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Enabling IT as a Service – Cloud Management and Orchestration
 

Enabling IT as a Service – Cloud Management and Orchestration

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  • ----- Meeting Notes (4/3/13 11:38) -----CITES 10 people, 1 project 1 program, director, ent architect, three CIAC developers, two IT architect and code.Added IT automation team.Where to get automation, schedulerApplication services team for the PaaSRun CCP instance for estore, separate teamWho is going to do this work. Most of the work was 5-6 people.Virtual team comes into play with SME'sYou already have a team in your company, because they work with similar tools. Work with the Enterprise Scheduling, then enhance that team virtually and/or a couple of people. Lots of cross over from automation engineerA couple of mistakes:- not using something off the shelf. Gen1 was all homegrown scripts, Different SME's wrote themEnded up with sprawl, difficult to maintain- Gen 2 we adopted CIAC and made it easy to code and maintain the tools. People turnover, they leave, move around, so it becomes very hard to maintain.Standard tools, and code to those standards, makes it much easier to Have a suite / framework so you can maintain in the long term.  Someone you can call in an emergencyStarted with an expansion team, and didn't know the scheduling team overlapped so much. I would have augmented the scheduling team. The Multi Tenant IaaS of Gen1 puts us at odds with the rest of the enterprise.  It took us a year People tend to want to implement the activities they follow as a workflow rather than the business outcome. You end up with a very efficient process.You want to focus on the outcome.Smallest number of inputs that will get me from point of A to B. Like how do you decide which Filer to put in the storage. One we understand the logic, it becomes easy to provision filer and provision Q Trees.We have practitioners who do design, operations, implementation. and have outside people who augment those people. We automate implementation, and no one likes do do that. Always behind, heavy lifting. And now they can focus on Design and Operations. So they were willing to do it.There are cost savings in removing button pushers, and we don't want people doing that anymore.If you look at all the things that need to be automated, it looks daunting. You don't have to automate everything, but only a set of those things. We found we take a composite of that offering and then do the end of end solution. People are willing to accept a standard solution because time to capability.The first six was supposed to automate 65%, but it ended up satisfying 100% of the demand. Because people were willing to go with the standard. Because without standard, they go wild thinking requirement. You can get this in 6 minutes. ANd it's centrally funded and we don't need to cross charge for customization.And that one environment becomes 100% of the solution
  • Cisco IT Datacenter Facts300 Locations165 Countries37 Cisco Datacenters334,000 sq/ft. of datacenter space35.6MW UPS power to raised floors64,000 employees80% servers virtualized in new data centers, 71% overall
  • From the standpoint of internal IT, your business users demand and expect faster, better, more agile and dynamic IT services. But many legacy data centers are built on old technology that just wasn’t designed for the demands and pace of today’s business. The infrastructure is complex, it’s messy, and it’s ill-suited for the future of IT.And from a management perspective, most IT organizations have dozens of different systems that don’t necessarily work all that well together. If you’ve ever played Jenga, you know what happens when you try to remove the wrong block too quickly, it falls apart. That complexity and inherent fragility applies to most legacy existing IT systems – they are very expensive to manage and maintain, and many IT organizations are ill-equipped to meet the demands of the business for faster service delivery.For example, in most IT departments, the process for data center infrastructure service requests is slow, complex and expensive. Each request, like a request to host an application whether it’s for dev or testing or production, is treated as essentially a new project with new requirements, architecture review, sizing, etc., even if that same or similar request has been made dozens of times. The resulting process is manual, cumbersome, inconsistent, and often takes several weeks for the end-to-end delivery of the requested service.By comparison, the operating model for cloud computing and infrastructure-as-a-service (or IT-as-a-Service in general) is one that requires on-demand provisioning with standardized options and processes, and rapid elasticity with a shared pool of resources. The graphic here on the right simple highlights those key attributes for cloud computing from the standard NIST definition (the National Institute of Standards & Technology).The cloud operating model means faster, simpler, more flexible and more cost-effective IT. This is what’s so appealing about public cloud computing options like Amazon Web Services. And what we’ve found is that IT organizations can deploy this operating model in a private cloud (and pave the way for a hybrid cloud model), but it requires a new approach to management and data center infrastructure.
  • 3500 active VM's15000 VM's in prod at Cisco15 people in design, support, arch, development30k Hosts by end of cal yearCore group of 8-10 people, with extended OPS and architecture interlock, 20 people. We have core competency in automationLessons learned- Bring in the Scheduling team. Everyone has them and they know automationGet exec sponsorship. We did it like a startup but that created distrust with opsBIG LESSON 3% automation drives 80% of use cases. We should have gone horizontal rather than vertical. We thought we had to do 80% automation to get there. Agility trumps completeness. We didn't know that and our clients didn't tell us or even have it as a requirement.Gen 1 was homegrown scripts by multiple people, when they left, moved on, huge collapse. Now using commercial off the shelf, we selected before we bought them, there's roadmap, we can pulll PS when we need to, it's doc'd 3000 Hosts now, on boarding 750-1200 hosts a week. Softlaunched it but it was probably a mistake, should have gone more aggresive
  • ----- Meeting Notes (4/3/13 12:15) -----This is where most people fall downYou have to stitch the rest of the processesHow do I get an IP address? Jason the network adminKey takeaway:- Lots of sources of records are in people's heads and unstructured- 100's to 1000's of rules need to be made explicit
  • ----- Meeting Notes (4/3/13 12:29) -----The tenants pick from t-shirt sizes offerings from micro to Jumbo Running in 3 datacenters and 2 regions
  • Today the automation takes 6 to 15 minutes depending on the type of environment we are provisioning.  Currently we still have manual post OS provisioning tasks that need to be completed and that drives our end to end delivery timing to 3 to 5 days depending on the server type.  In the final stage of our automation we will drive out those manual tasks and will have end to end provisioning completed in 15 minutes or less.”
  • John M
  • A developer can build, test and deploy applications un any application server foundationFacilitate the automated deployment and test of web-based applications.
  • CITES 10 people, 1 project 1 program, director, ent architect, three CIAC developers, two IT architect and code.Added IT automation team.Where to get automation, schedulerApplication services team for the PaaSRun CCP instance for estore, separate teamWho is going to do this work. Most of the work was 5-6 people.Virtual team comes into play with SME'sYou already have a team in your company, because they work with similar tools. Work with the Enterprise Scheduling, then enhance that team virtually and/or a couple of people. Lots of cross over from automation engineerA couple of mistakes:- not using something off the shelf. Gen1 was all homegrown scripts, Different SME's wrote themEnded up with sprawl, difficult to maintain- Gen 2 we adopted CIAC and made it easy to code and maintain the tools. People turnover, they leave, move around, so it becomes very hard to maintain.Standard tools, and code to those standards, makes it much easier to Have a suite / framework so you can maintain in the long term.  Someone you can call in an emergencyStarted with an expansion team, and didn't know the scheduling team overlapped so much. I would have augmented the scheduling team. The Multi Tenant IaaS of Gen1 puts us at odds with the rest of the enterprise.  It took us a year People tend to want to implement the activities they follow as a workflow rather than the business outcome. You end up with a very efficient process.You want to focus on the outcome.Smallest number of inputs that will get me from point of A to B. Like how do you decide which Filer to put in the storage. One we understand the logic, it becomes easy to provision filer and provision Q Trees.We have practitioners who do design, operations, implementation. and have outside people who augment those people. We automate implementation, and no one likes do do that. Always behind, heavy lifting. And now they can focus on Design and Operations. So they were willing to do it.There are cost savings in removing button pushers, and we don't want people doing that anymore.If you look at all the things that need to be automated, it looks daunting. You don't have to automate everything, but only a set of those things. We found we take a composite of that offering and then do the end of end solution. People are willing to accept a standard solution because time to capability.The first six was supposed to automate 65%, but it ended up satisfying 100% of the demand. Because people were willing to go with the standard. Because without standard, they go wild thinking requirement. You can get this in 6 minutes. ANd it's centrally funded and we don't need to cross charge for customization.And that one environment becomes 100% of the solution