Covington sdat presentation

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  • The city also moved forward with substantial public investment in its waterfront, which had a dramatic impact in inspiring new partnerships and private investment. Three years later, the city had over $75 million in planned and completed investments and had turned the corner by producing huge civic momentum across the community. In June 2012, Port Angeles was recognized with a state design award for its waterfront master plan. “ The City of Port Angeles SDAT experience was far more than just a planning exercise. This opportunity for our community was a catalyst for action, implementation and improvement. Three years after the SDAT team arrived, the progress and excitement continue. A primary outcome has been that the process awakened community pride and inspired a “together we can” attitude. Today the inspiration remains and the elements and recommendations of the program continue to be the driver for publicly endorsed capital projects and investments in our community. More importantly this sustainable approach has tapped into the core values and priorities of our citizens to ensure a better and more balanced future for our City.”
  • Covington sdat presentation

    1. 1. welcome
    2. 2. Tonight • Our Process • Findings / What we learned • Region / Covington’s niche • Opportunity / Change is possible • Scenarios / Idea testing • Engagement / One voice • Next Steps / Getting it done • Questions and Ideas
    3. 3. SDAT Team Paul Fontaine Kofi Boone, ASLA Jessica Strauss Deborah Moore Darrell Moore, FAIA Glenn Kellogg Elise Ross, University of Michigan Christian Roadman, University of Michigan
    4. 4. Process • 2 visits – Research – Team building – 3 days • Tours • Interviews • First impressions • Idea testing • Recommendations
    5. 5. Process • Limitations: TIME – Who is Missing • Kids • Latinos • Business • More neighbors • Specifics / Details
    6. 6. Findings • Resource Rich • TRUST
    7. 7. Resource Rich
    8. 8. Findings • TRUST – With City Hall – With neighbors – With institutions – With other neighborhoods
    9. 9. Region
    10. 10. community opportunities
    11. 11. Sustainable Cities: the triple bottom line Sustainable Social Environmental Economic mix of housing options access to amenities transportation options walkable green spaces efficient use of land local services mix of jobs feasible
    12. 12. Sustainable Neighborhood Goals mix of housing options access to amenities walkable to jobs and services green spaces efficient use of land anchor institutions feasible
    13. 13. Covington Employment Centers
    14. 14. Covington Employment Inflow/Outflow
    15. 15. Internal Jobs Filled by Outside Workers
    16. 16. Market Trends for Walkable Neighborhoods 6 in 10 prospective homebuyers chose walkable neighborhoods with less time spent driving Source: 2011 Community Preference Survey by National Association of Realtors and Smart Growth America
    17. 17. Walkable Places in the Region
    18. 18. 1/2 mile
    19. 19. MLK Blvd Greenway Trail Covington Latin School Hope VI Lincoln Grant Scholar House Change is possible- in fact, it’s happening. Local Projects
    20. 20. Opportunity Sites
    21. 21. Greenup Street Today
    22. 22. Greenup Street With New Housing
    23. 23. Robbins Street Today
    24. 24. Robbins Street With Infill Development
    25. 25. This is an opportunity to enhance your community.
    26. 26. randolph park
    27. 27. Randolph Park • Making great places • Three scenarios • Trade offs, finding opportunities
    28. 28. What a Public Space can be • Great places have great stories History and Change Culture • Great spaces are connected To each other To the larger world • Great spaces adapt and respond Physical and human development activity Social and political centers
    29. 29. Great places have great stories
    30. 30. Great places have great stories
    31. 31. Great places have great stories
    32. 32. Great places have great stories
    33. 33. Great places have great stories
    34. 34. Great places have great stories
    35. 35. Great places have great stories
    36. 36. What a Public Space can be • Great places have great stories History and Change Culture • Great spaces are connected To each other To the larger world • Great spaces adapt and respond Physical and human development activity Social and political centers
    37. 37. Great places are connected
    38. 38. Great places are connected
    39. 39. Great places are connected
    40. 40. • Great places have great stories History and Change Culture • Great spaces are connected To each other To the larger world • Great spaces adapt and respond Physical and human development activity Social and political centers What public space can be
    41. 41. Great spaces adapt and respond
    42. 42. Three scenarios
    43. 43. Three scenarios
    44. 44. Three scenarios
    45. 45. Three scenarios
    46. 46. Randolph Park Scenario One
    47. 47. Randolph Park Scenario One
    48. 48. Randolph Park
    49. 49. Randolph Park Scenario Two
    50. 50. Randolph Park Scenario Two
    51. 51. A new community center – year-round pool, adult and youth programs, park management – and a view!
    52. 52. A year-round pool - - a revenue generator for the community?
    53. 53. Three Scenarios Scenario Two
    54. 54. Randolph Park Scenario Three
    55. 55. Randolph Park Scenario Three
    56. 56. What is a Community School? • Learning community for all ages Fun after-school learning programs Adult education and training • Resources and services – located or linked Recreation for different ages, different times Health services • Collective problem-solving
    57. 57. A Community School Early childhood center K-5 Family and community resource center
    58. 58. Trade offs, finding opportunities Scenario One Scenario Two Scenario Three
    59. 59. Randolph Park
    60. 60. Randolph Park
    61. 61. Randolph Park
    62. 62. community development
    63. 63. Basis for Effective Community Development – to Build a Healthy Vibrant Neighborhood where Residents can live, work and play.
    64. 64. Community Engagement Opportunity for residents to contribute and influence outcomes which directly affect their lives. • Stakeholders • Structure • Communication • Consensus
    65. 65. Stakeholders Builds wider power base & levels of influence • Residents • Business Leaders • Schools • Churches • Social Services • Youth Groups
    66. 66. Structure Helps Raise the Awareness of the Group •Steering Committee •Non Profit Organization •Short Term Group
    67. 67. Communication  Word of Mouth  Posters/flyers  Telephone Tree  Email  Facebook  Twitter  Instagram
    68. 68. Consensus 1. Inclusion 2. Participation 3. Co-operation 4. Equal Weight 5. Solution Based Outcomes
    69. 69. Thank You
    70. 70. moving forward
    71. 71. 1. Real Community Engagement 2. Consider the ideas – build a plan 3. Work with Partners - Start Now! What’s Next?
    72. 72.  Consultant to bring people together, reach consensus  Create inclusive structures  Communicate! Real community engagement
    73. 73. Listen to all voices  Value • History • Connectedness • Adapting to Future  Prioritize • What goes in the park • What comes into the neighborhood Consider scenario ideas
    74. 74. Revive community gardens, host a farmers’ market Partner: Gateway, Extension Services Start Now – with Partners! Insert graphic of site analysis plan
    75. 75. Insert graphic of site analysis plan Neighborhood tours  Host walking tours starting at the Park  Take field trips
    76. 76. Organize mobile health visits Dental Blood pressure Partners: Healthpoint, St. E, Carlisle FRC Insert graphic of site analysis plan
    77. 77. Insert graphic of site analysis plan Plan fun activities Game days for kids and families Nature walks down Greenway Partner: Youth groups, schools, Conservancy
    78. 78. Pop-Up Performances Local and regional performers Partner: Carnegie Arts Insert graphic of site analysis plan
    79. 79. Thank You Covington! Special thanks to Northern Kentucky AIA www.aia.org/liv_sdat
    80. 80. Revitalization Process Port Angeles, Washington
    81. 81. Momentum: $75 Million in New Investments
    82. 82. Working together on a vision…
    83. 83. Today: Award-Winning Waterfront
    84. 84. Newport, VT Revitalization Momentum • Newport, Vermont (2009) • Last town in state to receive downtown designation, double-digit unemployment • Resident: “I’ve seen Newport come, and I’ve seen it go” • Newport, Vermont (2011) • $250 million in new investment, and 2,000 new jobs • “The biggest change here has been one of attitude. Now we realize that through partnerships, we can do anything. Now, nothing is impossible.”
    85. 85. Newport, VT • Initial: Community Garden (32 community partners) • Modest, volunteer-driven: “Grow a Neighborhood” initiative, Chairbombing • Small, city supported: Ped improvements, façade improvements • Partnership: Community code reform • Private Sector: 6 new restaurants, including, Crowdfunded restaurant, “Taste of the Town”, Regional Tasting Center • Boutique hotels • Major waterfront resort • Foreign Trade Zone – Korean biotech and others • Over $250 million and 2,000 new jobs in a town of 5,000 in just a couple of years

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