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Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
Italy power point   revised-2
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Italy power point revised-2

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  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013.
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Added March 16, 2013
  • Added March 16, 2013
  • Revised March 16, 2013
  • Created March 16, 2013
  • Transcript

    • 1. GLOBAL CHILD CARE: ITALY ECEP 104 - 062A Group Presentation By: Cinzia, Elizabeth, Jianfeng, Sadaf, Sonia and Youngsil 1
    • 2. Benvenuto - Welcomehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8JsdiTiowGMNumbers Song in Italian – Canzone dei NumeriPlease Enjoy Your Italian Treat 2
    • 3. ITALY AGENDA  Introduction (Elizabeth)  Treats (Cinzia and Sonia)  Philosophy (Elizabeth)  History (Sadaf)  ECE Roles and Training (Cinzia)  Child Care Systems (Sonia)  Accessibility (Youngsil)  Availability (Jianfeng)  Crossword Puzzle (Jianfeng)  Summary (Sadaf)  Bibliography
    • 4. PHILOSOPLocated in Northern Italy, Reggio … HY Emergent curriculum "first appearedEmilia is the birthplace to Italys in the 1970s" (page 52: Essentials ofinnovative approach to Early Childhood Early Childhood Education)Education. The signature educationalphilosophy was started by Loris "Emergent curriculum is anMalaguzzi (a teacher) and the village approach that encourages earlyparents in Reggio Emilia after World childhood practitioners to reallyWar II. respond to their immediate surroundings - physical place and people - and guide childrens naturalMalaguzzi based his theory on Dewey, curiosity about their environment toPiaget and Vygotsky: "Learning occurs encourage learning" (page 52:through relationships and interactions. Essentials of Early ChildhoodLearning is continuous and emergent" Education). In Ontario, the emergent(week 3 class notes, ECEP 104). curriculum is based on the Reggio Emilia approach.Curriculum is built and based on theprinciples of respect, responsibility and Curriculum is based on the cues ofcommunity. the children (including their interests and development of“There are no set materials. These are emerging ideas).gathered as projects are determinedand started” (week 3 class notes, ECEP There is freedom within the learning104). Children are free to explore and structure. The emphasis fordiscover in a supportive and enriching emergent curriculum is on in-depth projects to facilitate learning.environment based on their interests. 4
    • 5. PHILOSOPHY:Teachers are considered as co-learners Teachers brainstorm as a team, and areand collaborators with children - much "true partners with children and theirmore than just an instructor. families in the educational process" (week 3 PP class notes, ECEP 104). Teachers "develop plans with theParents are a vital component to Italys children for assisting the learningeducation philosophy, viewed as experiences" (week 3 class notes, ECEPpartners and advocates for their 104).children. Parents are expected to takepart in discussions about school policy,curriculum planning, and evaluation. Parental involvement in a childs learning is encouraged."We strive to create an amiable earlychildhood setting where children, early "The most effective curriculum ischildhood educators and families feel a custom-designed for each earlysense of well-being" (page 87: Essentials childhood program" (page 55: Essentialsof Early Childhood Education, quote of Early Childhood Education).from Loris Malaguzzi). 5
    • 6. History of Italy’s Childcare • At the end of World War II, there was urging to bring change and create new schools for their young children. • In 1967 all the preschools were transferred to the city government thanks to a famous group at the time, the union of Italian women (also called the U.D.I.) • The founder of Early Childhood Education system was Loris Malaguzzi who created this system by the need to women returning to work force. • By 1980’s the Reggio Emilia philosophy of Early Childhood Education became known in Italy andinternationally.• Since 2004 there was a fast network of services created to make it possible for families who arerequesting a place in child care.• Statistics show that profit and non-profit facilities have 1600 children attending infant- toddler centres,40% from birth to three years (highest percentage in Italy), and 90% three to six years attend preschools(about 3500 children). 6
    • 7. History of Ontario’s Childcare • During World War II, the Dominion Provincial War Time Agreement shared 50% of the cost to support childcare programs for mothers who worked in industries. • Only Ontario and Quebec agreed to the federal cost sharing, but only a number of childcare centers opened in Ontario, with the majority in Toronto. • After the World War II, the federal government took back the cost sharing agreement and federal funding for child care in Ontario, and announced that all the day nurseries were to be closed.• City of Toronto maintained to be open, and re-opened centers due to public pressure that was organized by Toronto base nursery and day care Parents Association.• In 1946 Toronto was the first province to establish the Day Nursery Act.• In 1966 Canada established the Canada Assistance Plan; there was subsidies for families that qualify. 7
    • 8. - Plan activities and lessons - Planned program by based on the child’s interest. observing the children or They also interact with the documentation. Role children and not sitting back s just to observe. - Both teachers and students - Co-construct the child’s participate together on a project knowledge and goals to make sure that the child Teacher nurtures the children’sROL understands what is being taught. play from birth to 5 years old. ES - Observe the children in order - Working in groups along with AN for them to create a curriculum activities done individually with and have it implemented. each child. D Roles TR - Work with children to help them achieve their goals. - Observing classroom and children.AIN Teacher nurtures the children’s play from ages 6 months to 6ING years old.
    • 9. Train - Requires a 3 year course to - Varies from 2 semester ing teach children under the age of programs to 3 or 4 year degree three as the basis. programs to take care of children.ROL - Infant and Toddler centres do not require one to have post - Requires post secondary training, along with CPR and first ES secondary training, but for a aid in order to work in childcare childcare centre for the ages of centres. AN 28 months to 6 years of age you D require a 5 year degree. Training TRAINING
    • 10. Types of Childcare Systems PUBLIC PRIVATE INFORMAL LICENSEDAccepting ages Not open to the Not owned by law. Learning and healthy3-5. public. development provided.95% of children It’s moreattended public expensive and Provided by friends, Constantly inspectedservices. overpriced. relatives, neighbors or and monitored by nannies. Ministry of childrenOnly for low income Timing depends on and youth services.families. child’s care. Initiated by lawAccepted depends Fewer children reaching theon family size and than public standards of care.income. childcare systems. 10
    • 11. ACCESSIBILITY 11Italy: o Free of charge and full-time coverage for over 90% of children between the ages of 3 and 6 in 2006. o Example : Regions like Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna during the past 30 years, have invested highly in early childhood education.Ontario: o Free public school service available to all children at age four and five for half-days or full-days. o Example : Child care (centres, family homes, nursery schools, and preschools) are licensed and regulated, but there is only minor government financial support of these services.
    • 12. 1. For children 3-6 years of age, child care centers are free and available to all children . 2. For children under 3 years of age, it varies in different regions. 3. Most child care centers for children under 3 years of age are nonprofit.  Government  Municipal  Religious  Private AVAILABILITY IN ITALYitaly
    • 13. • Child care opportunities are limited and a large proportion of parents use informal care to take care of their children. The limitations of childcare opportunities concern both availability and costs. • In terms of availability, Public childcare is also more expensive than in other countries. Public subsidy accounts for about 80% of the total cost in Italy. Private childcare is also more expensive, about 30% more than public childcare (Del Boca, Locatelli and Vuri 2005).italy AVAILABILITY IN ITALY
    • 14. • An increasing demand for more flexible and longer hours of care. The priority in public childcare waiting lists depends on the working status of parents, family composition and type, and children’s health. The length of waiting lists is indicated by the fact that for every 100 applications, 33 are registered on a waiting list (Del Boca Locatelli and Vuri 2005). •The small proportion of young children using childcare is not only because of a lack of availability or the relatively high costs. As the World Values Survey shows, Italian mothers are those most convinced that young children are better off being looked after by their mother. AVAILABILITY IN ITALYitaly
    • 15. 1. Kindergarten is free for children 4 and 5 years of age. 2. For children under 3 years of age, daycare subsidies are available . 3. Most child care centers for children under 3 years old are nonprofit.  Child care centers  Nursery school and preschool  Regulated family child care  Early childhood interventionontario AVAILABILITY IN ONTARIO
    • 16. CROSSWORD TIME! 5 MINS!!! 5 minu tes! 16
    • 17. PUB L I CCrossword.. N V L O I NFORMAL C V RE SPE C E N M TS NI NE T E N D Y P R IVA T E 17
    • 18. SUMMARY CHILD CARE IN ITALY CHILD CARE IN ONTARIOThe educational philosophy was started by Curriculum is built and based on theLoris Malaguzzi (a teacher) and the village principles of respect, responsibility andparents in Reggio Emilia after World War II. community.Teachers are considered as co-learners and Teachers brainstorm as a team, and are truecollaborators with children - much more than partners with children and their families injust an instructor. the educational process.At the end of World War II, there was urging During World War II, the Dominion Provincialto bring change and create new schools for War Time Agreement shared 50% of thetheir young children. cost to support childcare programs for mothers who worked in industries.In 1967 all the preschools were transferredto the city government thanks to a famous Only Ontario and Quebec agreed to thegroup at the time, the union of Italian women federal cost sharing, but only a number of(also called the U.D.I.) childcare centers opened in Ontario, with the majority in Toronto.Work with children to help them achievetheir goals. Co-construct the child’s knowledge and goals 18
    • 19. SUMMARY CHILD CARE IN ITALY CHILD CARE IN ONTARIO Teacher nurtures the children’s play from Teacher nurtures the children’s play fromages 6 months to 6 years old. birth to 5 years old.Requires a 3 year course to teach children Varies from 2 semester programs to 3 or 4under the age of three as the basis. year degree programs to take care of children.Free of charge and full-time coverage forover 90% of children between the ages of 3 Free public school service available to alland 6 in 2006. children at age four and five for half-days or full-days.For children 3-6 years of age, child carecenters are free and available to all children For children under 3 years of age, daycare subsidies are available .Most child care centers for children under 3years of age are nonprofit. Most child care centers for children under 3 years old are nonprofit. Only a small percentage of child care centres are privately run businesses. 19
    • 20. We thank you for your time! GOODBYE! Ciao ! 20
    • 21. BIBLIOGRAPHYGestwicki, Carol, and Jane Bertrand. www.toronto.ca/children/quality.htmEssentials of Early Childhood Education. cademia.edu/1488418/Early_Childcare_in_Italy4th Canadian ed. Toronto: Thomson Nelson, _path_dependency_and_new_needs2012. Print. http://www.poemhunter.com/quotations/famo us.asp?people=Loris%20MalaguzziNew, Rebecca Staples, and MoncrieffCochran. Early Childhood Education: an http://reggiochildrenfoundation.org/?page_iInternational Encyclopedia. Westport, d=605&lang=enConn., Praeger Publishers, 2007. Print. Slide 2 Photo: E. Brikman, March 16, 2013Week 3 Power Point Class NotesCox: ECEP 104-062 Slide 16 Photo: Flickr via Behold DSC_5521 (aka Italian Newspaper)Childcarepolicy.net/documents/ By: Luc de Schepper, May 29, 2006WinnipegPaper.pdf Slide 18 Photo: Flickr via Beholdwww.tariki.hu/en/research/childpoverty/ “Ah, Venezia” (aka Gondola)case_studies/childpoverty_italy.pdf By: Shawnoula, March 25, 2005 Italian Numbers Song found on YouTubewww.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/20218/1/dp983.pdf Crossword created by S. Sukhoo 21

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