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Cultural and Creative Industries, School of Arts & Social Sciences - City University London Undergraduate Open Day 29th June 2013
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Cultural and Creative Industries, School of Arts & Social Sciences - City University London Undergraduate Open Day 29th June 2013

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Presentation about undergraduate Cultural and Creative Industries courses at City University London. Presentation was given as part of the programme of the City University London Undergraduate Open …

Presentation about undergraduate Cultural and Creative Industries courses at City University London. Presentation was given as part of the programme of the City University London Undergraduate Open Day on Saturday 29th June 2013.

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  • 1. Academic excellence for business and the professions 29th June 2013 BA Cultural and Creative Industries
  • 2. What are ‘the cultural and creative industries’? ..the media, television, film and publishing industries alongside the visual and the performing arts
  • 3. Why are they important? Economic reasons • The cultural and creative Industries are well established as an important part of the UK economy • They employ 1.5 million people in 106,700 businesses; account for 5% of UK employment; 10.6% of UK exports (services); and nearly 3% of economic GVA (gross value added – or total of all revenues). [DCMS report]
  • 4. Why are they important? Cultural reasons: • They connect people and ideas • The products they make shape our social lives and identities • They offer the potential to enrich, entertain and expand us
  • 5. Why are they important? Social and political reasons: •As ‘the knowledge economy’ they have become touted as a model for contemporary work •Their role is sometimes contentious (eg environmental issues, debates around working cultures) •They are hugely influential in shaping political and social opinions and everyday ‘common sense’
  • 6. The Cultural and Creative Industries at City • City has a near forty-year history of running arts management, cultural policy and creative industries courses alongside academic research. • We excel at connecting academic research with industry and the professions • City is ranked 10th in the UK for graduate employability by The Times Good University Guide 2012.
  • 7. The new BA programme • develops your knowledge and critical understanding of the cultural and creative industries in the UK and globally • gives you a broad range of skills in creative business management • allows you to expand your interests through practice and cultural production
  • 8. Knowledge and critical understanding •Cultural politics •Consumer culture •Culture and world cities – geographies •Networked worlds •Cultural policy •Histories and politics
  • 9. Creative business management Builds on our highly successful foundation degree • organizational dynamics and structures • principles of management • interrogating enterprise • ethics and responsibility • global commodity chains • intellectual property rights • particular challenges for the creative industries
  • 10. Cultural production Learn: • Digital creativity • Distributing your work • Audio-visual relationship Specialise, e.g: • Short film • Exhibition • Social media project • Community arts • Music management • Live events • You choose via major project
  • 11. Programme structure Year 1 modules (30 credit: run all year) • Cultural and creative industries, the arts and popular culture • Managing creative enterprises • Cultural production and creative technologies (15 credit) • Contextualising cultural policy (term 1) • Interrogating consumer culture (term 2)
  • 12. Year 2 Core modules • Globalisation and the cultural and creative industries • Intellectual property rights and the regulation of culture • Research methods Elective modules • Cultural production project (practical) • Professional and community music studies • Work Placement • New media challenges • Circuits of culture • Popular music studies • Web creation and digital publishing • The music business • Contemporary UK cultural policy • Global perspectives: the world on your doorstep
  • 13. Year 3 Core modules • Individual major project on the cultural and creative industries • Cultural work and the enterprising self • The international marketing of culture Elective modules • Collaborative cultural production project • Audiences in the consumer society • Digital cultures • Popular music now • New media: from cyberspace to social media • Culture and world cities • Programming and its management .
  • 14. Can I do a work placement? • Choose the 2nd year placement elective • Departmental staff are available to help you to find a suitable work placement • Past students have gained placements at the BBC, the Barbican, the Roundhouse, Rich Mix, Kiss FM, the Arts Council, the Olympics and in a wide range of public, cultural, music, media and events organisations.
  • 15. Teaching • Lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials • Teaching is concentrated over 3 to 4 days per week • Academic excellence: specialist staff who have up-to-date industry knowledge. • All staff are either actively engaged in research within the sector, or are working in the industry.
  • 16. Potential graduate destinations Recent job titles • Research assistant (NESTA) • Assistant for orchestra planning and projects (London Orchestra) • Music programming assistant (London Arts Centre) • Business development assistant • Digital content coordinator • Independent record label coordinator • Licensing and royalty collection officer • Festival co-ordinator (Bristol) • Production assistant, The Farm (Television production • company) • Exhibitions Officer
  • 17. Entry requirements • 340 UCAS tariff points. • There is no restriction on the type of subjects acceptable, but demonstrating familiarity with subjects connected to the arts, humanities or social sciences is preferred.