76 $0.79 $1.00 - $1.50 1,552,442 6.74 $1.14 1,324,307 6.48 $1.15 $1.51 - $2.00 2,593,000 8.04 $1.86 1,252,000 6.52 $1.76 $2.01 - $2.38 648,561 8.88 $2.29 250,753 8.27 $2.24 5,484,250 7.61 $1.57 3,517,307 6.68 $1.37 At December 31, 2011, there were 2.7 million common share purchase warrants outstanding. Each common share purchase warrant entitles the holder to acquire one common share of the Company at prices determined at the time of issue. The range of exercise prices and dates of expiration of the warrants outstanding are as follows:Table 23: Schedule of Warrants Outstanding Number Number Exercise Outstanding at Outstanding at Price Expiry Date December 31, 2010 Exercised Expired December 31, 2011 $ 1.60 May 22, 2013 1,809,500 116,300 - 1,693,200 $ 0.83 April 9, 2011 139,321 139,321 - - $ 0.90 November 16, 2012 2,600,000 1,577,000 - 1,023,000 $ 1.75 December 30, 2011 6,000,000 - 6,000,000 - 10,548,821 1,832,621 6,000,000 2,716,200 NON-IFRS PERFORMANCE MEASURES The Company utilizes non-IFRS financial measures as supplemental indicators of operating performance and financial position. These non-IFRS financial measures are used internally by the Company for comparing actual results from one period to another. The Company believes that, in addition to conventional measures prepared in accordance with IFRS, certain investors use this information to evaluate the Company’s performance and ability to generate cash flow. Accordingly, such information is intended to provide additional information and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS. Cash Flow from Operations before Net Changes in Non-Cash Operating Working Capital The Company uses Cash Flow from Operations before Net Changes in Non-Cash Operating Working Capital as a supplemental measure of its financial performance. The Company uses this measure to analyze the cash generated by its operations. These measures are not necessarily indicative of operating profit or cash flow from operations as determined under IFRS. Investors are cautioned that the above measures may not be comparable to similarly titled measures of other companies. Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 45
  • 47. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 41 Table 24: Calculation of Cash Flow from Operations before Net Changes in Non-Cash Operating Working Capital December 31 December 31 2011 2010 Cash flows from operating activities Net profit $ 9,454 $ 10,313 Adjustments for non-cash items: Depreciation and depletion 11,407 11,329 Finance expense 361 265 Finance and other income (1,109) (1,485) (Gain) loss on investments (35) 207 Stock-based compensation 1,991 731 Write-down of mineral property 851 - Gain on sale of exploration property (1,131) - Gain on sale of discontinued operation - (1,133) Deferred income tax expense (recovery) 364 (424) Total Cash Flow from Operations before Net Changes in Non-Cash Operating Working Capital $ 22,153 $ 19,803 Weighted Average shares outstanding (basic) 156,062 131,193 Weighted Average shares outstanding (diluted) 158,410 133,411 Per share cash flows from operating activities $ 0.14 $ 0.15 (basic and diluted) Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization (EBITDA) The Company uses EBITDA as a supplemental financial measure of its operational performance. Management believes EBITDA to be an important measure of its capacity to generate cash flow from operations as it excludes the effects of items which primarily reflect the impact of long-term investment decisions and finance strategies, rather than the performance of the Company’s day-to-day operations. The Company measures EBITDA as profit from continuing operations, plus income taxes, interest expense, and depreciation and depletion. The Company believes that this measurement is useful in measuring the Company’s ability to service debt, meet other payment obligations and as a valuation measurement. The following table provides a reconciliation of the Company’s calculation of EBITDA: Table 25: EBITDA Calculation For the years ended December 31 December 31 2011 2010 Net profit from continuing operations $ 9,454 $ 8,762 Deferred income tax expense (recovery) 364 (424) Interest and other (1) 1,428 32 Depreciation and depletion 11,407 11,329 EBITDA $ 22,653 $ 19,699 Weighted Average shares outstanding (basic) 156,062 131,193 Weighted Average shares outstanding (diluted) 158,410 133,411 EBITDA per share (basic) $ 0.15 $ 0.15 EBITDA per share (diluted) $ 0.14 $ 0.15 (1) Interest and other is the sum of “Finance expense” and “Finance and other income”. Claude Resources Inc.46 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 48. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 42Table 26: EBITDA CalculationFor the three months ended December 31 December 31 2011 2010Net profit from continuing operations $ (202) $ 4,137Deferred income tax expense (recovery) 364 (424)Interest and other (1) 92 494Depreciation and depletion 3,944 2,514EBITDA $ 4,198 $ 6,721Weighted Average shares outstanding (basic) 164,351 136,081Weighted Average shares outstanding (diluted) 166,003 139,257EBITDA per share (basic and diluted) $ 0.03 $ 0.05(1) Interest and other is the sum of “Finance expense” and “Finance and other income”.As compared to profit (loss) according to IFRS, EBITDA is limited in that it does not reflect the periodiccosts of certain capitalized assets used in generating revenues, income taxes, gain on sale of long-terminvestments or interest and other. Management evaluates such items through other financial measures suchas capital expenditures and cash flow provided by operating activities.Cash Cost Per OunceThe Company reports its cash costs on a per-ounce basis, based on uniform standards developed by theGold Institute, an independent researcher and evaluator of the gold market and gold industry. Managementuses this measure to analyze the profitability, compared to average realized gold prices, of the Seabee GoldOperation. Investors are cautioned that the above measures may not be comparable to similarly titledmeasures of other companies, should these companies not follow Gold Institute standards.Table 27: Total Cash Cost per Gold Ounce Sold December 31 December 31 2011 2010Production cost (CDN$) $ 40,542 $ 31,217Divided by ounces sold (1) 44,632 44,003Total cash cost per ounce (CDN$) $ 908 $ 709CDN$ Exchange Rate $ 0.9893 $ 1.0300Total cash cost per ounce (US$) $ 918 $ 688 (1) 2010 statistics exclude ounces sold from Santoy 8 as that project had not yet been declared in commercial production.Net Cash MarginThe Company uses net cash margin, which represents realized price per ounce less net cash costs perounce. This measure is used by Management to analyze profitability trends and to assess the cash-generating capability from the sale of gold on a consolidated basis in each reporting period, expressed on aunit basis. Management believes that this measurement illustrates the performance of the Company’sbusiness on a consolidated basis and enables investors to better understand Claude’s performance incomparison to other gold producers who present results on a similar basis and is an important indicator ofexpected performance in future periods.The Company’s net cash margin is intended to provide additional information, does not have anystandardized meaning prescribed by IFRS and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute formeasures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS. This measure is not necessarily indicative ofoperating profit or cash flow from operations as determined under IFRS. Other companies may calculateClaude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 47
  • 49. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 43 net cash margin differently. This non-IFRS measure is calculated from realized gold price per ounce and total cash costs per ounce, as determined in the net cash cost reconciliation. Net cash margin could also be derived from realized price per ounce and net cash costs per ounce. DISCLOSURE CONTROLS AND INTERNAL CONTROLS OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING As at December 31, 2011, we evaluated our disclosure controls and procedures as defined in the rules of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and the Canadian Securities Administrators. This evaluation was carried out under the supervision and participation of Management, including the President and Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer. Based on that evaluation, the President and Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the design and operation of these disclosure controls and procedures were effective. Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting, no matter how well designed, has inherent limitations and can only provide reasonable assurance with respect to the preparation and fair presentation of published financial statements. Under the supervision and with the participation of the President and Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, management conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this evaluation, the President and Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer concluded that internal control over financial reporting is effective as at December 31, 2011. The Company’s independent auditor, KPMG LLP, has issued an audit report stating that the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2011 based on the criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations (“COSO”). We have assessed the impact of the IFRS transition on our internal control over financial reporting and on our disclosure controls and procedures. Changes in accounting policies or business processes may require additional controls or procedures to ensure the integrity of our financial disclosures. The transition to IFRS has not required any changes in our internal controls over financial reporting or our disclosure controls and procedures that have materially affected them or are reasonably likely to materially affect them. No significant changes were made in our internal controls over financial reporting during the year ended December 31, 2011 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting. CAUTIONARY NOTE TO U.S. INVESTORS CONCERNING RESOURCE ESTIMATES Resource Estimates The resource estimates in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis were prepared in accordance with National Instrument 43-101, adopted by the Canadian Securities Administrators. The requirements of National Instrument 43-101 differ significantly from the requirements of the SEC. In this Management’s Discussion and Analysis, the Company uses certain terms such as “measured”, “indicated” and “inferred” resources. Although these terms are recognized and required in Canada, the SEC does not recognize them. The SEC permits U.S. mining companies, in their filings with the SEC, to disclose only those mineral deposits that constitute “reserves”. Under U.S. standards, mineralization may not be classified as a reserve unless the determination has been made that the mineralization could be economically and legally extracted at the time the determination is made. U.S. investors should not assume that all or any portion of a measured or indicated resource will ever be converted into “reserves”. Further, “inferred resources” have a great amount of uncertainty as to their existence and whether they can be mined economically or legally, and U.S. investors should not assume that “inferred resources” exist or can be legally or economically mined, or that they will ever be upgraded to a more certain category. Claude Resources Inc.48 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 50. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 44Compliance with Canadian Securities RegulationsThis quarterly report is intended to comply with the requirements of the Toronto Stock Exchange andapplicable Canadian securities legislation, which differ in certain respects from the rules and regulationspromulgated under the United States Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (“Exchange Act”), aspromulgated by the SEC.U.S. investors are urged to consider the disclosure in our Annual Report on Form 40-F, File No. 001-31956, as filed with the SEC under the Exchange Act, which may be obtained from the Company (withoutcost) or from the SEC’s Web site: http://sec.gov/edgar.shtml.CAUTION REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATIONAll statements, other than statements of historical fact, contained or incorporated by reference in thisMD&A and constitute “forward-looking information” within the meaning of applicable Canadiansecurities laws and “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the United States Private SecuritiesLitigation Reform Act of 1995 (referred to herein as “forward-looking statements”). Forward-lookingstatements include, but are not limited to, statements with respect to the future price of gold, the estimationof mineral reserves and resources, the realization of mineral reserve estimates, the timing and amount ofestimated future production, costs of production, capital expenditures, costs and timing of the developmentof new deposits, success of exploration activities, permitting time lines, currency exchange ratefluctuations, requirements for additional capital, government regulation of mining operations,environmental risks, unanticipated reclamation expenses, title disputes or claims and limitations oninsurance coverage. Generally, these forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “plans”, “expects” or “does not expect”, “is expected”, “budget”, “scheduled”,“estimates”, “forecasts”, “intends”, “anticipates” or “does not anticipate” or “believes”, or the negativeconnotation thereof or variations of such words and phrases or state that certain actions, events or results,“may”, “could”, “would”, “might” or “will be taken”, “occur” or “be achieved” or the negative connotationthereof.All forward-looking statements are based on various assumptions, including, without limitation, theexpectations and beliefs of management, the assumed long-term price of gold, that the Company willreceive required permits and access to surface rights, that the Company can access financing, appropriateequipment and sufficient labour, and that the political environment within Canada will continue to supportthe development of mining projects in Canada.Forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors thatmay cause the actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements of Claude to be materiallydifferent from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements, including but not limited to:actual results of current exploration activities; environmental risks; future prices of gold; possible variationsin ore reserves, grade or recovery rates; mine development and operating risks; accidents, labour issues andother risks of the mining industry; delays in obtaining government approvals or financing or in thecompletion of development or construction activities; and other risks and uncertainties, including but notlimited to those discussed in the section entitled “Business Risk” in this MD&A. These risks anduncertainties are not, and should not be construed as being, exhaustive.Although Claude has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differmaterially from those contained in forward-looking statements, there may be other factors that cause resultsnot to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. There can be no assurance that such statements will proveto be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in suchstatements. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements.Forward-looking statements in this MD&A are made as of the date of this MD&A, being March 30, 2012and, accordingly, are subject to change after such date. Except as otherwise indicated by Claude, thesestatements do not reflect the potential impact of any non-recurring or other special items that may occurafter the date hereof. Forward-looking statements are provided for the purpose of providing informationClaude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 49
  • 51. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 45 about management’s current expectations and plans and allowing investors and others to get a better understanding of our operating environment. Claude does not undertake to update any forward-looking statements that are incorporated by reference herein, except in accordance with applicable securities laws. The forward-looking statements contained in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis are expressly qualified by these cautionary statements. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Additional information related to the Company, including its Annual Information Form (Form 40-F in the U.S.), is available on Canadian (www.sedar.com) and U.S. (www.sec.gov) securities regulatory authorities’ websites. Certain documents are also available on the Company’s website at www.clauderesources.com. Claude Resources Inc.50 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 52. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 46CONVERSION MULTIPLESFor ease of reference, the following factors for converting metric measurements into imperial equivalentsare provided:To Convert from Metric To Imperial Multiply Metric Units byMetres Feet (ft.) 3.281Kilometres (km) Miles 0.621Tonnes Tons (2,000 pounds) 1.102Grams Troy Ounces 0.032Hectares Acres 2.471GLOSSARY OF FINANCIAL TERMSCurrent ratio = (current asset / current liabilities)EBITDA = earnings (net profit or loss) before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortizationDebt to capital = (total debt – cash and cash equivalents) / (total debt – cash and cash equivalents + totalshareholders’ equity)Working capital = (current asset – current liabilities)GLOSSARY OF TECHNICAL TERMSAlteration – any change in the mineral composition of a rock brought about by physical or chemicalmeans.Assaying - laboratory examination that determines the content or proportion of a specific metal (i.e.: silver)contained within a sample. Technique usually involves firing/smelting.Au Eq (“gold equivalent”) – a measure of contained metal expressed in equivalent gold grade.Biotite – a widely distributed and important rock-forming mineral of the mica group.Brecciated – broken into sharp-angled fragments surrounded by finer-grained material.Bulk Sample – a collection of representative mineralized material whose location, geologic character andmetal assay content can be determined and then used for metallurgical or geotechnical testing purposes.Chalcopyrite - a sulphide mineral of copper and iron.Chlorite – a group of platy, monoclinic, usually greenish minerals.Chloritic alteration – the replacement by, conversion into, or introduction of chlorite into a rock.Core Samples - the cylindrical form of rock called “core” that is extracted from a diamond drill hole.Mineralized sections are separated and these samples are sent to a laboratory for analysis.Cross-cut - a horizontal opening driven from a shaft or haulage drift at an oblique or right angle to thestrike of a vein or other orebody.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 51
  • 53. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 47 Cut-off Grade - the lowest grade of mineralized material that qualifies as a reserve in a deposit (i.e.: contributing material of the lowest assay that is included in a reserve estimate). Diamond Drilling – a type of rotary drilling in which diamond bits are used as the rock-cutting tool to produce a recoverable drill core sample of rock for observation and analysis. Dip – the angle that a structural surface, a bedding or fault plane makes with the horizontal, measured perpendicular to the strike of the structure. Dore – the final saleable product from a gold mine. Drift - a horizontal underground opening that follows along the length of a vein or rock formation. Duty to Consult - governments in Canada may have a duty to consult with and potentially accommodate Aboriginal groups prior to making decisions which may impact lands and resources subject to established or potential treaty or Aboriginal rights, title or other claims. These governments, in turn, may delegate procedural aspects of this duty to industry. Exploration – work involved in searching for ore, from prospecting to diamond drilling or driving a drift. Fault – a fracture or break in rock along which there has been movement. Feasibility Study – a comprehensive technical and economic study of the selected development option for a mineral project that includes appropriately detailed assessments of realistically assumed mining, processing, metallurgical, economic, marketing, legal, environmental, social and governmental considerations together with any other relevant operational factors and detailed financial analysis, that are necessary to demonstrate at the time of reporting that extraction is reasonably justified (economically mineable). The results of the study may reasonably serve as the basis for a final decision by a proponent or financial institution to proceed with, or finance, the development of the project. The confidence level of the study will be higher than that of a Prefeasibility Study. Fire Assay - the assaying of metallic minerals by use of a miniature smelting procedure with various agents. Footwall - the rock on the underside of a vein or ore structure. Fracture – a break or crack in rock. Geophysical Survey - a scientific method of prospecting that measures the physical properties of rock formations. Common properties investigated include magnetism, specific gravity, electrical conductivity and radioactivity. Grade – the metal content of rock with precious metals, grade can be expressed as troy ounces or grams per tonne of rock. Gram metre – a measure of contained gold within a given interval calculated as the product of grams per tonne of gold intercepted over length of core. Granitoid – a light-coloured, plutonic rock with quartz between 20 and 60 percent. Head Grade – the average grade of ore fed into a mill. Hydrothermal – the products or the actions of heated waters in a rock mass such as a mineral deposit precipitating from a hot solution. Igneous – a primary type of rock formed by the cooling of molten material. Claude Resources Inc.52 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 54. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 48Indicated Mineral Resource – is that part of a Mineral Resource for which quantity, grade or quality,densities, shape and physical characteristics, can be estimated with a level of confidence sufficient to allow theappropriate application of technical and economic parameters, to support mine planning and evaluation of theeconomic viability of the deposit. The estimate is based on detailed and reliable exploration and testinginformation gathered through appropriate techniques from locations such as outcrops, trenches, pits, workingsand drill holes that are spaced closely enough for geological and grade continuity to be reasonably assumed.Inferred Mineral Resource – is that part of a Mineral Resource for which quantity and grade or quality canbe estimated on the basis of geological evidence and limited sampling and reasonably assumed, but notverified, geological and grade continuity. The estimate is based on limited information and sampling gatheredthrough appropriate techniques from locations such as outcrops, trenches, pits, workings and drill holes.Lens - a body of ore that is thick in the middle and tapers towards the ends.Lithostructural – an assemblage of rocks that is unified on the basis of structural and lithological features.Mafic - igneous rocks composed mostly of dark, iron and magnesium-rich minerals.Measured Mineral Resource - is that part of a Mineral Resource for which quantity, grade or quality,densities, shape, and physical characteristics are so well established that they can be estimated withconfidence sufficient to allow the appropriate application of technical and economic parameters, to supportproduction planning and evaluation of the economic viability of the deposit. The estimate is based ondetailed and reliable exploration, sampling and testing information gathered through appropriate techniquesfrom locations such as outcrops, trenches, pits, workings and drill holes that are spaced closely enough toconfirm both geological and grade continuity.Metallurgy – the study of the extractive processes which produce minerals from their host rocks.Mill - A processing facility where ore is finely ground and thereafter undergoes physical or chemicaltreatment to extract the valuable metals.Mineral – a naturally formed chemical element or compound having a definitive chemical composition andusually a characteristic crystal form.Mineralization – a natural concentration in rocks or soil of one or more minerals.Mineral Reserve – the economically mineable part of a Measured or Indicated Mineral Resourcedemonstrated by at least a Prefeasibility Study. This study must include adequate information on mining,processing, metallurgical, economic and other relevant factors that demonstrate, at the time of reporting,that economic extraction can be justified. A Mineral Reserve includes diluting materials and allowancesfor losses that may occur when material is mined.Mineral Resource – a concentration or occurrence of natural, solid, inorganic, or fossilized organicmaterial in or on the Earth’s crust in such form and quantity and of such a grade or quality that it hasreasonable prospects for economic extraction. The location, quantity, grade, geological characteristics, andcontinuity of a Mineral Resource are known, estimated or interpreted from specific geological evidence andknowledge.Muck - ore or rock that has been broken by blasting.Ounces - Troy ounces of a fineness of 999.9 parts per 1,000 parts.Ore - Rock, generally containing metallic or non-metallic minerals, which can be mined and processed at aprofit.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 53
  • 55. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis (in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 49 Ore Body - A sufficiently large amount of ore that can be mined economically. Plunge - the vertical angle a linear geological feature makes with the horizontal plane. Porphyry - any igneous rock in which relatively large crystals are set in a fine-grained groundmass. Prefeasibility Study – a comprehensive study of the viability of a mineral project that has advanced to a stage where the mining method, in the case of underground mining, or the pit configuration, in the case of an open pit, has been established, and where an effective method of mineral processing has been determined. This study must include a financial analysis based on reasonable assumptions of technical engineering, operating, and economic factors, which are sufficient for a Qualified Person acting reasonably, to determine if all or part of the Mineral Resource may be classified as a Mineral Reserve. Probable Mineral Reserve – the economically mineable part of an Indicated, and in some circumstances, a Measured Mineral Resource, demonstrated by at least a Prefeasibility Study. This study must include adequate information on mining, processing, metallurgical, economic and other relevant factors that demonstrate, at the time of reporting, that economic extraction can be justified. Proven Mineral Reserve – the economically mineable part of a Measured Mineral Resource demonstrated by at least a Prefeasibility Study. This study must include adequate information on mining, processing, metallurgical, economic and other relevant factors that demonstrate, at the time of reporting, that economic extraction is justified. Pulp - a mixture of ground ore and water. Pyrite - an iron sulphide mineral (FeS2), the most common naturally occurring sulphide mineral. Pyrrhotite - a bronze-colored, often magnetic iron sulphide mineral. Qualified Person – an individual who is an engineer or geoscientist with at least five (5) years of experience in mineral exploration, mine development, mine operation, project assessment or any combination of these; has experience relevant to the subject matter of the mineral project and technical report; and is a member in good standing of a professional association. Quartz – crystalline silica; often forming veins in fractures and faults within older rocks. Raise - a vertical or inclined underground working that has been excavated from the bottom upward. Sericite – a fine-grained potassium mica found in various metamorphic rocks. Shear Zone - a zone in which shearing has occurred on a large scale so that the rock is crushed and brecciated. Showing - surface occurrence of mineral. Shrinkage Stoping – any mining method in which broken ore is temporarily retained in the stope to provide a working platform and/or to offer temporary support to the stope walls during active mining. Sill - an intrusive sheet of igneous rock of roughly uniform thickness that has been forced between the bedding planes of existing rock; the initial horizontal drift along the strike of the ore vein. Specific Gravity - the ratio between the weight of a unit volume of a substance and that of a unit volume of water. Claude Resources Inc.54 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 56. 2011 Annual Management’s Discussion and Analysis(in thousands of CDN dollars, except as otherwise noted) Page 50Stope - an underground excavation from which ore has been extracted, either above or below a level. Accessto stopes is usually by way of adjacent raises.Stratigraphy – the sequence of bedded rocks in a particular area.Tailings - Tailings consist of ground rock and process effluents that are generated in a mine processing plantor mill. Mechanical and chemical processes are used to extract gold from mine ore and produce a wastestream known as tailings. This process of product extraction is never 100 percent efficient, nor is it possible toreclaim all reusable and expended processing reagents and chemicals. The unrecoverable and uneconomicmetals, minerals, chemicals, organics and process water are discharged, normally as slurry, to a final storagearea commonly known as a Tailings Management Facility (TMF) or Tailings Storage Facility (TSF).Till - is unsorted glacial sediment. Its content may vary from clays to mixtures of clay, sand, gravel andboulders. This material is typically derived from the subglacial erosion and incorporated by the moving ice ofthe glaciers of previously available unconsolidated sediments.Tonne – a metric ton or 2,204 pounds.Trenching - the process of exploration by which till is removed from a trench cut from the earth’s surface.Vein – a thin, sheet-like, cross-cutting body of hydrothermal mineralization, principally quartz.Waste – barren rock in a mine, or mineralized material that is too low in grade to be mined and milled at aprofit.Working interest or WI - means the interest held by Claude in property. This interest normally bears itsproportionate share of capital and operating costs as well as royalties or other production burdens. Theworking interest percentage is expressed before royalty interests.Claude Resources Inc. Annual Report 2011 55
  • 57. MANAGEMENT’S RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The accompanying consolidated financial statements of Claude Resources Inc. are the responsibility of Management and have been approved by the Board of Directors. The consolidated financial statements have been prepared by Management in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”). The consolidated financial statements include amounts that are based on estimates and judgments. Financial information used elsewhere in the annual report is consistent with that in the financial statements. The Management of the Company, in furtherance of the integrity and objectivity of data in the financial statements, has developed and maintains a system of internal accounting controls. These internal accounting controls provide reasonable assurance that financial records are reliable, form a proper basis for preparation of financial statements and that assets are properly accounted for and safeguarded. The internal accounting control process includes Management’s communication to employees of policies which govern ethical business conduct. The Board of Directors carries out its responsibility for the consolidated financial statements in this annual report principally through its audit committee, consisting of independent directors. The audit committee reviews the Company’s annual consolidated financial statements and recommends their approval to the Board of Directors. The shareholders’ auditors have full access to the audit committee, with and without Management being present. These consolidated financial statements have been examined by the shareholders’ auditors, KPMG LLP, Chartered Accountants, in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Neil McMillan Rick Johnson, C.A. President and Vice President Finance and Chief Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer Saskatoon, Canada March 30, 201256 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 58. KPMG LLP Telephone (306) 934-6200 Chartered Accountants Fax (306) 934-6233 600-128 4th Avenue South Internet www.kpmg.ca Saskatoon Saskatchewan S7K 1M8 CanadaREPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRMTo the Shareholders of Claude Resources Inc.We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial statements of Claude Resources Inc., whichcomprise the consolidated statements of financial position as at December 31, 2011, December 31, 2010and January 1, 2010, the consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, shareholders’ equityand cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, and notes, comprising asummary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information.Management’s responsibility for the consolidated financial statementsManagement is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these consolidated financialstatements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the InternationalAccounting Standards Board, and for such internal control as management determines is necessary toenable the preparation of consolidated financial statements that are free from material misstatement,whether due to fraud or error.Auditors’ responsibilityOur responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.We conducted our audits in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards and thestandards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards requirethat we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assuranceabout whether the consolidated financial statements are free from material misstatement.An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in theconsolidated financial statements. The procedures selected depend on our judgment, including theassessment of the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due tofraud or error. In making those risk assessments, we consider internal control relevant to the entity’spreparation and fair presentation of the consolidated financial statements in order to design auditprocedures that are appropriate in the circumstances. An audit also includes evaluating theappropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made bymanagement, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements.We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained in our audits is sufficient and appropriate to provide abasis for our audit opinion.OpinionIn our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidatedfinancial position of Claude Resources Inc. as at December 31, 2011, December 31, 2010 and January 1,2010, and its consolidated financial performance and its consolidated cash flows for the years endedDecember 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 in accordance with International Financial ReportingStandards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board. KPMG LLP, is a Canadian limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. KPMG Canada provides services to KPMG LLP. Page 52 Annual Report 2011 57
  • 59. Other Matter We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Claude Resources Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2011, based on the criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), and our report dated March 30, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion on the effectiveness of Claude Resources Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting. Chartered Accountants Saskatoon, Canada March 30, 2012 Page 5358 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 60. Consolidated Statements of Financial Position(In Thousands of Canadian Dollars) DECEMBER 31 DECEMBER 31 JANUARY 1 2011 2010 2010 Note (Note 26) (Note 26)AssetsCash and cash equivalents $ 2,529 $ 6,401 $ 11,948Restricted cash 5 - 4,389 -Short-term investments 6 33,168 - -Accounts receivable 2,714 2,716 4,806Inventories 7 13,366 9,283 11,448Prepaid expenses and deposits 227 496 327Assets related to discontinued operation 9 - - 4,968Current assets 52,004 23,285 33,497Mineral properties 8 149,794 106,479 81,173Deferred income tax asset 20 998 - -Investments 10 2,854 4,328 643Deposits for reclamation costs 11 2,237 2,277 2,277Non-current assets 155,883 113,084 84,093Total assets $ 207,887 $ 136,369 $ 117,590LiabilitiesAccounts payable and accrued liabilities $ 5,737 $ 4,779 $ 3,928Loans and borrowings 13 3,015 13,441 6,625Liabilities related to discontinued operation 9 - - 532Net royalty obligation 12 854 815 766Current liabilities 9,606 19,035 11,851Loans and borrowings 13 11,238 873 10,432Net royalty obligation 12 4,435 5,583 6,517Decommissioning and reclamation 11 9,713 4,810 3,534Non-current liabilities 25,386 11,266 20,483Shareholders equityShare capital 14 180,531 122,751 115,459Contributed surplus 4,796 3,089 2,601Accumulated deficit (13,071) (22,525) (32,838)Accumulated other comprehensive income 639 2,753 34Total shareholders equity 172,895 106,068 85,256Total liabilities and shareholders equity $ 207,887 $ 136,369 $ 117,590Subsequent event 25See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.On behalf of the Board:Ted J. Nieman Ronald J. Hicks, CAChairman Chairman, Audit Committee Page 54 Annual Report 2011 59
  • 61. Consolidated Statements of Income (In Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts) DECEMBER 31 2011 2010 Note (Note 26) Revenue $ 69,659 $ 55,998 Mine Operating: Production costs 40,542 31,217 Depreciation and depletion 11,407 11,329 51,949 42,546 Profit from mining operations 17,710 13,452 General and administrative 6,779 4,875 Finance expense 15 3,051 1,611 Finance and other income 16 (1,623) (1,579) Write-down of exploration property 8 851 - (Gain) on sale of exploration property 10 (1,131) - (Gain) loss on investments (35) 207 7,892 5,114 Profit from continuing operations before income tax 9,818 8,338 Deferred income tax expense (recovery) 20 364 (424) Profit from continuing operations 9,454 8,762 Profit from discontinued operation 9 - 1,551 Net profit $ 9,454 $ 10,313 Net earnings per share 21 Basic and diluted From continuing operations $ 0.06 $ 0.06 Net earnings $ 0.06 $ 0.08 Basic 156,062 131,193 Diluted 158,410 133,411 See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements. Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (In Thousands of Canadian Dollars) DECEMBER 31 2011 2010 (Note 26) Net profit $ 9,454 $ 10,313 Other comprehensive income (loss) Loss (gain) on available-for-sale securities transferred to profit, net of tax 20 (30) 179 Unrealized gain (loss) on available-for-sale securities, net of tax 20 (2,084) 2,540 Other comprehensive income (loss) (2,114) 2,719 Total comprehensive income $ 7,340 $ 13,032 See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements. Page 5560 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 62. Consolidated Statements of Shareholders Equity(In Thousands of Canadian Dollars) DECEMBER 31 2011 2010 (Note 26)Share Capital Balance, beginning of year $ 122,751 $ 115,459 Common shares and warrants issued 57,496 7,049 Transfers from contributed surplus 284 243 Balance, end of year $ 180,531 $ 122,751Contributed Surplus Balance, beginning of year $ 3,089 $ 2,601 Stock-based compensation 1,991 731 Transfers to share capital (284) (243) Balance, end of year $ 4,796 $ 3,089Accumulated Deficit Balance, beginning of year $ (22,525) $ (32,838) Net profit 9,454 10,313 Balance, end of year $ (13,071) $ (22,525)Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) Balance, beginning of year $ 2,753 $ 34 Other comprehensive income (loss) (2,114) 2,719 Balance, end of year $ 639 $ 2,753Shareholders equity, end of year $ 172,895 $ 106,068See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements. Page 56 Annual Report 2011 61
  • 63. Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (In Thousands of Canadian Dollars) DECEMBER 31 2011 2010 Note (Note 26) Cash flows from (used in) operating activities Net profit $ 9,454 $ 10,313 Adjustments for non-cash items: Depreciation and depletion 11,407 11,329 Finance expense 361 265 Finance and other income (1,109) (1,485) (Gain) loss on investments 10 (35) 207 Stock-based compensation 1,991 731 Write-down of exploration property 8 851 - Gain on sale of exploration property 10 (1,131) - Gain on sale of discontinued operation 9 - (1,133) Deferred income tax expense (recovery) 20 364 (424) Net changes in non-cash operating working capital: Accounts receivable 2 2,660 Inventories (3,748) 985 Prepaid expenses and deposits 269 (169) Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 958 1,064 Cash provided by operating activities 19,634 24,343 Cash flows from investing activities: Additions to mineral properties (51,172) (34,886) Proceeds on disposition of discontinued operation - 6,006 Additions to discontinued operation - (220) Reclamation deposits 40 - Restricted cash 4,389 (4,389) Increase in investments (32,972) (51) Cash used in investing activities (79,715) (33,540) Cash flows from financing activities: Proceeds from issue of common shares and warrants, net of issue costs 56,464 6,688 Debenture redemption (87) - Demand loan repayments (1,603) (2,087) Obligations under finance leases: Proceeds 4,077 1,819 Repayments (2,642) (2,770) Cash from financing activities 56,209 3,650 Decrease in cash and cash equivalents (3,872) (5,547) Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year 6,401 11,948 Cash and cash equivalents, end of year $ 2,529 $ 6,401 See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements. Page 5762 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
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  • 65. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted Decommissioning and Reclamation The Company’s mining and exploration activities are subject to various environmental laws and regulations. The Company estimates environmental obligations based on the current legal and constructive requirements. The Company provides for the closure, reclamation and decommissioning of its operating and development sites based on the estimated future costs using information available at the reporting date. Provision is made, based on net present values, for decommissioning and land restoration costs as soon as the obligation arises. Ore Reserve and Resource Estimates Ore reserves are estimates of the amount of ore that can be economically extracted from the Company’s mining properties. Estimating the quantities and grades of the reserves and resources requires the size, shape and depth of the ore bodies to be determined by analyzing geological data such as the logging and assaying of drill samples. This process may require complex and difficult geological judgments and calculations to interpret the data. The estimation of recoverable reserves is based upon factors such as estimates of foreign exchange rates, commodity prices, future capital requirements and production costs along with geological assumptions and judgments made in estimating the size and grade of the ore body. Because the economic assumptions used to estimate the gold mineral reserves and resources change from year to year, and because additional geological data is generated during the course of operations, estimates of the mineral reserves and resources may change from year to year. Changes in the reserve or resource estimates may impact upon the carrying value of exploration and evaluation assets, mine properties, property, plant and equipment, decommissioning and reclamation, recognition of deferred tax balances and depreciation and amortization charges. At the end of each financial year, the Company updates its estimate of proven and probable gold mineral reserves and resources. Depreciation of the Company’s mining assets, included within the Mineral properties line item on the Statement of Financial Position, is prospectively adjusted, based on these changes. The Company also monitors the accuracy of the estimate during the periods between annual updates for significant changes to economic assumptions and geological data that could require an interim update to the estimate. Exploration and Evaluation Expenditures The application of the Company’s accounting policy for exploration and evaluation expenditures requires judgment in determining whether future economic benefits are likely either from future extraction or sale or where activities have not reached a stage which permits a reasonable assessment of the existence of mineral reserves. The determination of a mineral resource is itself an estimation process that requires varying degrees of uncertainty depending on sub- classification and these estimates directly impact the decision to continue the deferral of exploration and evaluation expenditures. The accounting policy requires management to make certain estimates and assumptions about future events or circumstances, in particular whether an economically viable extraction operation can be established. Estimates and assumptions made may change if new information becomes available. If, after an expenditure is capitalized, information becomes available suggesting that the recovery of this expenditure is unlikely, the amount capitalized is written off in the statement of comprehensive income in the period when the new information becomes available. Impairment At the end of each reporting period, the Company assesses whether any indication of impairment exist. Where an indicator of impairment exists, an estimate of the recoverable amount is made. Determining the recoverable amount requires the use of estimates and assumptions such as long-term commodity prices, discount rates, future capital requirements, exploration potential and operating performance. Changes in circumstances may affect these estimates and the recoverable amount. Fair value for mineral properties is generally determined as the present value of estimated future cash flows arising from the continued use of the assets, which includes estimates such as the cost of future expansion plans and eventual disposal, using assumptions that an independent market participant would take into account. Cash flows are discounted to their present value using a post-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. Page 5964 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 66. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise notedProduction Start DateThe Company assesses the stage of each mine under construction to determine when a mine moves into commercialproduction. The criteria used to assess the start date of commercial production are based on the unique nature of eachmine construction project, such as the complexity of the geology and its location. The Company considers variousrelevant criteria to assess when the mine construction phase is substantially complete and the mine is ready for itsintended use. At this point, deferred costs are reclassified from “Mines under construction” to “Producing mines” and“Property, plant and equipment”. Some of the criteria will include, but are not limited, to the following: • Completion of a reasonable period of testing of the mine plant and equipment; • Ability to produce precious metal in saleable form; • Ability to sustain certain levels of ongoing production of precious metals; and • Production attaining a reasonable percentage of Mine Plan for a specified period of time.When a mine enters the production stage, the capitalization of certain construction costs ceases and costs are eitherregarded as inventory or operating expense, except for new capital costs which are capitalized. Depreciation anddepletion commences at this time.TaxationEstimation of deferred taxes includes judgments based on expected performance of the Company. Various factors areconsidered to assess taxes, including past operating results, operational plan, expiration of tax losses and tax poolscarried forward and tax planning strategies.3. Significant Accounting Policies:This summary of significant accounting policies is a description of the accounting methods and practices that have beenused in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements. The accounting policies set out below have beenapplied consistently to all periods presented in these consolidated financial statements and in preparing the openingIFRS statement of financial position at January 1, 2010 for the purposes of the transition to IFRS, unless otherwiseindicated.The accounting policies have been applied consistently by the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries.CONSOLIDATION PRINCIPLESThe consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries. Theseconsolidated financial statements include the Company’s proportionate share of joint ventures. Intercompanytransactions have been eliminated on consolidation. The financial statements of the subsidiaries are prepared using thesame reporting dates as the Company.INTERESTS IN JOINT VENTURESA joint venture can take the form of a jointly controlled entity, jointly controlled operation or jointly controlled asset.All joint ventures involve a contractual arrangement that establishes joint control.Reimbursement of the joint venture operator’s costsWhen Claude, acting as an operator, receives reimbursement of direct costs charged to the joint venture, such chargesrepresent reimbursement of costs that the operator incurred as agent for the joint venture and therefore have no effect onthe Statement of Income.Jointly controlled assetsA jointly controlled asset involves joint control and offers joint ownership by the Company and other venturers of assetscontributed to or acquired for the purpose of the joint venture, without the formation of a corporation, partnership orother entity.Where the Company’s activities are conducted through jointly controlled assets, the Company recognizes its share ofthe jointly controlled assets and liabilities it has incurred and related revenue and operating costs in the financial Page 60 Annual Report 2011 65
  • 67. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted statements. FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSLATION The Company’s functional and presentation currency is the Canadian dollar. Transactions denominated in foreign currencies are translated to Canadian dollars at the rate of exchange prevailing at the date of the transaction. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated to Canadian dollars at the rate of exchange in effect at the date of the Statement of Financial Position. Non-monetary items are translated at the rate in effect at the date of the transaction. Exchange gains and losses on these transactions are included in profit (loss). FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS Non-derivative Financial Assets The Company initially recognizes loans and receivables and deposits on the date they originate. All other financial assets (including assets designated at fair value through profit or loss) are recognized initially on the trade date at which the Company becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. The Company derecognizes a financial asset when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the asset expire, or it transfers the rights to receive the contractual cash flows on the financial asset in a transaction in which substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset are transferred. Financial assets and liabilities are offset and a net asset amount is presented in the Statement of Financial Position when, and only when, the Company has a legal right to offset the amounts and intends either to settle on a net basis or to realize the asset and settle the liability simultaneously. The Company’s non-derivative financial assets include: held-to-maturity financial assets; loans and receivables; and available-for-sale financial assets. Held-to-maturity financial assets If the Company has the positive intent and ability to hold debt securities to maturity, then such financial assets are classified as held-to-maturity. Held-to-maturity financial assets are recognized initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, held-to-maturity financial assets are measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method, less any impairment losses. Any sale or reclassification of a more than insignificant amount of held-to-maturity investments not close to their maturity would result in the reclassification of all held-to-maturity investments as available-for-sale, and prevent the Company from classifying investment securities as held-to-maturity for the current and the following two fiscal years. The Company’s held-to-maturity financial assets are deposits for reclamation costs. Loans and receivables Loans and receivables are financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. Such assets are recognized initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, loans and receivables are measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method, less any impairment losses. The Company’s loans and receivables are comprised of: cash and cash equivalents; accounts receivable; and short-term investments. Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash balances and deposits with original maturities of three months or less. Bank overdrafts, if utilized, are repayable on demand, form an integral part of the Company’s cash management and are included as a component of cash and cash equivalents for the purpose of the Statement of Cash Flows. Available-for-sale financial assets Available-for-sale financial assets are non-derivative financial assets that are designated as available-for-sale and that are not classified in any of the previous categories. The Company’s investments in equity securities are classified as available-for-sale financial assets. Subsequent to initial recognition, these assets are measured at fair value and changes Page 6166 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 68. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise notedtherein, other than impairment losses, are recognized in other comprehensive income and presented within equity.When an investment is derecognized either through sale or impairment that is other than temporary, the cumulative gainor loss in other comprehensive income is transferred to profit or loss.Non-derivative Financial LiabilitiesThe Company initially recognizes debt securities issued and subordinated liabilities on the date that they originate. Allother financial liabilities (including liabilities designated at fair value through profit or loss) are recognized initially onthe trade date at which the Company becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument.The Company derecognizes a financial liability when its contractual obligations are discharged, cancelled or expire.The Company has the following non-derivative financial liabilities: loans and borrowings; bank overdrafts in the formof a line of credit; accounts payable and accrued liabilities; and the Company’s debenture.Such financial liabilities are recognized initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequentto initial recognition these financial liabilities are measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method.Share CapitalCommon sharesCommon shares are classified as equity. Incremental costs directly attributable to the issue of common shares arerecognized as a deduction from equity, net of any tax effects.Flow-through sharesFrom time to time, the Company may finance a portion of its exploration activities through the issue of flow-throughshares. The premium paid for flow through shares in excess of the market value of the shares without the flow-throughfeatures at the time of issue is credited to other liabilities and included in income at the time the qualifying expendituresare made.DebentureThe Company’s debenture was issued with common share purchase warrants. The debenture and common sharepurchase warrants are presented separately on the Company’s Statement of Financial Position. Transaction costsincurred with the completion of this debenture have been netted against the proceeds received. The liability portion ofthe debenture has been designated as an other financial liability and was initially recognized at fair value. Subsequentto initial recognition, the debenture is measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method. The commonshare purchase warrants are not remeasured subsequent to initial recognition.Derivative and Other Financial InstrumentsDerivative financial instruments, which include foreign exchange and gold derivative contracts, are not designated as hedges.These instruments are recorded using the mark-to-market method of accounting whereby instruments are recorded in theconsolidated Statement of Financial Position at their fair value as either an asset or liability with changes in fair valuerecognized in profit or loss. Transaction costs are expensed as incurred.Effective Interest Rate MethodThe Company utilizes the effective interest rate method when accounting for certain of its financial instruments. Theeffective interest rate method is a method of calculating the amortized cost of a financial asset or a financial liability (orgroup of financial assets or financial liabilities) and of allocating the interest income or interest expense over therelevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that discounts estimated future cash payments or receipts throughthe expected life of the financial instrument or, when appropriate, a shorter period to the net carrying amount of thefinancial asset or financial liability. When calculating the effective interest rate, the Company estimates cash flowsconsidering all contractual terms of the financial instrument. Page 62 Annual Report 2011 67
  • 69. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted INVENTORIES Inventories are comprised of broken ore, gold in-circuit and consumable materials and supplies. Broken ore represents material that, at the time of extraction, the Company expects to process into a saleable form and sell at a profit. Ore is recorded as an asset that is classified within inventory as material is extracted from underground mines. Ore contained in stockpiles is initially measured by estimating the number of tonnes added and removed from the stockpile, and then converted to estimated ounces of gold contained therein based on assay data and applying estimated metallurgical recovery rates (based on the expected processing method). Stockpiled ore tonnages are verified by periodic surveys. Costs are allocated to ore stockpiles based on quantities of material stockpiled (measured in ounces) using current mining costs incurred up to the point of stockpiling the ore and include allocations of overheads, depreciation, depletion and amortization relating to mining operations. As ore is processed, costs are removed based on recoverable quantities of gold and each stockpile’s average cost per unit. Ore is accumulated in stockpiles which are subsequently processed into gold dore in a saleable form under a mine plan that takes into consideration optimal scheduling of production of the Company’s reserves, present plant capacity and the market price of gold. Gold contained in the milling circuit represents gold that the Company counts as production but is not yet in a saleable form. Gold inventory, which includes gold contained in the milling circuit and in stockpiled ore on surface, is valued at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Costs include labour, equipment costs and operating overhead. Material and supplies inventory is valued at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Any provision for obsolescence is determined by reference to specific stock items identified as obsolete. MINERAL PROPERTIES The Company holds various positions in mining interests, including exploration rights, mineral claims, mining leases, unpatented mining leases and options to acquire mining claims or leases. All of these positions are classified as mineral properties for financial statement purposes. Recognition and Measurement All costs related to the acquisition, exploration and development of mineral properties and the development of milling assets are capitalized on a property by property basis. Costs include expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the asset. Development costs on producing properties include only expenditures incurred to develop reserves or for delineation of existing reserves. Interest on debt directly related to the acquisition and development of mineral properties is capitalized until commencement of commercial production. Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged to operating expenses as incurred. The cost of self-constructed assets includes the cost of materials and direct labour, any other costs directly attributable to bringing the assets to a working condition for their intended use, the costs of dismantling and removing the items and restoring the site on which they are located, and borrowing costs on qualifying assets. Items of property, plant and equipment are measured at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. The decision to develop a mine property within a project area is based on an assessment of the commercial viability of the property and the availability of financing. Once the decision to proceed to development is made, development and other expenditures relating to the project area are reclassified and disclosed as part of mineral properties with the intention that these will be depreciated by charges against earnings from future mining operations. No depreciation is charged against the property until commercial production commences. After a mine property has been brought into commercial production, costs of additional work on that property are expensed as incurred, except for new capital costs which are capitalized. When material components of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, they are accounted for as separate items (major components) of property, plant and equipment and depreciated separately. Gains and losses on disposal of an item of property, plant and equipment are determined by comparing the proceeds from disposal with the carrying amount of property, plant and equipment, and are recognized within other income in profit or loss. Subsequent Costs The cost of replacing a part of an item of property, plant and equipment is added to the carrying amount of the item if it Page 6368 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 70. Annual Report 2011 69
  • 71. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted Changes in the provision relating to mine rehabilitation and restoration obligations, which are not the result of the current production of inventory, are added to or deducted from the related asset, other than the unwinding of the discount which is recognized as a finance cost in the Statements of Income. Changes to the provision for reclamation and remediation obligations related to operating mines, which are not the result of current production of inventory, are recorded with an offsetting change to the related asset. For properties where mining activities have ceased or are in reclamation, changes are charged directly to earnings. IMPAIRMENT Financial Assets A financial asset not carried at fair value through profit or loss is assessed at each reporting date to determine whether there is objective evidence that it is impaired. A financial asset is impaired if objective evidence indicates that a loss event has occurred after the initial recognition of the asset and that the loss event will have a negative effect on the estimated future cash flows of that asset. Objective evidence that financial assets (including equity securities) are impaired can include default or delinquency by a debtor, restructuring of an amount due to the Company on terms that the Company would not consider otherwise, indications that a debtor or issuer will enter bankruptcy, or the disappearance of an active market for a security. In addition, for an investment in an equity security, a significant or prolonged decline in its fair value below its cost is objective evidence of impairment. At the end of each reporting period, the Company assesses whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. With respect to available-for-sale securities, for which unrealized gains and losses are generally recognized in Other Comprehensive income (“OCI), a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value of the investment below its cost may be evidence that the assets are impaired. If objective evidence of impairment were to exist, the impaired amount (i.e. the unrealized loss) would be recognized in profit (loss); any subsequent reversals would be recognized in OCI and would not flow back into profit (loss). Impairment losses on available-for-sale investment securities are recognized by transferring the cumulative loss that has been recognized in other comprehensive income, and presented in unrealized gains/losses on available-for-sale financial assets in equity, to profit or loss. The cumulative loss that is removed from other comprehensive income and recognized in profit or loss is the difference between the acquisition cost, net of any principal repayment and amortization, and the current fair value, less any impairment loss previously recognized in profit or loss. If, in a subsequent period, the fair value of an impaired available-for-sale investment security increases and the increase can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment loss was recognized in profit or loss, then the impairment loss is reversed, with the amount of the reversal recognized in profit or loss. However, any subsequent recovery in the fair value of an impaired available-for-sale equity security is recognized in other comprehensive income. Non-Financial Assets The carrying amounts of the Company’s non-financial assets, other than inventories and deferred tax assets, are reviewed at each reporting date to determine whether there is any indication of impairment. If any such indication exists, then the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated. The recoverable amount of an asset or cash-generating unit (“CGU”) is the greater of its value in use and its fair value less costs to sell. Fair value less cost to sell is determined as the amount that would be obtained from the sale of the asset in an arm’s length transaction between knowledgeable and willing parties. Fair value for mineral assets is generally determined as the present value of the estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the continued use of the asset, including any expansion prospects, and its eventual disposal, using assumptions that an independent market participant would take into account. These cash flows are discounted by an appropriate discount rate to arrive at a net present value of the asset. Value in use is determined as the present value of the estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the continued use of the asset in its present form and its eventual disposal. Value in use is determined by applying assumptions Page 6570 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 72. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise notedspecific to the Company’s continued use and cannot take into account future development. These assumptions aredifferent than those used in calculating fair value and consequently the value in use calculation is likely to give adifferent result (usually lower) than a fair value calculation. The estimated future cash flows are discounted to theirpresent value using a post-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and therisks specific to the asset.For the purpose of impairment testing, assets that cannot be tested individually are grouped together into the smallestgroup of assets that generates cash inflows from continuing use that are largely independent of the cash inflows of otherassets or groups of assets.An impairment loss is recognized if the carrying amount of an asset or its CGU exceeds its recoverable amount.Impairment losses are recognized in profit (loss). Impairment losses recognized in respect of CGUs are allocated first toreduce the carrying amount of goodwill, if any, allocated to the units, and then to reduce the carrying amounts of theother assets in the unit (group of units) on a pro rata basis.Impairment losses recognized in prior periods are assessed at each reporting date whenever events or changes incircumstances indicate that the impairment may have reversed. If the impairment has reversed, the carrying amount ofthe asset is increased to its recoverable amount. An impairment loss is reversed only to the extent that the asset’scarrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation oramortization, if no impairment loss had been recognized. A reversal of an impairment loss is recognized immediately inprofit (loss).ASSETS RELATED TO DISCONTINUED OPERATIONNon-current assets that are expected to be recovered primarily through sale rather than through continuing use, areclassified as held for sale. Immediately before classification as held for sale, the assets are re-measured in accordancewith the Company’s accounting policies. Thereafter, generally, the assets are measured at the lower of their carryingamount and fair value less cost to sell.A discontinued operation is a component of the Company’s business that represents a separate major line of businessthat has been disposed of or is held for sale. Classification as a discontinued operation occurs upon disposal or whenthe operation meets the criteria to be classified as held for sale. When an operation is classified as a discontinuedoperation, the comparative Statement of Income is restated as if the operation had been discontinued from the start ofthe comparative period.PROVISIONSA provision is recognized if, as a result of a past event, the Company has a present legal or constructive obligation thatcan be estimated reliably, and it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle theobligation. Provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at a pre-tax rate that reflects currentmarket assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability. The unwinding of the discount isrecognized as finance cost.REVENUE RECOGNITIONRevenue from the sale of precious metals is recognized when the significant risks and rewards of ownership havepassed to the customer. This is when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, title and insurance risk passes to thecustomer, collection is reasonably assured and the price is reasonably determinable.LEASE PAYMENTSPayments made under operating leases are recognized in profit or loss on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease.Lease incentives received are recognized as an integral part of the total lease expense, over the term of the lease.Minimum lease payments made under finance leases are apportioned between the finance expense and the reduction ofthe outstanding liability. The finance expense is allocated to each period during the lease term so as to produce aconstant periodic rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability. Page 66 Annual Report 2011 71
  • 73. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted INCOME TAXES Income tax expense is comprised of current and deferred taxes. Current tax and deferred tax are recognized in profit or loss except to the extent that it relates to a business combination, or items recognized directly in equity or in other comprehensive income. Current tax is the expected tax payable or receivable on the taxable income or loss for the year, using tax rates enacted or substantially enacted at the reporting date, and any adjustments to tax payable in respect of previous years. Deferred tax is recognized in respect of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for taxation purposes. Deferred tax is measured at the tax rates that are expected to be applied to temporary differences when they reverse, based on the laws that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the reporting date. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset if there is a legally enforceable right to offset current tax liabilities and assets, and they relate to income taxes levied by the same tax authority on the same taxable entity, or on different tax entities, but they intend to settle current tax liabilities and assets on a net basis or their tax assets and liabilities will be realized simultaneously. A deferred tax asset is recognized for unused tax losses, tax credits and deductible temporary differences, to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profits will be available against which they can be utilized. Deferred tax assets are reviewed at each reporting date and are reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that the related tax benefit will be realized. EARNINGS PER SHARE The Company presents basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) data for its common shares. Basic per share amounts are calculated using the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period. Diluted per share amounts are calculated based on the treasury-stock method, which assumes that any proceeds obtained on exercise of options and warrants, along with any unrecognized stock-based compensation, would be used by the Company to repurchase common shares at the average market price during the period. The weighted average number of shares outstanding is then adjusted by the net change. SHARE-BASED PAYMENTS The Company has two stock-based compensation plans which are described further in Note 14(a) and 14(b). Stock Option Plan The Company accounts for all stock option awards using the fair-value method of accounting. Under this method, the Company recognizes compensation expense for the stock options granted based on their grant date fair value, which is determined using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The fair value of the option is expensed over the vesting period with a corresponding amount recorded as contributed surplus. Consideration received on the exercise of stock options is recorded as share capital and the related contributed surplus is transferred to share capital. Employee Share Purchase Plan Under the Employee Share Purchase Plan (“ESPP”), compensation expense is recognized as the fair value of the shares granted under the plan and is recognized over the one year vesting period pursuant to the ESPP. Consideration received from the ESPP is recorded as share capital and amounts recorded in contributed surplus related to the fair value of the shares granted under the plan are transferred to share capital upon the issuance of shares. Shares issued pursuant to the ESPP are valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. 4. Accounting Standards: Future Changes in Accounting Policies Financial Instruments IFRS 9, Financial Instruments (“IFRS 9”), was issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) on November 12, 2009 and will replace IAS 39, Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement (“IAS 39”). IFRS 9 uses a single approach to determine whether a financial asset is measured at amortized cost or fair value, replacing the multiple rules in IAS 39. The approach in IFRS 9 is based on how an entity manages its financial instruments in the Page 6772 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 74. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise notedcontext of its business model and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial assets. The new standard alsorequires a single impairment method to be used, replacing the multiple impairment methods in IAS 39. IFRS 9 iseffective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2015. The Company is currently evaluating the impact ofIFRS 9 on its financial statements.Consolidated Financial StatementsIn May 2011, the IASB issued IFRS 10, Consolidated Financial Statements. This new standard defines the principle ofcontrol and establishes control as the basis for determining which entities are included in consolidated financialstatements. The principle of control is based on three criteria: power over the investee; exposure to variable returnsfrom involvement in the investee; and the ability of the investor to use its power to affect the amount of its returns. Thestandard requires control of an investee to be reassessed when the facts and circumstances indicate that there have beenchanges to one or more of the criteria for determining control. This new standard supersedes the requirements relatingto consolidated financial statements in IAS 27, Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements (as amended in 2009)and SIC-12, Consolidation – Special Purpose Entities. IFRS 10 is effective for the Company beginning on January 1,2013, with early adoption permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of this standard to have a materialimpact on its financial statements.Joint ArrangementsIFRS 11, Joint Arrangements, was issued by the IASB in May 2011 and is effective for annual periods beginning on orafter January 1, 2013 with early adoption permitted. Under IFRS 11, joint arrangements are classified as either jointoperations or joint ventures. Parties to a joint operation retain the rights and obligations to individual assets andliabilities of the operation, while parties to a joint venture have rights to the net assets of the venture. Any arrangementwhich is not structured through a separate entity or is structured through a separate entity but such separation isineffective such that the parties to the arrangement have rights to the assets and obligations for the liabilities will beclassified as a joint operation. Joint operations shall be accounted for in a manner consistent with jointly controlledassets and operations whereby the Company’s contractual share of the arrangement’s assets, liabilities, revenues andexpenses are included in the consolidated financial statements. Any arrangement structured through a separate vehiclethat does effectively result in separation between the Company and the arrangement shall be classified as a joint ventureand accounted for using the equity method of accounting. Under the existing IFRS standard, the Company has theoption to account for any interests it has in joint ventures using proportionate consolidation or equity accounting. Theextent of the impact of adoption of IFRS 11 has not yet been determined by the Company.Disclosure of Interests in Other EntitiesIn May 2011, the IASB issued IFRS 12, Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities. This new standard requires enhanceddisclosures about an entity’s interest in subsidiaries, joint arrangements, associates and unconsolidated structuredentities. IFRS 12 contains new disclosure requirements for interests the Company has in subsidiaries, jointarrangements, associates and unconsolidated structured entities. Required disclosures aim to provide readers of thefinancial statements with information to evaluate the nature of and risks associated with the Company’s interests inother entities and the effects of those interests on the Company’s financial statements. IFRS 12 is effective for theCompany beginning on January 1, 2013. It is expected that IFRS 12 will increase the current level of disclosure relatedto the Company’s interests in other entities upon adoption.Fair Value MeasurementIn May 2011, the IASB published IFRS 13, Fair Value Measurement, which is effective prospectively for annualperiods beginning on or after January 1, 2013. IFRS 13 replaces fair value measurement guidance contained inindividual IFRSs, providing a single source of fair value measurement guidance. The standard provides a framework formeasuring fair value and establishes new disclosure requirements to enable readers to assess the methods and inputsused to develop fair value measurements and for recurring valuations that are subject to measurement uncertainty, theeffect of those measurements on the financial statements. The Company intends to adopt IFRS 13 prospectively in itsfinancial statements for the annual period beginning on January 1, 2013. The extent of the impact of adoption of IFRS13 has not yet been determined.Presentation of Financial StatementsIn June 2011, the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) issued IAS 1, Presentation of Items of OCI:Amendments to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements. The amendments stipulate the presentation of net profit and Page 68 Annual Report 2011 73
  • 75. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted OCI and also require the Company to group items within OCI based on whether the items may be subsequently reclassified to profit or loss. Amendments to IAS 1 are effective for the Company beginning on January 1, 2012 with retrospective application and early adoption permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of the amendments to this standard to have a material impact on its financial statements. Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures In May 2011, the IASB issued amendments to IAS 28, Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures, which are effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013 with early adoption permitted. Amendments to IAS 28 provide additional guidance applicable to accounting for interests in joint ventures or associates when a portion of an interest is classified as held for sale or when the Company ceases to have joint control or significant influence over an associate or joint venture. When joint control or significant influence over an associate or joint venture ceases, the Company will no longer be required to re-measure the investment at that date. When a portion of an interest in a joint venture or associate is classified as held for sale, the portion not classified as held for sale shall be accounted for using the equity method of accounting until the sale is completed at which time the interest is reassessed for prospective accounting treatment. The Company does not expect the amendments to IAS 28 to have a material impact on the financial statements. Offsetting Financial Assets and Liabilities In December 2011, the IASB published Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities and issued new disclosure requirements in IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures. The amendments to IAS 32 clarify that an entity currently has a legally enforceable right to set-off if that right is not contingent on a future event, and enforceable both in the normal course of business and in the event of default, insolvency or bankruptcy of the entity and all counterparties. The amendments to IAS 32 also clarify when a settlement mechanism provides for net settlement or gross settlement that is equivalent to net settlement. The amendments to IFRS 7 contain new disclosure requirements for financial assets and liabilities that are offset in the statement of financial position, or subject to master netting arrangements or similar arrangements. The effective date for the amendments to IAS 32 is annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2014. The effective date for the amendments to IFRS 7 is annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013. These amendments are to be applied retrospectively. The Company does not expect the amendments to IAS 32 to have a material impact on the financial statements. 5. Cash and Cash Equivalents: The Company only deposits cash surpluses with major banks of high quality credit standing. Cash on hand earns interest at floating rates based on daily bank deposit rates. Short-term deposits are made for varying periods of between one day and three months, depending on the immediate cash requirements of the Company, and earn interest at the respective short-term deposit rates. Restricted Cash: DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 2011 2010 2010 Restricted cash $ - $ 4,389 $ - During 2010, the Company completed the disposal of its oil and natural gas assets. Pursuant to the Company’s debenture agreement, the disposition triggered an offer to repay its outstanding debentures. The net proceeds from that sale were placed in trust until January 14, 2011 to fund possible debenture repayments. On January 14, 2011, $0.1 million of debentures were redeemed by debenture holders. Once paid, the balance held in trust was released and deposited into the Company’s operating account. 6. Short-term Investments: Short-term investments are denominated in Canadian dollars, are comprised of instruments with terms to maturity between three and 12 months and have stated interest rates varying between 0.77 percent and 0.87 percent. Short-term investments are classified as loans and receivables. Page 6974 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 76. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted7. Inventories and Stockpiled Ore:Details of the Company’s inventories and stockpiled ore are as follows: DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 Note 2011 2010 2010 Gold in-circuit (1) (2) $ 3,128 $ 1,471 $ 2,126 Stockpiled ore (1) (2) 265 329 1,140 Materials and supplies (3) 9,973 7,483 8,182 Inventories and Stockpiled Ore $ 13,366 $ 9,283 $ 11,448 (1) Depreciation and depletion of $0.7 million (December 31, 2010 - $0.4 million; January 1, 2010 - $1.2 million) is included in the above noted balances. (2) For the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company wrote-down $0.5 million of gold inventory (December 31, 2010 - $nil; January 1, 2010 - $nil). (3) For the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company wrote-down $0.2 million of materials and supplies inventory (December 31, 2010 - $0.3 million; January 1, 2010 - $nil).8. Mineral Properties:Details of the Company’s property, plant and equipment included in mineral properties are as follows:Cost Property Exploration acquisition Buildings, And and mine plant and Evaluations Note development equipment assets TotalBalance at January 1, 2010 26(c) $ 111,592 $ 94,387 $ 54,685 $ 260,664Additions 11,897 10,354 14,284 36,535Disposals (2,642) (439) (1,513) (4,594)Balance at December 31, 2010 $ 120,847 $ 104,302 $ 67,456 $ 292,605Balance at January 1, 2011 $ 120,847 $ 104,302 $ 67,456 $ 292,605Additions 25,548 16,767 13,593 55,908Transfers between groups 15,757 - (15,757) -Balance at December 31, 2011 $ 162,152 $ 121,069 $ 65,292 $ 348,513 Annual Report 2011 13 Depreciation and impairment lossesBalance at January 1, 2010 26(c) $ 96,167 $ 76,270 $ 7,054 $ 179,491Depreciation 4,509 5,644 - 10,153Disposals (2,642) (317) (577) (3,536)Write-down of exploration - - 18 18propertiesBalance at December 31, 2010 $ 98,034 $ 81,597 $ 6,495 $ 186,126Balance at January 1, 2011 $ 98,034 $ 81,597 $ 6,495 $ 186,126Depreciation for the period 5,482 6,260 - 11,742Write-down of exploration - - 851 851propertiesBalance at December 31, 2011 $ 103,516 $ 87,857 $ 7,346 $ 198,719 Page 70 Annual Report 2011 75
  • 77. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted Carrying amounts At January 1, 2010 26(c) $ 15,425 $ 18,117 $ 47,631 $ 81,173 At December 31, 2010 $ 22,813 $ 22,705 $ 60,961 $ 106,479 At December 31, 2011 $ 58,636 $ 33,212 $ 57,946 $ 149,794 Exploration properties Amounts reflected for exploration properties not in commercial production represent costs incurred to date, net of write- downs, and are not intended to reflect present or future values. The recoverability of these costs is dependent upon the discovery of economically recoverable ore reserves and the ability to obtain necessary financing for the development of future profitable production from the properties or realization of sufficient proceeds from the disposition of the properties. During 2011, the Company reclassified exploration and evaluations assets related to the Santoy 8 to mine development costs upon the property achieving technical feasibility and economic viability. In accordance with IFRS, the Company tested these costs for impairment upon transfer to mine development and determined that no impairment charge was required. Fair value less costs to sell was used to assess impairment and was determined using a discounted cash flow approach that incorporated marketplace participant assumptions. The cash flows were discounted over an 8 year period at a post-tax rate of 11.3 percent. Impairment loss Upon transition to IFRS as at January 1, 2010, the Company tested its Seabee Gold Mine for impairment. The carrying value of the asset was compared against the fair value less cost to sell. Fair value less cost to sell was determined using a discounted cash flow approach that incorporated marketplace participant assumptions. The cash flows were discounted over a seven year period at a post-tax rate of 11.3 percent. The Company determined that the carrying value of the Company’s CGU, the Seabee Gold Operation (which, at January 1, 2010, consisted of the Seabee Mine, as the Santoy 8 Project had not achieved technical feasibility and commercial viability), was in excess of its associated recoverable amount and an impairment of $13.1 million was calculated and charged to directly to retained earnings on transition to IFRS. During the year ended December 31, 2010, the Company tested its CGU, the Seabee Mine, and determined that the fair value less cost to sell of the asset was greater than the carrying value; as such, an impairment charge was not required. Fair value less cost to sell was determined using a discounted cash flow approach that incorporated marketplace participant assumptions. The cash flows were discounted over an eight year period at a post-tax rate of 11.3 percent. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company tested its CGUs for indicators of impairment and determined that the fair value less cost to sell of the Company’s Seabee Gold Mine CGU was greater than the carrying value; as such, an impairment charge was not required. Fair value less cost to sell was determined using a discounted cash flow approach that incorporated marketplace participant assumptions. The cash flows for the Seabee Mine were discounted over an eleven year period discounted at a post-tax rate of 10.0 percent. Leased machinery The Company leases production equipment under a number of finance lease agreements. Some leases provide the Company with the option to purchase the equipment at a beneficial price. Some leases are for specialized equipment and in these leases the Company can cancel the leases at its option, but is responsible for reimbursing the lessor for any losses incurred. The leased equipment secures lease obligations (see Note 13). At December 31, 2011 the carrying amount of assets under finance leases included in buildings, plant and equipment was $7.9 (December 31, 2010: $3.6 million; January 1, 2010: $4.0 million). Security The Company’s demand loans (Note 13) are secured by a general security agreement covering all of the Company’s assets. The Company’s debenture (Note 13) is secured by a general security agreement covering all of the Companys assets, except those subordinated to bank debt. Page 7176 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 78. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise notedCapitalized interestCumulative debenture interest costs of $2.4 million at December 31, 2011 (December 31, 2010: $2.0 million; January 1,2010: $1.4 million) relating to the Madsen project have been capitalized in accordance with the Company’s accountingpolicy.Mine Operating Costs by Function DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Production costs $ 40,542 $ 31,217 Depreciation and depletion 11,407 11,329 Write-down of exploration property 851 - (Gain) on sale of exploration property (1,131) - $ 51,669 $ 42,5469. Discontinued Operation:During 2010, the Company sold its remaining oil and natural gas assets. As such, there were no Assets held for sale orrelated liabilities at December 31, 2011 or December 31, 2010 nor were there any results or cash flows from operationsfor the year ended December 31, 2011. DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 2011 2010 2010 Assets Accounts receivable $ - $ - $ 570 Oil and natural gas properties - - 4,398 $ - $ - $ 4,968 Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities $ - $ - $ 370 Asset retirement obligations - - 117 $ - $ - $ 487The results of the discontinued operation were as follows: DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Revenue Oil and natural gas (net of royalties) $ - $ 1,254 Expenses Operating - 831 Accretion - 5 - 836 Earnings from discontinued operation $ - $ 418 Other income Gain on sale of assets - 1,133 Profit from discontinued operation $ - $ 1,551 Page 72 Annual Report 2011 77
  • 79. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted The cash flows provided by the discontinued operation were as follows: DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Profit from discontinued operation $ - $ 1,551 Adjustments for: Accretion - 5 Gain on sale of assets - (1,133) Decrease in Accounts receivable - 570 Decrease in Accounts payable and accrued liabilities - (370) Cash flows from operations provided by discontinued operation $ - $ 623 10. Investments: DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 2011 2010 2010 Available-for-sale securities, beginning of year $ 4,328 $ 643 $ 643 Disposition of available-for-sale securities (197) - - Acquisition of available-for-sale securities (1) 1,131 749 - Permanent write-down of available-for-sale securities (74) (207) - Unrealized gain (loss) on available-for-sale securities (2,334) 3,143 - Available-for-sale securities, end of year $ 2,854 $ 4,328 $ 643 (1) Acquisition in 2011 relates to shares in a public company received as settlement for Claude’s disposition of a mineral property interest. Acquisition of $749,000 in 2010 includes $698,000 worth of shares in a public company received as settlement for Claude’s disposition of a mineral property interest. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company disposed of certain of its available for sale securities, resulting in a gain on sale of $0.1 million (December 31, 2010 - $nil; January 1, 2010 - $nil). This amount was reclassified to profit from Other comprehensive income. At December 31, 2011, the Company reviewed its portfolio of available-for-sale securities in order to assess whether there was objective evidence of impairment. Factors considered in the Company’s assessment included the length of time and extent which to fair value was below cost and current conditions specific to the investment. At December 31, 2011, the Company concluded that objective evidence of impairment existed for one of its available-for-sale investments. The fair value of the investment, recorded in the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, was $0.1 million compared to the cost of $0.2 million; as a result, the unrealized loss of $0.1 million, which was included in Other comprehensive income, was charged against profit. By holding these investments, the Company is exposed to various risk factors including market price risk and liquidity risk (Note 22). 11. Decommissioning and reclamation: The Company’s decommissioning and reclamation costs consists of reclamation and closure costs. Mineral property obligations were determined using discount rates ranging from 1.94 to 3.35 percent. Expected undiscounted payments of future obligations are $11.2 million over the next 7 to 16 years. An accretion expense component of $0.2 million has been charged in 2011, augmented by revisions made to the decommissioning and reclamation costs, resulting in an increase in the overall carrying amount of the provision. Changes to the provision during the year are as follows: DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 2011 2010 2010 Decommissioning and reclamation provision, beginning of year $ 4,810 $ 3,534 $ 3,534 Accretion 166 108 - Discontinued operation - 162 - Revisions due to change in estimates and discount rate 4,737 1,533 - Page 7378 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 80. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 2011 2010 2010 Revisions due to sale of properties - (527) - Decommissioning and reclamation provision, end of year $ 9,713 $ 4,810 $ 3,534As required by regulatory authorities, the Company has provided letters of credit as security for reclamation related tothe Madsen and Seabee properties in the amounts of $0.7 million (December 31, 2010 - $0.7 million; January 1, 2010:$0.7 million) and $1.5 million (2010 - $1.6 million; January 1, 2010: $1.6 million), respectively. As security for theseletters of credit, the Company has provided investment certificates in the amount of $2.2 million (2010 - $2.3 million;January 1, 2010: $2.3 million).12. Net Royalty Obligation:(a) Royalty AgreementsDuring each of 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, the Company entered into separate Royalty Agreements (“Agreements”)whereby it sold a basic royalty on a portion of the gold production at its Seabee Gold Operation. The Companyreceived cash consideration consisting of royalty income, indemnity fee income and interest income.Under the terms of the Agreements, the Company is required to make royalty payments at fixed amounts per ounce ofgold produced; these amounts vary over the term of the respective Agreements. A portion of the cash received at theinception of the respective agreements was placed with a financial institution; in return, the Company received arestricted promissory note. Interest earned from the restricted promissory notes and a portion of the principal must beused to fund the expected basic royalty payments during the first ten years of each agreement. Over the life of theroyalty agreements, interest earned and principal from the restricted promissory notes will be sufficient to fund theexpected basic royalty payments.The Company and all of the counterparties have the legal right of offset and the intention to settle on a net basis. Assuch, the Company has presented these transactions on a net basis on the Statements of Financial Position. 2004 2005 2006 2007 Note Agreement Agreement Agreement AgreementRestricted PromissoryNotes Principal Balance (1) (b) 6,924 14,594 36,701 25,818 Interest receivable (1) 363 766 2,245 1,579 Interest Rate 6 percent 6 percent 7 percent 7 percent Maturity DEC 10, 2014 FEB 15, 2015 FEB 15, 2016 FEB 15, 2017Royalty Payments Royalty Rate per ounce $13.29 to $24.53 $23.15 to $112.45 $61.59 to $198.95 $35.34 to $147.05 of gold produced (2) Royalty payable (b) 328 690 2,232 1,561 (current) (1) Royalty obligation (b) 7,165 14,961 36,783 25,977 payable (long-term) (1)Net Profit Interest (c) - - - - Applicable years 2010-2014 2011-2015 2012-2016 2013-2017 Percent 2.50, 3.00 or 4.00 1.00, 2.00 or 3.00 3.75, 4.00 or 4.25 3.50, 3.70 or 3.90 Price of gold thresholds $800, $900 or $875, $1,075 or $975, $1,175 or $1,250, $1,500 or $1,200 $1,275 $1,375 $1,675 (1) At December 31, 2011. (2) Over the remaining life of the respective agreements. Page 74 Annual Report 2011 79
  • 81. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted (b) Net Royalty Obligation The following schedule outlines the different components of the transaction that are presented net on the Company’s consolidated Statements of Financial Position: DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 2011 2010 2010 Current portion Assets Interest receivable on Restricted promissory notes $ 4,953 $ 4,904 $ 4,866 Liabilities Current portion of deferred revenue 996 949 903 Interest payable on royalty obligations 4,811 4,770 4,729 $ 5,807 $ 5,719 $ 5,632 Net royalty obligation (current) (854) (815) (766) Long-term portion Assets Restricted promissory notes $ 84,037 $ 83,219 $ 82,568 Liabilities Deferred revenue 3,586 4,582 5,531 Royalty obligation 84,886 84,220 83,554 $ 88,472 $ 88,802 $ 89,085 Net royalty obligation (long-term) (4,435) (5,583) (6,517) Net royalty obligation $ (5,289) $ (6,398) $ (7,283) The interest income and the indemnity fees received by the Company are being amortized into income over the prepayment period and the life of the respective agreements. The interest income and the indemnity fees are netted against interest expense and are reflected in “Financing expense” on the consolidated statement of income. (c) NPI Payment In addition to the royalty, the Company granted a net profit interest (“NPI”) of varying percentages, payable only if gold prices exceed a pre-determined threshold. Prior to any NPI payment, the Company is entitled to first recover the NPI expenditures (including capital expenditures), working capital, operating losses, interest charges and asset retirement obligations relating to the production of ore at the Seabee Operation. These expenditures are calculated on a cumulative basis from the commencement of the individual agreements. At December 31, 2011, the cumulative carry forward amounts remained in a deficiency position under each of the agreements and no payments are expected during 2012. (d) Call and Put Under certain circumstances, a 100 percent owned subsidiary of Claude will have the right to purchase (“Call”) the equity of the holder of the royalties or right to receive the royalties at an amount no greater than the fair market value thereof at the time of the Call. The Call price will be paid from the balance owing to the Company under the promissory notes. Under certain circumstances, the purchaser of the royalties will have the right to sell (“Put”) their interest in the royalty to the Company at an amount no greater than the fair market value thereof at the time of the Put. However, such right is subject to the subsidiary of Claude’s pre-emptive right to exercise the Call in advance of any Put being exercised and completed. Page 7580 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 82. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted13. Loans and Borrowings:This note provides information about the contractual terms of the Company’s interest-bearing loans and borrowings, which aremeasured at amortized cost. For more information about the Company’s exposure to interest rate and liquidity risk, see Note22. DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 2011 2010 2010 Current liabilities Demand loans (a) $ 896 $ 2,499 $ 4,586 Current portion of finance lease liabilities (b) 2,119 1,598 2,039 Current portion of debenture (c) - 9,344 - $ 3,015 $ 13,441 $ 6,625 Non-current liabilities Finance lease liabilities (b) $ 1,786 $ 873 $ 1,240 Debenture (c) 9,452 - 9,192 $ 11,238 $ 873 $ 10,432(a) Demand LoansTerms and conditions of the Company’s outstanding demand loans are as follows: DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 2011 2010 2010 Demand loan, repayable in monthly payments of $ - $ 667 $ 1,667 $83,333 plus interest at prime plus 1.50 percent, due August 2011 Demand loan, repayable in monthly payments of - - 192 $96,514 including interest at 5.99 percent, due February 2010 Demand loan, repayable in monthly payments of 896 1,832 2,727 $83,371 including interest at 4.575 percent, due November 2012 $ 896 $ 2,499 $ 4,586The demand loans are secured by a general security agreement covering all assets of the Company. The scheduledrepayments are disclosed in Note 22.(b) Finance Lease LiabilitiesObligations under finance leases bear interest between 5.4 percent and 8.0 percent per annum, are due from 2012 to2014 and are secured by the leased equipment. The estimated principal repayments on the leases are as follows: 2012 -$2,119; 2013 - $1,495; and 2014 - $291. Present Value of Interest Future Value of Minimum Lease Minimum Lease Payments Payments DEC 31 DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2011 2011 Less than one year $ 2,119 $ 154 $ 2,273 Between one and five years 1,786 58 1,844 More than five years - - - $ 3,905 $ 212 $ 4,117 Page 76 Annual Report 2011 81
  • 83. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted Present Value of Interest Future Value of Minimum Lease Minimum Lease Payments Payments DEC 31 DEC 31 DEC 31 2010 2010 2010 Less than one year $ 1,598 $ 99 $ 1,697 Between one and five years 873 29 902 More than five years - - - $ 2,471 $ 128 $ 2,599 The Company’s finance leases are secured by a general security agreement. (c) Debenture The debenture bears a 12 percent annual interest rate, is due May 23, 2013 and requires monthly interest only payments. Upon entering into the debenture indenture agreement, debenture holders received warrants in the amount of 10 percent of the debenture purchase (Note 14(g)). Each warrant entitles the holder to acquire one common share of the Company at an exercise price of $1.60 per common share until May 23, 2013. The value of the warrants associated with the debenture on the date of issuance was $0.6 million. During 2009, the Company repaid $8.3 million of the outstanding debentures, representing principal plus unpaid interest thereon up to the repayment date. During 2011, the Company repaid $0.1 million of the outstanding debentures, representing principal plus unpaid interest thereon up to the repayment date. A total of $9.8 million in face value of debentures remain outstanding at December 31, 2011. The balance of the debentures outstanding is amortized using the effective interest rate method at an effective rate of 14.7 percent over the remaining term of the debentures. DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Debenture payable, beginning of year $ 9,344 $ 9,192 Amortized cost of debenture redemption (87) - Amortization of debt issue costs 195 152 Debenture payable, end of year 9,452 9,344 Current portion - 9,344 Debenture payable, long-term portion $ 9,452 $ - The debenture is secured by a general security agreement covering all of the Companys assets, except those subordinated to bank debt. (d) Other At December 31, 2011, the Company had no undrawn borrowing facilities. At December 31, 2010, the Company had available $5.0 million of undrawn committed borrowing facilities relating to the Company’s offer to repay its outstanding debentures. During the first quarter of 2011, this facility expired concurrently with the completion of the Company’s offer to repay its debenture outstanding. The Company has a $5.0 million operating line of credit which bears interest at prime plus 1.125 percent; the prime rate at December 31, 2011 was 3 percent. These funds are available for general corporate purposes. At December 31, 2011, December 31, 2010 and January 1, 2010, the Company had not drawn on the line of credit. 14. Share Capital: AUTHORIZED The authorized share capital of the Company consists of an unlimited number of common shares and two classes of unlimited preferred shares issuable in series. Page 7782 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 84. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise notedThe first preferred shares are issuable in series and rank ahead of the second preferred shares and the common shares inrespect of dividend payment, dissolution or any other distribution of assets. The other rights, privileges, restrictions andconditions attached to each series of the first preferred shares are fixed by the Board of Directors at the time of creationof such series.The second preferred shares are issuable in series and rank ahead of the common shares in respect of dividend payment,dissolution or any other distribution of assets. The other rights, privileges, restrictions and conditions attached to eachseries of the second preferred shares are fixed by the Board of Directors at the time of creation of such series.The common shares of the Company are entitled to vote at all meetings of the shareholders and, upon dissolution or any otherdistribution of assets, to receive such assets of the Company as are distributable to the holders of the common shares. DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Shares Amount Shares AmountCommon shares:Outstanding, beginning of year 138,913,329 118,279 118,478,686 98,155ESPP (a) 235,614 324 430,395 261Exercise of stock options (b) 648,667 642 422,414 402Equity issue (c) 23,000,000 57,500 - -Equity issue (d) - - 12,000,000 11,100Equity issue (e) - - 325,000 361Warrant exercise (f) - - 4,299,550 4,773Broker warrant exercise (f) 139,321 162 557,284 647Warrant exercise (g) 1,577,000 2,271 2,400,000 3,456Warrant exercise (g) 116,300 223 - -Issue costs, net of income taxes - (2,407) - (876)Outstanding, end of year 164,630,231 176,994 138,913,329 118,279Warrants and other equity:Common share purchase warrants (d) 2,700 2,700Tax adjusted cumulative issue costs (228) (228)Broker purchase warrants (f) - 46Common share purchase warrants (g) 552 1,404Debenture purchase warrants (g) 513 550 164,630,231 180,531 138,913,329 122,751(a) EMPLOYEE SHARE PURCHASE PLANThe ESPP was established to encourage employees to purchase Company common shares. Under the plan, eligible employeesmay contribute up to five percent of their basic annual salary and the Company shall contribute common shares in an amountequal to 50 percent of the employee’s contribution. Shares of the Company are issued to employees based on a weighted averagemarket price over a specific period. During 2011, the Company issued 235,614 common shares (2010 – 430,395) for $0.3million (2010 - $0.3 million) pursuant to this plan. The maximum number of common shares of the Company available for issueunder this ESPP is five percent of the Company’s common shares outstanding.The weighted average fair value of ESPP options granted during 2011 was $0.90 (2010 - $0.55) and was estimatedusing the Black-Scholes option pricing model with assumptions of a 1.00 year weighted average expected option life, a15 percent expected forfeiture rate, 53 percent volatility (2010 – 78 percent) and an interest rate of 1.3 percent (2010 –0.7 percent). This compensation expense has been included in general and administrative expenses in the ConsolidatedStatements of Income.(b) STOCK OPTION PLANThe Company has established a stock option plan under which options may be granted to directors, officers and keyemployees. The maximum number of common shares available for option under the stock option plan is nine percent of theCompany’s common shares outstanding. Options granted have an exercise price of the Company’s prior day’s closing price Page 78 Annual Report 2011 83
  • 85. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted quoted on the TSX for the common shares Claude. All options are settled by physical delivery of shares. Vesting periods of options granted under the Company’s stock option plan vary on a grant by grant basis, at the discretion of the Company’s Board of Directors. Grants to Employees have a term to expiry of 10 years and typically have a vesting term of 3 to 5 years. Grants to Directors have a term to expiry of 10 years and vest immediately. Options outstanding under this plan at December 31, 2011 and 2010 and their weighted average exercise prices are as follows: Weighted Weighted Average Average 2011 Exercise 2010 Exercise Options Price Options Price Beginning of year 3,916,737 $ 1.15 3,259,028 $ 1.08 Options granted 2,478,768 2.06 1,166,546 1.15 Options exercised (648,667) 0.75 (422,414) 0.66 Options forfeited (241,876) 1.86 (79,756) 1.01 Options expired (20,712) 1.04 (6,667) 0.98 End of year 5,484,250 $ 1.57 3,916,737 $ 1.15 The weighted average share price at the date of exercise for share options exercised during 2011 was $1.84 (2010: $1.34). For director and employee options outstanding at December 31, 2011, the range of exercise prices, the weighted average exercise price and the weighted average remaining contractual life are as follows: Options Outstanding Options Exercisable Weighted Weighted Weighted Average Weighted Average Average Exercise Average Exercise Option Price Per Share Quantity Remaining Life Price Quantity Remaining Life Price $0.50 - $0.99 690,247 6.76 $0.79 690,247 6.76 $0.79 $1.00 - $1.50 1,552,442 6.74 $1.14 1,324,307 6.48 $1.15 $1.51 - $2.00 2,593,000 8.04 $1.86 1,252,000 6.52 $1.76 $2.01 - $2.38 648,561 8.88 $2.29 250,753 8.27 $2.24 5,484,250 7.61 $1.57 3,517,307 6.68 $1.37 The foregoing options have expiry dates ranging from May 17, 2012 to December 8, 2021. The weighted average fair value of stock options granted during the year of 2011 was $1.37 and was estimated using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with assumptions of a 7.11 year weighted average expected option life, a two percent expected forfeiture rate, 68 percent to 75 percent volatility (2010 – 63 percent to 73 percent) and interest rates ranging from 1.3 percent to 3.1 percent (2010 – 2.2 percent to 3.2 percent). In 2011, the compensation expense recognized in respect of stock options was $1.7 million (2010 - $0.6 million). This compensation expense has been included in general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Income. The expected volatility used in the Black-Scholes option pricing model is based on the historical volatility of the Company’s shares. (c) EQUITY ISSUE During 2011, the Company completed a short form prospectus offering. The Offering consisted of the issuance of 20,000,000 common shares of the Company, on a bought deal basis, at a price of $2.50 per share, as well as the issuance of 3,000,000 shares of the Company, at a price of $2.50 per share, to the Underwriters pursuant to the over-allotment option, for aggregate gross proceeds of $57,500,000. Page 7984 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 86. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted(d) SPECIAL WARRANTSIn December 2009, the Company completed a private placement offering consisting of the issuance of 12,000,000 specialwarrants at a price of $1.15 per Special Warrant for aggregate gross proceeds of $13,800,000. Each Special Warrant entitledits holder to acquire upon exercise, or upon deemed exercise immediately prior to the expiry date, without payment of anyadditional consideration, one unit. Each unit was comprised of one common share of Claude and one-half of one commonshare purchase warrant; all of these Special Warrants were exercised on February 2, 2010. Each whole share purchase warrantentitled the holder to subscribe for one common share for a period up to and including December 30, 2011 at an exercise priceof $1.75. All of these share purchase warrants expired as at December 30, 2011.The fair value of $0.45 per warrant granted was estimated using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with assumptions of atwo year weighted average expected life, no forfeitures, 87 percent volatility and an interest rate of 2.25 percent.(e) EQUITY ISSUEDuring 2010, the Company issued 325,000 common shares at a price of $1.11 per share to purchase a net profit interestlocated on a portion of the Seabee property. In order to arrive at the number of shares issued, the Company calculated avaluation based on expected future cash payments pursuant to the NPI agreement.(f) EQUITY ISSUEDuring 2009, the Company completed a private placement offering consisting of two parts. The first involved the issuance of atotal of 8,599,100 units, at a price of $0.75 per unit, for gross proceeds of $6,449,325. Each unit consisted of one commonshare of Claude and one-half of one transferable common share purchase warrant. Each whole warrant entitled the holder,upon exercise at any time up to and including October 9, 2010 and upon payment of $0.90, to subscribe for one commonshare. The second part of the offering involved the issuance of a total of 5,333,000 flow-through shares at a price of $0.80 perFlow-Through Share, for gross proceeds of $4,266,400. As compensation for this offering, Claude paid to the Underwriters acommission equal to five percent of the gross proceeds of the offering and an aggregate of 696,605 broker warrants. Eachwhole broker warrant entitles the holder to subscribe for one common share for a period up to and including April 9, 2011 atan exercise price of $0.83. At December 31, 2011, all common share purchase warrants and all broker warrants had beenexercised.(g) SCHEDULE OF WARRANTS OUTSTANDINGAt December 31, 2011, there were 2.7 million common share purchase warrants outstanding. Each common sharepurchase warrant entitles the holder to acquire one common share of the Company at prices determined at the time ofissue. The range of exercise prices and dates of expiration of the common share purchase warrants outstanding are asfollows: Number Number Outstanding at Outstanding at Price Expiry Date December 31, 2010 Exercised Expired December 31, 2011$ 1.60 May 22, 2013 1,809,500 116,300 - 1,693,200$ 0.83 April 9, 2011 139,321 139,321 - -$ 0.90 November 16, 2012 2,600,000 1,577,000 - 1,023,000$ 1.75 December 30, 2011 6,000,000 - 6,000,000 - 10,548,821 1,832,621 6,000,000 2,716,200The range of exercise prices and dates of expiration of the common share purchase warrants outstanding at December31, 2010 were as follows: Number Number Outstanding at Outstanding at Price Expiry Date December 31, 2009 Issued Exercised December 31, 2010$ 1.60 May 22, 2013 1,809,500 - - 1,809,500$ 0.90 October 9, 2010 4,299,550 - 4,299,550 -$ 0.83 April 9, 2011 696,605 - 557,284 139,321$ 0.90 November 16, 2012 5,000,000 - 2,400,000 2,600,000$ 1.75 December 30, 2011 - 6,000,000 - 6,000,000 11,805,655 6,000,000 7,256,834 10,548,821 Page 80 Annual Report 2011 85
  • 87. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted 15. Finance Expense: DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Interest expense on loans and borrowings $ 1,321 $ 1,394 Interest capitalized to mineral properties (542) (543) Derivative loss 1,911 500 Debenture amortization 195 152 Accretion expense 166 108 $ 3,051 $ 1,611 Finance expense paid for the year ended December 31, 2011 was $3.2 million (December 31, 2010 - $1.9 million). 16. Finance and Other Income: DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Net royalty income $ (1,109) $ (886) Other income (200) (662) Interest income (314) (31) $ (1,623) $ (1,579) Finance and other income received during the year ended December 31, 2011 was $0.5 million (December 31, 2010 - $0.3 million). 17. Personnel Expenses: DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Wages and salaries $ 32,201 $ 27,225 Canadian Pension Plan (CPP) and EI remittances 1,249 1,073 $ 33,450 $ 28,298 18. Joint Venture Interest: Amisk Gold Project The Company conducts a portion of its business through joint ventures. The Company records its proportionate share of assets, liabilities, revenue and operating costs of the joint ventures. At December 31, 2011, the Company owned a 65 percent interest in the Amisk Gold Project joint venture, which owns the Amisk Property, located in northeastern Saskatchewan. Under the joint venture agreement between the Company and St. Eugene Mining Corporation Limited (“St. Eugene”), the Company is the operator. The Management Committee of the joint venture represents the joint venture partners, authorizes annual programs and budgets and approves major transactions prior to execution by site management. The joint venture owners are obliged to make their pro-rata share of contributions as requested. As per Company policy, all costs related to the acquisition, exploration and development of mineral properties and the development of milling assets are capitalized on a property by property basis. The Company reflects its proportionate interest in the assets and liabilities of the Amisk Gold Project as follows: Page 8186 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 88. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 2011 2010 2010 Total assets $ 2,986 $ 1,250 $ - Total liabilities $ - $ - $ -Subsequent to December 31, 2011, the Company completed the acquisition of all of the outstanding shares of St.Eugene that it did not already own (Note 25). Upon closing the transaction on February 1, 2012, Claude now owns 100percent of the Amisk Gold Project.19. Related Party Transactions:Key Management PersonnelCompensation of key management personnel of the Company: DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Cash compensation – Salaries, short-term incentives and other $ 1,819 $ 1,701 Benefits Long term incentives, including share-based payments 517 474 Total compensation paid to key management personnel $ 2,336 $ 2,175The Company’s Executive Leadership Team (consisting of the Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, SeniorVice President Mining Operations and Vice President Exploration) are considered to be Key Management Personnel. Inaddition, members of the Company’s Board of Directors are included in this definition, as defined by IAS 24, RelatedParty Disclosures.20. Income Taxes:(a) Income tax expense DEC 31 DEC 31 Income tax expense 2011 2010 Current Income tax expense (recovery): $ - $ - Deferred income tax expense (recovery): Origination and reversal of temporary differences 4,378 9,120 Write-down of mineral properties (230) - Change in unrecognized deferred tax assets (3,784) (9,544) 364 (424) Income tax expense (recovery) $ 364 $ (424)(b) Income tax recognized directly in Other comprehensive income (loss)Other comprehensive income included on the consolidated statements of comprehensive income is presented net ofincome taxes. The following income tax amounts are included in each component of other comprehensive income(loss): Page 82 Annual Report 2011 87
  • 89. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted For the year ended December 31, 2010: Income tax Before tax recovery Net of tax Other comprehensive income (loss) Loss on available for sale securities transferred to profit 207 (28) 179 Unrealized gain on available for sale securities 2,936 (396) 2,540 3,143 (424) 2,719 For the year ended December 31, 2011: Income tax Before tax expense Net of tax Other comprehensive income (loss) Gain on available for sale securities transferred to profit (35) 5 (30) Unrealized loss on available for sale securities (2,409) 325 (2,084) (2,444) 330 (2,114) (c) Effective tax rate reconciliation The provision for income tax, both current and deferred, differs from the amount calculated by applying the combined expected federal and provincial income tax rate to profit before income tax. The reasons for these differences are as follows: DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Profit before income taxes $ 9,818 $ 9,889 Federal and Provincial statutory income tax rate 28.5% 30.0% Expected tax expense 2,798 2,967 Permanent differences 571 16 Effect of change in effective tax rates (168) (269) Flow-through share renunciations - 1,611 Loss of deferred tax assets on sale of mineral properties - 5,136 Decrease in tax assets related to royalty payable 947 (341) Benefit of previously unrecognized tax assets (3,784) (9,544) Income tax expense (recovery) $ 364 $ (424) (d) Significant components of recognized and unrecognized Deferred tax assets and liabilities The significant components of deferred income tax assets/liabilities are as follows: Recognized in Recognized Recognized other JAN 1 in directly comprehensive DEC 31 2010 Net profit to equity Income 2010 Deferred income tax assets (liabilities) Share issue costs 814 (310) 60 - 564 Decommissioning and reclamation 998 301 - - 1,299 Net royalty obligation 3,641 277 - - 3,918 Investments 75 26 - (424) (323) Mineral properties 7,843 (9,458) - - (1,615) Other - 44 - - 44 Page 8388 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 90. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted Recognized in Recognized Recognized other JAN 1 in directly comprehensive DEC 31 2010 Net profit to equity Income 2010Total Deferred income tax assets (liabilities) 13,371 (9,120) 60 (424) 3,887Recognized (unrecognized) deferred tax (13,371) 9,544 (60) - (3,887)assets - 424 - (424) -Deferred tax assets were not recognized in 2010 as it was not probable that future taxable profit would be availableagainst which the company could utilize the benefits. Recognized in Recognized Recognized other JAN 1 in directly comprehensive DEC 31 2011 Net profit to equity Income 2011Deferred income tax assets (liabilities)Share issue costs 564 (461) 929 - 1,032Decommissioning and reclamation 1,299 1,324 - - 2,623Net royalty obligation 3,918 (1,024) - - 2,894Investments (323) 10 - 330 17Mineral properties (1,615) (3,960) - - (5,575)Other 44 (37) - - 7Total Deferred income tax assets (liabilities) 3,887 (4,148) 929 330 998Recognized (unrecognized) deferred tax (3,887) 3,784 103 - -assets - (364) 1,032 330 998(e) Unrecognized Income Tax CreditsThe company has $2.2 million (2010 - $1.4 million) of unused income tax credits that can be applied against futuretaxes payable. No deferred tax asset or income tax credit receivable has been recognized as it is not probable that futuretaxable profits will be available to utilize the credits. The income tax credit will expire, if unused, as follows: 2011 2026 $ 61 2027 533 2028 285 2029 239 2030 273 2031 827 $ 2,218 Page 84 Annual Report 2011 89
  • 91. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted 21. Earnings Per Share: Basic earnings per share: DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Basic earnings per share: Net profit attributable to common $ 9,454 $ 10,313 Shareholders Weighted average number of common 156,062 131,193 Shares outstanding Basic net earnings per share $ 0.06 $ 0.08 Diluted earnings per share: DEC 31 DEC 31 2011 2010 Diluted earnings per share: Net earnings attributable to common $ 9,454 $ 10,313 Shareholders Weighted average number of common 156,062 131,193 Shares outstanding Dilutive effect of stock options 1,385 1,084 Dilutive effect of warrants 963 1,134 Weighted average number of common 158,410 133,411 Shares outstanding Diluted net earnings per share $ 0.06 $ 0.08 Excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per share at December 31, 2011 were options outstanding on 648,561 common shares with an average exercise price greater than the average market price of the Company’s common shares. Excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per share at December 31, 2010 were: (i) options outstanding on 1,005,000 common shares with an average exercise price greater than the average market price of the Company’s common shares; and (ii) 7,809,500 warrants with an average exercise price greater than the average market price of the Company’s common shares. 22. Financial Instruments: The Company is exposed in varying degrees to a variety of financial instrument related risks by virtue of its activities. The overall financial risk management program focuses on preservation of capital and protecting current and future Company assets and cash flows by reducing exposure to risks posed by the uncertainties and volatilities of financial markets. The Company’s Board of Directors has responsibility to ensure that an adequate financial risk management policy is established and to approve the policy. The Company’s Audit Committee oversees Management’s compliance with the Company’s financial risk management policy, approves financial risk management programs, and receives and reviews reports on management compliance with the policy. The types of risk exposures and the way in which such exposures are managed are as follows: Credit Risk – The Company’s credit risk is primarily attributable to its liquid financial assets including cash and cash equivalents, receivables, and commodity and currency instruments. The Company limits exposure to credit risk on Page 8590 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 92. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise notedliquid financial assets through maintaining its cash and cash equivalents and reclamation deposits with high-creditquality financial institutions. Sales of precious metals are to entities considered to be credit worthy, as evaluatedthrough the Company’s risk management program, which includes an evaluation of new and existing customers andquarterly monitoring.Liquidity Risk – The Company ensures that there is sufficient capital in order to meet short term business requirements,after taking into account cash flows from operations and the Company’s holdings of cash and cash equivalents. TheCompany believes operating cash flows will be sufficient to fund the continued exploration at Madsen and Amisk andongoing capital improvements at the Seabee properties for the next twelve months. The Company’s cash is invested inbusiness accounts with quality financial institutions and is available on demand. Payments/Commitments due by period Less than 2-3 4-5 More than Total 1 year Years Years 5 yearsContractual ObligationDemand loans 896 896 - - -Interest on demand loans 21 21 - - -Debenture 9,751 - 9,751 - -Debenture interest 1,629 1,170 459 - -Capital lease obligations 3,905 2,119 1,786 - -Interest on capital leases 212 154 58 - -Office lease 311 114 197 - - 16,725 4,474 12,251 - -Market Risk – Market risk is the potential for loss from adverse changes in the market value of financial instruments.The level of market risk that the Company is exposed to varies depending on the composition of its derivativeinstrument portfolio, as well as current and expected market conditions. The significant market risk exposures to whichthe Company is exposed are Foreign exchange risk, Commodity price and Interest rate risk. These are discussed furtherbelow:Foreign exchange risk – The results of the Company’s operations are subject to currency risks. The Company’srevenues from the production and sale of gold are denominated in U.S. dollars. However, the Company’s operatingexpenses are primarily incurred in Canadian dollars and its liabilities are primarily denominated in Canadian dollars.The Company is not exposed to material foreign exchange risk on its financial instruments.Interest rate risk – In respect to the Company’s financial assets, the interest rate risk mainly arises from the interest rateimpact on our cash and cash equivalents, reclamation deposits and debt. In respect to financial liabilities, one of theCompany’s demand loans carries a floating interest rate with the balance of Company debt at fixed interest rates. Whenpossible, the Company will fix its interest costs to avoid variations in cash flows. Due to the greater proportion of fixedrate debt, a one percent change in interest rates would not materially impact earnings or cash flows.Commodity price risk – The value of the Company’s mineral resources is related to the price of gold and the outlookfor this mineral. Gold and precious metal prices historically have fluctuated widely and are affected by numerousfactors outside of the Company’s control, including, but not limited to, industrial and retail demand, central banklending, forward sales by producers and speculators, levels of worldwide production, short-term changes in supply anddemand because of speculative hedging activities and certain other factors related specifically to gold. The profitabilityof the Company’s operations is highly correlated to the market price of gold. If the gold price declines below the costof production at the Company’s operations, for a prolonged period of time, it may not be economically feasible tocontinue production. The Company is not exposed to material commodity price risk on its financial instruments.For a $10 US$ movement in gold price per ounce, earnings and cash flow will have a corresponding movement of CDN$0.4 million, or $0.00 per share.Fair Value - The Company has various financial instruments comprised of cash and cash equivalents, receivables, shortand long-term investments, restricted promissory notes, reclamation deposits, demand loans, accounts payable andaccrued liabilities, long-term debt, and royalty obligations. Page 86 Annual Report 2011 91
  • 93. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted For disclosure purposes, all financial instruments measured at fair value are categorized into one of three hierarchy levels, described below. Each level is based on the transparency of the inputs used to measure the fair values of assets and liabilities: Level 1 – Values based on unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical assets or liabilities. Level 2 – Values based on quoted prices in markets that are not active or model inputs that are observable either directly or indirectly for substantially the full term of the asset or liability. Level 3 – Values based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement. The fair values of financial assets and liabilities, together with the carrying amounts shown in the Statement of Financial Position, are as follows: December 31 December 31 2011 2010 Carrying Estimated Carrying Estimated Value Fair Value Value Fair Value Loans and receivables Cash and cash equivalents $2,529 $2,529 $6,401 $6,401 Restricted cash - - 4,389 4,389 Short-term investments (1) 33,168 33,168 - - Accounts receivable (3) 2,714 2,714 2,716 2,716 Available-for-sale financial assets Investments (1) 2,854 2,854 4,328 4,328 Held-to-maturity Deposits for reclamation costs 2,237 2,237 2,277 2,277 Other financial liabilities Demand loans 896 896 2,499 2,499 Accounts payable 5,737 5,737 5,036 5,036 Net royalty obligations 5,289 5,289 6,398 6,398 Debenture (1) 9,452 9,751 9,344 9,838 Gold forward contract (2) - - (257) (257) (1) Based on quoted market prices – Level 1 (2) Based on models with observable inputs – Level 2 (3) At December 31, 2011, there were no receivables that were past due or considered impaired. 23. Capital Management: The Company’s objective when managing its capital is to safeguard its ability to continue as a going concern so that it can provide adequate returns to shareholders and benefits to other stakeholders. The Company defines capital that it manages as the aggregate of its equity attributable to owners of the Company, which is comprised of issued capital, contributed surplus, accumulated deficit and accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). The Company manages the capital structure and makes adjustments to it in light of changes in economic conditions and the risk characteristics of the underlying assets and the Company’s working capital requirements. In order to maintain or adjust the capital structure, the Company (upon approval from its Board of Directors, as required) may issue new shares through private placements, sell assets or incur debt. The Board of Directs reviews and approves any material transaction out of the ordinary course of business, including proposals on acquisitions, major investments, as well as annual capital and operating budgets. The Company is not subject to externally imposed capital requirements. The Company utilizes a combination of short-term and long term debt and equity to finance its operations and exploration. Page 8792 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 94. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise notedCapital Structure DEC 31 DEC 31 JAN 1 Interest Maturity 2011 2010 2010Demand loan # 1 Prime + 1.50% Aug/2011 $ - $ 667 $ 1,667Demand loan # 2 4.575% Nov/2012 896 1,832 2,727Demand loan # 3 5.99% Feb/2010 - - 192Debenture 12.00% May/2013 9,452 9,344 9,192Total debt $ 10,348 $ 11,843 $ 13,778Shareholders’ equity 172,895 106,068 85,256Debt to equity 5.99 % 11.17% 16.75%The Company is bound by and has met all covenants on these credit facilities.24. Determination of Fair Values:A number of the Company’s accounting policies and disclosures require the determination of fair value, for bothfinancial and non-financial assets and liabilities. Fair values have been determined for measurement and or disclosurepurposes based on the methods described below. When applicable, further information about the assumptions made indetermining fair values is disclosed in the notes specific to that asset or liability.DerivativesThe fair value of the Company’s forward exchange contracts are estimated based on appropriate price modelingcommonly used by market participants. Such modeling uses discounted cash flow analysis with observable marketinputs including future interest rates, implied volatilities and the credit risk of the Company or the counterparties asappropriate, with resulting valuations periodically validated through third-party or counterparty quotes.Share-based payment transactionsThe fair value of the employee share purchase plan and the fair value of the stock options is measured using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Measurement inputs include share price on measurement date, exercise price of theinstrument, expected volatility (based on weighted average historic volatility adjusted for changes expected due topublicly available information), weighted average expected life of the instruments (based on historical experience andgeneral option holder behavior) and the risk-free interest rate (based on government bonds). Service conditions attachedto the transactions are not taken into account in determining fair value.25. Subsequent Event:Subsequent to December 31, 2011, the Company closed the transaction whereby Claude would acquire all of theoutstanding shares of St. Eugene Mining Corporation Limited (TSXV: SEM) ("St. Eugene") that it did not already own.The transaction was accomplished pursuant to the terms of a court approved plan of arrangement completed under theBusiness Corporations Act (British Columbia) (the “Arrangement”). Under the Arrangement, Claude acquired all of theoutstanding common shares of St. Eugene in exchange for the issuance of approximately 8.7 million common shares ofClaude, representing proceeds of approximately $13.0 million. In addition to Claude Shares, former shareholders of St.Eugene also received 0.25 of a common share of Satori Resources Inc. (“Satori”).As part of the Arrangement, Claude also exchanged all outstanding warrants of St. Eugene for warrants of Claude andreduced its existing net smelter return royalty on the Tartan Lake Project from a sliding scale to two percent. The netsmelter return royalty can also be repurchased at any time by Satori for $1.0 million for each one percent.On closing, Claude now owns 100 percent of the Amisk Gold Project. The transaction will be accounted for as an assetacquisition as St. Eugene did not meet the definition of business, as defined in IFRS 3, Business Combinations. Theapproximate purchase price of the transaction was $13.0 million, which will be recorded as an increase to mineralproperties and share capital. Page 88 Annual Report 2011 93
  • 95. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted 26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS: These consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011 are the Company’s first annual financial statements prepared under IFRS. For all accounting periods prior to December 31, 2011, the Company prepared its financial statements in accordance with Canadian GAAP (“previous GAAP”). In accordance with IFRS 1, First time adoption of IFRS, certain disclosures relating to the transition to IFRS are given in this note. These disclosures are prepared under IFRS as set out in the basis of preparation in Note 2. IFRS 1 generally requires that first-time adopters retrospectively apply all effective IFRS standards and interpretations in effect at the reporting date. However, IFRS 1 allows first time adopters to IFRS to take advantage of a number of voluntary exemptions from the general principal of retrospective restatement. The IFRS 1 exemptions and exceptions utilized by the Company in its conversion from Canadian GAAP to IFRS are as follows: IFRS 3 Business Combinations This standard has not been applied to acquisitions of subsidiaries that occurred before January 1, 2010, the Company’s transition date IFRS 2 Share-based Payments A first-time adopter is encouraged, but not required, to apply IFRS 2 Share-based Payments (“IFRS 2”) to equity instruments that were granted on or before November 7, 2002, or were granted after November 7, 2002 and vested before the entity’s IFRS transition date. The Company has only applied IFRS 2 to all equity instruments granted after November 7, 2002 that had not vested as of January 1, 2010, and to all liabilities arising from share-based payment transactions that existed at January 1, 2010. IFRIC 1 Changes in Existing Decommissioning, Restoration and Similar Liabilities The Company has elected to apply the available exemption from full retrospective application of decommissioning and reclamation provisions, as allowed under IFRS 1, and has therefore adopted IFRIC 1 prospectively at the Company’s transition date of January 1, 2010. Mandatory Exceptions to Retrospective Applications IFRS 1 provides specific guidelines that a first-time adopter must adhere to under certain circumstances. The guideline pertaining to estimates applies to the Company, which prohibits the use of hindsight to create or revise estimates. Accordingly, the estimates previously made by the Company under its previous GAAP are consistent with their application under IFRS. Material Adjustments to the Statement of Cash Flows for 2010 In addition the changes required to adjust for the accounting policy differences described in the following notes, interest paid and income taxes paid have been moved into the body of the consolidated statement of cash flows as part of operating activities, whereas they were previously disclosed as supplementary information. There are no other material differences between the statement of cash flows presented under IFRS and the statement of cash flows presented under previous GAAP. Page 8994 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 96. Annual Report 2011 95
  • 97. 96 Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted 26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS (continued): Reconciliation of equity (continued) Presentation Presentation Previous and Other Effect of Previous and Other Effect of Canadian Adjustments Transition Canadian Adjustments TransitionTSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR GAAP Note (k) To IFRS IFRS GAAP Note (k) To IFRS IFRS Notes January 1, 2010 December 31, 2010 Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (e)(f) 4,100 (498) 326 3,928 5,537 (758) - 4,779 Interest payable on royalty obligations 4,729 (4,729) - - 4,770 (4,770) - - Loans and borrowings - 6,625 - 6,625 - 13,441 - 13,441 Demand loans 4,586 (4,586) - - 2,499 (2,499) - - Liabilities related to discontinued operation (b)(d) 370 - 162 532 - - - - Net royalty obligation - 766 - 766 - 815 - 815 Other liabilities 2,942 (2,942) - - 2,634 (2,634) - - Current liabilities 16,727 (5,364) 488 11,851 15,440 3,595 - 19,035 Obligations under capital lease 1,240 (1,240) - - 873 (873) - - Loans and borrowings - 10,432 - 10,432 - 873 - 873 Debenture 9,192 (9,192) - - 9,257 (9,257) - - Royalty obligations 83,554 (83,554) - - 84,220 (84,220) - - Deferred revenue 5,531 (5,531) - - 4,582 (4,582) - - Liabilities related to discontinued operation (b) 117 - (117) - - - - - Net royalty obligation - 6,517 - 6,517 - 5,583 - 5,583 Decommissioning and reclamation (d) 2,965 - 569 3,534 4,221 - 589 4,810 Deferred tax liability (g) - - - - 1,975 - (1,975) - Non-current liabilities 102,599 (82,568) 452 20,483 105,128 (92,476) (1,386) 11,266 Shareholders’ equity Share capital (e)(g) 111,957 - 3,502 115,459 117,974 (276) 5,053 122,751 Contributed surplus (f) 2,465 (204) 340 2,601 2,754 (65) 400 3,089 Retained earnings (deficit) (i) (4,361) 702 (29,179) (32,838) 1,457 1,099 (25,081) (22,525) Accumulated other comprehensive income (g) 34 - - 34 2,753 - - 2,753 Total shareholders’ equity 110,095 498 (25,337) 85,256 124,938 758 (19,628) 106,068 Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity 229,421 (87,434) (24,397) 117,590 245,506 (88,123) (21,014) 136,369 Page 91
  • 98. ClaudeClaude Resources Inc. Resources Inc. Notes toNotes to the Consolidated Financial Statements the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended DecemberDecember 31,2010 and 2010 For the Years ended 31, 2011 and 2011 ExpressedExpressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except amounts or as otherwise otherwise noted in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share per share amounts or as noted 26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS (continued): 26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS (continued): Reconciliation of income for the year ended December 31, 2010 31, 2010 Reconciliation of income for the year ended December Presentation Presentation Previous Previous Other Other of Effect of And And Effect CanadianCanadian Adjustments Adjustments Transition Transition Notes Notes GAAP GAAP Note (k) NoteTo IFRS To IFRS (k) IFRS IFRSRevenue Revenue 55,998 55,998 - - - - 55,998 55,998 Mine Operating:Mine Operating: Production costs Production costs (a) (a) 31,364 31,364 - - (147) (147) 31,217 31,217 Depreciation and depletion depletion Depreciation and (c)(h) (c)(h) 14,617 14,617 - (3,288) (3,288) - 11,329 11,329 45,981 45,981 - (3,435) (3,435) - 42,546 42,546 Profit from mining operationsProfit from mining operations 10,017 10,017 3,435 3,435 13,452 13,452 General and administrative General and administrative 5,213 5,213 (384) (384) 46 46 4,875 4,875 Finance expense expense Finance (d)(h) (d)(h) - - - -1,611 1,611 1,611 1,611 Finance and other and other income Finance income (d)(e)(h) (d)(e)(h) 285 285 - (1,864) (1,864) - (1,579) (1,579) Loss on investments Loss on investments 207 207 - - - - 207 207 5,705 5,705 (384) (384)(207) (207) 5,114 5,114 Profit from continuing operations before taxProfit from continuing operations before tax 4,312 4,312 384 3843,642 3,642 8,338 8,338Deferred Deferred income tax recovery income tax recovery - - - - (424) (424) (424) (424) Profit from continuing operationsProfit from continuing operations 4,312 4,312 384 3844,066 4,066 8,762 8,762 Profit from discontinued operationProfit from discontinued operation (d) (d) 1,506 1,506 - - 45 45 1,551 1,551Net profit profit Net 5,818 5,818 384 3844,111 4,111 10,313 10,313 Reconciliation of comprehensive income for the year ended December 31, 2010 31, 2010 Reconciliation of comprehensive income for the year ended December Presentation Presentation Previous Previous Other Other of Effect of and and Effect CanadianCanadian Adjustments Adjustments Transition Transition GAAP GAAP Note (k) NoteTo IFRS To IFRS (k) IFRS IFRSNet profit profit Net 5,818 5,818 384 3844,111 4,111 10,313 10,313Other comprehensive income income Other comprehensive Loss on available-for-sale securities securities transferred to profit Loss on available-for-sale transferred to profit 176 176 - - 3 3 179 179 Unrealized gain (loss) on (loss) on available-for-sale Unrealized gain available-for-sale 2,543 2,543 - - (3) (3) 2,540 2,540 securities securitiesOther comprehensive income income Other comprehensive 2,719 2,719 - - - - 2,719 2,719Total comprehensive income income Total comprehensive 8,537 8,537 384 3844,111 4,111 13,032 13,032 Page 92 Page 92 Annual Report 2011 97
  • 99. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the Years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except per share amounts or as otherwise noted 26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS (continued): Notes to the reconciliations (a) Shrinkage Stope Platform Costs The Company utilizes the shrinkage stope and long-hole mining methods to mine its ore body at the Seabee Gold Operation. Under its previous GAAP, the Company deferred these costs (which included labour, equipment and overhead) until the related ore was transferred to the mine surface. Once the ore was transported to the surface, the costs were reclassified to inventory and charged to operating costs upon sale. Under IFRS, the Company is accounting for these costs as variable production costs that are directly attributable to the conversion of gold ore. The impact of applying this policy is as follows: Consolidated Statement of Financial Position: JAN 1 DEC 31 2010 2010 Increase in Inventories - 42 Decrease in Shrinkage stope platform costs (11,293) (11,199) Decrease in Retained earnings (11,293) (11,157) Consolidated Statement of Income: DEC 31 2010 Decrease in Production costs $ (147) (b) Discontinued operation Under the Company’s previous GAAP, long-lived assets classified as held for sale were classified in separate current and long term portions. Under IFRS, non-current assets and liabilities of disposal groups classified as held for sale are classified as current in the statement of financial position as they are expected to be realized within 12 months of the date of classification as held for sale or distribution. This difference has resulted in the reclassification of non-current assets and liabilities related to the Company’s discontinued operation from non-current to current, with no income or retained earnings impact. (c) Impairment of Non-Financial Assets Under the Company’s previous GAAP, impairment of long-lived assets was assessed on the basis of an asset’s estimated undiscounted future cash flows compared with the asset’s carrying amount and if impairment is indicated, discounted cash flows are prepared to quantify the amount of the impairment. Under IFRS, impairment is assessed based on discounted cash flows compared with the asset’s carrying amount to determine the recoverable amount and measure the amount of the impairment. Upon transition to IFRS, the Company tested its Seabee Gold Mine for impairment using the one-step approach prescribed by International Accounting Standard 36 (“IAS 36”), Impairment of Assets. The carrying value of the asset was compared against the fair value less cost to sell. Fair value less cost to sell was determined using a discounted cash flow approach that incorporated marketplace participant assumptions. The cash flows were discounted over a seven year period at a post-tax rate of 11.3 percent. As a result, an impairment of $13.1 million was calculated and charged directly to retained earnings as a transition difference. This asset was not considered impaired under the Company’s previous GAAP because the estimated cash flow projects on an undiscounted basis exceeded the carrying value. Page 9398 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 100. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except share data or as otherwise noted26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS (continued): Notes to the reconciliations (continued) The impact of this change decreased retained earnings as follows: Consolidated Statements of Financial Position: JAN 1 DEC 31 2010 2010 Decrease in Mineral properties $ (13,104) $ (10,004) Decrease in Retained earnings $ (13,104) $ (10,004) Consolidated Statement of Income: DEC 31 2010 Decrease in Depreciation and depletion $ (3,089) (d) Decommissioning and reclamation Under its previous GAAP, the fair value of the liability relating to the Company’s Decommissioning and reclamation was recorded in the period in which it was incurred, discounted to its present value using the Company’s credit adjusted risk-free interest rate and the corresponding amount was recognized by increasing the carrying amount of the related long-lived asset. The liability was then accreted and the capitalized cost depreciated over the useful life of the related asset. Under IFRS, the Company must recognize a liability at the time when it becomes legally or constructively obligated to rehabilitate a disturbance resulting from mining activities; IFRS also requires re-measurement of the liability at each reporting date. In addition, IAS 37, Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets (“IAS 37”), requires the re-measurement of the provision for reclamation and rehabilitation if there is a change in the current market-based discount rate. Under IFRS, discount rates used should reflect the risks specific to the decommissioning provision; a risk-free rate is used when the estimated future costs take into consideration related risks. Under IFRS 1, Claude elected not to retrospectively recalculate the effect of each change in its reclamation provision prior to January 1, 2010. Instead, the liability and related assets and depreciation were measured at the date of transition. Upon transition to IFRS, the Company recalculated its decommissioning and reclamation provision utilizing the guidance of IAS 37. A transition difference of $0.6 million was booked to the Company’s asset retirement obligation and retained earnings accounts. Consolidated Statements of Financial Position: JAN 1 DEC 31 2010 2010 Increase in decommissioning and reclamation provision Gold operation $ 569 $ 589 Discontinued operation 45 - Decrease in Retained earnings $ 614 $ 589 Page 94 Annual Report 2011 99
  • 101. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except share data or as otherwise noted 26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS (continued): Notes to the reconciliations (continued) JAN 1 DEC 31 2010 2010 Increase in Mineral properties $ - $ 147 Increase in Retained earnings $ - $ 147 Consolidated Statement of Income: DEC 31 2010 Decrease in Finance expense $ (90) Increase in Finance and other income (36) Increase in Profit from Discontinued operation (45) $ (171) (e) Share Capital Flow-through shares The Company, from time to time, finances a portion of its exploration activities through the issue of flow- through shares. Flow-through shares are a unique Canadian tax incentive which is the subject of specific guidance under the Company’s previous GAAP; however, there is no equivalent guidance under IFRS. Flow- through securities are securities of the Company which meet certain criteria and qualify for flow-through tax treatment for the purposes of the Income Tax Act (Canada) (“ITA”). Qualification as a “flow-through share” enables the Company to renounce certain eligible resource expenditures incurred by the Company for the benefit of any investor who is a Canadian taxpayer. Once issued, the shares are common shares of the Company and are not differentiated from shares which were not flow-through shares. Under the ITA, companies are permitted to issue flow-through shares pursuant to a written agreement under which the issuer agrees to incur certain eligible Canadian exploration expenses within the time frame specified in the agreement (generally 12 to 24 months) and to flow-through or “renounce” the related tax deduction to the investor. The proceeds from the issuance of flow-through shares must be expended on “qualifying expenditures,” which are related to mineral exploration in Canada and the Company recorded the future tax liability associated with the issuance of flow-through shares as a reduction in share capital at the time of renouncement of the related tax deduction. Under its previous GAAP, the Company recorded the tax cost of expenditures renounced to subscribers on the date the deductions were renounced to the subscribers provided there was reasonable assurance that the expenditures would be made. Under this treatment, share capital was reduced and future income tax liabilities were increased by the tax cost of expenditures renounced to the subscribers and the Company had unrecorded tax benefits on loss carryforwards and tax pools in excess of book values available for deduction against which a valuation allowance had been provided. In these circumstances, the future tax liability reduced the valuation allowance and that reduction was recognized in earnings. The premium paid for flow through shares in excess of the market value of the shares without the flow- through features at the time of issue was credited to other liabilities and included in income at the time the qualifying expenditures are made. In accordance with IFRS interpretations, the premium of proceeds received on Flow-through Shares in excess of the market value of the shares on the date of issue represents the value of the liability relating to the transfer of income tax credits foregone and owing to investors upon renunciation. As the Company fulfills its obligations by incurring the eligible expenditures, the premium from the proceeds received will be recorded as other income and the related deferred tax liability and expense recognized. Page 95100 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 102. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except share data or as otherwise noted26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS (continued): Notes to the reconciliations (continued) Under IFRS, the proceeds from the issuance of flow-through shares should be allocated between the offering of shares and the sale of tax benefits. The allocation is based on the difference between the issue price of flow-through shares and the fair value of the shares at the date of issuance. A liability is recorded for this difference and is reversed when expenditures are incurred. Upon transition to IFRS at January 1, 2010, the difference between these two approaches resulted in a $3.5 million increase to share capital and a corresponding decrease in retained earnings. Consolidated Statements of Financial Position: JAN 1 DEC 31 2010 2010 Increase in Accounts payable $ 326 $ - Decrease in Retained earnings $ 326 $ - JAN 1 DEC 31 2010 2010 Increase in Share capital Adjustment for flow-through shares $ 7,964 $ 7,964 Adjustment for flow-through share premiums (4,462) (4,462) Reversal of renunciation of income taxes on flow- - 1,611 through shares Decrease in Retained earnings $ 3,502 $ 5,113 Consolidated Statements of Income: DEC 31 2010 Increase in Finance and other income $ (326) (f) Share-based Compensation The Company has applied IFRS 2 to all equity instruments granted after November 7, 2002 that had not vested as of January 1, 2010, and to all liabilities arising from share-based payment transactions that existed at January 1, 2010. Under IFRS, the Company accrues the cost of share-based payments over the vesting period using the graded method of amortization with each installment accounted for as a separate arrangement. Under the Company’s previous GAAP, the Company elected to treat the share-based payments as a pool and determine the fair value using an average life of the instruments, provided that compensation was recognized on a straight-line basis, subject to at least the value of the vested portion of the award being recognized at each reporting date. Under the Company’s previous GAAP, the cost associated with the grant of these options was recorded in the period in which the options were granted. Under IFRS, the service date is considered to be the date the employee becomes eligible to participate in the bonus plan (i.e. January 1 of each year), rather than the grant date. This accounting treatment is a difference between the Company’s previous GAAP and IFRS. Consequently, an adjustment of $0.3 million was recorded to decrease contributed surplus with offset to opening retained earnings. Page 96 Annual Report 2011 101
  • 103. Claude Resources Inc. Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements For the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except share data or as otherwise noted 26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS (continued): Notes to the reconciliations (continued) JAN 1 DEC 31 2010 2010 Decrease in Contributed surplus $ 340 $ 400 Increase in Retained earnings $ 340 $ 400 (g) Deferred Tax Liability The following changes decreased the deferred tax liability due to other changes under IFRS. Consolidated Statements of Financial Position: JAN 1 DEC 31 Notes 2010 2010 Decrease in Share capital $ - $ (60) Increase in Other comprehensive income - 424 Increase in Share capital (e) - 1,611 Decrease in Deferred tax liability $ - $ (1,975) (h) Presentation changes The transition to IFRS resulted in numerous financial statement presentation changes, most noticeably on the statements of income. These reclassifications have been identified in the reconciliations contained within this note and have no impact on the final equity position of the Company. The changes are listed below: Consolidated Statement of Income: DEC 31 2010 Increase in Finance expense $ 1,701 Decrease in Depreciation and depletion (199) Increase in Finance and other income (1,502) $ - Under the Company’s prior GAAP, accretion was included as a component of Depreciation and depletion and Interest expense was grouped with Other income. Under IFRS, Finance income and expense are presented as separate line items. As such, the above-noted increase in finance expense relates to accretion being removed from depreciation and depletion and interest expense being removed from being grouped within Other income. Consolidated Statement of Financial Position: As disclosed in note 5, in 2010, the Company made an offer to repay all of its outstanding debentures. Under the Company’s prior GAAP, the current portion of the debentures of $87 as at December 31, 2010 was determined by the amount of debentures repaid by the Company subsequent to December 31, 2010. Under IFRS, the Company’s offer to repay all of the debentures prior to December 31, 2010 requires the entire carrying amount of the debentures to be classified as a current liability as at December 31, 2010. Accordingly, the long-term portion of the Company’s debentures was reclassified from long-term liabilities to current liabilities as at December 31, 2010. Page 97102 TSX:CRJ | NYSE AMEX: CGR
  • 104. Claude Resources Inc.Notes to the Consolidated Financial StatementsFor the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010Expressed in Thousands of Canadian Dollars, except share data or as otherwise noted26. Explanation of Transition to IFRS (continued): Notes to the reconciliations (continued) (i) Retained Earnings (Deficit) Adjustments The above changes decreased (increased) retained earnings as follows: JAN 1 DEC 31 Notes 2010 2010 Inventories - 42 Shrinkage stope platform costs (a) (11,293) (11,199) Mineral properties (b) (13,104) (9,857) Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (e) (326) - Decommissioning and reclamation (d) (614) (589) Deferred tax liability - 1,611 Income tax recovery - 424 Share capital (e) (3,502) (5,113) Stock compensation (f) (340) (400) Total Adjustment under IFRS - Retained earnings (deficit) (29,179) (25,081) (j) Reclassifications Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s financial statement presentation. (k) Presentation and Other Adjustments ESPP and Stock Compensation Expense Certain prior period amounts have been adjusted due to the correction of immaterial errors in the application of the Company’s previous GAAP that were identified during the Company’s transition to IFRS. As a result, at January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2010 Accounts payable was reduced by $0.6 million and $0.5 million, respectively, Share capital was reduced by nil and $0.3 million, respectively, Contributed surplus was reduced by $0.2 million and $0.2 million, respectively, and Retained earnings was increased by $0.8 million and $1.0 million, respectively. In addition, in the year ended December 31, 2010, general and administrative expense was reduced by $0.4 million. Royalty Obligation As disclosed in Note 12, during each of 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, the Company entered into separate Royalty Agreements whereby it sold a basic royalty on a portion of the gold production at its Seabee Gold Operation. The Company received cash consideration consisting of royalty income, indemnity fee income and interest income. Amounts relating to these Royalty Agreements were presented on a gross basis on the Statement of Financial Position under the Company’s Previous GAAP. These amounts have been reclassified on a net basis, as the Company and all counterparties have a legal right of offset and the intention to settle on a net basis. Page 98 Annual Report 2011 103
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  • 106. Annual Report 2011 105