Dr. Gianluca Misuraca
Senior Scientist, Information Society
Unit of the European Commission’s
Joint Research Centre
The social and economic role of eInclusion
intermediaries in the European Union:
Results from the MIREIA project
Gianluca ...
Joint Research Centre

Institute for Prospective
Technological Studies

Serving society
Stimulating Innovation
Supporting ...
State of the Union…
 Deepest and longest recession
since the birth of the EU…
 Unemployment hits record highs…

 26.654...
Poverty is rising…


In 2011, 119.6 million people
(24.2% of EU27) at risk of
poverty or social exclusion
(AROPE)



Inc...
Social exclusion
A vicious cycle

6
ICT-enabled innovation
and Employment
85.0

 More innovative
countries have higher
employment rates

SE

80.0

Employment...
eInclusion Policy:
evolving context
Objectives: to reduce gaps in ICT usage and promote the use of ICT to



overcome

ex...
An untapped resource
eInclusion intermediaries
 Crucial role due to their multiplier/amplifier effects

 High diversity ...
Objectives

In cooperation with
stakeholders, MIREIA is
involving researchers and
practitioners to:

1. Map eInclusion act...
Focus
(Unit of Analysis)
eInclusion intermediary actors
 Public, private and third sector organisations which
intentional...
EU27 Mapping:
Methodology
First attempt of collection of
primary data at EU27 level

In collaboration with
2,752 organisat...
Typology
of eInclusion actors

PUBLIC SECTOR
1. National, Regional or State
Agencies
2. Municipal/City Government
3. Publi...
Estimated
'market’ size


Public
libraries,
municipalities,
government and NGO-run telecentres
represent the bulk of eInc...
The EU27 landscape…

Private Sector

Third Sector

Public Sector

N=2752

15
Organisational
capacities
Staff size

Size (Staff & Budget)

Less than €10,000

22%

€10,000 to €100,000

25%

€100,000 to...
Targets Groups
General (all groups)

54%

Adults

51%

Senior citizens/elderly

49%

Young adults

46%

Unemployed people
...
Services
ICT enabled
services
Internet &…

Social & Economic
services
88%

Basic ICT Skills…

80%

Online job…

50%

Socia...
Key results


Important effort of characterisation and first mapping at EU27 level




A myriad of actors playing a vit...
Policy Options


Support the network effects, the innovation processes created and the
services provided by this high and...
gianluca.misuraca@ec.europa.eu

For further information about MIREIA:
http://is.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pages/EAP/MIREIA.html
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  • EXAMPLES: POVERTY in FRANCE, ITALY, GERMANYAt least 14% (more than 8 million people) live on less than 60% of the average income in France. The French poverty line is officially 964 euros for a single person per month. And this is the euro zone’s second-richest country, after Germany.In the euro zone’s third-largest economy, Italy, a map has been made public showing where the poor can get free meals and lodging in Rome. Its statistics agency’s latest findings show that more than 28% of Italians were already suffering close to the poverty line or below it in 2011. The average income for a person considered poor here is just over 700 euros per month.The climb in poverty trends is even evident also in Germany, the leading euro zone economy, which is not applying austerity policies.Its national statistics show that nearly 16% of Germans were living below the poverty line in 2011 – again, measured as 60% of the average wage, or 940 euros per month
  • The unit of analysis is represented by the individual telecentre and, by extension, any similar centre that provides eInclusion services/opportunities. A telecentre is defined in this study as 'a public place where people can access computers, the Internet, and other digital technologies that enable them to gather information, create, learn, and communicate with others while they develop essential digital skills. While each telecentre is different, their common focus is on the use of digital technologies to support community, economic, educational, and social development—reducing isolation, bridging the digital divide, promoting health issues, and creating economic opportunities, to name a few'. In addition to this general definition, study participants were selected based on the following criteria:The public nature of the space or service provided by the organizations, reflected in the fact that at least “access to Internet” service is available to the general public, or to everybody belonging to a socially-disadvantaged target group (e.g. a women association which provides access and training only to women). This definition would exclude schools providing access and training to their students only.The organization must have a social mission (independently of its for-profit or non-for profit character). In this way, specific categories like social enterprises providing paid services fall into the sample, while pure commercial cybercafés would not be included in the sample.If the organization provides other ICT-enabled services in addition to just access, for example ICT skills training.As defined in wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecentre
  • Diversity (Typology) & Dependency of the changing local context (needs of targets groups,…)
  • Strong links among eInclusion Actors & ICT & Employments related services
  • Dr Gianluca Misuraca presentation

    1. 1. Dr. Gianluca Misuraca Senior Scientist, Information Society Unit of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre
    2. 2. The social and economic role of eInclusion intermediaries in the European Union: Results from the MIREIA project Gianluca Misuraca Senior Scientist, European Commission, JRC-IPTS The views expressed by the authors are not necessarily those of the EC
    3. 3. Joint Research Centre Institute for Prospective Technological Studies Serving society Stimulating Innovation Supporting legislation 3
    4. 4. State of the Union…  Deepest and longest recession since the birth of the EU…  Unemployment hits record highs…  26.654 million unemployed people in EU28 (11%)  Youth unemployment in EU28: 23.4% (5.560 million people - under 25) Source: Eurostat, July 2013 4
    5. 5. Poverty is rising…  In 2011, 119.6 million people (24.2% of EU27) at risk of poverty or social exclusion (AROPE)  Increased from 23.6% in only one year (2010) The AROPE indicator is defined as the share of the population in at least one of the following three conditions: 1) at risk of poverty (meaning below the poverty threshold); 2) in a situation of severe material deprivation; 3) living in a household with very low work intensity. 5
    6. 6. Social exclusion A vicious cycle 6
    7. 7. ICT-enabled innovation and Employment 85.0  More innovative countries have higher employment rates SE 80.0 Employment rate (2011) NL DK 75.0 AT DE UK FI CY CZ LU 70.0 PT SI EE FR LT LV BE PL 65.0 SK BG IE RO ES MT IT 60.0 HU EL R² = 0.3098 corr. = 0.556 55.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 Index of economic impact of innovation (2010-2011) Source: DG Research and Innovation - Economic Analysis unit (2013) Data: Eurostat, Innovation Union Scoreboard 2013  ICT play an important role in enabling innovation Source: Regional Innovation Scoreboard 2012 7
    8. 8. eInclusion Policy: evolving context Objectives: to reduce gaps in ICT usage and promote the use of ICT to  overcome exclusion, and improve economic performance, employment opportunities, quality of life, social participation and cohesion Inclusive pillar of the Lisbon Strategy under the i2010 Agenda   Riga (2006) and Vienna (2008) Ministerial Declarations Among the key targets of the Europe 2020 strategy   Increase employment from 69 to 75% of EU population  Improve educational levels (school drop-out <10%; at least 40% of 30-34 years old to complete tertiary education)  20 million people out of poverty and/or social exclusion Key element of EU2020 flagships and social & economic policies   Digital Agenda; Innovation Union; Agenda for new skills and new jobs; Youth on the move; European platform against poverty & social exclusion;  EU Employment Package (2012) and Social Investment Package (2013) 8
    9. 9. An untapped resource eInclusion intermediaries  Crucial role due to their multiplier/amplifier effects  High diversity in the EU  Telecentres, Cybercafés, Libraries, civic centres, educational and training institutions, NGOs, private and public organisations, etc.  Limited policy attention and important ‘knowledge gaps’ 9
    10. 10. Objectives In cooperation with stakeholders, MIREIA is involving researchers and practitioners to: 1. Map eInclusion actors in Europe to better understand their characteristics and policy potential; 2. Design and 'test' a methodological framework to enhance capacity of eInclusion intermediaries and engage them to collect data and to measure their impacts http://is.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pages/EAP/eInclusion/MIREIA.html 10
    11. 11. Focus (Unit of Analysis) eInclusion intermediary actors  Public, private and third sector organisations which intentionally address social inclusion goals through ICTs or promote the use of ICTs to enhance the socioeconomic inclusion of marginalized and disadvantaged groups and of people at risk of exclusion Source, JRC-IPTS (2012). 11
    12. 12. EU27 Mapping: Methodology First attempt of collection of primary data at EU27 level In collaboration with 2,752 organisations >300 Networks ≥ (70.000 members) Literature review 3 Locality Mapping EU 27 Mapping 27 Countries 15 languages 14 country profiles 12
    13. 13. Typology of eInclusion actors PUBLIC SECTOR 1. National, Regional or State Agencies 2. Municipal/City Government 3. Public Libraries 4. Government-run Telecentres 5. Formal Educational Institutions PRIVATE SECTOR 1.Cybercafés 2.Private Training Organizations 3.Formal Educational Institutions 4.Other THIRD SECTOR 1. Non-governmental organizations 2. Associations, Foundations, or Charities 3. Community Organizations 4. Cooperative 5. Federation 6. Trade Union 7. Informal Network 8. Other 13
    14. 14. Estimated 'market’ size  Public libraries, municipalities, government and NGO-run telecentres represent the bulk of eInclusion actors with variations across the EU27 Sector and Type  Low participation of private sector  >20% of networks networks organisations are or members of  ≥250,000 eInclusion intermediaries in EU27  1 actor every 2,000 citizens 14
    15. 15. The EU27 landscape… Private Sector Third Sector Public Sector N=2752 15
    16. 16. Organisational capacities Staff size Size (Staff & Budget) Less than €10,000 22% €10,000 to €100,000 25% €100,000 to €1 million 18% €1 to €10 million More than €10 million 9% 3% Annual Budget 16
    17. 17. Targets Groups General (all groups) 54% Adults 51% Senior citizens/elderly 49% Young adults 46% Unemployed people 42% Children 37% Women 36% Low-skilled people 34% Individuals w/physical disabilities 27% Migrants 24% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Percentage of organizations which serve that target group 17
    18. 18. Services ICT enabled services Internet &… Social & Economic services 88% Basic ICT Skills… 80% Online job… 50% Social Media… 48% eGovernment 45% eAccessibility… Online safety 24% 50% 26% 24% 23% Vocational training 26% 0% 44% Social/Government… 33% ICT skills for… Other Language training 36% Advanced ICT… 55% Entrepreneurship… 45% Online courses Employment services 22% Legal assistance 100% 9% 0% 20% 40% 60% Percentage of organizations that provide such services 18
    19. 19. Key results  Important effort of characterisation and first mapping at EU27 level   A myriad of actors playing a vital social and economic role   in spite of limited resources and organisational capacities Crucial contribution to advancing the Digital Agenda for Europe and other key social and economic policy goals of the EU   baseline for future research and a 'living directory' for policy interventions strengthening community building, digital empowerment, social inclusion, learning and employability Complementarity of social functions performed  High potential for the creation of multi-stakeholders partnerships 19
    20. 20. Policy Options  Support the network effects, the innovation processes created and the services provided by this high and diverse number of organisations   Create the conditions for a larger involvement of the private sector   e.g. CSR, innovative PPP, and within the Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs Reinforce the capacities of eInclusion intermediary actors to further develop their entrepreneurial skills and ensure self-sustainability   Half of which have <10 employees and annual budgets of <100.000€ through service provision and the establishment of business models increasingly based on usage/service fees Strengthen the role these organisations can play in addressing digital exclusion, employability, and the shortage of ICT skilled workers  Link to the Social Investment Package and cohesion policy instruments 20
    21. 21. gianluca.misuraca@ec.europa.eu For further information about MIREIA: http://is.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pages/EAP/MIREIA.html

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