802.11ac (Gigabit WiFi)

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Faster is better, the latest IEEE 802.11ac standard breaks down the barriers between wired and wireless networking speeds. Come explore Cisco's new 802.11ac products , and how the next generation of Wi-Fi increases rate, range, and capacity of your network.

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802.11ac (Gigabit WiFi)

  1. 1. Cisco Unified Access: 802.11ac Solutions for Mobility Networks Kurt Sauter Wireless PSS © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1
  2. 2. What is 802.11ac? What is 802.11ac? What does it deliver? What Does 802.11ac Deliver? •  Most efficient Wi-Fi standard to date •  Consistent connectivity at higher speed •  3X the performance of 802.11n •  Optimized for high density and bandwidth •  Wider channels and more spatial streams •  Significantly better client battery life •  Operates on the less-crowded 5GHz band •  Multi-user mode – “Switch-like” Practical Considerations for 802.11ac •  Most implementations will be 3 Stream for the first few years •  Client device adoption will be rapid to take advantage of extended battery life •  Standard is split into 2 phases with Wave 2 coming out in 2015 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 2
  3. 3. BYOD Mobility The rapid adoption of client devices including 802.11ac Increasing demand for bandwidth & performance throughout the network. © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Higher Bandwidth Applications Both cloud-managed and enterprise solutions Cisco Confidential 3
  4. 4. Higher Education K-12 Education •  Students bring in the latest devices laptops, smartphone, tablets •  Collaborative Classrooms with HD Video •  High concentration of devices connecting to the network •  Multi-screen HD video is streamed live to 802.11ac and 802.11n enabled devices in classrooms •  Better spectrum use in 5GHz (rather than a crowded 2.4GHz band) © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4
  5. 5. Healthcare •  Transfer large MRI Images or provide live viewing of operations from remote locations in the hospital. •  Deploy in Density high-density conference areas and meeting rooms to address issues resulting from more devices •  Faster File transfer means less contention on the network for other applications © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Service Provider •  Competitive differentiator − higher bandwidth in Hotspots •  Generate more revenue by charging for more bandwidth •  Better Customer experience with high bandwidth apps − Netflix or Hulu Plus •  Continued shift to 5 GHz will offload the already crowded 2.4 GHz band Cisco Confidential 5
  6. 6. IEEE 802.11ac Ratification Wave 1 CY 2012 Q1 Q2 CY 2013 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 CY 2014 Q4 Q1 Q2 802.11ac mobile devices Intel® Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 shipping today Samsung S 4 ZTE Grand Memo HTC One © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Q3 … Q4 AP3700 Dual-band 802.11ac Wave 1 Linksys 1x1 AC USB Consumer class devices from Linksys and Netgear Wave 2 Apple releases MacBook Air with 11ac Cisco 802.11ac Module for AP3600 Apple releases MacBook Pro Retina with 11ac 802.11ac Wave2 Starts to Roll 1H CY15 Cisco Confidential 6 6
  7. 7. 6900 6900 8 Spatial Streams 3500* •  1300 Leadership of 802.11ac amendment to the 802.11 standard 450 300 Supports 802.11b/g/n, 802.11a/n, and 802.11ac •  Committed support for Wave 1 and Wave 2 54 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 65 24 11 802.11 *Assuming 160 MHz Is Available and Suitable 290 1 Spatial Stream 600 Industry’s only future-proof modular (3) radio platform •  3 Spatial Streams 870 First to announce and commit to 802.11ac Wave 1 and 2 •  1730* 1997 290 802.11b 802.11a/g 802.11n 802.11ac Wave 1 1999 2003 2007 2013 2 Gigabit Ethernet Uplinks •  50% of all shipping mobile devices will be 802.11ac by end of 2014 (ABI) Gigabit Ethernet Uplink •  802.11ac Wave 2 2015 Cisco Confidential 7
  8. 8. Best in Class Enterprise Class Mission Specific 600 & 700 NEW 1600 •  Up to 600 Mbps •  702w: Wall Plate AP •  Dorms, hospitality • Up to 600 Mbps • CleanAir Express* •  702i: Compact Mid-market AP • ClientLink 2.0 •  600: Teleworker • VideoStream Flexibility © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Enterprise Mission Critical 2600 •  Up to 900 Mbps •  High Client Scalability •  CleanAir •  ClientLink 2.0 •  VideoStream Mission Critical NEW 3600/3700 • Over 1 Gbps, 802.11ac support • High Density Experience • CleanAir 80 MHz, ClientLink 3.0, VideoStream • Future proof modularity Security, 3G Small Cell or Wave 2 802.11ac Best In Class Cisco Confidential 8
  9. 9. 2x3:2 $1395 2x3:2 $995 2x2:2 $795 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 4x4:3 $1495 3x4:3 $1095 3x3:2 $695 Cisco Confidential 9
  10. 10. •  Scale & Performance for High-Density Env. & Cutting Edge Mobile Devices •  3x Performance of Current Wi-Fi Higher performance at a Greater Distance •  Industry’s first 4x4:3 802.11ac Access Point •  Device Battery Life Savings: RF Excellence •  Modular Design: Future-proof for Next-Gen Mobile Devices and Wi-Fi Standards •  WSSI •  3G Small Cell •  802.11ac Wave 2 (future) © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 10
  11. 11. •  CleanAir 80 MHz High density auto interference mitigation •  ClientLink 3.0 Up to 60% better performance & range •  Optimized Roaming Intelligently assist client roaming •  Cross AP Noise Reduction* Enables greater AP density networks •  Enhanced Location Accuracy* Ideal for CMX •  (* future) © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11
  12. 12. 3600 3700 450 Mbps 1.3 Gbps – 11ac Module 1.3 Gbps Dual Band Dual Band 4x4:3 – Integrated Radios 3x3:3 – 11ac Module 4x4:3 .11b,g,n and .11a.n.ac Power Draw 4x4:3 + 3x3:3 = 802.3at 5 GHz only = 802.3af 4x4:3 = 802.3at 3x3:3 = 802.3af Client Count 200 - per integrated radio 50 – 11ac Module 200 - per integrated radio Beamforming ClientLink 2.0 a/g/n - AP ECBF with 11ac – Module ClientLink 2.0+ a/g/n/ac and ECBF with 11ac Beamforming Client Count 128 - per integrated radio 7 – 11ac Module 128 - per integrated radio .11b,g,n and .11a.n.ac CleanAir CleanAir ✔ ✔ WSSI 802.11ac Wave 1 3G Small Cell 802.11ac Wave 2 WSSI Max Data Rate Radios RF Design (MIMO:SS) Spectrum Intelligence RRM Modules List Price (Integrated Ant.) © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. $1495 – AP $500 – 11ac Module 3G Small Cell 802.11ac Wave 2 $1495 Cisco Confidential 12
  13. 13. •  802.11a/g use , BPSK, QPSK, 16-QAM or 64-QAM •  64 small waves (called Carriers, or Tones) 64-QAM 000 100 001 100 011 100 010 100 110 100 111 100 101 100 100 100 000 101 001 101 011 101 010 101 110 101 111 101 101 101 No relationship between “64 carriers” and “64” in 64-QAM •  Some carriers are not used for data: 100 101 •  •  4 pilot subcarriers (in red) for synchronization and tracking 000 111 001 111 011 111 010 111 110 111 111 111 101 111 12 zero subcarriers (in black) for calibration on sides and center 000 110 001 110 011 110 010 110 110 110 111 110 101 110 100 110 000 010 001 010 011 010 010 010 110 010 111 010 101 010 100 010 001 011 011 011 010 001 110 011 111 011 101 011 100 011 000 001 001 001 011 001 010 001 110 001 111 001 101 001 100 001 000 000 001 000 011 000 010 000 110 000 111 000 101 000 001 101 100 111 •  •  48 data subcarriers (in green) 110 110 100 000 100 010 Inside each carrier, symbols are separated by silences (guard intervals), and some of them are repeated Modulation Data Rate per Carrier (kb/s) Total Gross Data Rate (Mb/ s) Repea t ratio Total Net Data Rate (Mb/s) 64-QAM 1125 72 1/3 48 64-QAM 1125 72 1/4 54 000 011 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 13
  14. 14. •  802.11n aggregates two carriers to more than double the speed: 128 subcarriers •  •  14 zero subcarriers (vs. 12) for calibration on sides and center 6 pilot subcarriers (vs. 4) for synchronization and tracking •  108 data subcarriers (vs. 48) •  54 Mb/s to 108+11 = 119 Mb/s •  Usable only in the 5GHz band •  802.11n also allows several co-existing radios on the same frequency (MIMO) •  MIMO AP Up to 4 radios, to receive and / or to send: “abcdef” “def” Sending side: send more symbols, in parallel (spatial multiplexing) © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. “abc” “abc” “abc” MIMO AP “abc” “abc” Sending side: synchronize signals for better resulting signal at receiving end (Transmit Beamforming, TxBF, ClientLink) MIMO AP “abc” “abc” Receiving side: synchronize signals for better signal (Maximal Ration Combining, MRC) Cisco Confidential 14
  15. 15. MCS Modulation Ratio 40 MHz channel 20 MHz channel 800 ns GI 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 400 ns GI 0 BPSK 1/2 6.5 7.2 13.5 15 1 QPSK 1/2 13 14.4 27. 30 2 QPSK 3/4 19.5 21.7 40.5 45 3 16-QAM 1/2 26 28.9 54 60 4 16-QAM 3/4 39 43.3 81 90 5 64-QAM 2/3 52 57.8 108 120 6 64-QAM 3/4 58.5 65 121.5 135 7 64-QAM 5/6 65 72.2 135 150 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 15
  16. 16. Spatial Streams Data rate (20 Data rate (20 Data rate (40 Data rate (40 MHz channel, MHz channel, MHz channel, MHz channel, 800 ns GI) 400 ns GI) 800 ns GI) 400 ns GI) 1 65.5 72.2 135 150 2 130 144.4 270 300 3 195 216.7 405 450 4 260 288.8 540 600 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 16
  17. 17. •  Increase channel width… beyond 40 MHz •  Increase number of spatial streams… more than 4 •  Improve the modulation? Is 64-QAM the best we can do? •  Better manage the cell •  Why would only one device send at a time? –  If we can have one device send 3 streams at the same time on the same frequency, why not have 3 devices send 1 stream at the same time on the same frequency instead? •  Why would all devices be on the same frequency? –  If we can send one 40 MHz signal, why not send two 20 MHz signals instead? © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 17
  18. 18. •  160 MHz-wide channel width… Up to 160 MHz for APs 80 MHz for stations, 160 MHz optional •  More spatial streams Up to 8 spatial streams 8 radio circuits sending or receiving •  Better modulation 256-QAM (8 bits per symbol vs. 6 bits for QAM-64) Up to 4 times faster © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 18
  19. 19. •  8 spatial streams… but many (battery-operated) clients will be 1 SS… are we going to “waste” 7 SS (like we “waste” 3 SS with 802.11n?) •  No! With MU-MIMO, up to 4 clients can receive signals at the same time, on the same frequency •  Each client has a dedicated spatial stream •  No collisions anymore •  “Full-duplex” becomes possible “abc” MIMO AP “def” © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 19
  20. 20. MCS Modulation Ratio 40 MHz channel 20 MHz channel 800 ns GI 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 80 MHz channel 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 160 MHz channel 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 400 ns GI 0 BPSK 1/2 6.5 7.2 13.5 15 29.3 32.5 58.5 65 1 QPSK 1/2 13 14.4 27. 30 58.5 65 117 130 2 QPSK 3/4 19.5 21.7 40.5 45 87.8 97.5 175.5 195 3 16-QAM 1/2 26 28.9 54 60 117 130 234 260 4 16-QAM 3/4 39 43.3 81 90 175.5 195 351 390 5 64-QAM 2/3 52 57.8 108 120 234 260 468 520 6 64-QAM 3/4 58.5 65 121.5 135 263.3 292.5 526.5 585 7 64-QAM 5/6 65 72.2 135 150 292.5 325 585 650 8 256-QAM 3/4 78 86.7 162 180 351 390 702 780 9 256-QAM 5/6 N/A N/A 180 200 390 433.3 780 866.7 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 20
  21. 21. MCS Modulation Ratio 40 MHz channel 20 MHz channel 800 ns GI 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 80 MHz channel 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 160 MHz channel 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 400 ns GI 0 BPSK 1/2 13 14.4 27 30 58.6 65 117 130 1 QPSK 1/2 26 28.8 54. 60 117 130 234 260 2 QPSK 3/4 39 43.4 81 90 174.6 195 351 390 3 16-QAM 1/2 52 37.8 108 120 234 260 468 520 4 16-QAM 3/4 78 86.6 162 180 351 390 702 780 5 64-QAM 2/3 104 111.6 216 240 468 520 936 1040 6 64-QAM 3/4 117 130 243 270 526.6 585 1053 1170 7 64-QAM 5/6 130 144.4 270 300 585 650 1170 1300 8 256-QAM 3/4 156 173.4 324 360 702 780 1404 1560 9 256-QAM 5/6 N/A N/A 360 400 780 866.6 1560 1733.4 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 21
  22. 22. MCS Modulation Ratio 40 MHz channel 20 MHz channel 800 ns GI 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 80 MHz channel 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 160 MHz channel 400 ns GI 800 ns GI 400 ns GI 0 BPSK 1/2 19.5 21.6 40.5 45 87.9 97.5 175.5 195 1 QPSK 1/2 78 43.2 81 90 175.5 195 351 390 2 QPSK 3/4 58.5 65.1 121.5 135 263.4 292.5 526.5 585 3 16-QAM 1/2 78 86.7 162 180 351 390 702 780 4 16-QAM 3/4 117 129.9 243 270 526.5 585 1053 1170 5 64-QAM 2/3 156 173.4 324 360 702 780 1404 1560 6 64-QAM 3/4 175.5 195 364.5 405 789.9 877.5 1579.5 1755 7 64-QAM 5/6 204 216.6 405 450 877.5 975 1755 1950 8 256-QAM 3/4 234 260.1 486 540 1053 1170 2106 2340 9 256-QAM 5/6 N/A N/A 540 600 1170 1299.9 2340 2600.1 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 22
  23. 23. 802.11ac PHY Rates, MCS9, Short GI •  Throughput will all depend on stations! 7000 •  Example best case: 6000 PHY Layer Throughput (Mbps) 160 MHz-wide channel, 8 antenna AP with MU-MIMO support One 4-SS, 160 MHz client, 3.47 Gbps data rate to this client One 2-SS, 160 MHz client, 1.73 Gbps data rate to this client Two 1-SS, 160 MHz clients, 867 Mbps data rate to each client •  Total cell throughput, 6.93 Gbps! But in reality, clients are not expected to support more than 80 MHz (only the APs will support 160 MHz) © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 20MHz 40MHz 80MHz 160MHz 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 No of Spatial Streams 7 8 Cisco Confidential 23
  24. 24. •  AES CCMP uses blocks of 128 bits, with a 128 bit key: •  128 bit key is getting a bit light, especially if you want FIPS certification (you will require 256 bit keys at some point) •  Blocks of 128 bits: with 802.11n A-MPDU max length of 65,535 octets, you may need more than 24 580 calculations to encrypt a frame •  If your throughput is about 270 Mbps (3SS 450 Mbps), this represents more than 13 million calculations per second (just to encrypt) •  Imagine 6.93 Gbps… close to 350 million calculations per second… •  The 802.11ac members decided that more efficiency would soon be needed •  A first change is that 802.11ac allows for 256 bit keys, even with WPA2/CCMP and 128-bit blocks •  Packet format and process would stay the same, except that MIC would change from 64 bits (8 bytes) to 128 bits (16 bytes) © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 24
  25. 25. •  A second change is that AES with Counter Cipher Mode (CCM) with Block Chaining Message Authentication Code (CMAC) Protocol (CCMP) is not the only possible mechanism anymore •  A new mechanism, AES with GCM with Galois Message Authentication Code (GMAC) Protocol (GCMP) is allowed •  Key is 128 or 256 bits •  Block can be 128, 192, 256, 384, 512 or 704 bit long •  A great strength of this mechanism is that you can calculate (still using AES) the different elements needed for the MIC determination in parallel, saving an enormous amount of time •  GCMP was recently allowed in 802.11ac, experiments are being made so see how much time is saved •  GCMP (with 128 bit blocks and key) was already allowed by 802.11ad © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 25
  26. 26. •  More streams: it’s not that easy! •  Multiple streams reach multiple receiving circuits •  Distinguishing one from the other is difficult •  Larger channel is easier than more streams Throughput 1x1 - 20 MHz 240 2x2 - 20 MHz 220 3x3 - 20 MHz 200 4x4 - 20 MHz OTA Throughput (Mbps) 180 1x1 - 40 MHz 160 2x2 - 40 MHz 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Range (m) © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 26
  27. 27. •  Here again, not that easy! •  Where do I find 160 MHz? •  One 80 MHz channel in 2.4GHz •  Two 160 MHz channels in 5 GHz (with DFS; one without DFS band) •  802.11ac focuses on 5 GHz •  Even in 5 GHz, a new protocol does not make the spectrum wider •  One great advantage of 802.11ac will be to increase the 5 GHz adoption •  But multiple 802.11ac cell coexistence will be a challenge •  And can you afford 8 radios in your mobile device? © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 27
  28. 28. 149 153 157 161 165 169 173 177 181 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 100 104 108 112 116 120 124 128 132 136 140 144 Channel # 20 MHz 40 MHz 80 MHz 160 MHz UNII-1 UNII-2 5250 5350 MHz MHz Available TDWR channels, not yet available UNII-2 Extended 5470 MHz UNII-3 5725 MHz To become available 5825 MHz 5925 MHz Special OOBE must be met •  In the US there are currently there are 22/10/5/1 channels with bandwidth 20/40/80/160MHz channels •  With opening up of 5.35-5.47GHz & 5.85-5.925GHz, the number of channels increases to 34/16/8/3 •  If the industry manages to take back the TDWR channels, the number of increases to 37/18/9/4 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 28
  29. 29. •  The number of channels with 20/40/80/160MHz bandwidth in other countries is currently: •  EU: 17/8/4/2 •  China: 5/2/1/0 – about to expand number of channels •  India: 13/6/3/1 •  Japan: 19/9/4/2 •  Russia: 16/8/4/1 •  Efforts are underway globally to expand the availability of 5Ghz, including for use by wide 802.11ac channels © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 29
  30. 30. •  WFA Wave 1 certification includes only a subset of features: •  80 MHz is mandatory, 256QAM is optional (but all vendors put it in) •  Ability to RX 1/2/3SS is tested –  2SS is mandatory for non-battery-powered APs –  Only 1SS is mandatory for battery powered APs and clients •  For Wave 1, the majority of vendors focus on 80 MHz, 1-3SS and 256QAM •  Wave 1 products are based on 11ac D3.0 (May 2012) and started in June 2013 •  The WFA brand name is “Wi-Fi CERTIFIED™ ac” •  Wave 2 should include: 256QAM, 160MHz, 4SS – 3.5Gbps PHY, 2.4Gbps MAC •  Fort Wave 2, it is expected that 160 MHz devices appear with 1-3SS for low- to high-end products (data rates of 867-2600 Mbps) •  Marketing roadmap for Wave 2 has not yet be approved •  In between, 802.11ac draft 7 was recirculated and approved with few comments •  Amendment final approval is expected… next month (officially, March 2014) © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 30
  31. 31. 90 90 135 •  80 MHz, 3 SS => 1.3 Gbps •  80 MHz, 2 SS => 866.7 Mbps •  80 MHz, 1 SS => 433.3 Mbps •  256 QAM is very rewarding, 180 0 1000 points mapped, no noise 225 180 •  1.3 Gbps range is likely to be short! 16-QAM 90 135 (high QAM density) more than signal w/lower density 315 270 QPSK •  However, noise affects dense signal 0 225 315 270 for marketing 45 135 45 90 45 0 180 45 135 180 0 1000 points mapped, with noise 225 315 270 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 225 315 270 Cisco Confidential 31
  32. 32. •  802.11ac MU MIMO is like 802.11n MIMO, except instead of one client, there are up to four clients •  AP does pre-coding for all the clients within the MU group simultaneously •  In MU precoding, when AP beamforms space-time streams to one client, it simultaneously null-steers those space-time streams to the rest. •  All users’ MPDUs are padded to the same number of OFDM symbols •  MU-MIMO is technically risky and challenging: •  Needs precise channel estimation (CSI) to maintain deep nulls •  Precise channel estimation adds overhead •  Rate adaptation is more difficult •  Throughput benefits are sensitive to MU grouping WFA Wave 2 certification: •  MU-MIMO © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Null-steering:To send data to user 1, the AP forms a strong beam toward user 1, shown as the top-right lobe of the blue curve. At the same time the AP minimizes the energy for user 1 in the direction of user 2 and user 3. This is called "null steering" and is shown as the blue notches. Same logic applies to red and yellow beams. Cisco Confidential 32
  33. 33. •  One issue of 802.11n is 40 MHz coexistence with 20 MHz channels •  B sends on Ch 36 (because it senses 802.11a AP on Ch 40) •  802.11an AP does CCA on 36,40, hears nothing, transmits •  40 MHz signal collides at B CCA: 40 is busy -> use 36 only CCA: 36 and 40 clear -> use 36 and 40 802.11n 36 802.11n B 36,40 36+40 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 802.11a 40 Collision on 40 Cisco Confidential 33
  34. 34. •  This issue could be a lot worse for 802.11ac: •  802.11ac can use 20 MHz, 40 MHz (20 MHz primary/secondary), 80 MHz (40 MHz primary/secondary) Primary 20 Free? 36 40 44 48 44 48 Primary 20 Secondary 20 36 40 Primary 20 Secondary 20 36 40 Free? 44 48 Primary 40 Primary 20 Secondary 20 36 40 Secondary 40 44 48 Primary 40 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 34
  35. 35. •  This issue could be a lot worse for 802.11ac: •  If secondary20 is busy, transmitter cannot extend to secondary40 •  OBSS (802.11n or 802.11ac) with primary on local AP secondary would cause both APs to block each other •  Choice of primary channel is critical for 802.11ac Primary 20 Secondary 20 36 40 Block Secondary 40 Block Secondary 20 Primary 20 36 40 48 44 Wasted Best configuration: both primary 20s aligned Second best: primary 20s far apart (e.g. 36 and 48) Secondary 40 44 48 Block 36 © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 35
  36. 36. •  Initiator sends RTS on channels that its senses are free •  Subsequent exchange depend on the capabilities of both sides •  Dynamic bandwidth reservation: Responder sends CTS only on channels that it sense are free. Initiator transmits data only over channels indicated free by CTS response •  Static bandwidth reservation: If the initiator has static capability, the responder sends CTS only if all the requested channels are free, otherwise sends no CTS CTS is in 20MHz 11a format, but indicates 40MHz BW Example of “Dynamic Bandwidth Reservation” RTS is in 20MHz 11a format, but indicates: (1) 80MHz BW, (2) initiator is capable of dynamic BW RTS CTS Data transmission RTS CTS Data transmission RTS Interference at the responder side WFA Wave 1 certification: •  RTS with BW signaling is optional •  CTS with BW signaling in response to RTS with BW signaling is a mandatory test RTS © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 36
  37. 37. •  80 MHz channel should be seen in Spectrum Expert © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 37
  38. 38. •  Integrated devices – Shipping Apple – Macbook Air – http://www.apple.com/macbook-air/features.html#wireless Intel® Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/wireless-products/dual-band-wireless-ac-7260-bluetooth.html Samsung S 4 - http://www.samsungmobilepress.com/2013/03/14/GALAXY-S-4-1 HTC ONE – http://www.htc.com/us/smartphones/htc-one/#specs ZTE Grand Memo - http://www.zteusa.com/news-zte-launches-grand-memo/ •  USB Clients - Shipping LinkSys AE6000 – 1x1 http://store.linksys.com/linksys-ae6000-wifi-wireless-ac-dual-band-mini-usbadapter_stcVVproductId153081401VVcatId553466VVviewprod.htm Asus – USB-AC53 – 2x2 - http://www.asus.com/Networking/USBAC53/ NetGear – A6200 – 2x2 http://www.netgear.com/home/products/wireless-adapters/ultimate-wireless-adapters/a6200.aspx Belkin - 2x2 - http://www.belkin.com/us/F9L1106-Belkin/p/P-F9L1106 D-Link – 2x2 http://www.dlink.com/us/en/home-solutions/connect/adapters/dwa-182-wireless-ac1200-dual-band-usb-adapter Bulffalo – 2x2 http://www.buffalotech.com/products/wireless/client-adapters/airstation-ac866-dual-band-wireless-usb-adapter Edimax – 2x2 - http://www.edimax.com/en/produce_detail.php?pd_id=479&pl1_id=28&pl2_id=138 •  Ethernet to 802.11ac Bridges - Shipping LinkSys (Belkin) WUMC710 http://store.linksys.com/en-us/linksys-WUMC710-wireless-media-connector-wifi-5ghzbridge_stcVVproductId149779333VVcatId550467VVviewprod.htm Buffalo WLI-H4-D1300 - http://www.buffalo-technology.com/en/wli-h4-di300-airstation-1300.html BEST LIST FOR IDENTIFYING NEW 802.11AC HARDWARE © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. http://wikidevi.com/wiki/List_of_802.11ac_Hardware REVIEW LAST SEVT Cisco Confidential 38
  39. 39. There are so many data-rates in .11ac Using the internal .11n radio on the AP-3600i. We performed a quick cell size characterization with .11n rates using several .11n clients. When we switched to .11ac clients, and the .11ac radio module it performed similar @40 MHz with clients having a cell size similar to the .11n clients. Take-away .11n/11ac are similar rate/ range but of course @80 MHz and 256-QAM you get a significant datarate boost © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. New facility in Richfield Ohio for competitive testing Cisco Confidential 39
  40. 40. Comparison 802.11ac versus 802.11n using 3-SS clients 11ac client Dell E6430 with Broadcom 3-ss Vs. 11n client Apple 3-ss Macbook Pro (Take-away) .11ac client @ 3-ss is able to get twice the speed © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 40
  41. 41. © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 41
  42. 42. © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 42
  43. 43. © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 43
  44. 44. •  Also keep in mind that 802.11ac is new… client performances and behavior vary: L J From the vendor, after long Tshoot: “I understand that you want to verify the Channels which are supported in US and in this regard, I would like to mention that the Channels supported in US are as below: ## 36 ## 40 ## 44 ## 153” Translation: your card shows 149,153,157,161, but you are in fact operating on 153 only, in 20 MHz… © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 44
  45. 45. TCP  Downlink  Throughput  5GHz  MulB-­‐Client:    Sixty  802.11ac  Clients   350   300   MEGABITS  PER  SECOND   250   200   150   100   50   0   5   © 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 10   15   20   25   30   35   NUMBER  OF  CLIENTS   40   45   50   55   60   Cisco Confidential 45
  46. 46. Thank you.

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