Sept 30 2013 council goals presentation - Utilities

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  • Debt service is still the largest cost in the sewer fund with approximately $10M in debt service per year (down from $12M). This cost is from the long range sewer improvement program that was completed between 1990 and 2010 for a cost of approx $210M. The program has been very successful in mitigating sewer water from backing up into basements
  • 143 miles of combined52 miles of relief16 miles of storm
  • Sewer rehabilitation, using the Cured-In-Place Pipe (CIPP) lining process is main emphasis of sewer capital improvement program at this time. Fund approx $500K / year to do this work on smaller diameter sewers which allows for the rehabilitation of approximately 1% of the combined sewer per year133 miles of small diameter pipe (<36”)23.6 miles (18%) lined since 1987Annual lining program now targets 1% (1.33 miles) per yearLined an average of 1.4 miles/year in last five years
  • In 2013 used $3.1M low interest low from IEPA to rehabilitate X miles of large diameter sewer mains and $ XXX from TIF funds to rehabilitate X miles of large dia sewer mains.Following this work, 2.5 miles has been rehabilitateWe already have a loan for 1.0 mile in 2014 (Central Park Ave and Main St).Working to apply for loans for remaining 1.5 miles (Greenleaf, Mulford, Cleveland).11 miles of large diameter pipe (36” to 72”)Plan to line an additional 2.5 miles by 2017 using state low interest loan funding
  • Most North Shore communities had extensive flood damage after the heavy rains in late April 2013. Evanston customers had comparatively little damage, and most of that was due to flooding in the North Shore Channel and the TARP system being full. Our relief sewers functioned as designed and kept the vast majority of customers from experiencing basement backups.Hydraulic study will begin with flow monitoring to determine how sewage flows between the combined and relief sewer systems. The data will be used to construct a sewer system hydraulic model, with the goal of addressing areas that experienced basement backups in April, as well as any bottlenecks in the system.20-year, $210 million projectDrastically reduced basement backups Some backups occurred in April 2013 because TARP was full and North Shore Channel was floodedSewer system hydraulic study planned for the next few years
  • Municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4)20-30 years oldLocated in proximity to the lake and North Shore ChannelNew initiatives under MS4 Program aimed at protecting water quality20-30 years oldLocated in proximity to the lake and North Shore ChannelNew initiatives under MS4 Program aimed at protecting water quality
  • Allocating funding to minimize the amount of storm water that goes into the combined system. In 2013 funded the porous pavement in the parking lanes on Davis Street. Will look for similar opportunities in future year projects or to extend the relief sewer onto streets with only combined sewers to mitigate street flooding.
  • Any good capital improvement program requires an ongoing maintenance plan to protect the investment. Maintenance is performed by in-house employees,Have a total of just under 15,000 sewer structures (drainage structures and inspection manholes).
  • The current pace of water main replacement is faster than most communities in the Chicago area, but at some point it will have to be accelerated further, as existing mains cannot be expected to last more than 100 years.The 30” feeder main is a critical source of water supply and fire flow for Northwestern and the downtown business district, as well as forming the major water supply loop for the entire community. At nearly 80 years old, this main has exceeded its useful life and is increasingly at risk for failure. It has experienced two shear breaks in the last five years, all of which had the potential to result in full blow-outs if they had not been caught early. 157 miles of pipe87 miles (55%) are over 80 years oldAt current rate, it will take 58 years to replace 80+ year-old mains30” feeder main is also 80 years old
  • Approx. 32.5 miles replaced since 1987Annual replacement program targets 1% (1.5 miles) per yearReplaced average of 1.6 miles/year in last 5 years
  • Plant Reliability Improvements: Upgrade chemical feed to eliminate single point of failure and eliminate bottlenecks to enable full 108 mgd to flow to and from the 12 East Plant filters.Finished Water Reservoir: Existing reservoir is 80 years old and constructed of non-air entrained concrete that has been damaged by years of exposure to freeze-thaw cycles. Two separate studies recommend replacement within 5 years.Intake Improvements: Replace 20-year-old mussel control system and add heating system to 48” intake.Master Meter & Chem Feed: Improve metering accuracy to Evanston/Skokie (increase revenue), reduce chemical usage (reduce costs)Meter Reading System: Improve reading accuracy, eliminate estimated bills, and allow customers to view their water usage 24/7.
  • Three criteria used to prioritize mains for replacement: maintenance problems (breaks/leaks), fire flow restrictions, age of the pipeLining is a less expensive alternative to open-cut replacement. We hope to do a demo project with a 24” main on Pitner in 2015.\Water main replacement program: $3.1 – $3.5 million/yearThree criteria used to prioritize mainsReplace 30” feeder main: $7.2 million in 2015-2016Water main lining may be a less expensive alternative
  • Proactive valve testing, maintenance, and replacement allows faster and more efficient shut-downs during water main breaks. This reduces water loss, reduces labor costs associated with shut-downs, and minimizes the number of customers affected by a shut-down.New leak detection equipment purchased in 2013. Proactive leak detection aims to water loss (and water production costs) and catch water main leaks when they are small (to minimize damage from main breaks). New system will allow for leak detection in more areas than just the streets being resurfaced.C3 Program – 2,800 permitted devices, up from 1,400 in 2008 when the program started.
  • Filter improvements and companion plant reliability impts project will us to take the West Plant out of service for critical structural repairs, or to be demolished or retrofitted to make way for improvements related to plant expansion for new wholesale customers.
  • Anticipate negotiating a cost of service-based agreement with Skokie and have it in place before the current agreement expires.Commission is currently meeting with other communities to potentially add them as members.
  • Anticipate negotiating a cost of service-based agreement with Skokie and have it in place before the current agreement expires.Commission is currently meeting with other communities to potentially add them as members.
  • It’s not hydraulically possible to “wheel” much water through Skokie or the existing NWC transmission main, so a new dedicated transmission main would be required to serve these communities.Glenview and Morton Grove could be included on the transmission main.
  • The proposed transmission main route is from the intersection of Hartrey & Cleveland, south on Hartrey, through James Park and then south on Hartrey to Howard and west on Howard to the City limit. Estimated cost for Evanston’s portion of the transmission main is $3.4M.
  • Based on facility level plan, $65M to expand to 132 MGD and $264M to expand to 214 MGDDesign, permitting and construction of pipeline tunnel and water plant expansion is estimated to take 5 years to complete.
  • Sept 30 2013 council goals presentation - Utilities

    1. 1. UTILITIES DEPARTMENT: STATUS AND GOALS PRESENTATION TO CITY COUNCIL SEPTEMBER 30, 2013
    2. 2. AGENDA • Sewer Fund • Water Fund • Wholesale Water Customers
    3. 3. SEWER FUND: MAJOR COSTS • Debt Service • Operation and Maintenance • Capital Improvement Program • Sewer Rehabilitation • Stormwater Management Improvements • Sewer repairs on streets being resurfaced • Emergency sewer repairs
    4. 4. SEWER FUND: THREE SEWER SYSTEMS • Combined sewer system is 100+ years old, not sized to handle storm flows • Relief sewer system constructed in 1990 – 2010 to convey wet weather flow to MWRD’s deep tunnel reservoir system (TARP) • Storm sewer system constructed in 1980s and 1990s to mitigate flooding in isolated areas
    5. 5. SMALL DIAMETER SEWER REHABILIATION PROGRAM 1987 – 2013
    6. 6. LARGE DIAMETER SEWER REHABILITATION PROGRAM
    7. 7. RELIEF SEWER SYSTEM
    8. 8. STORM SEWER SYSTEM
    9. 9. SEWER FUND: STORM SEWER SYSTEM • Annual Stormwater Management Program will fund “green” components of public improvement projects: • Pervious pavement • Bioinfiltration areas • Open-bottom catch basins • Extend the relief sewer system onto streets that currently only have combined sewer.
    10. 10. SEWER FUND: IN-HOUSE INITIATIVES In-house initiatives to maximize reliability: • Drainage structure and pipeline cleaning program – one-third of the City each year • Closed-circuit televising of sewer mains in conjunction with street resurfacing program • Regular maintenance of sewer infrastructure
    11. 11. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AGE
    12. 12. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM REPLACEMENT PROGRAM 1987 - 2013
    13. 13. WATER FUND: WATER TREATMENT PLANT The plant is well maintained and functions well, but improvements are needed due to its age: • Plant Reliability Improvements = $3.1 million • Finished Water Reservoir = $26.1 million • Intake Improvements = $2.0 million • Master Meter & Chemical Feed Project = $1.0 million Other planned improvements: • Meter Reading System = $2.4 million • Standpipe Painting and Repair = $2.7 million
    14. 14. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM REPLACEMENT NEEDS
    15. 15. WATER FUND: DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM In-house initiatives to maximize reliability: • Fire Hydrant Program – 98% of fire hydrants are <50 years old, all hydrants are tested annually • Valve Program – 70% of valves are <50 years old, half of the system is tested each year • Leak Detection Program – Proactively search for water system leaks • Cross Connection Control Program – Preserving water quality and protecting public health
    16. 16. WATER FUND: WATER TREATMENT PLANT Major projects in the last 20 years: • Intake reliability improvements to prevent frazil ice and mussel build-up • Asbestos removed from all buildings • Filter improvements to make needed repairs and increase reliability • Replacement of 30-year-old SCADA system with state-of-the-art control system • Chlorine scrubber ensures safety for nearby residents
    17. 17. WHOLESALE WATER: EXISTING CUSTOMERS • Village of Skokie • Became a wholesale customer in 1944 • Current agreement runs 1997 – 2017 • Currently paying $0.99/1,000 gal • Northwest Water Commission • Became a wholesale customer in 1985 • Current agreement expires in 2035 • Currently paying on average $0.60/1,000 gal
    18. 18. WHOLESALE WATER: POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS
    19. 19. WHOLESALE WATER: ENGINEERING ANALYSIS • Transmission main feasibility study conducted in coordination with Northwest Water Commission and 5 potential wholesale customers: • Lincolnwood • Niles • Park Ridge • Des Plaines • Regional transmission main is technically and financially feasible for all but Lincolnwood. • North Suburban Municipal Joint Action Water Agency
    20. 20. WHOLESALE WATER: OUTLOOK FOR LINCOLNWOOD • No modifications needed at the Water Plant or in the distribution system. • A dedicated transmission main would be constructed from Evanston’s South Standpipe. • City has submitted a proposal to Lincolnwood; negotiations are ongoing. • Would take about one year to design, permit, and construct the transmission main.
    21. 21. WHOLESALE WATER: OUTLOOK • Would require a major water plant expansion from 108 mgd to 132 or 214 mgd. • Meetings continue with Niles, Park Ridge and Des Plaines. • Morton Grove and Glenview have also expressed interest. • The Northwest Water Commission has held meetings with these same communities. • Northwest Suburban Municipal Joint Action Water Agency still expressing an interest.
    22. 22. QUESTIONS?

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