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Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
Sydney Opera House eNotebook
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Sydney Opera House eNotebook

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  • 1. Sydney Opera House MathBy: Kaytlyn KelleyFall 2011
  • 2. History of the House (number & operations) The Sydney Opera House project took 19 years in total. In 1954, a committee was set up with the main goal of creating the House. Danish architect Jorn Utzon’s design was chosen as the framework for the building in 1957. The construction began in 1959 but was delayed on multiple occasions due to unrealistic plans and costs. The first performance didn’t occur until September 28, 1973 with the production of War and Peace and the building was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on October 20th of that year.
  • 3. Cost Concerns(data analysis & probability)  One of the first steps in creating the opera house was setting up an appeal fund to raise money. It was expected that the building would cost $AU 7 million. The initial fund raised only 12% of that reaching $AU 900,000. The Opera House Lotteries were set up as an attempt to raise the remaining money. The House ended up costing $AU 102 million, which profits from the lottery were able to cover. The state’s government covers 30% of the costs a year to maintain the building.
  • 4. Size(measurement) The Sydney Opera House is 185 meters (606 ft. 11 in.) long. It is 120 meters (393 ft. 8 in.) wide.
  • 5. Design (geometry)The structure of the Sydney Opera House is that of beautiful andadvanced architecture and technology. The shapes involved in creating itinclude a rectangular base. The well-designed sails are created fromspheres but have been restructured to include obtuse and acute anglesand create a look of a dozen isosceles triangles.
  • 6. Seating Selections(number & operations)  There are 100 different rooms in the House, including the main 5 venues, which seat a total of 5, 532 people. The Concert Hall holds 2,679, the Opera Theatre holds 1,547, the Drama Theatre holds 544, the Playhouse holds 398, and the Studio holds 364 people.
  • 7. Ticket Pricing (algebra) In 2008, the average ticket price for a show at the House was $AU 76.60. The profit made for these tickets for the year was a total of $AU 1,061,273,304. This means that 15,823,705 total tickets were sold that year.
  • 8. Utzon’s Room(measurement) Utzon’s legacy was not forgotten after the Opera House was built. The smallest and one of the newest rooms in the House is dedicated solely to him. On one wall contains a 14 meter (45 ft. 11 in.) long beautifully colored tapestry, which is Utzon’s first decorative artwork.
  • 9. The Concert Hall (geometry) One of the things the Opera House is known for the most is the acoustics of their largest hall. The total volume of the room is 26,400 cubic meters (880,000 cubic feet). The room includes 18 adjustable acoustic acrylic rings suspended above the stage, which assist the sound quality of the music.
  • 10. Sydney Oprah(data analysis & probability) In 2010, Australian tourism programs created a plan to target the traveling American middle class through the use of icon Oprah. She brought herself and 300 lucky American winners to Australia to travel to various locations. Two of her talk shows were taped at the Sydney Opera House. It was expected she would bring in approximately $47 million in tourism revenue. They would reveal top sites for vacationing in hopes of generating plans of future trips by American families.
  • 11. Attendance(number & operations) The Opera House has a total of approximately 2,200,000 paying visitors a year. 200,000 of those individuals receive guided tours. 2,000,000 of them attend one of the 3000 shows shown throughout the year.
  • 12. Top Ten(data analysis & probability)  As of September of this year, the Sydney Opera House was the 10th most photographed building in the world based on the largest online photo resource, Alamy website.
  • 13. My Australia (number & operations) This year, I spent a total of 10 days in Sydney, Australia. Of those 10 days, I went to the Opera House a total of 6 days. This means I spent 1.64% of my year at the Sydney Opera House.
  • 14. Works Cited http://australia.gov.au/about- australia/australian-story/sydney-opera- house http://www.lilburnes.org/Students/Media2/Syd ney/Geometry_Sydney.html http://www.gids.nl/sydney/opera.html http://www.liveperformance.com.au/site/_cont ent/document/00000105-source.pdf http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/entertainme nt/sydney-confidential/the-sydney-oprah- show-finally-gets-under-way/story-e6frewz0- 1225966658819 http://www.alamy.com/pressreleases/2011/top _10_most_photographed_buildings.asp

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