Family values scan 2011

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Family values scan 2011

  1. 1. Family Values By Adrian S. (sample student essay)
  2. 2. 1 The concept of family has fallen into its traditional definition of mother-father-children unit of society. People have always referred to their first-degree blood relations as ‘family’. I think is more universal, something with a deeper meaning and value. I believe that the family consists of those people who you spend your time with, not because of duty, not by force or coincidence, but because of your own free will. 2 Most of us, if not all, were raised in a traditional family. We had home, a caring mother, a supportive father and siblings to spend time with. Later on we grow out of our family, although we never sever our ties with them, and raise our own family. Though there is nothing wrong with this cycle, it is very dangerous to simply rely on this pattern and neglect giving thought on what family really is. Replacing the real definition of family with this cycle tarnishes the value of family. 3 Why is the family important? How do we put the value back into the concept of family? It is true, and anyone who would disagree is either crazy or is a fool, that no man can live alone. An effective example is that of a hermit. He is isolated from society yet he employs alternate form of companionship: he reads books, communes with nature or may ‘live with God.’ The books he reads from his knowledge upon which his will can act; communing with nature alters his way of life; he falls under Mother Nature’s care. If he spends time reading Aristotle’s works, he would have philosophies that are in line with of parallel to that of Aristotle’s. If the hermit lives in the jungle inhabited by wild tigers, he would live in such a way that he survives them. He could probably take shelter up in the trees. These are things that the hermit spends his time on; these determine who the hermit becomes. 4 Now if we superimpose the hermit example over a normal person’s life we will see that whatever or whoever the persons spends his time with is what he becomes. For example, a scientist doing research in the Galapagos Islands would turn out to believe in or disapprove of Darwin’s theory of evolution but he would know pretty well how to contain and put out a burning house. In both cases vast amounts of time had to be put into becoming or a scientist, so much so that their lives revolved around their profession. This is so because all knowledge has to be experienced, and experiencing takes time. 5 Again we see that a person becomes what he spends time on. Parents have the responsibility of shaping their children, in a sense, making who their children become. How do they do this? By ‘controlling’ what the children experience: by spending time with them. There is no bypassing this responsibility, and spending time with their children is the only way the parents can effectively influence their children. Now we’ve come to this conclusion: that in the basic unit of family the parents have to spend time with their children. Add this conclusion to the common knowledge that our parents are the closest family we have and we see that family is whatever we spend out time on. Furthermore, our family is who we become. 6 This definition of family can be expanded to accommodate all sorts of situations. If we take the example of the scientist on the Galapagos Islands and add that she is single and, is an only child and hardly ever sees her parents, then her family is her research. She cares for her work, she constantly thinks of it: she puts love into the research. Though her parents are still alive, not spending time with them would definitely put some distance between them. Though memories of the past with her parents live within her, her life is currently dedicated to her research. She is nurturing a new child. 7 If we take another example, that of a hardworking and dedicated businessman,: married, well off with two beautiful toddlers. This businessman, in spite of the wonderful family he has, dedicated his days and nights to his duties at work. His love for work is so great that his toddlers are growing up without a father. He isn’t nurturing his children but his work. He isn’t able to engrain precious lessons into his son’s minds but instead wins that crucial deal that earns him another million. The family he has doesn’t come in the form of a loving wife and two adorable children, but piles of papers to sign and hour-long meetings at a golf course. 8 On the other hand, a nun dedicates her life in prayer for all mankind. She becomes a spouse of Christ. The family she grew up with – her mother, her father, and siblings – is replaced by her adopted family of fellow nuns and Christ. 9 There are also situations wherein people are forced to dedicate their time on things they don’t consider family. An OFW has no choice but to live apart from his or her family. Though they would consider their spouse and children family, the gap that time apart creates is undeniable, the OFW still has a choice: a choice between family and work. Prolonged separations destroys family. 10 This isn’t a radical approach of understanding family. It is far from it. This is a reminder of how a family should be. In today’s world of high-speed everything, family time is an important choice we have to make,; it is a choice that comes with dedication of time and decision of who or what we spend our time on.
  3. 3. 1 The concept of family has fallen into its traditional definition of mother-father-children unit of society. People have always referred to their first-degree blood relations as ‘family’. I think is more universal, something with a deeper meaning and value. I believe that the family consists of those people who you spend your time with, not because of duty, not by force or coincidence, but because of your own free will. 2 Most of us, if not all, were raised in a traditional family. We had home, a caring mother, a supportive father and siblings to spend time with. Later on we grow out of our family, although we never sever our ties with them, and raise our own family. Though there is nothing wrong with this cycle, it is very dangerous to simply rely on this pattern and neglect giving thought on what family really is. Replacing the real definition of family with this cycle tarnishes the value of family. 3 Why is the family important? How do we put the value back into the concept of family? It is true, and anyone who would disagree is either crazy or is a fool, that no man can live alone. An effective example is that of a hermit. He is isolated from society yet he employs alternate form of companionship: he reads books, communes with nature or may ‘live with God.’ The books he reads from his knowledge upon which his will can act; communing with nature alters his way of life; he falls under Mother Nature’s care. If he spends time reading Aristotle’s works, he would have philosophies that are in line with of parallel to that of Aristotle’s. If the hermit lives in the jungle inhabited by wild tigers, he would live in such a way that he survives them. He could probably take shelter up in the trees. These are things that the hermit spends his time on; these determine who the hermit becomes. 4 Now if we superimpose the hermit example over a normal person’s life we will see that whatever or whoever the persons spends his time with is what he becomes. For example, a scientist doing research in the Galapagos Islands would turn out to believe in or disapprove of Darwin’s theory of evolution but he would know pretty well how to contain and put out a burning house. In both cases vast amounts of time had to be put into becoming or a scientist, so much so that their lives revolved around their profession. This is so because all knowledge has to be experienced, and experiencing takes time. 5 Again we see that a person becomes what he spends time on. Parents have the responsibility of shaping their children, in a sense, making who their children become. How do they do this? By ‘controlling’ what the children experience: by spending time with them. There is no bypassing this responsibility, and spending time with their children is the only way the parents can effectively influence their children. Now we’ve come to this conclusion: that in the basic unit of family the parents have to spend time with their children. Add this conclusion to the common knowledge that our parents are the closest family we have and we see that family is whatever we spend out time on. Furthermore, our family is who we become. 6 This definition of family can be expanded to accommodate all sorts of situations. If we take the example of the scientist on the Galapagos Islands and add that she is single and, is an only child and hardly ever sees her parents, then her family is her research. She cares for her work, she constantly thinks of it: she puts love into the research. Though her parents are still alive, not spending time with them would definitely put some distance between them. Though memories of the past with her parents live within her, her life is currently dedicated to her research. She is nurturing a new child. 7 If we take another example, that of a hardworking and dedicated businessman,: married, well off with two beautiful toddlers. This businessman, in spite of the wonderful family he has, dedicated his days and nights to his duties at work. His love for work is so great that his toddlers are growing up without a father. He isn’t nurturing his children but his work. He isn’t able to engrain precious lessons into his son’s minds but instead wins that crucial deal that earns him another million. The family he has doesn’t come in the form of a loving wife and two adorable children, but piles of papers to sign and hour-long meetings at a golf course. 8 On the other hand, a nun dedicates her life in prayer for all mankind. She becomes a spouse of Christ. The family she grew up with – her mother, her father, and siblings – is replaced by her adopted family of fellow nuns and Christ. 9 There are also situations wherein people are forced to dedicate their time on things they don’t consider family. An OFW has no choice but to live apart from his or her family. Though they would consider their spouse and children family, the gap that time apart creates is undeniable, the OFW still has a choice: a choice between family and work. Prolonged separations destroys family. 10 This isn’t a radical approach of understanding family. It is far from it. This is a reminder of how a family should be. In today’s world of high-speed everything, family time is an important choice we have to make,; it is a choice that comes with dedication of time and decision of who or what we spend our time on. Definition/assertion Process Description Exemplification Exemplification Process Description illustration Exemplification Contrast Causal analysis Rephrased definition/affirmation of family values

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