Tremonton, UT Sustainability Project
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The Tremonton, Utah Sustainable Design Assessment Team final presentation to the community.

The Tremonton, Utah Sustainable Design Assessment Team final presentation to the community.

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  • Certain dimensions of the community image may be controllable or changeable whereas other dimensions may be fixed.
  • Customers are Most effective at promoting brand… Customers create the value of a brand and NO ONE OWNS the customers.! No media – advertising (controlled) or public relations (uncontrolled) can beat positive word of mouth. What do companies like Nordstrom, Jet Blue, Amazon and Dell have in common? They have built their brand value on providing a positive experience for their customers. User experience is not just a practice or a process – it is a philosophy. User experience should be: comfortable, intuitive, consistent and trustworthy.
  • Once you've defined your brand, how do you get the word out? Here are a few simple, time-tested tips: Get a great logo. Place it everywhere. Write down your brand messaging. What are the key messages you want to communicate about your brand? Every employee should be aware of your brand attributes. Integrate your brand. Branding extends to every aspect of your business--how you answer your phones, what you or your salespeople wear on sales calls, your e-mail signature, everything. Create a "voice" for your company that reflects your brand. This voice should be applied to all written communication and incorporated in the visual imagery of all materials, online and off. Is your brand friendly? Be conversational. Is it ritzy? Be more formal. You get the gist. Develop a tagline. Write a memorable, meaningful and concise statement that captures the essence of your brand. Design templates and create brand standards for your marketing materials. Use the same color scheme, logo placement, look and feel throughout. You don't need to be fancy, just consistent. Be true to your brand. Customers won't return to you--or refer you to someone else--if you don't deliver on your brand promise. Be consistent. I placed this point last only because it involves all of the above and is the most important tip I can give you. If you can't do this, your attempts at establishing a brand will fail.

Tremonton, UT Sustainability Project Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 1 Tremonton in Transition Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT)
  • 2. 2 Tremonton SDAT • Mike Davis, FAIA, team leader • Haley Blakeman, ASLA, AICP, landscape/connectivity • Jason Claunch, Market analysis • Wayne Feiden, FAICP, planning/land use • Jane Jenkins, Main St revitalization/branding • Joe Skibba, ASAI, urban design, illustration • Joel Mills, Director AIA Communities By Design • Erin Simmons, Director AIA Design Assistance
  • 3. 3 YOU told us: We love living here! • Good hot dogs & ice cream (more please) • Great quality of life • It’s the people! • Strong sense of community • The setting and agricultural identity great • Connection to outdoors • Safe community • Good schools • Good place to raise children
  • 4. 4 YOU told us: Downtown • Is part of our identity • Is in long decline, but with good bones • Not attracting people • A key economic engine • Focus on Western/agricultural history • In need of more restaurants • Needs to define its identity
  • 5. 5 YOU told us: Opportunities • The west end is the new growth engine • People want to shop in town • Be modern, but simple and quiet • People care about downtown and the city • City Hall needs focus on economic development and jobs
  • 6. 6 Environment Planet Social Equity People Economy Profit BlissBliss Economy Environment Equity You can have it all, mostly
  • 7. 7 market analysis
  • 8. 8 Market Analysis Analyze demographic and economic trends to inform the Tremonton development strategy. Estimate the potential demand for high density owner occupied and non-owner occupied housing to determine propensity for additional population growth. Estimate the potential absorption for additional commercial space in Tremonton and downtown. Develop Outline of a strategy for for retail in Downtown Tremonton. 8
  • 9. 9 Utah 9 5th in Population Growth 1st in Personal Income 8th Best in Employment
  • 10. 10 Area Characteristics 10 Tremonton Utah Population, 2012 estimate 7,790 2,855,287 Population change ( 2010 -2012) 1.90% 3.30% Housing units, 2010 2581 979,709 Median value of housing $150,400 $221,300.00 Median household income $50,917 $57,783.00 Retail sales per capita, 2007 $20,100 $13,730.00 Tremonton US Unemployment 6.80% 8.8% Future job growth over the next ten years is predicted to be 24.50%.
  • 11. 11 Age Characteristics The population is concentrated between 25 & 54 years of age, and the largest segment are “Millenials” between the ages of 18 to 34 A recent survey by the Urban Land Institute found that 60% of “Millenials” prefer urban core living with a mix of housing choices in close proximity to shops, dining, offices, and transit Job growth is occurring the fastest in high paying jobs in the energy, manufacturing, and technology sectors, and the fastest growth is expected to occur in the top half of income earners 11 Age Distribution Persons < 5 years 12.70% Persons 6- 18 years 24.60% Persons 19-64 54.20% Persons 65+ 8.50% Total 100.00%
  • 12. 12 Reside ntial Workfor ce Visitor Commu ter Sources of Demand MARKET
  • 13. 13 Residential Spending U.S. consumers spent $48 less per year on dining out, $141 less on clothing and apparel, and $126 on entertainment.
  • 14. 14 Tremonton Retail Trade Area 14 Over 18,400 Employees in The Tremonton Region Over 18,400 Employees in The Tremonton Region Primary Trade Area 20 minutes 2015 Population 22,647 2015 Households 6808 Per Capita $21,529 Aggregate Income $487,567,263 Retail Expenditures $170,648,542
  • 15. 15 RETAIL GAP ANALYSIS
  • 16. 16 Major Area Workforce 16 Over 18,400 Employees in The Tremonton Region Over 18,400 Employees in The Tremonton Region 17miles+/- Mean travel time to work 16.4 min for Tremonton 21.4 min for Utah US Census
  • 17. 17 Major Area Workforce 17 There are an estimated 2,013 employees in the Tremonton Region There are an estimated 2,013 employees in the Tremonton Region
  • 18. 18 Major Area Workforce 18 2,013 Employees in The Tremonton Region Can support up to 2,363 sf downtown 2,013 Employees in The Tremonton Region Can support up to 2,363 sf downtown
  • 19. 19 Major Employers & Workforce Over 18,000 workers in the Tremonton region Average weekly retail expenditures of $53 Annual workforce retail expenditures of $5,334,848 Regional workforce expenditures supports 120,177 SF of retail annually The Study Area may reasonably capture ~10% of workforce equal to approximately 13,000 SF annually 19 The stronger the district the greater attraction of retail spending in the Study Area
  • 20. 20 Commuter Demand .The average commuter spends $112 per week in transportation related expenses Catalyst study determined approximately 3% of commuters are likely available consumers.
  • 21. 21 Study Area Daily Traffic Flow 21 22,010 6,725 3,645 2,605 6,300 4,920 1,075 9,960 Crossroads DowntownInterstate Frontage Vehicles Per Day 28,310 Vehicles Per Year 10,191,600 Capture 2% Avg. Retail Spending $10 Annual Retail Expenditures $2,038,320 Supportable SF 6,794
  • 22. 22 Visitor Generated Demand 1 visitor per day can generate 90 square feet of retail per year Art Show Water Park Parade Theme Park State FairSportsConcert Farmers Market Multi-purpose
  • 23. 23 Visitor Economy 23
  • 24. 24 Visitor Economy 24 Tremonton can capture over 80,000 Visitors with a spend over $6M Tremonton can capture over 80,000 Visitors with a spend over $6M EDIT DATA
  • 25. 25 Supportable Retail in Study Area The potential retail spending from residents, commuters, visitors, and workforce, may support 621,000 SF of retail 25 Annual Spending Total Spend Pot SF Residents in Primary Trade Area $170,648,542 568,828 Visitor Population $7,403,607 24,679 Workforce $6,301,160 21,004 Commuter $2,038,320 6,794 Total $184,353,309 621,305
  • 26. 26 Person $22,000 $7,480 24.93 Worker $936 3.12 Visitor $27,375 91.25 Commuter $19,345 64.48 Total 183.79 26 Purchasing Power per Capita
  • 27. 27 Purchasing Power Box Elder County has a .10 Pull Factor This trade area overlaps other areas, and therefore may capture less than 100%
  • 28. 28 Benefits of Independent Retailers 28http://www.amiba.net/news/2012/slc-utah-study
  • 29. 29 Retail Incentives While the fiscal condition of individual cities varies greatly depending on differences in local tax structure, an overwhelming majority of cities rely on local sales taxes for the lion’s share of revenue. Economic incentives have increased exponentially to attract retail projects since 2008. CATALYTIC POSITIVE RETURN ALIGNED ACCRETIVE PERFORMANCE BASED ACHIEVE HURDLE FINITE TIMEFRAME REQUIRED IRR REQUIRED NPV
  • 30. 30 Catalytic Projects • “Catalytic” projects are those that stimulate additional demand. – Daytime employment, higher education, destination retail/entertainment, other high-traffic public sector, parks, etc. – Identification is relatively straightforward – challenge is to maximize benefits to the area • Key elements of maximizing benefits – Appropriate infrastructure investment – Workable regulatory environment – Viable incentive policy – Targeted marketing – Coordination with other economic development entities
  • 31. 31 Financing Strategy • Adopt policy for sales tax and property tax rebate for retail • Façade Improvement Grants (50% match with max) • Create Business Improvement District Downtown • Explore CDA/TIF for Downtown • Low interest or forgivable loans for incubator business and/or gap financing • Sponsor public property to induce development Sequence • Strengthen Downtown prior to inducing regional retail
  • 32. 32 downtown identity
  • 33. 33 The Tremonton brand To thine own self be true…
  • 34. 34 Branding is…… • What someone else thinks of you, not what you say you are. • Obvious and pervasive throughout the community. • A feeling. In this case a feeling that makes you want to go there. • Not a logo and/or a slogan. They simply reinforce the brand.
  • 35. 35 Community Branding • Branding is the process of setting yourself apart from everyone else. • Successful brands create the perception that there’s no place quite like yours. • Branding revolves around product more than marketing. • Successful brands do not appeal to everyone.
  • 36. 36 A Brand = PROMISE • Branding is promise you make to customers (residents and visitors) about their experience in Tremonton. • Your printed material, social media and online messaging must communicate this promise. • You make that promise in your communications, but you must support it with all your actions. • REMEMBER: No media – advertising (controlled) or public relations (uncontrolled) can beat positive word of mouth.
  • 37. 37 Branding Recommendations • Embrace your geography. • Balance that your brand is regional, but it should reflect your competitive advantage. • Understand the challenges of a multilayered identity. • Debunk local negative perceptions – and non perceptions. • Know what your brand is NOT.
  • 38. 38 TREMON TON The Old West is Alive Here TREMONTON Gateway to the Great Outdoors TREMONTON A 21st Century Agricultural Community TREMONTON A Friendly and Progressive Town
  • 39. 39 TREMON TON The Old West is Alive Here TREMONTON Gateway to the Great Outdoors TREMONTON A 21st Century Agricultural Community TREMONTON A Friendly and Progressive Town DRAW UPON THEM ALL
  • 40. 40 Branding Recommendations • Hire a professional to help your community develop a brand. • Remember: it’s a process - not a logo. • Be who you are. • Be bold vs. being shy. • Be consistent.
  • 41. 41
  • 42. 42
  • 43. 43 Downtown is your most important business and industrial recruitment tool. Your entire community will be judged based on the quality and vitality of downtown.
  • 44. 44
  • 45. 45
  • 46. 46
  • 47. 47
  • 48. 48
  • 49. 49
  • 50. 50
  • 51. 51
  • 52. 52
  • 53. 53 Provo Ogden Moab
  • 54. 54
  • 55. 55
  • 56. 56 Downtown Recommendation Create a downtown organization for the 21st century
  • 57. 57 Main Street Approach™ –Organization –Design Promotion Economic Restructuring
  • 58. 58 The Coordinator is key to a successful downtown program You need a downtown champion responsible for building consensus, engaging volunteers, implementing programs.
  • 59. 59 Events build community
  • 60. 60 Use maps to tell people where they can find businesses, parks and other attractions.
  • 61. 61 Pop-up Shops, kiosks and other temporary retail are a great way to activate downtown quickly.
  • 62. 62 Create an effective “Shop Local” program.
  • 63. 63 Farmer’s Markets can showcase your agricultural heritage. They also activate your downtown streets and function as community social events.
  • 64. 64 Food Trucks are trendy, fun and entrepreneurial!
  • 65. 65 Tremonton has good opportunities to develop tourism as an industry.
  • 66. 66
  • 67. 67 Funding: Collaborate. Build Partnerships • Utah Heritage Foundation • BRAG – Small Business Development Center – Business Retention and Expansion (BEAR) • Box Elder Economic Development Alliance • Fairgrounds Board • State Tourism organization • Corporate Sponsorship
  • 68. 68 Funding: the Oklahoma City model • 1 cent sales tax for capital economic development expenditures. • Create a BID for maintenance and management.
  • 69. 69 connections gateways &
  • 70. 70
  • 71. 71 Main Street AND Highway 102 • High truck mode share • Low volume road (<7,000 AADT) • Speeding (85th percentile: 35-40 MPH)
  • 72. 72 Pedestrian Experience
  • 73. 73 Are those accidents or crashes? • Moderate crash rates – Pedestrian/vehicle crashes – Personal injuries
  • 74. 74
  • 75. 75 Design principles • Accommodate all vehicles – Traffic will increase over time • Divert some trucks • Better safety • Better pedestrian experience • Better sense of place and arrival • Slow downtown traffic • Improve ecologically sound drainage
  • 76. 76 Divert some trucks to Route 30 • Truck Route sign • Main St calming • Mapping services
  • 77. 77 400 West St. (Arrival) to Tremont St.(Downtown) Arrival
  • 78. 78
  • 79. 79 Arrival: 400 W St. to 200 W St.
  • 80. 80 200 West St. to 200 East St.(Downtown) Downtown
  • 81. 81 Re-task real estate for pedestrians • Crosswalk: was 56’ now 36’ • Was 19 seconds now 12 seconds
  • 82. 82 Downtown: Tremont to 200 W Shorter crosswalks Few large truck turns EXCEPT Fire
  • 83. 83 Re-task for pedestrians and green
  • 84. 84 Curvilinear travel path
  • 85. 85 200 E to Malad River
  • 86. 86 Tree belt options
  • 87. 87 Drainage retrofits
  • 88. 88 Snow removal • 20% less snow to be hauled away
  • 89. 89 Shorter-Term Options
  • 90. 90 Connectivity • 2,000’ walking • 600 N and 600 S as bicycle boulevards
  • 91. 91 design
  • 92. 92 SAMPLE STOREFRONT DESIGN GUIDELINES
  • 93. 93
  • 94. 94
  • 95. 95
  • 96. 96 CATALYST SITE opposite Fairgrounds: 100,000 GSF, mixed use with hospitality. Max 40’ setback, one major curb cut, developed façade for 60% of frontage
  • 97. 97 CATALYST SITE Main & 400W: 300,000 GSF +/-, mixed use with junior box retail and entertainment. Max 60’ setback, sidewalks behind canal, developed façade for 60% of frontage
  • 98. 98 WEST END MASTER PLAN: Up to 800,000 SF on multiple parcels. Small parking fields between buildings and road, smaller pad sites (under 65KSF) not more than 100’ from lot line. FORM-BASED ZONING
  • 99. 99 Public Realm Improvement: redesigned Midland Square
  • 100. 100
  • 101. 101
  • 102. 102 Public Realm Improvement: Enhanced Streetscape
  • 103. 103
  • 104. 104 Public Realm Improvement: Enhanced Gateway at Malad River
  • 105. 105
  • 106. 106 Public Realm Improvement: Gateway at 400W
  • 107. 107
  • 108. 108
  • 109. 109 SEQUENCE OF RECOMMENDATIONS
  • 110. 110 SEQUENCE OF RECOMMENDATIONS 1.Organization is STEP ONE. Get residents, commercial property owners, businesses and government working TOGETHER. Put someone in charge
  • 111. 111 SEQUENCE OF RECOMMENDATIONS •Organization is STEP ONE. Get residents, commercial property owners, businesses and government working TOGETHER. Put someone in charge 1.Do the “branding” thing right. Get “buy-in” from all stakeholders
  • 112. 112 SEQUENCE OF RECOMMENDATIONS •Organization is STEP ONE. Get residents, commercial property owners, businesses and government working TOGETHER. Put someone in charge 1.Do the “branding” thing right. Get “buy-in” from all stakeholders 2.Create partnerships
  • 113. 113 SEQUENCE OF RECOMMENDATIONS •Organization is STEP ONE. Get residents, commercial property owners, businesses and government working TOGETHER. Put someone in charge 1.Do the “branding” thing right. Get “buy-in” from all stakeholders 2.Create partnerships 3.Look for easy “wins”: Storefront and signage improvements, programming, promotional events
  • 114. 114 SEQUENCE OF RECOMMENDATIONS •Organization is STEP ONE. Get residents, commercial property owners, businesses and government working TOGETHER. Put someone in charge 1.Do the “branding” thing right. Get “buy-in” from all stakeholders 2.Create partnerships 3.Look for easy “wins”: Storefront and signage improvements, programming, promotional events 4.Make public realm enhancements
  • 115. 115 SEQUENCE OF RECOMMENDATIONS •Organization is STEP ONE. Get residents, commercial property owners, businesses and government working TOGETHER. Put someone in charge 1.Do the “branding” thing right. Get “buy-in” from all stakeholders 2.Create partnerships 3.Look for easy “wins”: Storefront and signage improvements, programming, promotional events 4.Make public realm enhancements 5.Drive development on Main Street “catalyst” sites. DOWNTOWN COMES FIRST
  • 116. 116 SEQUENCE OF RECOMMENDATIONS •Organization is STEP ONE. Get residents, commercial property owners, businesses and government working TOGETHER. Put someone in charge. 1.Do the “branding” thing right. Get “buy-in” from all stakeholders 2.Create partnerships 3.Look for easy “wins”: Storefront and signage improvements, programming, promotional events 4.Make public realm enhancements 5.Drive development on Main Street “catalyst” sites. DOWNTOWN COMES FIRST. 6.Master-plan and re-zone the west end and crossroads sites. Make the VISITOR ECONOMY PLAY