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Broad Street Subway
                          Ridership Study




      Prepared For:




                       Philadelp...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study




Table of Contents
List of Tables ....................................................
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study


List of Figures
Figure 1 Study Area....................................................
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

Figure 31 Egress Mode - Weekday ........................................................
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study



Executive Summary
Eng-Wong, Taub & Associates (EWT) in association with Portfolio A...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of how the existing tr...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

     Table ES-1
Recommendations Matrix




       Page ES - 3
                       ...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

          Table ES-1
Recommendations Matrix (Continued)




            Page ES - 4
 ...
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Introduction
Eng-Wong, Taub & Associates (EWT) in association with Portfolio Associ...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study




    •   future SEPTA marketing efforts and communication strategies with riders;
 ...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

                                              Figure 1
                              ...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study



   1. Inform elected officials, community based organizations, community residents,...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

Some key discussion points from the three Stakeholder interviews are summarized below...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

   •   There is vehicle parking on the sidewalk plaza area surrounding the headhouse ...
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Ridership Survey
Purpose
The purpose of the survey is to identify trip patterns at t...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

A customized survey was created for each station so that the survey question script w...
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            2.   Business travel
            3.   Travel to/from school
            4...
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weight the 1,832 surveys to represent 16,577 people that entered the stations. In gen...
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Figure 2




Figure 3




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Key Findings and Selected Tables from the Final Weighted Database
                                                        ...
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Weekday passengers at Pattison Station (see Figure 5) primarily came from the South P...
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Figure 6




Figure 7




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Most of the passengers boarding weekday trains at Pattison, Oregon and Snyder stati...
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Oregon Station and 9 percent of the Snyder Station passengers. This can be attributed...
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Figure 10




Figure 11




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                                               Figure 12




On Saturday, Center City...
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Figure 13




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When examining the access mode by station on weekdays (see Figure 15), the walk share...
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Figure 15




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Figure 17




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Figure 21




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                                                Table 2
                           ...
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This study also looked to identify where subway passengers were parking since parking...
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Figure 24




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Figure 26




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                                              Figure 28




At Snyder Station 60 perc...
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Passengers were asked to identify the egress mode they would be using to reach their ...
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                                                Figure 32




Passengers that exited ...
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Figure 33




Figure 34




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Trip Purpose and Trip Frequency
Passengers were asked to identify the purpose of thei...
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Figure 37




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Figure 39




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Figure 41




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Passengers were also asked how often they make this trip to determine trip frequency....
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Figure 43




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Figure 45




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Figure 47




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Identified Issues and Recommended Actions
One of the study goals is to utilize the f...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

A key requirement of this study was that the recommendations be realistic, that they ...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

Traffic Flow and Parking
The study area section of South Broad Street is a congested ...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

Figure 51 Restriped Parking Along West Moyamensing Avenue




Figure 52 Reconfigurati...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

Figure 53 Improvements to West Passyunk Avenue and South Broad Street




           ...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

Beyond the concerns about parking, Stakeholders indicated that the intersection of Br...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

Buses and Shelters
The Broad Street corridor is well served by buses. About 10 routes...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

and schedules. Consideration should also be given to improving the Casino bus stop ne...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

Pedestrian Facilities/Green Space
Improvements to the pedestrian facilities surroundi...
Broad Street Subway Ridership Study

The Infill Philadelphia: Commercial Corridors Study stated that East Passyunk’s gatew...
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 A pedestrian countdown signal similar to what has been         An existing crossw...
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Ritner Streets, or about one mile east of Broad Street so utilizing the existing stat...
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Intermodal Transfers and Wayfinding
Throughout the corridor and specifically at the s...
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Transcript of "Broad Street Subway Ridership Study "

  1. 1. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Prepared For: Philadelphia City Planning Commission Prepared By: In Association With: Date: June 30, 2009
  2. 2. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Table of Contents List of Tables ......................................................................................................................................1 List of Figures .....................................................................................................................................2 Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................1 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................1 Project Purpose ..................................................................................................................................1 Project Area .......................................................................................................................................2 Project Stakeholders...........................................................................................................................3 Ridership Survey.................................................................................................................................7 Purpose..........................................................................................................................................7 Survey Methodology.......................................................................................................................7 Survey Schedule .............................................................................................................................9 Survey Sample Size and Weighting...................................................................................................9 Key Findings and Selected Tables from the Final Weighted Database ...............................................12 Origins-and-Destinations ...........................................................................................................12 Access and Egress Modes...........................................................................................................18 Trip Purpose and Trip Frequency................................................................................................34 Identified Issues and Recommended Actions......................................................................................44 Traffic Flow and Parking ................................................................................................................46 Buses and Shelters........................................................................................................................50 Pedestrian Facilities/Green Space ..................................................................................................52 Intermodal Transfers and Wayfinding ............................................................................................56 Bicycle Accommodation ................................................................................................................59 APPENDIX ........................................................................................................................................64 List of Tables Table 1 Sample Size ..........................................................................................................................10 Table 2 Study Area Bus Routes ..........................................................................................................25 Table 3 Recommendations Matrix .....................................................................................................65 Page i - 1 June 2009
  3. 3. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study List of Figures Figure 1 Study Area.............................................................................................................................3 Figure 2 Ridership by Hour - Weekday ...............................................................................................11 Figure 3 Ridership by Hour - Saturday ................................................................................................11 Figure 4 City Planning Commission Planning Analysis Sections.............................................................12 Figure 5 Origin of Weekday Passengers boarding trains at Pattison Station..........................................13 Figure 6 Origin of Weekday Passengers boarding trains at Oregon Station ...........................................14 Figure 7 Origin of Weekday Passengers boarding trains at Snyder Station............................................14 Figure 8 Exiting Station - Weekday.....................................................................................................15 Figure 9 Exiting Station - Saturday .....................................................................................................16 Figure 10 Final Destination of Weekday Passengers boarding trains at Pattison Station ........................17 Figure 11 Final Destination of Weekday Passengers boarkding trains at Oregon Station........................17 Figure 12 Final Destination of Weekday Passengers boarding trains at Snyder Station ..........................18 Figure 13 Access Mode - Weekday.....................................................................................................19 Figure 14 Access Mode - Saturday .....................................................................................................19 Figure 15 Access Mode - All Three Stations- Weekday.........................................................................21 Figure 16 Access Mode - All Three Stations - Saturday ........................................................................21 Figure 17 Access Bus Route - Pattison Station - Weekday....................................................................22 Figure 18 Access Bus Route - Pattison Station - Saturday.....................................................................22 Figure 19 Access Bus Route - Oregon Station - Weekday .....................................................................23 Figure 20 Access Bus Route - Oregon Station - Saturday......................................................................23 Figure 21 Access Bus Route - Snyder Station - Weekday......................................................................24 Figure 22 Access Bus Route - Snyder Station - Saturday.......................................................................24 Figure 23 Parking Locations - Pattison Station - Weekday....................................................................26 Figure 24 Parking Locations - Pattison Station - Saturday ....................................................................27 Figure 25 Parking Locations - Oregon Station - Weekday.....................................................................27 Figure26 Parking Locations - Oregon Station - Saturday ......................................................................28 Figure 27 Parking Locations - Snyder Station - Weekday......................................................................28 Figure 28 Parking Locations - Snyder Station - Saturday ......................................................................29 Figure 29 Was there a Bike brought On-board - Weekday ...................................................................30 Figure 30 Was there a Bike brought On-board - Saturday....................................................................30 Page i - 2 June 2009
  4. 4. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 31 Egress Mode - Weekday .....................................................................................................31 Figure 32 Egress Mode - Saturday......................................................................................................32 Figure 33 Egress Mode by Trolley Routes - Weekday...........................................................................33 Figure 34 Egress Mode by Trolley Route - Saturday.............................................................................33 Figure 35 Trip Purpose – All Three Stations - Weekday........................................................................35 Figure 36 Trip Purpose – All Three Stations - Saturday ........................................................................35 Figure 37 Trip Purpose - Pattison Station - Weekday...........................................................................36 Figure 38 Trip Purpose - Pattison Station - Saturday............................................................................36 Figure 39 Trip Purpose - Oregon Station - Weekday ............................................................................37 Figure 40 Trip Purpose - Oregon Station - Saturday.............................................................................37 Figure 41 Trip Purpose - Snyder Station - Weekday.............................................................................38 Figure 42 Trip Purpose - Snyder Station - Saturday..............................................................................38 Figure 43 Trip Frequency – All Three Stations - Weekday ....................................................................40 Figure 44 Trip Frequency – All Three Stations - Saturday .....................................................................40 Figure 45 Trip Frequency - Pattison Station - Weekday........................................................................41 Figure 46 Trip Frequency - Pattison Station - Saturday ........................................................................41 Figure 47 Trip Frequency - Oregon Station - Weekday.........................................................................42 Figure 48 Trip Frequency - Oregon Station - Saturday .........................................................................42 Figure 49 Trip Frequency - Snyder Station - Weekday .........................................................................43 Figure 50 Trip Frequency - Snyder Station - Saturday ..........................................................................43 Figure 51 Restriped Parking Along West Moyamensing Avenue...........................................................47 Figure 52 – Reconfiguration of West 13th and West 15th Streets...........................................................47 Figure 53 – Improvements to West Passyunk Avenue and South Broad Street......................................48 Figure 54 – Shared Parking Opportunities ..........................................................................................48 Figure 55 Bike Lane Recommendations for South 13th and South 15th Streets.......................................61 Page i - 3 June 2009
  5. 5. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Executive Summary Eng-Wong, Taub & Associates (EWT) in association with Portfolio Associates, Inc. – the project team – was retained by the Philadelphia City Planning Commission (PCPC) to prepare the Broad Street Subway Ridership Study for Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations. The study has been funded by an allocation from the Federal Transit Administration through PENNDOT and the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) and via a local match of 20 percent which was met through in-kind services provided by PCPC. The Broad Street Subway Ridership Study: Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations concerns an approximately two-mile-long corridor within the City of Philadelphia focused within half-mile radii of each of the three subway stations (or approximately between 11th and 17th Streets). It is bounded by Mifflin Street on the north, Terminal Avenue/I-95 overpass on the south, 11th Street on the east, and 17th Street on the west (see Figure 1) Figure ES-1 Study Area Page ES - 1 June 2009
  6. 6. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of how the existing transportation network is being utilized, in order to inform a number of ongoing planning and marketing efforts. The study tasks included meetings with an advisory committee, a review of existing studies, a ridership survey of Broad Street Subway passengers at Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder stations, stakeholder interviews and recommendations of strategies and actions for improved transportation and access. Key findings from the ridership survey of passengers boarding trains at Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations include: • Over 90 percent of the passenger origins are from the South Philadelphia area with most in either the 19145 or 19148 zip codes. • About 45 percent of the weekday and 37 percent of the Saturday passengers exit the Broad Street line at the City Hall Station • About 40 percent of the passengers have destinations in Center City • Over 60 percent of the passengers access the subway station by walking • About 24 percent of the weekday passengers and 28 percent of the Saturday passengers come to the station by bus • About 66 percent of weekday passengers and almost 58 percent of the weekend passengers walk to their final destination after leaving the Broad Street Subway line. • Work commute was the trip purpose for almost 62 percent of the weekday passengers and nearly 43 percent of the Saturday passengers • About 61 percent of the weekday passengers travel on the Broad Street Line about 4 to 5 days a week. Detailed tabulation and cross tabulation tables can be found in the Appendix. Based on all of the inputs to the study (a review of existing field conditions, review of past and ongoing studies, Advisory Committee input, Stakeholder interviews, and the ridership survey results), the study area problems/issues that have been identified and the resulting recommendations fall under the following categories: • Traffic flow and parking, • Buses and shelters • Pedestrian facilities/green space, • Intermodal transfers and wayfinding, and • Bicycle accommodation. Each of the recommendations is listed in the recommendations matrix (see Table ES-1). The recommendations matrix lists the implementing agency for each action to help facilitate the next steps toward implementation. Page ES - 2 June 2009
  7. 7. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Table ES-1 Recommendations Matrix Page ES - 3 June 2009
  8. 8. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Table ES-1 Recommendations Matrix (Continued) Page ES - 4 June 2009
  9. 9. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Introduction Eng-Wong, Taub & Associates (EWT) in association with Portfolio Associates, Inc. – the project team – was retained by the Philadelphia City Planning Commission (PCPC) to prepare the Broad Street Subway Ridership Study for Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations. The study has been funded by an allocation from the Federal Transit Administration through PENNDOT and the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) and via a local match of 20 percent which was met through in-kind services provided by PCPC. Project Purpose The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of how the existing transportation network is being utilized, in order to inform a number of ongoing planning and marketing efforts. The first step was to identify trip patterns. There has been no recent attempt to collect/analyze such data for Broad Street Line riders. Furthermore, current fare technology cannot precisely track riders who use transfers. The southernmost stations on the Broad Street Line have a certain amount of patronage from NJ residents commuting to/from Center City each business day. This may be witnessed by the unusually large number of cars with NJ license plates on nearby residential side streets particularly surrounding Oregon Station and occupying the parking spaces at the Sports Complex surrounding Pattison Station. Snyder Station is the layover point for Bus Route 37 providing direct service to all terminals at Philadelphia International Airport (PHL), and beyond to PHL Business Center, and the City of Chester. In addition to four cross-town bus routes and two bus routes serving PHL and beyond, transfers may also be made to/from a connecting shuttle bus (SEPTA Route 71) at Pattison Station serving the Navy Yard complex. Knowing subway rider origins and destinations provides a better understanding of subway ridership and intermodal connections, and what current and potential trip generators are being addressed/under- served. This data complements and helps to inform various studies and initiatives including: Page 1 June 2009
  10. 10. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study • future SEPTA marketing efforts and communication strategies with riders; • the PIDC Broad Street Subway Extension Feasibility Study to improve access into the Navy Yard; • PCPC’s Stadium Area Transit Study which recommended various phased approaches toward creating a more transit-oriented and pedestrian-friendlier experience; and • the Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA) PATCO Extension Study, currently underway, which has a large Philadelphia component including the concept of a light rail connector along the Delaware Riverfront with potential extensions to the Sports Complex (Pattison Station) and Navy Yard. Given the multi-functionality of the South Broad Street corridor, there are several transportation-related problems affecting the different populations who live and work along it, and travelers who pass through it that the study has examined from a planning perspective including traffic congestion, transit accessibility and intermodal connectivity, parking, pedestrian safety, bicycle use and wayfinding/signage. Finally, the findings of the study look to add value to the current planning for the corridor, by recommending strategies and actions for improved transportation and access. Project Area The Broad Street Subway Ridership Study: Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations concerns an approximately two-mile-long corridor within the City of Philadelphia focused within half-mile radii of each of the three subway stations (or approximately between 11th and 17th Streets). It is bounded by Mifflin Street on the north, Terminal Avenue/I-95 overpass on the south, 11th Street on the east, and 17th Street on the west (see Figure 1) These three station areas comprise the “core” of the gateway area that connects the Delaware Valley region’s metropolitan center (Philadelphia’s Center City) with several neighborhoods in South Philadelphia and beyond including the Sports Complex and Navy Yard. Broad Street is a transit corridor for the Broad Street Subway as well as portions of five surface bus routes that follow its alignment. There are also several intersecting transit routes within the study area. It is worth noting that all five surface transit routes that partially operate on South Broad Street have partial or full-time terminals/layovers along South Broad within the study area. The northernmost subway station of the study area at Snyder Avenue is a major transfer point to other SEPTA routes. Flanking the South Broad Street corridor are several residential neighborhoods that are in a state of flux with some transitioning from middle income to lower income but with most undergoing substantial revitalization with market-rate housing development. These neighborhoods include Girard Estate, Packer Park, the Reserve at Packer Park, The Villas, Siena Place, and Hoffman Estates. Many of the residents of these areas patronize and make regular use of facilities along South Broad Street including commercial establishments, religious and educational institutions, social-service providers, and transit. Page 2 June 2009
  11. 11. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 1 Study Area Project Stakeholders The Broad Street Subway Ridership Study: Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations builds upon ongoing efforts focused on South Broad Street. The plans and processes already established by PCPC, PIDC, DRPA, and the Sports Complex served as starting points for continued involvement of and cooperation by stakeholders and advisors. An Advisory Committee was identified to guide the project and provide feedback during the course of the project. Four meetings were held with the Advisory Committee at key points in the project. The Advisory Committee was comprised of representatives from PCPC, DVRPC, SEPTA, PIDC, Philadelphia Streets Department, the Philadelphia Parking Authority, Comcast-Spectacor, Office of Economic Opportunity, Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU), and Philadelphia City Council (Districts 1and 2). In addition to the Advisory Committee meetings, three targeted focus group-style Stakeholder interviews were held during the course of the project. Overall Stakeholder Interview objectives aimed to accomplish the following: Page 3 June 2009
  12. 12. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study 1. Inform elected officials, community based organizations, community residents, commuters, businesses, institutions, agencies and other stakeholders about the Broad Street Subway Ridership Study. 2. Facilitate stakeholder conversations to: a. Inform stakeholders about the project b. Understand specific impacts each station’s ridership and facilities has on stakeholders and their constituents c. Identify the community assets that stakeholders want to emphasize as affected by the Broad Street Subway’s ridership and facilities i. parks, shopping centers, services, schools, institutions, intersections, etc. that are important d. Community values, transportation-related values, values unique to South Philadelphia e. Identify new projects, plans or initiatives including i. residential projects, ii. plans for new or improved infrastructure, iii. initiatives to promote local shopping, iv. Improvements to transit, etc. f. Discuss how future improvement projects impact or may be impacted by the community values identified g. Help stakeholders articulate the community’s perceived value of the Broad Street Subway and its ridership h. Ascertain the transit/travel connections made possible by the Survey component of this study i. Transportation-related problems, improvements or additional transportation-related amenities needed j. Identify needed transportation-related improvements in the study area (with special focus on transit facilities, operations and accessibility; traffic congestion, bicycle use, pedestrian safety, parking, wayfinding/signage, etc.) To facilitate more targeted discussions three Stakeholder interview/focus groups were convened. The Stakeholder groups included: • Group 1: Philadelphia Parking Authority (PPA), Comcast-Spectacor, Sports Complex Special Services District (SCSSD), City Council Districts 1& 2 • Group 2: Streets Dept., MOTU, SEPTA, PADOT, DVRPC, PIDC • Group 3: Methodist Hospital, St. Agnes Hospital, funeral homes, churches, School District Page 4 June 2009
  13. 13. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Some key discussion points from the three Stakeholder interviews are summarized below by station and overall discussion points for the corridor. Sample Discussion Points – Pattison Station • The proposed Philly Live is to begin development after the Spectrum is demolished in Fall 2009. The build out is envisioned to include mixed use, retail, entertainment, and a 300-room hotel. • The Stadium District Traffic Study is examining the traffic impacts of the sports complex since the new Phillies and Eagles venues were completed five years ago. The study is expected to be completed by end of 2009. • Pedestrian access by the sports complex is challenging. Many people park in Roosevelt Park so there are numerous attempted mid-block crossings which are dangerous • Wayfinding is limited or nonexistent. Signage both inside and outside of the station is limited and does not provide a clear path to/from the subways and the various stadium venues. • Vehicles pull up onto sidewalk areas surrounding the station limiting pedestrian circulation. • Limited use of all headhouses is confusing, especially when approaching on-foot from a distance. Sample Discussion Points – Oregon • Red light camera and countdown pedestrian signals have been installed at the intersection of Oregon Avenue and Broad Street and have been working successfully. • There have been discussions about beautifying the triangle area at the northwest corner of Oregon Avenue and Broad Street. Currently vehicles park in that area. • The intersection of Oregon Avenue and Broad Street is not a pedestrian-friendly environment. There are many buses stopping in the vicinity of the station (although not all buses have stops at the corners – some are midblock) along with trucks traveling on Broad Street which make that area unsafe and difficult to navigate. • Vehicles temporarily park in the bus stop area to drop-off passengers at subway. • The sidewalk is very narrow along the subway head house on north east side of Broad Street. Page 5 June 2009
  14. 14. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study • There is vehicle parking on the sidewalk plaza area surrounding the headhouse at the northeast corner of Broad Street and Oregon Avenue. Sample Discussion Points – Snyder • A study has been conducted regarding gateway improvements at the intersection of Broad Street, Passyunk Avenue, and McKean Street. • South Philadelphia High School and Methodist and St. Agnes Hospitals generate subway riders. • Vehicles parked in the center median on Broad Street encroach on the left turn lane. • Route 37 buses have a difficult time making turns at station. • The parking lot for South Philadelphia High School has a lot of parking spaces and neighbors park there at night but there is no knowledge of a formal agreement regarding parking. • People don’t use Snyder Station because they don’t feel comfortable or safe – particularly the elderly. • Passyunk Avenue and S. Broad Street is a challenging Intersection to navigate for motorists as well as pedestrians and bicyclists. • The fate of the recently vacated large apartment building just beyond the northwest corner is unclear. Sample Discussion Points – Corridor • SEPTA is in the process of implementing a Smart Stations program which includes safety and security upgrades, lighting improvements, etc. at all Broad Street Subway stations. • Corridor traffic is sluggish but that calms traffic which makes it safer for pedestrians and bicyclists. • Civic groups are getting more organized; several routinely operate as coalitions when issues are faced that affect areas beyond individual civic boundaries. • Seniors living in area are afraid of using the subways. • Wayfinding improvements are needed – there are not good wayfinding landmarks in the corridor. The findings from the Stakeholder interviews along with the findings from the ridership surveys and feedback from the Advisory Committee was used to develop the recommended actions which are discussed in the final section of this report. Page 6 June 2009
  15. 15. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Ridership Survey Purpose The purpose of the survey is to identify trip patterns at the three South Philadelphia subway stations -- Pattison, Oregon and Snyder -- and to better understand transfers between travel modes as the current fare technology cannot precisely track riders who use transfers. Knowing subway rider origins and destinations will provide for a better understanding of how the existing transportation infrastructure is being utilized, and which current and potential trip generators are being satisfied or are served. Such data will complement and provide information for various studies and initiatives including future SEPTA marketing efforts and communication strategies with riders. Survey Methodology The survey was administered as customers entered each of the stations. Survey agents were positioned at strategic locations along the platforms to randomly intercept and interview customers before they boarded trains. Customers were selected in a random manner to ensure that interviewer bias (interviewing only those that appear “approachable” or bias by gender and/or age) would be held to a minimum and that a representative sample of customers was surveyed at each station. The survey instrument was programmed into Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) which were used to record the data. The PDAs are an important quality control measure to minimize the amount of data cleaning and editing needed and also to ensure data consistency and reliability. As a surveyor prepared to conduct interviews at a specific station, he/she began by selecting the survey instrument for that station. For example, if the Pattison survey was selected, all survey records were then coded with Pattison Station as the “boarding station.” The PDA also recorded the time and date of each survey by time stamping each survey record. When surveyors moved to a different station, they logged out of the survey and logged into the survey for the new station. Page 7 June 2009
  16. 16. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study A customized survey was created for each station so that the survey question script was specific to that station. For example, the Oregon Station survey did not include Oregon Station as a choice for “Exit Station” and the “Access Mode” bus route response options included routes that serve Oregon Station. The survey included the following questions and response options: 1. Exit Station: At which station will you leave the Broad Street Line? (response options included all stations on the Broad Street Line) 2. Destination: What is your final destination when you leave _______ (station name to be filled- in based on response to Q.1) Station?(Zip code, address or nearest intersection was recorded ) 3. Egress Mode: After you leave the Broad Street Line, how will you travel to your final destination? 1. Auto: Driver 2. Auto: Passenger 3. Commuter Van 4. Taxi 5. Walk ONLY 6. Bicycle 7. Bus  What bus company/route? 8. SEPTA Regional Rail 9. PATCO High Speed Line 10. Trolley Route Which Route (10, 11, 13, 15, 34, or 36)? 11. Market-Frankford Line 12. Other  specify 4. Origin: Where did you begin your trip (Zip code, address or nearest intersection was recorded) 5. Access Mode: How did you get to THIS Broad Street Station? 1. Auto: Driver Where did you park Parking lot, On-Street at the curb, On-Street in the center median, dropped off, other (specify) 2. Auto: Passenger  Where did you park Parking lot, On-Street at the curb, On-Street in the center median, dropped off, other (specify) 3. Commuter Van Where did you park Parking lot, On-Street at the curb, On-Street in the center median, dropped off, other (specify) 4. Taxi 5. Walk ONLY 6. Bicycle 7. Bus  What bus company/route If Snyder Station (37, 79, or other), if Oregon Station (7, 68, G, or other); If Pattison (17, 71, or other) 8. Other  specify 6. Trip Purpose: What is the main purpose of your trip? 1. Work Commute Page 8 June 2009
  17. 17. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study 2. Business travel 3. Travel to/from school 4. Shopping 5. Entertainment/Recreation 6. Visit family or friends 7. Medical 8. Other (specify) 7. Trip Frequency: How often do you make THIS trip? 1. 6 or more days a week 2. 4 to 5 days a week 3. 1 to 3 days a week 4. Less than once a week Survey Schedule The Broad Street Subway Ridership Survey was conducted over three weekdays and one Saturday as per the following schedule: • Tuesday April 21, 2009 – 5AM to 11AM • Wednesday April 22, 2009 – 11AM to 6PM • Thursday April 23, 2009 – 6PM to Midnight • Saturday April 25, 2009 – 5AM to Midnight The weekday survey was split over three days so each day consisted of one shift of six to seven work hours and over the course of the three days surveys were conducted between 5AM and midnight at all three stations. While there were events scheduled at the venues near the Pattison Station during each of the weekday survey days, none of the events began or ended during our survey period so the data is that of a “typical” non-event weekday. The Saturday survey was conducted over one day by staffing several survey shifts throughout the day. The Saturday survey was conducted over the same time period (5:00 AM and midnight) as the weekday survey at all three stations except at the Pattison Station. At Pattison Station, the survey was concluded Survey Sample Size and Weighting at 10 pm because the platform was overcrowded since an event had just finished. Over 1,800 surveys were conducted including 1,391 weekday surveys and 441 weekend surveys (see Table 1). The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) provided turnstile data in half hour intervals for each station on each survey date which showed that 9,978 people entered the stations during the weekday survey periods and 6,599 people entered the three stations on Saturday. Responses to the survey were expanded or “weighted” so that they would reflect their true proportion in the riding population, and thus could be expanded to that population. This was necessary because various “real-world” conditions (such as crowding and population characteristics) caused response rates to vary from station to station and from time period to time period. The turnstile data was used to Page 9 June 2009
  18. 18. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study weight the 1,832 surveys to represent 16,577 people that entered the stations. In general, the weekday data was weighted in half hour intervals by dividing the station entry count for a particular half hour by the number of surveys conducted during that same 30 minute period. There were some exceptions where the weekday data was expanded based on one hour intervals because there were no surveys conducted in that 30-minute period. Through weighting, the survey results depict proportional response rates across the study. Table 1 Sample Size Total Weekday Total Weekday Weekday Weekday Saturday Saturday and Saturday and Saturday Interviews Passengers Interviews Passengers Interviews Passengers Station (between 5AM and Midnight) Pattison 377 1,476 111 1,953 488 3,429 Oregon 503 3,192 121 1,780 624 4,972 Snyder 511 5,325 209 2,866 720 8,191 Total 1,391 9,993 441 6,599 1,832 16,592 A review of the SEPTA weekday turnstile data for the survey period reveals that the AM peak hour occurs between 7AM and 8AM at Oregon Station (about 585 passengers) and between 8AM and 9AM at Pattison (235 passengers) and Snyder (nearly 770 passengers) Stations (see Figure 2). During the weekday afternoon, volumes are relatively flat without any notable PM peak hour at Pattison and Oregon Stations from about noon until about 7PM. At the Snyder Station volumes begin to increase with some fluctuations between noon and 6PM with a slight peak (370 passengers) at 3PM. On Saturdays, volumes entering Snyder (about 100 to 215 passengers each hour) and Oregon Station (about 60 to almost 175 passengers per hour) remain relatively flat for most of the day (see Figure 3). At Pattison Station volumes were also flat (about 30 to about 115 passengers per hour) until they began to increase between 4 and 7PM with a peak of 600 passengers at 6PM. Page 10 June 2009
  19. 19. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 2 Figure 3 Page 11 June 2009
  20. 20. Key Findings and Selected Tables from the Final Weighted Database Broad Street Subway Ridership Study The following sections contain key findings and selected tables that were prepared from the final weighted database. Specific findings including origins and destinations, boarding and exiting stations, access and egress modes, trip purpose, and trip frequency are discussed. Detailed tabulation and cross tabulation tables can be found in the Appendix including information about the connecting bus routes used by subway passengers. Origins-and-Destinations One of the key pieces of data obtained from the survey effort was the passenger’s origin (prior to boarding the train) and final destination after exiting the Broad Street Line. Data was obtained at the zip code level. If a passenger did not know their origin and/or final destination zip code, surveyors asked for the nearest intersection, address, or a landmark so that zip codes could be determined during survey post processing. For reporting purposes, the zip codes were aggregated approximating the City Planning Commission Planning Analysis Sections (PAS) as shown in Figure 4; however, two PAS’s (Near Northeast Philadelphia and Far Northeast Philadelphia) were combined and are called Northeast Philadelphia due to low origins/destinations in these PAS’s. Figure 4 City Planning Commission Planning Analysis Sections Page 12 June 2009
  21. 21. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Weekday passengers at Pattison Station (see Figure 5) primarily came from the South Philadelphia PAS (nearly 70 percent) with most from the 19148 zip code (almost 35 percent) followed by the 19145 zip code (almost 20 percent) and 19112 (about 15 percent). Less than five percent came from the Southwest Philadelphia PAS, and less than 1 percent from the West Philadelphia PAS. Almost eleven percent came from other Pennsylvania Counties and almost 15 percent came from outside Pennsylvania. At Oregon Station, most of the weekday passenger origins (almost 94 percent) were from South Philadelphia with most (58 percent) from zip code 19148, followed by zip code 19145 with 32 percent (see Figure 6). About 4 percent came from the Southwest Philadelphia PAS. Similar to the findings at Pattison and Oregon Stations, the passengers boarding trains at Snyder Station (see Figure 7) had origins primarily in the South Philadelphia PAS (about 94 percent) with most (almost 45 percent) from the 19148 zip code followed by the 19145 zip code (almost 44 percent). About 4 percent came from the Southwest Philadelphia PAS. On Saturday, the pattern was similar at all three stations. Nearly all the origins (90 to almost 98 percent) of passengers boarding trains at the three stations were from the South Philadelphia PAS with most (about 42 to 45 percent) from the 19148 zip code followed by the 19145 zip code (41 to 50 percent). Figure 5 Page 13 June 2009
  22. 22. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 6 Figure 7 Page 14 June 2009
  23. 23. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Most of the passengers boarding weekday trains at Pattison, Oregon and Snyder stations were exiting the Broad Street Line at City Hall (41 to almost 49 percent) as shown in Figure 8. The Walnut-Locust Station is the next highest (12 to 14 percent) exiting station. City Hall is located in the heart of Center City Philadelphia and is a major transportation hub with access to many connecting transit routes. The Walnut-Locust stop is just to the south of the City Hall Station with access to the PATCO Line and various universities, hospitals, museums, etc. The Cecil B. Moore/Temple University Station is the exiting station for almost 9 percent of the passengers boarding trains at Snyder Station, about 7 percent of the passengers boarding trains at Oregon Station and about one percent of the passengers boarding trains at Pattison Station. The remaining stations are each exited by five or less percent of the passengers boarding trains at Pattison, Oregon, or Snyder Station. The almost 7 percent of Oregon Station passengers exiting at Allegheny Station may be due to the presence of hospitals and their staff using both stations. Figure 8 On Saturday a similar pattern occurs (see Figure 9). The City Hall Station has the highest percentage of exiting passengers (36 to 40 percent), and the Walnut-Locust Station has the next highest percentage (8 to almost 15 percent). The exiting percentages at the remaining stations vary from the weekday pattern with the Pattison Station serving as the exiting station for about 9 percent of the passengers boarding at Page 15 June 2009
  24. 24. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Oregon Station and 9 percent of the Snyder Station passengers. This can be attributed to weekend events at the sports complex and recreational activities at FDR Park/Golf Course. Figure 9 Since more than half of the weekday passengers boarding trains at Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations are destined for either the City Hall or Walnut-Locust Station, it is not suprising that the Center City PAS (see Figures 10 to 12) is the final destination for most of those passengers. About 48 percent of the Pattison Station passengers are destined for the Center City PAS, almost 13 percent stay in the South Philadelphia area, 11 percent travel to Lower North Philadelphia, 6 percent to West Philadelphia, and 5 percent to Olney/Oak Lane. In addition, almost 4 percent travel to other Pennsylvania Counties. At Oregon Station about 50 percent of the weekday passengers are destined for Center City, 14 percent travel to Lower North Philadelphia, 9 percent stay in South Philadelphia, 7 percent are destined for West Philadelphia, 6 percent travel north to Olney/Oak Lane, and four percent go to Upper North Philadelphia. Almost 32 percent of the weekday passengers boarding trains at Snyder Station have final destinations in Center City while nearly 21 percent travel to Lower North Philadelphia and 20 percent have destinations in the South Philadelphia area. About 9 percent of the Snyder Station weekday passengers have final destinations in West Philadelphia, 4 percent in Olney/Oak Lane and nearly 4 percent travel to Upper North Philadelphia. Page 16 June 2009
  25. 25. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 10 Figure 11 Page 17 June 2009
  26. 26. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 12 On Saturday, Center City continues to be the top destination from all three stations although it commands a lower share (25 to 36 percent) of the passengers because about 21 to 23 percent of the passengers stay in the South Philadelphia area. About 14 to 16 percent are destined for Lower North Philadelphia, 6 to 7 percent to Olney/Oak Lane, about 3 to 6 percent travel to Upper North Philadelphia and about 2 to 6 percent are destined for Northeast Philadelphia. Access and Egress Modes To better understand transfers between travel modes and how the existing transportation infrastructure is being utilized, passengers were asked about the access mode they used to reach their boarding Broad Street Subway station and the egress mode when they exited the Broad Street Subway line. Depending on their response, specific follow-up questions were asked which are also discussed in this section. Overall, at all three stations weekday and Saturday passengers responded that they “walk only” from their origin (almost 61 percent and 63 percent, respectively) as shown in Figures 13 and 14. Bus (24 and 28 percent) followed by auto drivers (about 9 percent and 4 percent) and auto passengers (nearly 5 percent and almost 3 percent) were the next highest modes. On weekdays and Saturdays, about 1 percent come by bicycle and less than one-half a percent come by taxi. On weekdays less than one percent come by commuter van. Page 18 June 2009
  27. 27. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 13 Figure 14 Page 19 June 2009
  28. 28. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study When examining the access mode by station on weekdays (see Figure 15), the walk share at Oregon (nearly 60 percent) and Snyder (68 percent) Station is higher than at Pattison Station (almost 37 percent). The bus shares at Oregon (about 25 percent) and Snyder (27 percent) are similar while at Pattison Station (nearly 12 percent) it is lower. At Pattison Station where there is easy access to the off- street parking lot at the stadium, the auto driver (nearly 36 percent) and the auto passenger (almost 11 percent) shares are higher than at Oregon (driver – 8 percent, passenger – 6 percent) and Snyder (driver – almost 2 percent, passenger about 2 percent) Stations. The commuter van share comprises 5 percent at Pattison Station with most commuter vans serving the Navy Yard. At all three stations the bicycle share is about one percent (or about 85 total bicycles) and the taxi share is less than one-half percent to zero at Snyder Station. On Saturdays, the walk only and bus mode shares are somewhat more balanced between the stations (see Figure 16). Snyder Station has the highest walk only share (nearly 68 percent), followed by Pattison Station (63 percent) and Oregon Station (nearly 56 percent). The bus share is highest at Oregon Station (almost 33 percent), followed by Snyder Station (27 percent) and Pattison Station (26 percent). The combined auto share (driver and passenger) is highest at Oregon Station (about 5 to 6 percent each) followed by Pattison Station (6 percent – auto driver, 2 percent – auto passenger) and Snyder Station (2 percent each). It is important to note that the off-street parking lot at the stadium at Pattison Station is open on the weekend. If there is an event an attendant is present, the cost of parking is $12 and it is open to anyone (event attendees and others). If there isn’t an event, there are no attendants and parking is free. Also, Methodist Hospital has an agreement with the parking lot operator that allows hospital employees who display a special hang tag to park in a designated area of the lot during the week and on weekends. At Pattison Station, the Saturday bicycle share is nearly 3 percent while it is lower at Oregon (about 1 percent) and Snyder (less than one-half percent) Stations. Taxi use is also low – less than one-half percent at Snyder Station and zero at the other two stations. Passengers that indicated they came to the station by bus were asked what bus route they used (see Figures 17 thru 22). This question was customized by station to include only the buses that served each station. Unfortunately, a number of passengers either didn’t answer the question or responded that they “didn’t know” or that they would use “whatever bus came by.” Several bus routes serve each station or have stops within walking distance of the station as show in Table 2 on page 25. An explanation for this rather high rate of no response could be use/abuse of transfer privileges and therefore an unwillingness of passengers to give an accurate answer. For instance, passengers who live near Packer Avenue may find it easier to board a “C” bus to connect to the subway at Oregon Station. During the weekday almost 65 percent of the passengers that boarded trains at Pattison Station and came by bus used the Route 71 bus. About 3 percent each used the Route C, Route 17 and Route G with about 26 percent not responding. On Saturdays the Route 71 bus does not run so other routes were used including the Route 68 (14 percent), Route G (nearly 13 percent), Route 17 (6 percent) and Routes 37 and Route C (about one-half percent each). About 66 percent of the passengers did not respond or did not know what bus route they used. Page 20 June 2009
  29. 29. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 15 Figure 16 Page 21 June 2009
  30. 30. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 17 Figure 18 Page 22 June 2009
  31. 31. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 19 Figure 20 Page 23 June 2009
  32. 32. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 21 Figure 22 Page 24 June 2009
  33. 33. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Table 2 Study Area Bus Routes Stations Served Saturday Bus Route Service Area Description Pattison Oregon Snyder Service Route 7 Strawberry Mansion to Pier 70 X Yes Route 17 South Philadelphia to Penn's Landing X Yes Route 23 Chestnut Hill to South Philadelphia X Yes South Philadelphia to Eastwick and Chester Route 37 Transportation Center via Philadelphia International Airport X Yes Route 68 South Philadelphia to UPS X Yes Route 71 Pattison Station To The Navy Yard X No Route 79 South Philadelphia Crosstown via Snyder Avenue X Yes Center City and South Philadelphia to Fern Rock Route C Transportation Center and West Oak Lane X X Yes South Philadelphia to Overbrook and Lankenau Route G Hospital X Yes Greyhound Lucky Streak service from Philadelphia to Bus Line Atlantic City Casinos X Yes At Oregon Station, Route 7 is the most heavily used bus route capturing almost 26 percent of the weekday riders and almost 30 percent of the Saturday riders. Route 68 is the next highest with 9 percent of the weekday riders and about 2 percent of the Saturday riders. Three routes -- Route 23 (almost 4 percent), Route 79 (about 1 percent) and Route C (less than one-half percent) –captured the rest of the weekday riders. The non-response was high at this location – 60 percent on the weekday and almost 68 percent on the weekend. At Oregon Station, the high rate of no response is possibly attributable to the many connecting bus routes, most of which run in parallel alignments on the segments of Oregon Avenue between Front and 24th Streets. As such, a great many bus-to-subway transferees may honestly not pay attention to the bus route(s) they use to get to Oregon Station. These assumptions have an even greater validity when considering the lower rate of no response at Snyder Station which has only a single cross-town connection serving it and another longer-distance bus to International Airport and beyond. At Snyder Station, most of the bus passengers used Route 79 (75 percent on weekdays and almost 59 percent on Saturday). The next highest route was Route 37 with almost 16 percent of the weekday bus riders and 13 percent of the Saturday riders. On weekdays the remaining bus transfers were from the Route C (almost 3 percent), the Greyhound bus (about 1 percent), and Route’s 68 and 71 (one-half percent each). Almost 5 percent of the bus passengers on weekdays did not respond. On Saturdays the remaining bus transfers were from the Greyhound bus which serves Atlantic City (6 percent), and Route C, G, 7, and 23 each about one and one-half to two percent. About 15 percent of the bus passengers did not respond. Page 25 June 2009
  34. 34. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study This study also looked to identify where subway passengers were parking since parking is in such high demand in the South Philadelphia area. Passengers that accessed the subway as an auto driver or as an auto passenger were asked where they parked. Four response options were available – parking lot, on- street at the curb, on-street in the center median, or else they were dropped-off (see Figures 23 to 28). At Pattison Station, 72 to 74 percent of the passengers were parked in the parking lot on a weekday and Saturday. About 24 percent were dropped-off on a weekday and nearly 20 percent were dropped off on a Saturday. About 2 percent were parked on-street at the curb on a weekday and 8 percent on Saturday while no one was parked in the center median on either day since there isn’t a center median area near the Pattison Station where one is able to park. At Oregon Station, almost 51 percent of the weekday passengers coming by auto were dropped off and about 45 percent of the Saturday passengers were dropped off. Nearly 39 percent of the weekday passengers were parked on-street at the curb and 32 percent of the Saturday passengers. About 6 percent of the weekday passengers and nearly 23 percent of the Saturday passengers coming by auto said they parked in a parking lot. About 4 percent of the weekday passengers were parked on-street in the center median and none of the Saturday passengers. Figure 23 Page 26 June 2009
  35. 35. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 24 Figure 25 Page 27 June 2009
  36. 36. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 26 Figure 27 Page 28 June 2009
  37. 37. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 28 At Snyder Station 60 percent of the weekday and Saturday passengers that came by auto were dropped off at the station. About 36 percent of the weekday passengers and 20 percent of the Saturday passengers parked on-street at the curb. About 2 percent of the weekday passengers and 10 percent of the Saturday passengers parked in a parking lot and about 2 percent of the weekday passengers and 10 percent of the Saturday passengers parked on-street in the center median. SEPTA staff requested that the survey capture information regarding bicycles that are brought on-board trains. If a passenger responded that they came to the station by bicycle, the survey agent recorded whether or not they had a bicycle with them at the platform. About 20 percent (2 bicyclists) of the weekday passengers and nearly 15 percent (8 bicyclists) of the Saturday passengers that came by bicycle to the Pattison station had the bicycle with them at the platform (see Figures 29 and 30). All of the weekday and Saturday passengers that used a bicycle as their access mode to Oregon station brought the bike with them on the platform and almost 42 percent (22 bicyclists) of the weekday and one hundred percent of the Saturday passengers that came to Snyder Station by bicycle brought the bicycle on-board. Page 29 June 2009
  38. 38. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 29 Figure 30 Page 30 June 2009
  39. 39. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Passengers were asked to identify the egress mode they would be using to reach their final destination once they exit the Broad Street Subway. Since the passengers that were surveyed as they boarded trains at Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations could exit the subway at any of the stations along the line, there was wide variety of egress mode responses (see Figures 31 and 32). However, a majority of the weekday (66 percent) and Saturday (nearly 58 percent) of the passengers indicated that they “walk only” to their final destination. Transferring to a bus had the second highest response – nearly 13 percent of the weekday passengers and about 17 percent of the Saturday passengers. More details about the bus routes used can be found later in the Appendix. On weekdays, the Market-Frankford Line is the third highest mode (12 percent) with the remaining modes (trolleys, auto drivers and passengers, SEPTA Regional Rail, PATCO High Speed Line, bicycle, taxi, and commuter van) each representing three percent or less. On Saturdays, passengers transferring to the Market-Frankford Line is the third highest mode (nearly 10 percent) followed by SEPTA Regional Rail (5 percent), auto drivers (4 percent) and the remaining modes (trolleys, auto passengers, bicycle, and PATCO High Speed Line) representing three percent or less. Figure 31 Page 31 June 2009
  40. 40. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 32 Passengers that exited Broad Street Subway trains and said they were using a trolley to get to their final destination were asked to identify the trolley route they expected to ride. The top trolley routes (see Figures 33 and 34) that were identified include the Route 10 (weekday -- almost 28 percent, Saturday -- 34 percent), Route 11 (weekday – almost 20 percent, Saturday – 31 percent), Route 13 (Weekday – 18 percent, Saturday – 13 percent), and the Route 15 (weekday – nearly 13 percent, Saturday – almost 6 percent). About 10 percent of the weekday respondents and 14 percent of the Saturday respondents did not answer or did not know which trolley route they would be taking. This is more than likely due to a destination somewhere between 19th and 40th Streets on Routes 11, 13, 34, and 36 in which case a passenger may simply board whatever route comes next (except for Route 10 in some instances). Page 32 June 2009
  41. 41. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 33 Figure 34 Page 33 June 2009
  42. 42. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Trip Purpose and Trip Frequency Passengers were asked to identify the purpose of their trip and how frequently they make the trip. During both the weekday and Saturday surveys most passengers boarding trains at Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations were commuting to work (see Figures 35 and 36) although as expected the weekday percentage (nearly 62 percent) is higher than Saturday (almost 43 percent). On weekdays, traveling to and from school has the next highest percentage (about 14 percent) followed by visiting family and friends (8 percent) and entertainment/recreation (5 percent). The remaining trip purposes accounted for three or less percent each. On Saturday trip purposes are somewhat different. After commuting to work, entertainment/recreation is the next highest (30 percent), followed by visiting family and friends (almost 10 percent), shopping (nearly 8 percent) and traveling to/from school (about 4 percent). The remaining trip purposes each accounted for less than 2 percent. A look at the trip purpose by station reveals additional insights into each station’s ridership characteristics (see Figures 37 to 42). Commuting to work is the highest trip purpose at Pattison Station (weekday – nearly 78 percent, Saturday --45 percent) and entertainment/recreation was the second highest trip purpose (weekday – almost 7 percent, Saturday – nearly 44 percent). It is important to note that there was an event during the evening of the Saturday survey which is likely the reason for the high entertainment/recreation percentage. All other trip purposes are 6 percent or less each. At Oregon station commuting to work is again the highest trip purpose (weekday – 68 percent, Saturday – almost 49 percent). On weekdays, traveling to/from school is the second highest trip purpose (12 percent) followed by entertainment/recreation (almost 6 percent) and visiting family and friends (almost 4 percent). All other trip purposes are less than 3 percent each. On Saturdays, the second highest trip purpose is entertainment/recreation (27 percent) followed by shopping (12 percent), traveling to/from school (nearly 5 percent) and visiting family and friends (4 percent). The remaining trip purposes account for less than 2 percent each. At Snyder Station commuting to work is the highest trip purpose (weekday – 53 percent, Saturday – almost 38 percent). With South Philadelphia High School at the corner of Broad Street and Snyder Avenue, it’s not surprising that traveling to/from school is the second highest weekday trip purpose (17 percent). Visiting family and friends is the third highest weekday trip purpose (nearly 13 percent) with all others accounting for less than 4 percent each. On Saturdays, entertainment/recreation trips represent the second highest trip purpose (23 percent) followed by visiting family and friends (16 percent), shopping (8 percent) and traveling to/from school (almost 5 percent). All other trip purposes account for less than 4 percent each. Page 34 June 2009
  43. 43. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 35 Figure 36 Page 35 June 2009
  44. 44. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 37 Figure 38 Page 36 June 2009
  45. 45. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 39 Figure 40 Page 37 June 2009
  46. 46. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 41 Figure 42 Page 38 June 2009
  47. 47. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Passengers were also asked how often they make this trip to determine trip frequency. Since most people boarding trains at Pattison, Oregon, and Snyder Stations on a weekday responded that they were commuting to work, it is not surprising that most people (61 percent) said they make this trip 4 to 5 days a week (see Figure 43). About 17 percent of the weekday passengers at the three stations said they travel 1 to 3 days a week, 12 percent travel less than once a week and about 9 percent make the trip 6 to 7 days a week. On Saturday, the trip frequency is more proportional among the choices (see Figure 44). Almost 30 percent make the trip less than once a week, about 28 percent travel 4 to 5 days a week, 24 percent make the trip 1 to 3 days a week and almost 19 percent said they make the trip 6 to 7 days a week. A look at the trip frequency results by station shows some of the trip making patterns (see Figures 45 to 50). At all three stations most weekday passengers travel 4 to 5 days a week (59 to 68 percent) while the remaining trip frequency percentages vary by station. At Pattison Station 12 percent of the passengers travel less than once a week, almost 11 percent travel 1 to 3 days a week and about 8 percent travel 6 to 7 days a week. At Oregon Station, 15 percent of the weekday passengers travel 1 to 3 days a week, 12 percent travel 6 to 7 days a week and 10 percent travel less than once a week. At Snyder Station, 20 percent travel 1 to 3 days a week, 13 percent travel less than once a week and almost 8 percent travel 6 to 7 days a week. On Saturday, the trip frequency percentages are fairly proportional at Oregon and Snyder Stations but not at Pattison Station. On Saturdays, 43 percent of the Pattison Station customers said they travel less than once a week (most likely since this station serves the Stadium area and people don’t travel there regularly), about 25 percent travel 4 to 5 days a week, 21 percent travel 1 to 3 days a week and almost 11 percent travel 6 to 7 days a week. About 27 percent of the Saturday Oregon Station passengers said they travel 4 to 5 days a week and another 27 percent said they travel less than once a week, 22 percent travel 1 to 3 days a week and nearly 23 percent travel 6 to 7 days a week. At Snyder Station, almost 30 percent of the passengers travel 4 to 5 days a week, nearly 27 percent travel 1 to 3 days a week and about 22 percent travel less than once a week and another 22 percent travel 6 to 7 days a week. Page 39 June 2009
  48. 48. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 43 Figure 44 Page 40 June 2009
  49. 49. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 45 Figure 46 Page 41 June 2009
  50. 50. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 47 Figure 48 Page 42 June 2009
  51. 51. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 49 Figure 50 Page 43 June 2009
  52. 52. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Identified Issues and Recommended Actions One of the study goals is to utilize the findings to add value to current corridor planning by recommending strategies and actions for improved transportation and access. Given the multi-modal aspects of the South Broad Street corridor, there are several transportation-related problems affecting the different populations who live and work along it, and travelers who pass through it. Study area issues were identified through field visits, Advisory Committee meeting discussions, stakeholder interviews, the ridership survey results, and a review of recent studies and planned activities. There are several efforts underway that address associated problems of South Broad Street including: • SEPTA subway station upgrades to all three of the stations in the study area (recently completed or programmed); • Streets Department’s recent improvements to the streetscape, lighting, signals, etc., in the stadium vicinity; • PPA’s new red-light cameras at the intersection of Broad Street and Oregon Avenue; • South Broad Street Neighbors Association (SBSNA) and Central South Philadelphia Civic Association Alliance (CSPCAA) study of the physical form of South Broad Street between Washington and Oregon Avenues, currently underway; • PIDC Commercial Corridors study of Broad & McKean, currently underway; • Community Design Collaborative: Infill Philadelphia Commercial Corridors conceptual design study of gateway treatment for East Passyunk corridor, 2006; • Community Design Collaborative: Infill Philadelphia Commercial Corridors Broad & Passyunk Strategies for a Gateway, 2007; and • PCPC’s Urban Design Study for the East Passyunk Avenue and Reed Street Community Gateway. These studies have been reviewed by the consultant team to identify issues and recommendations related to the Broad Street Survey study area. Most of these efforts touch on transportation and access issues; however, the study focus is generally on discrete locations within the Study Area, not necessarily associated with the subway stations exclusively. There are also several ongoing studies/initiatives (which have also been reviewed by the consultant team) that may benefit from the ridership survey results and the recommended actions including: • future SEPTA marketing efforts and communication strategies with riders; • the PIDC Broad Street Subway Extension Feasibility Study to improve access into the Navy Yard; • DVRPC’s Airport Transportation Study, which is examining regional access to/from Philadelphia; • PCPC’s Stadium Area Transit Study which recommended various phased approaches toward creating a more transit-oriented and pedestrian-friendlier experience; and • the DRPA PATCO Extension Study, currently underway, which has a large Philadelphia component including the concept of a light rail connector along the Delaware Riverfront with potential extensions to the Sports Complex (Pattison Station) and Navy Yard. Page 44 June 2009
  53. 53. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study A key requirement of this study was that the recommendations be realistic, that they have not been developed in a vacuum, and that they are based on conditions specific to Philadelphia and the neighborhoods surrounding the stations. Based on all of the inputs to the study (a review of existing field conditions, review of past and ongoing studies, Advisory Committee input, Stakeholder interviews, and the ridership survey results), the study area problems/issues that have been identified and the resulting recommendations fall under the following categories: • Traffic flow and parking, • Buses and shelters • Pedestrian facilities/green space, • Intermodal transfers and wayfinding, and • Bicycle accommodation. The next sections describe each of these problem areas/issues along with recommended solutions and/or further study based on the study findings. The report is concluded with a recommendations matrix which lists the recommendations and the implementing agency(s). Page 45 June 2009
  54. 54. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Traffic Flow and Parking The study area section of South Broad Street is a congested roadway serving multiple uses. It serves as a connector to major highways like I-95 and the Schulykill Expressway (I-76) and as a local arterial from the Stadium District to Center City Philadelphia. It is flanked by many land uses including parks, Stadiums, retail, residential, schools, institutional, etc. The corridor is multimodal with the Broad Street Subway running underground, numerous surface bus routes, autos, trucks, bicyclists, and pedestrians all attempting to utilize the same tight corridor. Parking is in great demand and nearly every available space is utilized including unconventional parking areas like the center median. Although parking in the center median is unconventional, it is accepted and “unofficially” allowed. While one would expect to hear complaints about slow travel speeds, that did not occur during this study. When Stakeholders were asked about traffic, it was just accepted that the corridor was sluggish because of all the demand on it. However, parking was a topic of conversation by the Stakeholders who indicated that more parking was needed and questioned who was utilizing existing parking – particularly parking in the center median. Although the ridership survey results showed that less than 10 percent of the Subway passengers are accessing the station by auto, that still amounts to several hundred each day. The density and confines of much of the areas around the tree subway stations often leads to parking in the medians, sidewalks, and in left-turn lanes. Several areas were identified where additional parking may be allocated by restriping (see Figures 51 and 52). Along the triangle section of West Moyamensing Avenue near the corner of Broad Street and Oregon Avenue it may be possible to remove part of the island and restripe with back-in angle parking to create about five additional spaces. West Moyamensing Avenue near Marconi Plaza could also be restriped to create 10 additional spaces. Restriping along South 13th and South 15th Streets (and adding a bicycle lane which will be discussed in the bicycle accommodation section) could add about 9 parking spaces. Vehicles park along the north side of Passyunk Avenue west of Broad Street in a disorganized manner because parking stalls are not striped and technically parking is not permitted in this area. Since parking occurs and has been allowed, the Philadelphia Parking Authority in conjunction with the Department of Streets and the Philadelphia Police, should examine whether parking may continue to be prohibited or whether that regulation can be rescinded. If parking is allowed, it should be striped on both sides of the street to allow back-in angled parking so that the maximum number of vehicles can park (see Figure 53). Additional parking may also be provided through a public/private shared parking agreement with some of the nearby schools and hospitals (see Figure 54). Stakeholders informed us that on weekends residents informally park in the South Philadelphia High School parking lot. Also, in the past there was an agreement with Methodist Hospital and the community to let residents use available parking in their garage for a nominal monthly fee. Agreements like these should be explored with the High School, Methodist and Saint Agnes Hospitals and other community neighbors with available parking. Page 46 June 2009
  55. 55. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 51 Restriped Parking Along West Moyamensing Avenue Figure 52 Reconfiguration of South 13th and South 15th Streets Page 47 June 2009
  56. 56. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Figure 53 Improvements to West Passyunk Avenue and South Broad Street Figure 54 Shared Parking Opportunities Page 48 June 2009
  57. 57. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Beyond the concerns about parking, Stakeholders indicated that the intersection of Broad Street and West Passyunk Avenue was difficult for both pedestrians and vehicles to navigate since five roadway approaches come together. Improved and re-painted crosswalks along with additional signage and lane extension pavement markings through the intersection could improve navigation and safety at the intersection. Page 49 June 2009
  58. 58. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Buses and Shelters The Broad Street corridor is well served by buses. About 10 routes have stops in the vicinity of one or more of the three study area Subway stations. The ridership survey results showed that bus travel was the second highest access mode (24 percent on weekdays and about 28 percent on Saturdays). Improvements to the bus facilities and intermodal connections will benefit Subway riders, bus riders and the general community. During the Stakeholder interviews, several bus-related issues were identified and these issues were confirmed during field visits including: • buses not pulling up to the curb; • vehicles illegally parked or dropping off passengers at signed bus stops; • limited information about buses serving particular bus stops; • poorly maintained or inadequate/non-existent bus shelters; • lack of coordination between bus and subway transfers; and • limited or no weekend service on some bus routes. A bus observed not pulling fully to the curb A bus unable to pull fully to the curb because of a car parked in the bus lane Extensive public outreach as part of the City's preparation of the DRAFT Greenplan Philadelphia report included recommendations for the South Philadelphia area to "improve transit systems and infrastructure" and to "improve policing and enforce laws" which is supported by this study. Recommendations include SEPTA operations staff working with bus drivers via training sessions to encourage them to pull to the curb so that passengers can board buses safely. By encouraging buses to pull to the curb, traffic flow is not impeded. Additional Philadelphia Police force enforcement of parking regulations by ticketing and towing vehicles that are illegally parked or dropping off/picking up at bus stops is recommended. More passenger information about buses serving the areas around the stations is needed. Existing bus shelters could be upgraded or enhanced and new shelters could be constructed to include service routes Page 50 June 2009
  59. 59. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study and schedules. Consideration should also be given to improving the Casino bus stop near Snyder Station and better marketing and signage of that service. Stakeholders and subway passengers both mentioned that there is a lack of coordination between buses and subways. Almost 65 percent of the Subway passengers that arrive at Pattison Station by bus are riding the Route 71 bus which serves the Navy Yard. In addition, several companies in the Navy Yard operate private shuttle service between Pattison Station and the Navy Yard. With the potential development and expansion of the Navy Yard, further study should be given to expanding the service hours and starting weekend operation of the Route 71 bus. An existing bus stop near the corner of Snyder Avenue and An existing bus stop along South Broad Street South Broad Street that does not have a bus shelter A example of a high-tech bus shelter An example of a low-tech bus shelter Page 51 June 2009
  60. 60. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Pedestrian Facilities/Green Space Improvements to the pedestrian facilities surrounding the stations and additional green space will benefit subway passengers since the ridership survey data showed that over 60 percent of the passengers access the subway by walking only and most have origins close to the stations. Pedestrian facility improvements will also benefit the neighboring community near Snyder and Oregon Stations since both station areas have a shopping district adjacent to the station that appears to be patronized by both residents and people who work in the area. Visitors to and employees of the Stadiums near Pattison Station and people visiting FDR Park would benefit from pedestrian improvements in that area. At the Stakeholder group interviews, representatives said that the intersection of Broad Street and Oregon Avenue is not a pedestrian-friendly environment. The crosswalks and sidewalks – particularly near Snyder and Oregon Stations are in poor condition. An existing faded crosswalk at the corner of Oregon An existing faded crosswalk at the corner of Snyder Avenue and South Broad Street Avenue and South Broad Street The Stakeholders also commented that people did not feel safe using the subway. Security issues are often less of an actual problem and more of a perceived problem. Improvement to the pedestrian environment and additional green space in the station areas, particularly at Snyder Station, would certainly make the area more inviting and active, potentially providing a “safer” perception of the area. Another safety concern that was mentioned by Stakeholders was attempted midblock crossings near Pattison Station. Broad Street is very wide and vehicles often travel at high speeds through this area so attempted crossings at midblock can be very dangerous. Both the 2004 Stadium Area Transit Study and the Infill Philadelphia: Commercial Corridors Study discuss the inadequate pedestrian facilities and the lack of green space in the study area and have recommendations to remedy the situation. The Stadium Area Transit Study recommends: • widening the Pattison Avenue sidewalk • adding pedestrian-scale lighting and landscaping • Installing attractive fencing and/or perhaps bollards along both sides of Pattison Avenue to guide pedestrians to designated mid-block crossing locations Page 52 June 2009
  61. 61. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study The Infill Philadelphia: Commercial Corridors Study stated that East Passyunk’s gateway intersection at Broad Street is difficult to navigate and lacks the flavor of the rest of the corridor and that this intersection can be confusing, even intimidating for both drivers and pedestrians because it is a five- point intersection. Some of the recommendations from Infill Study that are supported by this study’s findings include: • Create gateways to enhance commercial corridor visibility • Redesign intersection and public areas to create outdoor amenities and improve the pedestrian experience • Re-engineer the Broad and Passyunk intersection to permit left-hand turns by southbound Broad Street drivers, making the Avenue easier to access • Add bump outs to shorten walking distances for pedestrians crossing Broad Street and slow down drivers entering the East Passyunk Avenue commercial corridor. Pedestrians are at risk whenever they cross Broad Street. The degree of risk depends on the complexity of the vehicular and pedestrian traffic patterns and the effectiveness of supplementary information provided regarding the crossing location, direction, and duration. At intersections, turning vehicles and the speed at which they travel pose the greatest threat to pedestrians because the motorist's attention is focused primarily on other motorists. In addition to the geometric design of the intersection, pedestrian safety also relies heavily on the information that is provided to pedestrians (e.g., signs or signals). All pedestrians, including people with vision impairments, need the same information at an intersection. Providing vital information in multiple, accessible formats (e.g., visual, auditory, tactile) also benefits all pedestrians since information is better recognized and remembered if it is understood by multiple senses. Generally, the more complex the crossing, the more important it is to have accessible information about the crossing location, direction, and duration. Techniques that can help improve pedestrian conditions and access at intersections and should be considered and evaluated for study area intersections (with priority given to crosswalks adjacent to the Subway headhouses) through a follow-up study include: • Provide curb extensions to decrease crossing distances and increase pedestrian visibility; • Increase the pedestrian crossing times to accommodate people who walk slow including physically challenged individuals; • Restrict right turns on red; • Install accessible pedestrian signals to assist people with vision impairments; • Consider midblock signalized crossings with accessible pedestrian signal opportunities near busy intersections to encourage people to cross where there are fewer potential points of conflict with motorists; and • Add pedestrian countdown signal indicators if they do not already exist. Page 53 June 2009
  62. 62. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study A pedestrian countdown signal similar to what has been An existing crosswalk in the corridor near the stadium installed at select locations in the corridor. district At a minimum the crosswalks and sidewalks near the stations need to be improved, even if this just involves rehabilitating the sidewalks and repainting the crosswalks using the current continental layout. This layout consists of the ladder layout with the transverse lines removed and is most visible to motorists and to those with low vision and cognitive impairments. There are also several opportunities around the Snyder and Oregon Stations to provide additional green space or streetscape improvements. At Snyder Station, the classic subway entrances provide an opportunity to advertise transit. The Subway entrance on the southeast corner may provide an opportunity for the School District in conjunction with SEPTA to do something creative (glass canopy, replica of cast-iron subway kiosk, etc.). The generous apron on that same corner would provide excellent bike parking/bike-share opportunities or even adding some planters and streetscape improvements. It may be possible to support and/or fund these improvements and the necessary maintenance through a public/private partnership with Walgreen's, CVS and/or other surrounding businesses. The newer glass and concrete subway headhouses and recent SEPTA station renovations at Oregon Station provide an excellent opportunity to reflect those investments back to the community by providing an actual gateway to the neighborhood. The underutilized and barren concrete "plaza" surrounding the subway headhouse at the northeast corner of Broad Street and Oregon Avenue provides a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the subway beneath it and the buses alongside it while providing a useful and aesthetically-pleasing bit of open- space for the cramped neighborhood. Possibilities could include: a small dog park, aerobics station, bicycle facility, sculpture garden, designated outdoor classroom/recreation space for the new Charter grade school just opposite the site and the new Daycare facilities that have sprung up nearby. It is noteworthy that the dense rowhouse neighborhoods north of Oregon and south of Snyder on the east side of Broad have no open space or recreational opportunities nearer than Mifflin Square at 6th & Page 54 June 2009
  63. 63. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Ritner Streets, or about one mile east of Broad Street so utilizing the existing station around the space in a more creative/public-friendly way would provide an amenity to the community that is not readily available. The triangle on the west side of Broad Street at the northwest corner of Oregon Avenue provides another potential "complementary" community space for the neighbors on the west side of Broad Street. In addition to or instead of creating more parking options, it may be possible to incorporate a small area of community space like a garden, a few higher-quality benches, a chess table or two, etc. An example of streetscape improvements. An example of a gateway treatment. Page 55 June 2009
  64. 64. Broad Street Subway Ridership Study Intermodal Transfers and Wayfinding Throughout the corridor and specifically at the stations there is a lack of wayfinding information. This is most prominent near Pattison Station. The Stadium District is a valuable asset for the City of Philadelphia and its surrounding metropolitan region. With four vibrant sports/entertainment venues located in such close proximity to each other and with access to multiple transportation modes, the District displays some of the unique characteristics of a downtown area despite its distance from Philadelphia’s Center City. Visitors to the various venues are likely to be infrequent customers who require more guidance and direction to reach their venue. The level of activity associated with the various attractions at these multiple venues, coupled with prospective redevelopment plans for the area, present a number of challenges involving the safe and efficient movement of and intermodal transfers between the various transportation modes serving the area. Many stadiums give the highest priority to pedestrians, from street closures (in many cities) to provision of a pedestrian “walk” (e.g., “Ravens Walk” in Baltimore) which could be achieved and should be considered in the Stadium District. Wayfinding signage near Heinz Field in Pittsburgh. Pedestrian safety zones within parking fields in Seattle. The Stadium Area Transit Study states the existing wayfinding and signage system and the lack of direct pedestrian connectivity to certain venues from the Pattison Station pose obstacles to promoting transit access to the Sports Complex. The Stadium Area Transit Study recommends, and the findings from this study support, maximizing the utility of Pattison Station through better pedestrian circulation including sidewalk, crosswalk, and landscaping enhancements, accommodation of direct pathways, traffic calming, wayfinding, and lighting improvements. Specific recommendations for improving the overall pedestrian experience include: • Provide enhanced directional signage and information at the platform and surface levels. It is especially important to direct emerging subway riders to the appropriate staircase/headhouse in order to avoid or minimize grade-level crossings. • Install/improve pedestrian pathways to shorten and/or enhance the walking environment between the Pattison Station and the four venues. One option involves installing a “shortest Page 56 June 2009

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