Southeast Tennessee Valley SDAT
<ul><li>The AIA’s Center for Communities by Design is a catalyst, convener, and source of information that helps AIA membe...
SDAT Communities
Design Assessment Program Principles <ul><li>Multidisciplinary expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Objectivity </li></ul><ul><li>L...
The Steering Committee <ul><li>Stephen Hasse, Chairman  </li></ul><ul><li>Karen Hundt, Co-Chairman </li></ul><ul><li>Heath...
<ul><li>Thomas W. Rounds, AICP </li></ul>
SDAT Process Investigation & Discovery
<ul><li>SDAT Team Leader Chosen </li></ul><ul><li>Team Leader and Staff visit community for day and a half of meetings and...
<ul><li>SDAT Team assembled </li></ul><ul><li>Pertinent information is gathered and disseminated to the SDAT Team </li></u...
The Team <ul><li>Monica Bansal – Washington, DC  </li></ul><ul><li>Bill Dodge – Silverton, CO </li></ul><ul><li>Marsha Gar...
Full Team Visit
<ul><li>William Dodge </li></ul>
Regional Cooperation
Regions Change with Challenges Defining Regional Success
Ideas for Building Capacity to Cooperate
Bring “Unlikelies” Together to Discuss “Unmentionables” and Do “Unheardofs”
Educate Everyone on Becoming a Practicing Regional Citizen <ul><li>Share Regional Cooperation Successes </li></ul><ul><li>...
Explore Regional Impact of VW Plant
Pursue Early Success Regional Initiatives <ul><li>Prepare Regional Legislative Agenda </li></ul><ul><li>Share  Economic De...
Focus Regional Attention on Local Distress
A Pelo de Cochino!
<ul><li>Nancy Steele </li></ul>
 
 
 
Prime Tennessee Farmland for Sale www.bizbuysell.com
Photo by Joel Mills
<ul><li>What do you need? </li></ul><ul><li>Good air quality </li></ul><ul><li>Clean abundant water </li></ul><ul><li>Natu...
Partnerships The  Ochs Center for Metropolitan Studies Benwood Foundation South Chickamauga Creek Photo by: Rick Woods
Courtesy of Land Trust for Tennessee and the University of Tennessee Chattanooga
 
 
 
 
Challenges/Opportunities <ul><li>Regional Population Growth </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing pressure on resources </li></...
Challenges/Opportunities <ul><li>Economics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Changes in p...
How do you get there from here? <ul><li>Regulations and Ordinances </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
Hydromodification
 
Press Release October 8, 2008  Contact: Kerjon Lee Office: (626) 458-4348 Mobile: (626) 476-0533 [email_address] New Count...
How do you get there from here? <ul><li>Education and Outreach </li></ul><ul><ul><li>General Public </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
Courtesy of Land Trust of Tennessee
 
Chesapeake Bay Program: A Watershed Partnership
How do you get there from here? <ul><li>Regional Watershed Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identification of appropriate ...
Tennessee Valley Watershed Authority?? <ul><li>TVA </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. EPA </li></ul><ul><li>Tennessee DEQ </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>Carlos Macedo Rodrigues, AICP, PP </li></ul>
<ul><li>Since 1922, RPA  has championed major investments, development and conservation in the tri-state metropolitan regi...
 
Visualizing the Region  –  Forging an Identity
Regional Transit Regional Highways
<ul><li>Milestone accomplishments initiated by RPA: </li></ul><ul><li>The George Washington, Triboro, and Verrazano Narrow...
<ul><li>Existing Urbanized Areas and Future Build Out </li></ul><ul><li>The “big picture” </li></ul><ul><li>Linking land u...
<ul><li>Regional Circulation Network </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping Connections and Choke Points </li></ul><ul><li>Closing the ...
<ul><li>Regional Network Discontinuities </li></ul><ul><li>Physical barriers </li></ul><ul><li>Barriers by design </li></ul>
Full Spectrum Impact Assessments <ul><ul><li>Economy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inf...
Full Spectrum Impact Assessment <ul><li>Same population and employment growth - different allocation </li></ul><ul><li>Sav...
<ul><li>Soren D. Simonsen, AIA, AICP, LEED AP </li></ul>
Public Policy Political Collaboration
Sign in Restaurant: “ Open 7 days a week and weekends.” Source: University of Texas Department of Advertising
Classified Ad: “ Dog for sale. Eats anything and is fond of children.” Source: University of Texas Department of Advertising
Sign in Dance Hall: “ Good clean dancing every night but Sunday.” Source: University of Texas Department of Advertising
Used Car Dealer Ad: “ Why go elsewhere and be cheated when you can come here?” Source: University of Texas Department of A...
Auto Repair Service Ad: “ Try us once, you’ll never go anywhere again.” Source: University of Texas Department of Advertis...
We Create what we  Plan  to Create ...when you plan for people and places, you get people and places. When your plans citi...
Complete Streets
Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates/Steve Price
Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates/Steve Price
Complete Commutes
Source: Envision Utah
Source: Envision Utah
Source: Envision Utah
Source: Envision Utah
Complete Networks
Savannah, GA St. Louis, MO Charleston, SC Chattanooga, TN Allentown, PA Source: University of Texas PCL Historic Map Archive
 
Separated Development <ul><li>Key Elements: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. Housing Subdivisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Sh...
<ul><li>Key Elements: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. The Center </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. The Five-Minute Walk </li></ul></u...
Complete Neighborhoods
<ul><li>The Neighborhood Center </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A place to locate community needs: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ch...
<ul><li>The average person walks about ¼ mile in 5 minutes. </li></ul><ul><li>75% of neighborhood is within 5 minutes of v...
<ul><li>Parks are used most by people who live in the immediate neighborhood. </li></ul><ul><li>When a park is 750 feet or...
<ul><li>“As growth continues, the effectiveness and safety of key transportation corridors depends on a  well-planned, int...
Case Study: Brief History of Envision Utah
<ul><li>1995 - Utah Quality Growth Summit convenes </li></ul><ul><li>1997 - Coalition for Utah’s Future launches  Envision...
<ul><li>1999 -  Envision Utah  Regional Growth Preference Scenario published </li></ul><ul><li>2000 -  Envision Utah  Qual...
<ul><li>2002 - Planning Tools for Quality Growth published </li></ul><ul><li>2003 - Transit Oriented Development Guideline...
<ul><li>2008 - Jordan River Blueprint and Governance Strategy </li></ul><ul><li>2009 - 3% Regional Development Strategy </...
<ul><li>Eileen McGurty, Ph.D. </li></ul>
Education and Training
Job Training for New Economy <ul><li>Can’t rely on VW solely </li></ul><ul><li>Build on success in improved educational at...
Bring Training to Where People Are
Education for Sustainability In collaboration with policy changes that make  different choices easy for people
Recycling
School-based education
Schools as Nodes of Sustainability
 
Community Involvement <ul><li>Go to the residents; don’t wait for them to go to you </li></ul><ul><li>Make it easy.  Take ...
<ul><li>Q+A </li></ul>
<ul><li>Next Steps </li></ul>
<ul><li>Center for Communities By Design </li></ul><ul><li>American Institute of Architects (AIA) </li></ul><ul><li>www.ai...
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  • IN 2005 the Center delivered 6 SDATs in communities located across the country. Cache Valley, UT Forest City, NC Pittsfield, MA Oklahoma City, OK Northampton, MA Alexandria Twp., NJ IN 2006 the Center continued to encourage this regional diversification, delivering an additional 8 SDATs for a total of 14 in just 18 months (between May 2005 and November 2006) Longview, WA; Guemes Island, WA; Northern Nevada; Lawrence, KS; Northeast Michigan; Syracuse, NY; New Orleans, LA; Hagerstown, MD
  • Multidisciplinary expertise – While architecture is obviously an important component of each SDAT, team members represent a broad spectrum of expertise and disciplines. LA, ecologists, air quality experts, historic preservationists, economic development experts, and a number of other fields have been represented. To date, over 20 disciplines have participated in SDATs, a number that will surely continue to grow. Objectivity – Team members come from outside the community in question, usually outside the region and the state of the community. By pulling people in from all over the country, we ensure that the team approaches the community with a clear and objective vision, without a predetermined bias or emotional attachment. Community participation – The team’s recommendations are developed using the information given to them by the community. The SDAT is for the community; by encouraging as much community and public participation as possible
  • Ratio of annual runoff in the Los Angeles River at Firestone Blvd. to annual ppt at the Los Angeles Civic Center. As urbanization as proceeded in Los Angeles, so has runoff relative to rainfall increased, from a low of 5% in the 20’s to at least 50%.
  • Home &gt; About Us &gt; Overview &gt; History of CBP History of the Bay Program The Chesapeake Bay was the nation&apos;s first estuary targeted by Congress for restoration and protection. Since the formation of the Chesapeake Bay Program in the 1980s, Bay Program partners have signed several agreements to reduce pollutants into the Bay and restore its living resources. In addition to these agreements, each year the Chesapeake Executive Council meets to reaffirm its commitment to Bay restoration. New policy documents are signed annually to address emerging issues or new opportunities. Early History and Formation of CBP In the late 1970s, U.S. Senator Charles “Mac” Mathias (R-Md.) sponsored a congressionally funded $27 million, five-year study to analyze the rapid loss of living resources that was devastating the Bay. The study identified an oversupply of nutrients as the main source of the Bay&apos;s degradation. The publication of these initial research findings in the early 1980s led to the creation of the Chesapeake Bay Program as the means to restore this exceptionally valuable resource. The Chesapeake Bay Agreement of 1983 The original Chesapeake Bay Agreement , a simple, one-page pledge by the partners to work together to restore the Bay, was signed in 1983 by the group that later became known as the Chesapeake Executive Council. The members of the Executive Council are: The governors of Maryland , Virginia and Pennsylvania . The mayor of the District of Columbia . The administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency . The chairman of the Chesapeake Bay Commission , a tri-state legislative body.
  • While many people know that “sprawl is bad,” what are the core issues that make sprawl so undesirable? Consumptive of Land: Sprawl continues to spread across formerly rural areas, converting open space and sensitive lands into new housing and shopping centers. Blandness: the high development and infrastructure costs involved in building on the fringe results in low quality construction, and the “cookie cutter” homes that no one seems to care for. These subdivisions lack the basic elements that a neighborhood need in order to develop into a true community with a distinct character. Inherently inefficient: Disconnected roads create interior roads that are largely unused, while funneling all traffic onto a few arterials that become overloaded, congested, and require expensive maintenance. Suburban roads are designed to be confusing, making wayfinding in sprawl development patterns difficult. Mandatory car use for every trip adds further cost to both the private and public sectors, even for the shortest of trips. Fiscally unsustainable: The largest costs to municipalities for new developments is extension of utility lines and streets. Further maintenance of these facilities are becoming less and less feasible for city budgets. Levels of service for other needs, such as police, fire, and schools are reduced for everyone when sprawl continues. Cost per unit to the city increases substantially in sprawl developments compared to connected communities. Socially and economically segregating: Separates citizens into distinct socioeconomic groups. Suburbs are designed primarily for motorists, marginalizing those who are too young to drive, too old to drive, or unable to drive for other reasons (nearly 1/3 of the population). Safety: Wide residential streets in sprawl developments have higher fatality rates than narrower, traditional streets, due to higher design speeds. Emergency response times are much slower in cul-de-sac type development. Single use developments used for only part of the day (housing subdivisions, office parks, malls) are less safe during off hours with no “eyes on the street.” Unhealthy: Numerous studies have looked at the link between obesity and sprawl style development. Suburbs discourage walking, often making walking unsafe, uncomfortable, or impossible. With mandatory car use, air quality is also negatively affected by sprawl.
  • Traditional Development is the way that towns and cities have developed for centuries. Suburban style of development with separated uses has only been happening for the last 50 years. There is now a growing consensus that traditional development patterns are functionally better than more auto-centric development. These time-tested principles are simple and easily applied to any scale of development. Traditional development is based on just a few concepts that plan for a diversity of uses, users, connections, and choices. Sprawl style development does the opposite: reduces the number of choices, reduces the number of connections, and creates large pods of one kind of use and user.
  • The Center: Each neighborhood has a clear center, focused on the common activities of commerce, culture, and governance. With a defined center, you have a community “heart” around which people gather both psychologically and physically. With many suburban cities that have developed over the last 50 years, all these uses have been scattered “no place in particular” and are now trying to create centers where the community heart can be. What is a Village Square? A place to locate community services Church School Neighborhood services Parks and plazas A community gathering place From the beginning of the Plat of Zion plan Joseph Smith planned three sections of land to be used for public buildings, and more specifically, temples for a “center of worship.” (Richard Bushman 2005) Support at the center served the well-being of the people through providing a physical, psychological, and sociological framework on the very basic levels of attachment and connection. The concept of three squares in the center, the placement of public buildings on those squares – providing for goods and services – and, the inclusion of temples (the symbol of the faith that would require the sacrifice of all things and in some cases their lives) that would create attachment for the people, all surrounded by homes with a random distribution between the wealthy and the poor (and only seven blocks by seven blocks before the pattern was to repeat again) was brilliant and inspired. Smith’s plan was not only “mixed use,” it was “mixed socio-economic status” and consequently had enormous potential to accommodate and encourage diversity.
  • 2. The Five Minute Walk: Most people are willing to walk ¼ mile or less to reach a school/church/commercial area. “Walkable” areas are defined as those areas that provide a wide number of options within ¼ mile. With the original 1833 Plat of Zion plan, nearly 75% of the town was within a short, 5-minute walk of the center blocks. Planning the city around these village centers will serve to concentrate needed services in defined areas, creating distinct districts with differing character.
  • Developing more, smaller parks is a bit harder for cities in the short term. Developing one large, easily maintained park is much cheaper to maintain for a city than for many smaller parks; however, fewer people will use a park if they have to get in a car to drive to it. We are much more likely to use our neighborhood park, small though it may be, than to travel to a larger, more desirable park. A small neighborhood park, within walking distance of many people, will be used at different times of the day and week. A park that is used is a self-sustaining amenity. If most people are walking to a park, the city doesn’t have to invest as much in parking facilities, and more land and money can be spent in providing quality park space, rather than another parking lot. Also, a park that is regularly used drives out undesirable elements that have come to be synonymous with many large, infrequently used parks in cities across the country.
  • Creating a refined network of roads is vital to a functional city. Predictability and legible pathways are important elements of way finding. Pathways create ease of flow and are simple to extend.
  • VW not a
  • Bring training to where the people are Regional effort with local programs. Identifying neighborhoods where they are needed. Multiple delivery methods Flexible and accessibility Range of skills, and industries – not just VW jobs and related.
  • not enough on its own. Engaging residents as a means for education
  • Way of
  • environmental education as a formal part of the curriculum state level requirements
  • Without community involvement in planning decisions
  • TN SDAT presentation

    1. 1. Southeast Tennessee Valley SDAT
    2. 2. <ul><li>The AIA’s Center for Communities by Design is a catalyst, convener, and source of information that helps AIA members work with citizens and other stakeholders to envision and create more livable, healthy, safe, and sustainable communities. </li></ul>Center for Communities by Design
    3. 3. SDAT Communities
    4. 4. Design Assessment Program Principles <ul><li>Multidisciplinary expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Objectivity </li></ul><ul><li>Local participation </li></ul>
    5. 5. The Steering Committee <ul><li>Stephen Hasse, Chairman </li></ul><ul><li>Karen Hundt, Co-Chairman </li></ul><ul><li>Heather Adcox </li></ul><ul><li>Blythe Bailey </li></ul><ul><li>Roger Boaz </li></ul><ul><li>Bruz Clark </li></ul><ul><li>Jon Coddington </li></ul><ul><li>Dave Dalton </li></ul><ul><li>Tom Dugan </li></ul><ul><li>Tiffany Gibby </li></ul><ul><li>Teresa Groves </li></ul><ul><li>Gary Hilbert </li></ul><ul><li>Gene Hyde </li></ul><ul><li>Karna Levitt </li></ul><ul><li>Ron Littlefield </li></ul><ul><li>James Sherrill </li></ul><ul><li>Roger Tuder </li></ul><ul><li>Dan Wade </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Thomas W. Rounds, AICP </li></ul>
    7. 7. SDAT Process Investigation & Discovery
    8. 8. <ul><li>SDAT Team Leader Chosen </li></ul><ul><li>Team Leader and Staff visit community for day and a half of meetings and tours—refine scope of project and determine team composition </li></ul>SDAT Project Phases – Preliminary Visit (February)
    9. 9. <ul><li>SDAT Team assembled </li></ul><ul><li>Pertinent information is gathered and disseminated to the SDAT Team </li></ul>SDAT Project Phases – Visit Preparation
    10. 10. The Team <ul><li>Monica Bansal – Washington, DC </li></ul><ul><li>Bill Dodge – Silverton, CO </li></ul><ul><li>Marsha Garcia – AIA National </li></ul><ul><li>Eileen McGurty – Baltimore, MD </li></ul><ul><li>Joel Mills – AIA National </li></ul><ul><li>Carlos Rodrigues – Princeton, NJ </li></ul><ul><li>Thom Rounds – Denver, CO </li></ul><ul><li>Soren Simonsen – Salt Lake City, UT </li></ul><ul><li>Nancy Steele – Los Angeles, CA </li></ul>
    11. 11. Full Team Visit
    12. 12. <ul><li>William Dodge </li></ul>
    13. 13. Regional Cooperation
    14. 14. Regions Change with Challenges Defining Regional Success
    15. 15. Ideas for Building Capacity to Cooperate
    16. 16. Bring “Unlikelies” Together to Discuss “Unmentionables” and Do “Unheardofs”
    17. 17. Educate Everyone on Becoming a Practicing Regional Citizen <ul><li>Share Regional Cooperation Successes </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitate Using Regional Information </li></ul><ul><li>Launch Regional Leadership/Citizenship Programs </li></ul><ul><li>Train Students to Become Regional Citizens </li></ul>
    18. 18. Explore Regional Impact of VW Plant
    19. 19. Pursue Early Success Regional Initiatives <ul><li>Prepare Regional Legislative Agenda </li></ul><ul><li>Share Economic Development Prospects </li></ul>
    20. 20. Focus Regional Attention on Local Distress
    21. 21. A Pelo de Cochino!
    22. 22. <ul><li>Nancy Steele </li></ul>
    23. 26. Prime Tennessee Farmland for Sale www.bizbuysell.com
    24. 27. Photo by Joel Mills
    25. 28. <ul><li>What do you need? </li></ul><ul><li>Good air quality </li></ul><ul><li>Clean abundant water </li></ul><ul><li>Natural beauty & biodiversity </li></ul><ul><li>Agriculture and local food </li></ul><ul><li>Green infrastructure: parks, greenways </li></ul>ENVIRONMENT
    26. 29. Partnerships The Ochs Center for Metropolitan Studies Benwood Foundation South Chickamauga Creek Photo by: Rick Woods
    27. 30. Courtesy of Land Trust for Tennessee and the University of Tennessee Chattanooga
    28. 35. Challenges/Opportunities <ul><li>Regional Population Growth </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing pressure on resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Higher pollution loads </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development and sprawl </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Increasing Regulation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Air Quality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Water Quality </li></ul></ul>
    29. 36. Challenges/Opportunities <ul><li>Economics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Changes in philanthropic giving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to involve all of the community </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Climate Change </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased intensity in weather </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Changes in natural environment </li></ul></ul>
    30. 37. How do you get there from here? <ul><li>Regulations and Ordinances </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compliance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enforcement </li></ul></ul>
    31. 38. Hydromodification
    32. 40. Press Release October 8, 2008 Contact: Kerjon Lee Office: (626) 458-4348 Mobile: (626) 476-0533 [email_address] New County Building Standards Bring LID Practices to LA County Communities LOS ANGELES—The County of Los Angeles Board of Supervisors approved a precedent setting suite of green building ordinances today, introducing new building standards that support water and energy conservation, diversion of waste from landfills and a healthier environment. The new County ordinances will apply to industrial, residential and commercial developments within County unincorporated areas and go into effect on January 1, 2009.
    33. 41. How do you get there from here? <ul><li>Education and Outreach </li></ul><ul><ul><li>General Public </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Municipal Officials </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Agencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Businesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community Groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Farmers </li></ul></ul>
    34. 42. Courtesy of Land Trust of Tennessee
    35. 44. Chesapeake Bay Program: A Watershed Partnership
    36. 45. How do you get there from here? <ul><li>Regional Watershed Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identification of appropriate region </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Getting the right people to the table </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Public involvement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Setting quantified goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Call for projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan adoption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ongoing inclusive and open governance </li></ul></ul>
    37. 46. Tennessee Valley Watershed Authority?? <ul><li>TVA </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. EPA </li></ul><ul><li>Tennessee DEQ </li></ul><ul><li>Water Companies </li></ul><ul><li>Utility Districts </li></ul><ul><li>Sanitation Districts </li></ul><ul><li>Conservancies </li></ul><ul><li>Farmers </li></ul><ul><li>Cities </li></ul><ul><li>Counties </li></ul><ul><li>Planners </li></ul><ul><li>Bike advocates </li></ul><ul><li>Etc. </li></ul>
    38. 47. <ul><li>Carlos Macedo Rodrigues, AICP, PP </li></ul>
    39. 48. <ul><li>Since 1922, RPA has championed major investments, development and conservation in the tri-state metropolitan region. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>$75 billion in infrastructure investments since 1999 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 million acres of protected open space </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Acknowledged experts on assessing the regional impact of major development projects in the region </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community designs to promote sustainable growth locally </li></ul></ul>RPA promotes growth while maintaining the New York region’s high quality of life
    40. 50. Visualizing the Region – Forging an Identity
    41. 51. Regional Transit Regional Highways
    42. 52. <ul><li>Milestone accomplishments initiated by RPA: </li></ul><ul><li>The George Washington, Triboro, and Verrazano Narrows bridges </li></ul><ul><li>JFK Airport and Airlink </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of Metro-North </li></ul><ul><li>The Merritt Parkway and the Long Island State and Palisades Interstate parkway systems </li></ul>A Long History of Shaping the Region RPA-proposed George Washington Bridge recently celebrated its 75 th birthday.
    43. 53. <ul><li>Existing Urbanized Areas and Future Build Out </li></ul><ul><li>The “big picture” </li></ul><ul><li>Linking land use and transportation </li></ul><ul><li>Planning’s value added </li></ul><ul><li>Planning tool box </li></ul>
    44. 54. <ul><li>Regional Circulation Network </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping Connections and Choke Points </li></ul><ul><li>Closing the gap between State and local systems </li></ul>
    45. 55. <ul><li>Regional Network Discontinuities </li></ul><ul><li>Physical barriers </li></ul><ul><li>Barriers by design </li></ul>
    46. 56. Full Spectrum Impact Assessments <ul><ul><li>Economy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community Life </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intergovernmental Coordination </li></ul></ul>
    47. 57. Full Spectrum Impact Assessment <ul><li>Same population and employment growth - different allocation </li></ul><ul><li>Save $160M/year towns/counties/school districts </li></ul><ul><li>Save $870M in local road costs </li></ul><ul><li>Save $1.45B in water and sewer </li></ul><ul><li>Save 122,000 acres of land </li></ul><ul><li>Save 68,000 acres of prime farmland </li></ul><ul><li>Save 45,000 acres of environmentally sensitive land </li></ul><ul><li>40% less water pollutants </li></ul>
    48. 58. <ul><li>Soren D. Simonsen, AIA, AICP, LEED AP </li></ul>
    49. 59. Public Policy Political Collaboration
    50. 60. Sign in Restaurant: “ Open 7 days a week and weekends.” Source: University of Texas Department of Advertising
    51. 61. Classified Ad: “ Dog for sale. Eats anything and is fond of children.” Source: University of Texas Department of Advertising
    52. 62. Sign in Dance Hall: “ Good clean dancing every night but Sunday.” Source: University of Texas Department of Advertising
    53. 63. Used Car Dealer Ad: “ Why go elsewhere and be cheated when you can come here?” Source: University of Texas Department of Advertising
    54. 64. Auto Repair Service Ad: “ Try us once, you’ll never go anywhere again.” Source: University of Texas Department of Advertising
    55. 65. We Create what we Plan to Create ...when you plan for people and places, you get people and places. When your plans cities for cars and traffic, you get cars and traffic... Source: Project for Public Spaces/Soren Simonsen
    56. 66. Complete Streets
    57. 67. Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates/Steve Price
    58. 68. Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates/Steve Price
    59. 69. Complete Commutes
    60. 70. Source: Envision Utah
    61. 71. Source: Envision Utah
    62. 72. Source: Envision Utah
    63. 73. Source: Envision Utah
    64. 74. Complete Networks
    65. 75. Savannah, GA St. Louis, MO Charleston, SC Chattanooga, TN Allentown, PA Source: University of Texas PCL Historic Map Archive
    66. 77. Separated Development <ul><li>Key Elements: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. Housing Subdivisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Shopping Centers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. Employment Centers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4. Civic Institutions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5. Roadways </li></ul></ul>Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates
    67. 78. <ul><li>Key Elements: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. The Center </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. The Five-Minute Walk </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. The Street Network </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4. Versatile Streets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5. Mix of Uses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>6. Special Sites for Special Buildings </li></ul></ul>Connected Development Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates
    68. 79. Complete Neighborhoods
    69. 80. <ul><li>The Neighborhood Center </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A place to locate community needs: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Churches </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Schools </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Neighborhood-scale services </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Parks and plazas </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A community gathering place </li></ul></ul>Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates
    70. 81. <ul><li>The average person walks about ¼ mile in 5 minutes. </li></ul><ul><li>75% of neighborhood is within 5 minutes of village center. </li></ul><ul><li>This improves walkability to school, church, shopping, parks, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces demand for parking in village square, reducing development costs and transportation demands </li></ul>Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates
    71. 82. <ul><li>Parks are used most by people who live in the immediate neighborhood. </li></ul><ul><li>When a park is 750 feet or less from home (about a 3 minute walk), people are more inclined to walk and use the park more regularly. </li></ul><ul><li>Regularly used parks reduce undesirable activity. </li></ul>Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates
    72. 83. <ul><li>“As growth continues, the effectiveness and safety of key transportation corridors depends on a well-planned, integrated system of collector and local roadways. </li></ul>Source: Cooper Roberts Simonsen Associates
    73. 84. Case Study: Brief History of Envision Utah
    74. 85. <ul><li>1995 - Utah Quality Growth Summit convenes </li></ul><ul><li>1997 - Coalition for Utah’s Future launches Envision Utah – a grassroots public/ private partnership to create a vision for quality growth in the Salt Lake City region </li></ul>Source: Envision Utah
    75. 86. <ul><li>1999 - Envision Utah Regional Growth Preference Scenario published </li></ul><ul><li>2000 - Envision Utah Quality Growth Strategy published </li></ul>Source: Envision Utah
    76. 87. <ul><li>2002 - Planning Tools for Quality Growth published </li></ul><ul><li>2003 - Transit Oriented Development Guidelines published </li></ul><ul><li>2006 - 2040 Regional Transportation Plan </li></ul>Source: Envision Utah
    77. 88. <ul><li>2008 - Jordan River Blueprint and Governance Strategy </li></ul><ul><li>2009 - 3% Regional Development Strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing training, support and advocacy </li></ul>Source: Envision Utah
    78. 89. <ul><li>Eileen McGurty, Ph.D. </li></ul>
    79. 90. Education and Training
    80. 91. Job Training for New Economy <ul><li>Can’t rely on VW solely </li></ul><ul><li>Build on success in improved educational attainment in the region </li></ul><ul><li>Take advantage of all the human resources available </li></ul>
    81. 92. Bring Training to Where People Are
    82. 93. Education for Sustainability In collaboration with policy changes that make different choices easy for people
    83. 94. Recycling
    84. 95. School-based education
    85. 96. Schools as Nodes of Sustainability
    86. 98. Community Involvement <ul><li>Go to the residents; don’t wait for them to go to you </li></ul><ul><li>Make it easy. Take them seriously. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider growing diversity of community to harness the energy of all resources available </li></ul><ul><li>Without full involvement the complex issues will be even more difficult </li></ul>
    87. 99. <ul><li>Q+A </li></ul>
    88. 100. <ul><li>Next Steps </li></ul>
    89. 101. <ul><li>Center for Communities By Design </li></ul><ul><li>American Institute of Architects (AIA) </li></ul><ul><li>www.aia.org </li></ul>

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