• Like
  • Save
Student Mentoring Reference Guide
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Student Mentoring Reference Guide

on

  • 845 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
845
Views on SlideShare
845
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Student Mentoring Reference Guide Student Mentoring Reference Guide Document Transcript

    • Society forTechnicalCommunicationInvest in the Future ... Sponsor an STC StudentMentoring Program! (Update)Reference Guide and Turnkey ToolkitPresented by Dan Voss and Bethany BowlesLeadership Day60th Annual STC International Conference: The SummitMay 5, 2013Atlanta, GA(Updated from Reference Guide and Toolkit from Leadership Programat the 59th STC International Conference, May 20-23, 2012, Rosemont, IL)L
    • Society forTechnicalCommunicationInvest in the Future ... Sponsor an STC StudentMentoring Program! (Update)Reference Guide and Turnkey ToolkitPresented by Dan Voss and Bethany BowlesLeadership Day60th Annual STC International Conference: The SummitMay 5, 2013Atlanta, GA(Updated from Reference Guide and Toolkit from Leadership Programat the 59th STC International Conference, May 20-23, 2012, Rosemont, IL)L
    • PrefaceThis printed reference guide and accompanying "turnkey" e-toolkit on DVD are designed to help STC studentcommunities and professional communities (geographic and virtual) to establish and sustain mutually beneficialpartnerships-specifically, mentoring programs pairing professionals with students. Such programs are clearly win-win-win situations, benefitting "mentees" and mentors alike as well as both organizations in the partnership and theSociety as a whole.The reference guide consists of two sections, separated by tab dividers. The first section contains background material,including hard copies ofthe two "Jet Propel" student outreach presentations at Leadership Day ofthe 60th STCSummit: (1) the morning progression presentation on how to tap student power to build or rebuild your STCcommunity and (2) the afternoon workshop presentation, which provides an overview of several other presentations aswell as opportunity for the audience to interactively explore whatever they find most useful in terms ofstudentoutreach. The first section also includes hard copies ofthe "ancillary" afternoon presentations on face-to-face andvirtual professional-to-student mentoring programs, as well as the two STC presentations that were presented at theinternational conference of Sigma Tau Delta, the collegiate honor society for English majors, in March 2013: (1)"Careers in Technical Communication for English Majors" and (2) "Student Mentoring Programs." These two .pptpresentations, fully scripted with speakers notes, are on the CD accompanying this printed guide. They are already inuse by the Northeast Ohio chapter for member student outreach visits to nearby colleges, and they are turnkey-ready formembers of your community to do the same.The second section outlines a sequential step-by-step procedure for establishing and sustaining a mentoring program. Itbegins with a "to do" checklist keyed to the steps that follow. Originally set up to support a hands-on workshop onmentoring programs within the Leadership Program ofthe 59th STC Summit, this section can also be usedindependently, although we certainly encourage you to contact us (and/or our successors as leads for student programson the STC Community Affairs Committee [CAC]) if you have any questions or concerns. Having benefitted bothpersonally and organizationally from our own mentoring relationship, we encourage our student and professionalcolleagues in STSC to share such a unique and wonderful opportunity.A word about e-file naming conventions. To facilitate use of the CD accompanying this printed guide, the 48 e-filescorresponding to each item on the Table ofContents (both Section 1, Background Materials, and Section 2, Step-by-Step Procedures, including a full set of administrative forms) are file-named beginning with an alpha prefix, starting at"A_" and running through "ZV_." That way, when you open the CD, you will find a one-to-one sequentialcorrespondence with the Table of Contents and the material in this guide book. The final file on the CD is the printingmaster (.pdf) for the entire book--enabling you to reproduce additional copies for your community if you wish. TheCD label is also on the CD, so you can bum additional COs as well.We believe youll find these materials practical and useful. The STC-France chapter used them to establish itsmentoring program with the University ofParis -7 (Diderot) and found they had to make only minimal modificationsto the guidelines and administrative forms to meet their specific needs. So dont reinvent the wheel-start rolling! ©Dan Voss and Bethany BowlesSTC CAC Co-Leads for Student OutreachAcknowledgmentThe authors, as well as the CAC, would like to express our appreciation to the Publishing and Distribution Center atLockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control in Orlando, FL, for providing the printed guidebooks and COs to supportthe STC student outreach initiative at the 60th STC Summit this year (as well as at the 59th STC Summit last year)...((.
    • BackgroundMaterials
    • BcDEFGHLMTable of Contents for Book and Index for CD"Harnessing Student Power to Jet-Propel Your Community: Part 1: Back to Basics,"ssion Presentation Leadership Day, 60th STC International Conference"Harnessing Student Power to Jet-Propel Your Community: Part II: Building onBasics," Wo Presentation, Leadershi 60th STC lntl Conference"STC Student Mentoring Programs: Investing in the Future," Proceedings, 59thSTC International Conference"STC Student Mentoring Programs: Investing in the Future," ProgressionPresentatio Leadershi Program, 59th STC Conference"Invest in the Future ... Sponsor an STC Student Mentoring Program! (Update),"Overview Presentation on "Toolkit" for STC Student Mentoring Programs (PrintedReference Guide and Leadershi 60th STC lntl Conference"Theres Virtue in Virtual ... or An Old Dinosaur Learns New Tricks," PanelPresentation, Academic SIG-Sponsored Workshop Preceding 39th Annual Meetingof the CPTSC, October 2011"Coaching Online: STCs Emerging Virtual Professional-to-Student Mentoringur,.,..·.,ro•rn~" Leadership 60th STC International Conference"Careers in Technical Communication for English Majors," STC Presentation atma Tau Delta International Conference, March 2013.*"Bridging the Gap Between Industry and Academe," Proceedings, 52nd STCConference (describi the start-u of the STC-Orlan mentori"Un Programme de Mentorat International? Mais Oui, Cest Possible!Absolument!", Proceedings, 57th STC Conference (describing how a trans-Atlanticvirtual mentoring relationship helped STC-France establish a mentoring programwith the Unive of Paris)N "Reaching Across the Atlantic: An International Mentoring Initiative," ProgressionPresentatio 57th STC ConferenceuvwXy"STC Orlando Chapter/FTC (UCF) Mentoring Program Guidelines and Procedures,2013-2014"*"The Mentoring Program, 2013-2014," Capsule Summary on Orlando ChapterWeb Site"OPERATION 9-9-9: Our Mentoring Program Needs You," Promotional on ChapterListserv Recruiti Mentors and Mentees"Mentoring Program Off to Rousing Start in 9th Year," Article in ChapterNewsletter, Memo to Members, Describi Kickoff Meeti November 2011I):ll3313f1fS9/
    • z *Mentor Application (alternate format) 93ZA Mentor Summary (compilation of data from mentor applications, used for pairingmentors and mentees) 1C.ZB Mentor Summary (alternate format) 97zc Mentee Application (skills to be expanded, interests, preferred learning style) "1JZD *Mentee Application (alternate format) jOOZE Mentee Summary (compilation of data from mentee applications, used forpairing mentees and mentors) 163ZF Mentee Summary (alternate format) 104ZG "Mentor Kick-off Meeting Availability" (survey: scheduling tool for setting upkickoff meeting with goal of 100% attendance) /OSZH *Mentor/Mentee Agreement (for establishing objectives, activities via which topursue those objectives, and a plan for meeting) /07Zl "M&M Bonding Moments" (list of suggested activities and projects) /09ZJ Mentee Pre-Assessment Form (for program metrics and refinement) II IZK Mentor Pre-Assessment Form (for program metrics and refinement) -/l:lZL Contact Log (mentors and mentees record dates of meetings as well as significantphone calls or e-mail exchanges, topics of discussion, and activities 113ZM Facebook Group (informal alternative or supplement to contact log) I !IfZN Mentee Post-Assessment Iff;zo Mentee Program Evaluation 1/7ZP Mentor Post-Assessment IL9ZQ Mentor Program Evaluation j).O .·:- ·..·•..·,_·, ~ .• ·-·•e~Ftiesfor FroQt;M.att!!r in:CiJJCieb~ok (for Reprinting this·ood.lrnertt}•••· ""····ZR Preface (e-file)..{.<.zs Contents (e-file)., ,C.C.GZT Title Page (e-file) c,·Jzu CD Label (e-file) tl/~/j:, Master l;pijf(fqtReptJgti~g tti,~P.Pcumentzv Printing file for this reference guide (e-file) fill*Also available on Orlando-STC Central Florida web site, at http://www.stc-orlando.org/education/mentor/mentor.aspt.v
    • SG~i~tyforTedmi<alCommunkaticnHarnessing Student Power to Jet-Propel Your CommunityPart 1: Back to BasicsII•May 5, 2013: Leadership Day6Qth Annual STC International Conference, Atlanta, GABethany Bowles, Sally Henschel, Dan VossCommunity Affairs CommitteeStudent Outreach by Your Community:Overarching ObjectiveTap a new and amazing resource ...... Students are dam-powerful!STCs Student Outreach: 2010-2011Student Outreach Team formed as a subset of the CACLed by Dan Voss, STC-Qrtando chapter, and Sarah Baca, STC-Orlandochapter and the University of Central Florida (UCF)Included STC leaders from the Board, the STC staff, and STCgeographic communities and SIGsReceived outstanding support from STC leadershipOverarching objectives were (and remain):Build STCs student membership baseIncrease communicatiOn and establish partnerships betweenstudent chapters and other STC communitiesIncrease retention of student members upon graduationAccomplishmentsActive role in Leadership Day at 58" Summit in Sacramento and atthe annual business meetingBoard voted to enfranchise student membersBoard established discounted "NTC" membership rate for studentsfor 1" 3 years after graduation•II•Agenda• Objective• Background on CAC• Background on STC Student Outreach Initiative• Approach• Tapping Student Power: Back to Basics: Steps 1-7• Preview of Afternoon Session (Part II of "Jet Propel")• Summary• Contact Information• Q&As, DiscussionWhat is the CAC? AIt is STCs Community Affairs Committee • -Established by the Board in 2009 to provide assistance to STCcommunities and to improve communication between the communibesthe Board, and the STC staffServes as a direct pipeline from the communities to STC leadership toensure communities needs/concerns are addressed and their ideas heardLed by Board member Tricia Spayer and Board member-<!lect Ben WoelkStaffed by dozens of volunteer leaders from STC communities across thecountry (professional chapters, SIGs, and student communities)Sponsors Leadership Day at the annual Summ~Come meet us at "STC Central" ... bring your earplugs in case weattempt to reprise last years unforgettable Irish drinking songSTCs Student Outreach: 2011-2012Led by Dan Voss and Bethany Bowles, STC-Ortando chapter and UCF(Sarah Baca assumed another leadership role on the CAC)AccomplishmentsBoard established special STC Task Force for Student OutreachSTC staff resolved IRS tax exemption issue w~ student chaptersEstablished new student chapter at Missouri Inst~te of Science andTechnology (1" new STC community in years)Conducted "hea~ survey" of student communities and assignedCAC reps to maintain communication with and assist themSTC treasurer and CFO {tiOth on Task Force) adjusted studentchapter budget cycle to frt the academic year and ensured fundingOutreach Team focused on establishing student mentoringprograms between STC geographic communities and tech comstudents at nearby univers~iesMajor role in Leadership "Day" at 59" Summ~ in Chicago, sparkingbroad interest in student mentoring programs and providing tools~ ~
    • •II•STCs Student Outreach: 2012-2013Voss and Bowles continued their "reign of terror," joined by Sally Henschel,who has spearheaded a new initiative on virtual mentoringTwo disappointmentsCAC Student Outreach Team reps have had diffiCulty establishing andmaintaining communication with some student communities:the Team will be changing its approach next yearIt has proven easier to spark genuine interest in establishingstudent mentoring programs than to actually get them goingNotable accomplishmentsEstablished new student mentoring program between Rochester chapterand RIT (thank you, Ben Woelk!)Several more such programs remain on the launchpad, fueled and readySuccessfully established pilot program pairing students with virtual mentorSMEs to work on BoK-related research/writing projectsAcademic SIG and STC staff paved way for expansion into general virtualmentoring in 2013-2014 (new MentorBoard software) -7 high potential foractively engaging more student membersEstablished alliance with Sigma Tau Delta with 2 presentations ·-:!""~at its international conference, focusing on careers in tech com . *for English majors ~ recruiting new STC student members 1 " ,Active role in 6Qlh Summit •Student Outreach by Your Community:Overall ApproachBuild your communitys student membership base• Find and contact student members you already have• Recruit at nearby universities• Activelyengage your student members• Never underestimate them• Usten to their ideas!• Entrust them with leadership roles, right from the start• Turbo-charge your volunteer pool• Establish a pipeline of future chapter leaders• Grow your students ... Give them recognition, credit,professional growth, and networking opportunities• Mentor them• Partner on community projects• Help them get jobs• Retain your students as STC New Technical Communicators(NTC) members when they graduate• Strengthen your community; ensure your Societys future!Step 1: FindYour Student Members!• Check your membershiproster; find your students!• Establish direct personalcontact with all yourstudents.• Invite them to chaptermeetings or onlinecommunity forums andactivities.• Engage them ... involve them ... give themresponsibilities ... listen to them ... support them,mentor them ... and benefit from all they have to offeryour community ... and STC!•••Now ... "Back to Basics"Tap a new and amazing resource ...... Safe student power prevents melt-down!Student Outreach by Your Community:Step-by-Step Approach• Step 1: Findyour student members!Step 2: Recruit new student members from nearby studentchapters.• Step 3: Check for tech com programs at local universities.• Step 4: Synergize with Sigma Tau Delta!Step 5: Use STCs materials from the Sigma Tau Deltaconference.• Step 6: Sign up student members from all sources, includingSigma Tau Delta.• Step 7: Engage your student members!Step 2: Recruit New Student Membersfrom Nearby Student Chapters• Look for the STC studentchapter nearest you*• Establish a partnership• F2F if feasible• Virtual if not• Invite students to chaptermeetings or online communityforums and activities.UUCF• If you have the resources, launch a formal student· mentoring program. If not, start "small."• Grow together ... empower your students and jet-power your community ... its a sure "WIN-WIN"!* htto·l/www stc orgtabout·str:tcommyn;ties/student-chaoters
    • •••Step 3: Check for Tech Com Programsat Local UniversitiesContact English Department chairs• Contact tech com facultyConduct classroom visits• Review student portfolios• Provide SME expertise in classroompresentations and by conductingspecial workshops for studentsAsk faculty to encourage STC student memberships, attendanceat chapter meetings, and active involvement with STC.Where possible, get a faculty member to join STC and sponsor astudent chapter on campus (5 students + 1 advisor = chapter)With or without a student chapter, as resources allow, establisha formal mentoring program with your student membersStep 5: Use STCs Materials from theSigma Tau Delta Conference• At this afternoons "Jet-Propelled II" session, take apeek at STCs 2 slam-dunk presentations at the SigmaTau Delta international conference in Portland, OR,March 20-23, 2013 ... with a big thank you to RachelHoughton and Bethany Bowles!• Both presentations are "off-the-shelf-ready,"with theoriginal .ppt files on our turnkey toolkit DVD, includingfully scripted speakers notes that can be used as is orreadily adapted to your on-campus visits.Bethany ... Orlandochapter and UCF,Sigma Tau Chi, CAC,Distinguished STCStudent Service AwardRachel ... wmametteValley chapter, formerSociety secretary, newSTCAssociate Fellow,being inducted Tuesday!Step 7: Engage Your Student Members!• Work on STC projectstogether (for academiccredit where possible).• Co-present at chaptermeetings, in webinars,and at conferences.• Begin with a "mini" mentoring program, even if its just1, 2, or 3 students.•· Establish a "WIN-WIN" relationship with high mutualreturn on the time investment on both sides.• Your community gets an invaluable infusion of freshtalent, energy, and leadership• Your students grow professionally, network, buildtheir portfolios, and improve their job prospects3••Step 4: Synergize with Sigma Tau Delta!Better ......Together!The Society for TechnicalCommunicationInternational CollegiateEnglish Honor Society• Check for STD chapters at nearby universities• STD has 8,000 members; is on most major campuses Visit STD chapter meetings• Give STC presentations "Careers in Technical Communicationfor English Majors" and "Student Mentoring Programs"• Recruit new STC student members for your chapterStep 6: Sign Up Student Members fromAI/Sources, Including Sigma Tau Delta• Tap STC student chapters.• Tap tech com programs atcampuses without STCstudent chapters.• Where a faculty memberwill serve as sponsor, forma new STC student chapter.• Tap Sigma Tau Delta chapters.• Explain the benefits of STC student membership,particularly active involvement in your STC community(job search, networking, publications, conferences,mentoring ... F2F or virtual, formal or informal).• Subsidize STC student memberships from your communitybudget and, where possible, the university.This is a Transition Slide ... ©• 2012-2013 CAC Student Outreach Team focused on formalprograms• F2F mentoring programs pairing geographic chapters andtech com students at universities• Virtual mentoring program tied to the BoK initiative• A promising new alliance with Sigma Tau DeltaFocus of "Jet-Propelled, Part !"was "Back to Basics," whichweve done in Steps 1-7• Focus of "Jet Propelled, Part II/ this afternoon, is "Building onBasics," where we will provide guidance and tools to help STCcommunities establish and tap into formal programs
    • •IIDont Miss Part II of "Jet-Propelled":"Building on Basics" this Afternoon!StudentMentoring Programs. Everything you ever wanted to knowabout establishing and sustaining face-to-face student mentoringprograms and were afraid to ask ... plus a turnkey-ready toolkit ...no need to "re-invent wheels"!AcademicSIG SpecialDetails on this years successful BoK-specific virtual mentoringprogram and plans to expand it next year• Plans for allying the Academic SIG with STCs studentpopulation next year, including virtual mentoring partnershipsSTC/Sigma Tau Delta Alliance• A terrific way for STC geographic communities to expand theirstudent membership at nearby universities!• Turnkey-ready presentations on "careers in TechnicalCommunication for English Majors" and "Student MentoringPrograms" ... already in use at the Northeast Ohio chapter!A Practical, Interactive, Hands-on" Workshop: We will take thisafternoons session wherever our audience wants us to go!Agenda to STD "Mentoring" Presentation• Adapting this STC presentation for mentoringprograms within theEnglish curriculum• What is mentoring?• Types of mentoring• Face-to-face mentoringSociety lorTe<hnkalCommuniraticnThank you!• Dan Voss• Virtual mentoring• Why is it a good thing?• daniel.w.voss@lmco.com• Bethany Bowles• bethanybowles@gmail.com• Sally Henschel• sally.henschel@mwsu.edu•IIAgenda to STD "careers" Presentation• Technical communication• Skills• Disciplines• Career opportunities• Paths to careers in tech com• Society for Technical Communication• Values• Benefits of membershipSummary ... and Q&As• As you work to sustain, build, or rebuild your STCcommunity, make student outreach an integral part ofthe process.• The CAC Student Outreach Team and the Academic SIGhave paved the way for you and will assist you in anyway that we can.• Lets start right now! ... What would you like to know?
    • >ocr?ty forTedm:icalCommunicationHarnessing Student Power to Jet-Propel Your CommunityII•Part II: Building on BasicsMay 5, 2013: Leadership Day6Qth Annual STC International Conference, Atlanta, GABethany Bowles, Sally Henschel, Dan VossCommunity Affairs CommitteeObjectiveEstablish a nation-wide grid of student power ...... and re-energize STC!Four Roads Diverged ...Road 1: Face·to-face student mentoring programs pairing professionalsin geographic chapters with tech com students at nearby universitiesForming a partnership with an existing student chapter• Forming a new student chapter• Partnering without a formal student chapterRoad 2: Virtual student mentoring programs pairing professionals inSIGs or remote geographic chapters with tech com students atuniversitiesBoK-specific virtual mentoring partnerships pairing SMEs in theAcademic SIG and other S!Gs with students working BoK-relatedresearch{wr~ing projects, centrally administered by the STC Officeusing MentorBoardGeneral virtual mentoring partnerships pairing src professionals withstudents, using MentorBoardRoad 3: Leverage STCs new alliance with Sigma Tau Delta, internationalcollegiate English Honor Society for English majorsRoad 4: Distribute, preview, and work with a comprehensive toolkit onestablishing and sustaining student mentoring programs (book and DVD)5•II•BAgenda• Objective• Approach• Preview of What We Have to Offer• Decision on Approach: One Session or Splinter Sessionsby Topic• Execute Approach• If"Splintered," Reconvene• Wrap-Up• Distribution of Materials (Toolkit)• Q&As, DiscussionApproach• Be interactive• Be flexible• You tell us what you want• And thats where we go. ©Road 1: F2F Student Mentoring Programs:Overview of PresentationLearning about successful mentoring programs pairingSTC geographic with student commuMiesBecoming familiar w~ the benefits such programsrepresent for students, professionals, thecommunities, and the SocietyLearning the basic ingredients of a successful mentoring program andreceiving a "turnkey" package including guidelines, tools, and aworksheet w~ which to initiate and administer a mentoring programExploring the possibilities for forming mentoring programs pairing STCprofessional and student communitiesPaving the way to "win-win-win" partnerships!Detailed Presentation on How to Establishand Sustain F2F Mentoring Programs
    • ••Road 2: F2F Mentoring Programs:7 Key Steps and Checklist/Presentation_ Rnd a student and professional to lead the program._Review "turnkey " source materials and adapt the guidelines,promotionals, and administrative forms to meet your specific needs.Recruit mentors and mentees._Pair them based on information on their applications._Hold an activity-based kickoff meeting to introduce the mentor[mentee pairs andsuggest activities and projectS they may wish to pursue._Have ead1 M&M pair complete a mentor/mentee agreement form identifYing objectivesand activities to fulfill those objectives, as well as SCheduling for future mentoring sessions._Mooitorthe progress of the M&M pairs, encourage them to share experiences, and, ifnecessat), to encourage them to meet or, occasionally, intervene to resolve issues.Step-by-Step WorksheeUCheclist with a "Built-in" TurnkeyToolkit: Everything You Need to Make this Happen!Road 2: Virtual Student Mentoring:Overview, Presentation 2BoK-specific ... successful pilot program atAppalachian StateGeneral ... Academic SIGs plans for a centralizedSTC program for virtual professional-to-studentmentoring relationships beginning with the 2013-2014 academic yearNew MentorBoard program at STC Office is primed for actionNew program can provide oversight for unaffiliated "community-less"STC student members-at-large, including Sigma Tau Delta recruitSDDetailed Presentation on STCs Emerging VirtualProfessional-to-Student Mentoring ProgramsSTD "careers in Technical Communicationfor English Majors" Presentation: Agenda• Technical communication• Skills• Disciplines• career opportunities• Paths to careers in tech comm• Society for Technical Communication• Values• Benefits of membershipBethany Bowies•••Orlando chapter andUCF, Sigma Tau Chi,CAC, Distinguished STCStudent Service AwardRachel Houghton ..Wilamette Valley chapter,former Society secretary,new STC Associate Fellow,being inducted Tuesday!SalaryCharts•II... ..---.,..._....w...---Colif-Road 2: Virtual Student Mentoring:Overview, Presentation 1How a successful trans-Atlantic virtual mentoringpartnership led to:A new student mentoring program pairingthe STC-France chapter with the Universityof ParisA "two-way street" mentoring relationship that has become a long-term professional and personal friendshipThe role of e-mail and social media in virtual mentoringHow to teach an old "dinosaur" new tricks ..Detailed Presentation on Virtual Student MentoringPrograms from 39th CPTSC ConferenceRoad 3: STC/Sigma Tau Delta Alliance:Overview, 2 PresentationsAbout Sigma Tau Delta and its affiliatesBackground on STC/Sigma Tau Delta allianceSTC outreach and presentations at Sigma TauDelta international conference in Portland, OR,March 20-23, 2013Recruitment of new STC student members from Sigma Tau DeltaPresentation on "Careers in Technical Communication for EnglishMajors"Presentation on "Student Mentoring Programs"Full "Careers" and "Mentoring" Presentations for Visitsto STD Chapters and College Tech Com ClassesCompetitive CompensationSalary Comparison Table, Part 1Tedullcalwrlten . -·- ....··- "" """"<N"""""" : """",_..";~HedMtl$11"" 2,1802 2900 62.1K55.21(1,530 47.31( 3,820" 72.21(""·" "2 72.9K" 79.5K 79.7K 7<0 ..... 56.21(" 82.1K 81.5K 1170"-" 56.7K4,o10 38.7K 71.0K...,. ..... ..... .....Data is shown for the 9 states with the highest salaries in technicalwriting, plus the national average.
    • Competitive Compensation (Cont.)Salary Comparison Table, Part 2.......Employed ~n Med~$/Y Employed""""" Employed ~ Hedian$fy2,0001,530 3,450"·" 1,070 53.3k" "" 59.41("" 3,190 62AK1,61() 79.71(·"" " 70.7K 66.3K1,960 81.51( 3860 960 58.7K5,910 8~.1K SO.lK 10,930·" 93.7K 65.2K45120""" "·" ..... ..,,. 68.1K 55.9KThe mean and median salaries for tech writers are much closer than forother writers, reflecting dependable income.•II•Road 4: But Wait! ... Theres More!! ...call Now and Get a Free Turnkey Toolkit!!!Printed reference guide on STC student mentotingprogramsSTC, CPTSC, and Sigma Tau Oelta presentations• F2F and Virtual Student Mentoting Programs• careers in Technical CommunicationArticles on student mentoring from conference Proceedings, intercom,and MySTC• Qescriptions of successful student mentoring programs• Procedural guidelines, "recipes for success"Administrative forms from A to Z ... and much, much more!Accompanying DVD with the e-files for everything in the printed book(including the master printing .pdf with which to reproduce more books)This is a Transition Slide ... ©Road 1: Face-to-face mentoring programs pairing professionals ingeographic chapters with tech com students in a nearby university:partnering with a student chapter, establishing a student chapter, orwithout establishing a student chapter*Road 2: Virtual mentoring programs using STCs new MentorBoardfor pairing: BoK-specific and general mentoring relationships,coordinated by the Academic SIG**Road 3: Sigma Tau Oelta alliance: recruiting English majors as STCstudent members: STCs presentations to STD on "careers in TC" and"Student Mentoring Programs"*Road 4: Toolk~ (printed reference guide&. accompanying DVD)** Complete presentations and materials available in printed reference guide & accompanying DVD.** CPTSC presentation on virtual mentoring available in printed guide and DVD; Academic SIGpresentationoo BoK pilot and plans for virtual mentoring in 2013-2014 will be available assupplementary handouts at Leadership Day (BoK pilot at Appalachian State was still in progressat press time for the toolkit)7•II•STD "Student Mentoring Programs"Presentation: Agenda• Adapting this STC presentation for mentoringprograms within the English curriculum• What is mentoring?• Types of mentoring• Face-to-face mentoring• Virtual mentoring• Why is it a good thing?Bethany Bowles•••Orlando chapter andUCF, Sigma Tau Chi,CAC, Distinguished STCStudent Service AwardDecision Time ...Rachel Houghton ...Winamette VaHey chapter,former Society secretary,new STC Associate Fellow,being inducted Tuesday!• Stay together as a group and do a high-speed flip-through of all these presentations and materials (aglimpse down all 4 roads in the yellow wood ...OR• ... Split up into splinter groups (F2F, virtual, SigmaTau Delta, toolkit), each hiking down 1 roaddeep into the forestSummary• The many ways to tap student "power" to buildyour STC community and your Society• Q&As, discussion• Distribution of turnkey toolkitsIt Doesnt Get Any Better than This! ©
    • So::ier~ forTechnicalCornmunicaticnThank you!• Dan Voss• daniel.w.voss@lmco.com• Bethany Bowles• bethanybowles@gmail.com• Sally Henschel• sally.henschel@mwsu.edu4/10/2013
    • STC Student Mentoring Programs: Investing in the FutureBy Dan Voss and Bethany BowlesMentoring programs pairing professionals in STC sgeographic and virtual communities with studentmembers grant benefits on all sides. Such programsprovide valuable guidance and experience tofuturetechnical communicators as they enter our professionand are immensely gratifying to the mentors as well.Moreover, they encourage student members tobecome more active in the Society, which producesboth short- and long-term benefitsfor thecommunities and the Society. From the very inceptionofsuch programs, the infusion ofenthusiasm, newideas, and new perspectives strengthens thesponsoring communities. And, over the years,mentoringprograms maintain a pipeline offutureleaders at both the community and the Society level.STC s Community Affairs Committee (CAC) has ledan STC Board-mandated special taskforce this yearto strengthen the Societys student constituency andimprove the membership retention rate upongraduation. Mentoring programs constitute a vitalpart ofthat initiative.As she sat staring at her resume, she thought to herself,"The formatting looks really great, and there is certainly agenerous amount of white space." Aside from a smatteringof academic awards and a brief stint working in customerservice, her resume was looking bare. Three years investedin a bachelors degree, she was starting to wonder if shewould even be able to get a job after graduation.At the urging of a classmate, she joined STC as a studentmember, intending to use the membership as a bulletpoint to fill up some of that excessive white space on herresume. At her first STC meeting, she found herself gettingexciting about involvement with the chapter. Joining thementoring program seemed like an obvious way to make asolid connection to help in the future job-hunt. Throughher mentor, she soon found herself caught in a whirlwindof activity: sending emails, writing newsletter articles,taking part in telecoms. While participating with thechapter, she and her mentor also worked on a society-level committee.Before she knew it, she had signed up to help run thementoring program with her university. After just oneface-to-face meeting with her mentor, they began anintense e-mail correspondence to plan and execute asuccessful mentoring program. A few weeks of harrowingactivity and many a shared obstacle later, the mentor andmentee were able to enjoy the fruits of their labors andsee their fellow mentors and mentees begin theirpartnerships.Those ofus who have had the special opportunity toparticipate in a professional or academic mentoringrelationship, whether as mentor or mentee (in somecases, both) have many more inspirational stories likethis one to share. As members ofSTCs CommunityAffairs Committee (CAC) and an STC Board ofDirectors-mandated special task force chartered torevitalize, sustain, and expand our studentconstituency, and as co-managers of a successfulmentoring program pairing professionals in the STCOrlando Central Florida chapter with students at theUniversity of Central Florida, the authors believepassionately in the many benefits to be gained byboth the individuals and the communities involved inmentoring programs. It is therefore no accident thatone ofthe major emphases ofboth the task force andthe CAC this year has been to encourage theformation ofmentoring programs in which STCstudent communities partner with geographic andvirtual communities. As these Proceedings "went topress," the task force was engaged in finding partnersfor IS student communities that have expressed aninterest in participating in a mentoring program. Ourprogress is to be reported as part ofthe CACLeadership Program presentation and activities.So, to get down to brass tacks, four questions arise:I. What, exactly, is a mentoringprogram?2. For that matter, what, exactly, is mentoring?3. Why would an individual STC member(student or professional) or community(geographic, student, or SIG) want toparticipate in a mentoring program? and4. If interested, how would they go aboutestablishing and sustaining such a mentoringprogram?Its logical to address questions #I and 2 in reverseorder. The word "mentoring," as well as the concept,dates to antiquity. Carlos Parada, author ofGenealogical Guide to Greek Mythology, has tracedthe concept ofmentoring back to Greek mythology,finding its roots in the tale ofOdysseus (Figure I).Mentor Athena, Protege Telemachus, Absentee Dad OdysseusFigure 1. Mentoring has its roots in antiquity.
    • Mentor 4 was an old friend of Odysseus. To himOdysseus entrusted his household when he joined thecoalition that sailed against Troy. Athena, assumingseveral times the shape ofMentor 4, became theguide of Odysseus son Telemachus, giving himprudent counsel. Since then, wise and trusted advisershave been called "mentors." 13 TYPES OF MENTORINGFast forwarding from antiquity to today, mentoringrelationships within the technical communicationprofession exist in three basic "configurations":1. Within industry, pairing an experiencedpractitioner with an entry-level member ofthe profession;2. Within academe, pairing a faculty memberwith a student (not in his/her class); and3. Bridging the two,pairing a professionalpractitioner with astudent.GUIDELINES FORMENTORINGCertain guidelines characterize mentoringrelationships, differentiating them from other types ofrelationships within industry or academe.The two key requirements for establishinga mentor-protege [mentee] relationship are(1) to pair a skilled (senior) professionalwith a novice and (2) to make sure that therelationship is outside formal channels ofsupervision and evaluation. Cross-trainingamong peers is not mentoring per se;mentoring implies a senior-juniorrelationship.In industry, its very important that the[mentee] not report to the mentor withinthe organization; a supervisor who isresponsible for an employees personnelappraisals and career advancement cannotalso fulfill the role ofconfidante andadvisor. A mentor-[mentee] relationshiprequires a special trust and candidcommunication; indeed, one ofthe subjectsthe [mentee] is likely to want to discuss isthe relationship with the supervisor!In academe, the mentor-[mentee]relationship needs to be outside thetraditional professor-to-student framework.A professor certainly can be an effective10mentor, but not ifthe student is--or willbe--in his/her class during the period ofmentorships. Issuing grades, just likegiving personnel appraisals, isincompatible with a mentor-[mentee]relationship.2Returning to the first question (what, exactly, is amentoring program?), the type ofmentoring programthe CAC and the task force are encouraging fallsprimarily in the third configuration: pairingprofessional technical communicators with students(Figure 2), although as a subset ofthe presentinitiative, the Academic SIG and a proposed studentSIG will be encouraging mentoring relationshipsbetween Academic SIG members (most ofwhom arefaculty members) and students not in their classes(perhaps not even in their university), which wouldfall into the second configuration, mentoringrelationships with academe. Mentoring relationshipswithin industry (configuration #1) are not the focusofthe current initiative, which certainly isnt to sayencouraging such relationships within a geographicor virtual STC community would not be beneficial.Figure 2. In Year 1 ofthe mentoring program in Orlando,mentors and mentees met via a "treasure hunt" routing themaround campus to rendez-vous points.Within the CAC/task force initiative, we see twobasic types ofmentoring programs developingbetween nearby and remote communities,respectively:1. Pairing STC student communities withnearby geographic communities-anapproach which typically, although notalways and certainly not entirely, tends tofocus onface-to-face interaction betweenmentors and mentees;and2. Pairing unaffiliated student STC members ormembers ofstudents that are not locatednear a geographic community with membersofthe Academic SIG, another SIG, or evenprofessionals in a remote geographicchapter-and approach which, by definition,focuses entirely, or nearly entirely, onvirtual mentoring.
    • A word about face-to-face versus virtual mentoring.Our experience with the STC Orlando CentralFlorida/University of Central Florida (UCF)mentoring program has taught us the importance ofregular face-to-face communication in developing atrusting and fruitful mentor-mentee ("M&M" forshort) relationship. After establishing our M&Mpairs, we introduce the partners face to face via anactivity-oriented, get-to-know-you kickoff meeting(Figure 3), as did the STC France chapter in kickingoff its mentoring program with the University ofParis 7- Diderot (Figure 4).Figure 3. At the latest STC-Orlando Central Florida/UCFmentorinq kick-off event, mentors and mentees bonded overpottery painting.Figure 4. The M&M pair-ups in the STC France/University of Parisprogram took place at a conference.We encourage M&Ms to meet regularly, typicallyonce a month, whether it be over lunch, at a coffeeshop, after a chapter meeting, or perhaps in a jobshadowing activity. We have found that in almostevery case, M&Ms who communicate regularlyface-to-face have productive and mutually satisfyingmentoring relationships.However, in all cases communication via othermedia, particularly e-mail, has also helped nurture thementoring relationships. And weve also had severalcases where very successful mentoring relationshipshave developed even though face-to-face contact waslimited and most ofthe communication came viae-mail.Virtual mentoring relationships can be highlysuccessful. This was the topic of a panel discussion atthe Academic SIG-sponsored workshop precedingthe 39th annual meeting ofthe Council for Programsin Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC)in October 2011 at James Madison University inHarrisonburg, VA (Figure 5).I (Figure 5. The social media have created new avenues ofcommunication for virtual mentoring.VIRTUAL MENTORINGAlthough the primary initial focus ofthe CAC andthe task force has been on pairing up studentcommunities with nearby geographic communities toform mutually beneficial partnerships and mentoringprograms, task force member Sally Henschel ofMidwestern State University is spearheading aneffort by the Academic SIG to sponsor a virtualmentoring program for student STC members.The STC Academic SIG is working toestablish an international sub-SIGforstudent members ofSTC. The objective ofthe international Student SIG is to provide acommunity in which all STC studentmembers can interact andparticipate, boththose who are members ofa student chapterand those who are not. Establishing aStudent SIG also will helpfacilitatecommunication between STC staff,geographic chapter members, and studentmembers. In addition, the Student SIG canfacilitate contact between students andpractitioners through opportunities such asa virtual mentoringprogram.--Sally Henschel, Midwestern State U.Academic SIG Student LiaisonWithout a doubt, it is possible to build and sustain avirtual mentoring relationship using media such as e-mail, instant messenger, telephone, Skype, and thevarious social media. Examples ofsuch successfulpartnerships abound (Figure 6).Figure 6. Trans-Atlantic virtual mentoring works!Having meet face-to-face only once, at the STCconference in Atlanta in 2009, Clio Fouque and DanVoss formed a successful and mutually enrichingtrans-Atlantic mentoring relationship via e-mail; andClio and Ray Gallon ofthe STC France chapter
    • established a flourishing mentoring program with theUniversity ofParis. Ray spoke to the importance ofvirtual mentoring when dealing with geographicremote stakeholders:France covers a lot ofterritory. We havemembers in STC France all over thecountry. The students, although allfromthe same Paris university, alternate everytwo weeks between class and internship.When on internship, they can also bespread almost anywhere. It was obviousfrom the startfor us, that some ofthementoringprocess would have to bevirtual. As it turns out, we had one mentorin Germany, one in Holland, and anotherin the United States. All ofthese virtualrelationships turned out to befulfilling andsuccessfulfor mentors and mentees,proving that distance is no hindrance togood mentoring.--Ray Gallon President, STC FranceChapter and Board ofDirectors, STCA WIN-WIN-WIN SITUATIONReturning to the third question: why would an STCgeographic community or SIG want to investprecious volunteer time to establish and sustain amentoring program with a student community orindividual students?The answer is clear: there is an enormous return onsuch an investment in the form ofmanifold benefitsto the sponsoring community, the studentcommunity, the Society, and-above all-theindividual mentors and mentees. The precise natureofthe benefits vary according to the type (primarilyface-to-facer or primarily virtual) and uniquecharacteristics of each mentoring program, but thebenefits realized by the participating individuals andcommunities in the STC Orlando Central Floridachapter IUCF program are typical (Table 1).Table 1. A mentoring program is a triple-win situation,benefitting mentors, mentees, and their organizations.••Gain personal satisfaction helping others reach theirpotentialEnhance coachi skills(}..,• Gain exposure to new perspectives, new media•• Strengthen student communities by partnering withprofessionalsStrengthen professional communities with new ideasand leadership• Provide a boost in volunteer labor as mentors andmentees work together on projects to benefit boththeir communities and the SocietyIncrease retention rate of STC student membershipsupon graduationIncrease attendance at chapter meetings and/orinvolvement in virtual activities {SIGs)Leverage academe/industry partnerships• Groom STCs leaders of tomorrowHaving addressed the "why" offorming mentoringprograms, the logical conclusion is to address the"how." As it turns out, we hope, this yearsconference-specifically, the Leadership Program-will be an important part ofthe "how" in theCAC/task force initiative to help STC communitiesform win-win-win professional-to-student mentoringpartnerships.The logistics of forming mentoring programs is thesubject ofa progression table in the SundayLeadership Program as well as informal discussionsthat afternoon and hands-on work sessions onWednesday afternoon. The authors will come"armed" with a turnkey toolkit ofguidelines andadministrative forms we use to govern and implementthe STC Orlando Central Florida/UCF mentoringprogram. The material will be available both on CDand in hard copy at the progression, in thediscussions, at the work sessions, and at "STCCentral." Its also available on the STC OrlandoCentral Florida chapter web site, at http://www.stc-orlando.org/education/mentor/mentor.asp. We encourage ourcolleagues who are interested in forming a mentoringprogram to make use ofthese resources, which aresummarized in Table 2.Table 2. Dont reinvent the wheel! These materials can readily beadapted to your mentoring program.STC guidelines for mentoring programs• Specific program guidelines and procedures• Specific program summary••••History of a successful mentoring programMentee application formMentor application formMentee summary form (for making pairings)Mentor summa form
    • ••••Mentor/mentee agreement form (goals, objectives,activities)Suggested mentor/mentee (M&M) activities andprojectsMentor/mentee contact logLink to a typical mentor/mentee Facebook pageMentee pre-assessment formMentor pre-assessment formMentee post-assessment form• Mentor post-assessment form• Mentee program evaluation• Mentor program evaluationWe believe youll find these materials can be adaptedto meet the unique requirements and circumstances ofyour program. By not "reinventing the wheel,"youll free up the professional and studentcoordinators ofyour program to focus on recruitingand pairing the mentors and mentees, kicking off, andmonitoring the program, rather than creating forms.The forms that STC Orlando Central Floridaprovided usfrom its mentoring program withUniversity ofCentral Florida were easy toadaptfor our needs. Clio Fouque and Isimply had to tweak a few phrases here andthere, add afew questions andremove afewothersfrom the questionnaires, andwe wereready to go. It took us less than a week tohave all the documents up andrunning.--Ray GallonSpeaking ofprogram coordinators, they areunquestionably the two essential ingredients informing a successful mentoring program. Pair up aprofessional and a student who are motivated tocreate such a program and willing to put in a shortburst (about 2 months) of initial effort followed by amuch lower level of follow-up "maintenance," andyou will have a successful mentoring program.Absent either one ofthose two ingredients, and youwon t-its just that simple.Weve had a couple "lean" years in the otherwiserobust STC Orlando Central Florida/UCF mentoringprogram, and both times that was because we lackedone ofthose two ingredients. In each case, we foundthe missing leader the following year and theprogram once again flourished.A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS ...Table 3 offers a capsule "recipe" for successfullybaking a fruitful professional/student mentoringprogram from scratch. Try it! Youll find this recipebrings enormous benefits both to the partneringorganizations and to the partnering mentors andmentees.I)Table 3. Establishing a mentoring program is a straightforwardprocess. This pattern has workedfor a number ofcommunities.•Professional coordinator and student coordinatorrecruit mentors and mentees.Mentors and mentees submit applications identifyingtheir areas of SME and interest, respectively, plussome other information.• Coordinators compile information on the "M&M"applications onto the mentor/mentee summary forms.• Using the information on these two forms as well astheir personal knowledge of the M&Ms, thecoordinators make the pairings (note that thecoordinators often, but not always, are an M&M pairthemselves). Weve done it successfully both ways, butthe former does have advantages.• The coordinators plan a kickoff meeting to introducethe M&Ms and give a brief overview on the mentoringprocess (note that we have only done this face-to-face,but Ray Gallon can explain how the STC France chapterkicked off some of the pairings virtually).• Pre-kickoff orientation materials for the M&Msinclude the STC guidelines for mentoring programs, theguidelines for your specific program, a capsulesummary of that program, and, if you wish, the articleabout how the STC-Orlando/UCF mentoring programwas established and sustained.• The M&Ms work together at the kickoff meeting (orwhatever process is used) to complete thementor/mentee agreement, wherein they establishtheir objectives for a specified period (generally 2semesters), the activities by which they plan to pursuethose objectives, and sign a confidentiality agreement(the coordinators, of course, are also bound byconfidentiality as they work with the M&Ms thru theyear).• If you want "metrics" to help you improve and growyour program from year to year, have the M&Mssubmit a quick and simple pre-assessment form duringthe kickoff meeting.• The coordinators track the activities between theM&Ms either by asking for periodic submittals of thecontact log, establishing and monitoring a Facebookgroup, or whatever works best. Its important to issueoccasional reminders because busy people dosometimes tend to start enthusiastically and then getovercome by events. A mentoring relationships needstime and communication to develop.The coordinators encourage F2F contact wherepossible, although successful virtual mentoring hasbeen demonstrated as well.• They also encourage mutual projects such as the oneslisted in the form "M&M Tasks." In the best of worlds,it is sometimes possible for such projects to satisfyboth a task needed by the sponsoring geographicchapter and a course assignment for the student. Suchprojects also make terrific portfolio items for students.Working together on projects enhances the mentoringexperience on both sides.• If you want metrics, have the M&Ms complete a quickand simple post-assessment and program evaluation atthe end of the year.• Occasionally, where the mentee is a junior, the M&Msopt to extend their relationship for a year. They shouldhave that option. Its only happened maybe a halfdozen times in Orlando, but each time it did, greatresulted.
    • "I got coffee for you, but I am going with Coke myself."Surrounded by stacks of files full of papers, the studentreflected on how much her life had changed since startingthe mentoring partnership. On top of working together onthe Community Affairs Committees Student Outreach taskforce, the mentor and mentee pair was starting thearduous task of co-authoring a chapter in a book undercontract for commercial/academic publication.While the student had first joined STC for purelymercenary reasons, she found that she was rewarded withmore than a resume bullet point: a variety of non-academic projects for her portfolio, a greaterunderstanding how the world of industry functions, aflourishing partnership and friendship with her mentor,and a firm dedication to STC.ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThe authors would like to express our appreciation toour colleagues on the Student Outreach Task Force,the CAC, and the CAC Outreach Team, withoutwhose dedication and hard work the progressreported in this paper and at the conference wouldnever have been possible.REFERENCES1. Parada, Carlos. "Telemachus,"Genealogical Guide to Greek Mythology,http://www.maicar.com/GMLI2. Allen, Lori, and Voss, Dan. Ethics inTechnical Communication: Shades ofGray,John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1997, pp.293-4.ABOUT THE AUTHORSDan Voss is co-lead for theCommunity Affairs Committeesstudent outreach initiative and leadsthe task force established by the STCBoard ofDirectors to implement thatinitiative. He delivered the industrykeynote at the Academic SIG-sponsored workshop preceding the39th annual conference ofthe Councilfor Programs in Technical and ScientificCommunication (CPTSC) on the theme"Academy/Industry Relationships and Partnerships." A34-year aerospace veteran as a proposal contentspecialist for Lockheed Martin and an adjunct instructorfor Webster University, Voss is an STC Fellow whose23 years include leadership roles in the STC OrlandoCentral Florida Chapter, the Academic andAccessAbility SIGs, and the Ethics and StrategicPlanning committees. In Orlando, he co-manages thesuccessful mentoring program pairing chapterprofessionals with technical communication students atthe University ofCentral Florida and has assisted otherSTC communities in establishing similar programs.With Lori Allen, he co-authored the textbook Ethics inTechnical Communication: Shades ofGray (John Wileyand Sons, 1997) and is the only non-engineer to winLockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Controls covetedAuthor-of-the-Year Award.Bethany Bowles is a second-year member of STC, whereshe is a Sigma Tau Chihonoree, and a graduatingsenior and incoming graduatestudent at the University ofCentral Florida (UCF), whereshe is vice president oftheSigma Tau Delta- Zeta Xichapter (English Honor Society), and works as themanager ofthe Tech Writing Lab. She is currentlyserving on STCs Community Affairs Committee as co-lead ofthe student outreach initiative and serves on thetask force established by the STC Board ofDirectors toimplement that initiative. As a student member oftheSTC Orlando Central Florida Chapter, she co-managesthe chapters mentoring program pairing professionalswith student STC members in the Future TechnicalCommunicators, a UCF-sponsored organization. Sheand her mentor, Dan Voss, are co-authoring a chapter onthe ethics of intercultural communication in a soon-to-be-published instructors guide for teaching interculturalcommunication to engineers, scientists, and students ofengineering and science. A gifted writer, poised leader,and talented organizer on the threshold ofher career as atechnical communicator, Bethany is clearly one ofSTCs rising stars.
    • 1. Within industry: pairing anexperienced practitionerwith an entry-levelmember of the profession·· Within academe: pairing afaculty member with astudent andBridgingthe Two). Pairing a professionalpractitionerwith a studentLearning about successful m 1geographic and virtual communitiescommunities• Becomingfamiliar with the benefits such programsrepresent for students, professionals, the communities,and the SocietyLearning the basic ingredients of a successful mentoringprogram and receiving a "turnkey" package includingguidelines and tools with which to initiate and administer amentoringprogram~ Exploring the possibilitiesforforming mentoring programspairing STC professional and student communitiesPaving the way to "win-win-win" partnerships!MentorAthena, Protege Telemachus, Absentee Dad OdysseusMentoring is a Key IngredientSTC Community Affairs Committee (CAC)0
    • STC-Orlando Central FloridaChapterFTC at the University ofCentral Florida~TECHNICAl:COMMUNICATORSE,,Orlando-UCF France-University of ParisThe STC Academic SIG is working to establish an internationalsub-SIG for student members of STC. The objective of theinternational Student SIG is to provide a community in which allSTC student members can interact and participate, both thosewho are members of a student chapter and those who are not.Establishing a Student SIG also will help facilitatecommunication between STC staff, geographic chaptermembers, and student members. In addition, the Student SIGcan facilitate contact between students and practitionersthrough opportunities such as a virtual mentoring program.-Sally Henschel, Midwestern State U.Academic SIG Student LiaisonMentee BenefitsDevelop networks, increasevisibilityReceive career guidance and jobsearch tipsPolish specialized skills" Prepare for the move fromacademe to industryEnhance skills for careeradvancement
    • Mentor BenefitsGain personal satisfactionhelping others reach theirpotentialEnhance coaching, feedback,leadership skills" Gain exposure to newperspectives, new mediaExpand professional networksGet help on STC projectsCombine equal proportions ofmentees and mentorsSeason with guidelines andturnkey administrative toolsMix we!!" Bake for one academic yearGarnish with job placementicing17Society forTechnicalCommunicationStrengthen student communities bypartnering with professionalsStrengthen professional communitieswith new ideas and leadershipLeverage volunteer labor as M&Mscollaborate on projects to benefittheir communities and the SocietyIncrease retention rate of graduatingSTC student membersIncrease attendance at chaptermeetings and involvement in SIGsBridge industry and academeGroom STCs leaders of tomorrowSpecific program guidelines andproceduresSummary of successful programsMentor/mentee (M&M)application formsM&M summary form (for makingpairings)M&M agreementform (goals,objectives, activities)Suggested M&M activities andprojects... and MORE!
    • ,, Objectives Expectations Activities Schedule" Communication channelsUpdate the mentees resume to present his/her abilities andexperience to future employers; conduct a mock job interviewWork together to create a portfolio for the mentee to use when job-hunting" Arrange a job-shadowing visit for the mentee to learn more aboutthe workplacePost what projects you are up to on the Facebook page to sharewith everyone!Review a technical book or guide for newsletterPreview the upcoming STC annual conference by highlighting apresentation being done by local membersContact Log Facebook Group* Job-shadowing* Resume and portfolio assessment, interviewingskills" Jungle training for corporate AmericaJoint projectsLife lessons*"Reverse" mentoring (mentee teaches mentor)... happens a lot!Write a short review of one or more web sites that would interest orhelp readersCreate a short, engaging article that teaches a grammar and/ormechanics point- creative formatting encouraged!Join an STC SIG in an area of mutual interest and participate in a SIC-related project together.Use the social media (e.g., IM, texting, Facebook, Skype, or evenasynchronouscolor-coded 11e-mail ping-pong"*) to engage in some real-time 11chats" from time to time to get to know each other betterandshare ideas.*Dont ask.
    • PrivacyHistory of successful mentoring programsMentor/mentee{M&M) application formsM&M summary forms (for making pairings)ConfidentialityM&M agreement form (goals, objectives, activities)Suggested M&M activities and projectsM&M contact logLink to typical M&M Facebook pageM&M pre~assessmentformsM&M post-assessmentfonnsM&M program evaluation formDan Vossdanie!,w.•v.o.ss@lmco..comSkills learned/taught* Preparedness for the jobmarket/tips conveyed* Confidence for jobhunting/experience incoaching,, Satisfaction with program(from both sides)Bethany Bowlesbf~thanybowies@gmaH.co.m
    • ~-SocietyforTechnicalCommunicationInvestintheFuture...SponsoranSTCStudentMentoringProgram!(Update)ReferenceGuideandTurnkeyToolkitPresentedbyDanVossandBethanyBowlesLeadershipDay60thAnnualSTCInternationalConference:TheSummitMay5,2013,Atlanta,GA(UpdateofPresentationinLeadershipProgramat59thSTCSummit,May20-23,2012,Rosemont,IL)I.flcKHEED1111ABT~11
    • .,..,)-JSocietyforTechnicalCommunicationWorksheetonStudentMentoringProgramsDanVossandBethanyBowlesCACCo-LeadsforStudentOutreachKeySteps__Findastudentandprofessionaltoleadtheprogram.__Review"turnkey"sourcematerialsandadapttheguidelines,promotionals,andadministrativeformstomeetyourspecificneeds.Recruitmentorsandmentees.--__Pairthembasedoninformationontheirapplications.__Holdanactivity-basedkickoffmeetingtointroducethementor/menteepairsandsuggestactivitiesandprojectstheymaywishtopursue.__HaveeachM&Mpaircompleteamentor/menteeagreementformidentifyingobjectivesandactivitiestofulfillthoseobjectives,aswellasschedulingforfuturementoringsessions.__MonitortheprogressoftheM&Mpairs,encouragethemtoshareexperiences,and,ifnecessary,toencouragethemtomeetor,occasionally,intervenetoresolveissues.
    • "P~SocietyforTechnicalCommunicationDetailedProceduresE-FilePrefixActionPart1-BackgroundReadingMaterialsA"HarnessingStudentPowertoJet-PropelYourCommunity:Part1:BacktoBasics,"ProgressionPresentation,LeadershipDay,GOthSTCInternationalConferenceB"HarnessingStudentPowertoJet-PropelYourCommunity:PartII:BuildingonBasics,"WorkshopPresentation,LeadershipDay,60thSTClntlConferencec"STCStudentMentoringPrograms:InvestingintheFuture,"Proceedings,sgthSTCInternationalConferenceD"STCStudentMentoringPrograms:InvestingintheFuture,"ProgressionPresentation,LeadershipProgram,sgthSTCConferenceE"InvestintheFuture...SponsoranSTCStudentMentoringProgram!(Update),"OverviewPresentationon"Toolkit"forSTCStudentMentoringPrograms(PrintedReferenceGuideandDVD),LeadershipDay,60thSTClntlConferenceF"TheresVirtueinVirtual...orAnOldDinosaurLearnsNewTricks,"PanelPresentation,AcademicSIG-SponsoredWorkshopPreceding39thAnnualMeetingoftheCPTSC,October2011G"CoachingOnline:STCsEmergingVirtualProfessional-to-StudentMentoringPrograms,"LeadershipDay,60thSTCInternationalConferenceComplete
    • Cj-)-t.SocietyforTechnicalCommunicationDetailedProceduresE-FilePrefixActionPart1-BackgroundReadingMaterialsH"CareersinTechnicalCommunicationforEnglishMajors,"STCPresentationatSigmaTauDeltaInternationalConference,March2013.I"StudentMentoringPrograms,"STCPresentationatSigmaTauDeltaInternationalConference,March2013.J"2012:{YearoftheStudentMemberinSTC!",CACBlogPost,January2012K"STCandMentoring,"intercom,April2011,pg.46L*"BridgingtheGapBetweenIndustryandAcademe,"Proceedings,52ndSTCConference(describingthestart-upoftheSTC-Orlando/UCFmentoringprogram)M"UnProgrammedeMentoratInternational?MaisOui,CestPossible!Absolument!",Proceedings,57thSTCConference(describinghowatrans-AtlanticvirtualmentoringrelationshiphelpedSTC-FranceestablishamentoringprogramwiththeUniversityofParis)N"ReachingAcrosstheAtlantic:AnInternationalMentoringInitiative,"ProgressionPresentation,57thSTCConference0*"GuidelinesforMentoringPrograms,"STCPublication#AD-109-02,2002CompleteI
    • -V)SocietyforTechnicalCommunicationDetailedProceduresE-FilePrefixActionPart2-Step-by-StepProcedureforEstablishingandSustainingaStudentMentoringProgrampWorksheet/ChecklistforleadershipProgramWorkshop,59thSTCConferenceQ11TheTwoEssentialIngredientsforaSuccessfulMentoringProgram"R11STCStudentMentoringPrograms:InvestingintheFuture,"One-PageCapsuleSummary,leadershipProgram,59thSTCConferences11RecipeforSuccess...MentoringPrograms"T11Step-by-StepProceduresforInitiatingandSustainingaMentoringProgram"u11STCOrlandoChapter/FTC(UCF)MentoringProgramGuidelinesandProcedures,2011-2012"v*11TheMentoringProgram,2011-2012,"CapsuleSummaryonOrlandoChapterWebSitew110PERATION9-9-9:OurMentoringProgramNeedsYou,"PromotionalonChapterlistservRecruitingMentorsandMenteesX11MentoringProgramOfftoRousingStartin9thYear,"ArticleinChapterNewsletter,MemotoMembers,DescribingKickoffMeeting,November2011yMentorApplication(skillset,interests,preferredteachingapproach)z*MentorApplication(alternateformat)------Complete
    • ,._,"SocietyforTechnicalCommunicationDetailedProceduresE-FilePrefixActionPart2-Step-by-StepProcedureforEstablishingandSustainingaStudentMentoringProgramZAMentorSummary(compilationofdatafrommentorapplications,usedforpairingmentorsandmentees)ZBMentorSummary(alternateformat)zcMenteeApplication(skillstobeexpanded,interests,preferredlearningstyle)ZD*MenteeApplication(alternateformat)ZEMenteeSummary(compilationofdatafrommenteeapplications,usedforpairingmenteesandmentors)ZFMenteeSummary(alternateformat)ZGuMentorKick-offMeetingAvailability"(survey:schedulingtoolforsettingupkickoffmeetingwithgoalof100%attendance)ZH*Mentor/MenteeAgreement(forestablishingobjectives,activitiesviawhichtopursuethoseobjectives,andaplanformeeting)Zl(IM&MBondingMoments"(listofsuggestedactivitiesandprojects)ZJMenteePre-AssessmentForm(forprogrammetricsandrefinement)ZKMentorPre-AssessmentForm(forprogrammetricsandrefinement)---------···--·-···-·---.------Complete
    • ~--.1SocietyforTechnicalCommunicationE-FilePrefixDetailedProceduresActionCompletePart2-Step-by-StepProcedureforEstablishingandSustainingaStudentMentoringProgramZLContactLog(mentorsandmenteesrecorddatesofmeetingsaswellassignificantphonecallsore-mailexchanges,topicsofdiscussion,andactivitiesZMFacebookGroup(informalalternativeorsupplementtocontactlog)ZNMenteePost-AssessmentzoMenteeProgramEvaluationZPMentorPost-AssessmentZQMentorProgramEvaluation*AlsoavailableonOrlando-STCCentralFloridawebsite,athttp://www.stc-orlando.org/education/mentor/mentor.aspALOCHEEDMARTIN~
    • Theres Virtue in Virtual orAn Old Dinosaur Can Learn New Tricks!Presented at the 39111 Annual CPTSC MeetingDan VossLockheed Martin Missiles and Fire ControlPanel on "Virtual Mentoring and Internships"Pre-Conference Workshop Sponsored by STCs Academic SIGHosted by James Madison UniversityOctober 6, 2011Trudging off to the Tar PitsAnd Then ... Came ... the COMPUTER!FAgenda• Ruminations of an old fossil• Why computers are evil• Why text messaging is evil• Why social media are evil• A virtual epiphany• An old dinosaur learns new tricks• A trans-Atlantic virtual mentoring program• Whats next?Ah, Those Were the Days ...... and the Internet
    • Twitter, twitterTweet, tweet, tweet;The social mediaCant be beat."C= CryingE-E-E-E .... Mail!!!; lo: lao:.l@~.CJ19;.-rOomaktf:Ja,,.gi!>:""1~.a.....t;;::·l::::···""ROTFC*MAOWiki,wiki,Blog, blog, blog;Bubbling tar pits,There we jog.... Textingnrr,.•MySpace, Facebook,Text, text, textWeve killed the language;What comes next?Alas! ... the Social Media!You(Bflickr..:The Epiphany... and Then ... I Saw the Light ...
    • ... IM-ing... and then ... Virtual MentoringMentor and Mentee Meet in Atlanta Sharing Pictures ...II• The serendipity factor• An instant alliance• A new trans-Atlantic relationship• A new trans-Atlantic pilot programAn International Mentoring Relationship is Born! ... Across the OceanSharing Thoughts ... Sharing Successes ...• A successful job interview!• A successful soutenance! *• A successful new mentoring program!*Defense of masters thesis."A Walk in the Country" And Above All ... TRUST!30
    • A New Mentoring Program is BornClio and Ray Gallon Recruit Menteesat the University of Paris 7 in January 201 0Mission Accomplished ...Managers of New Mentoring Program, Ray Gallon and Clio FouqueMaybe Dinosaurs Can Fly ...® @ ©3{Mentors and Mentees Finally Meet ...... at the Content Strategy Forum in Paris, April 16, 2010The Orlando Mentoring Program ...... Adds Facebook!Ground Zero: "Hey, this Facebook thing actually works ...I think ... did anybody getthis?" ..Oan3 minutes later. "I got it!" -Rachael5 minutes later: "facebook Ninja!" -Bethany
    • wJ...JSocietyforTechnicalCommunicationPlaceholderPage.Thispresentationwasnotcompleteatpresstime.AprintedhandoutwillbedistributedatLeadershipDayforinsertionintothisbook.Forthe.pptfileofthispresentation,contactsally.henschel@mwsu.edu.CoachingOnline:STCsEmergingVirtualProfessional-to-StudentMentoringProgramsPresentedbySallyHenschelLeadershipDay60thAnnualSTCInternationalConference:TheSummitMay5,2013,Atlanta,GAI.0CIfIIIIIID1111ARTIN*Cf
    • Careers in TechnicalCommunication for English Majors····---········--- ·······-·.0··--···---··----··---·RACHEL HOUGHTON ANDBETHANY BOWLESPresentation for the Sigma Tau Delta International ConferenceMarch 21, 2013Technical Communication is ...····---··--·-······--····-·······-·--··-····--0}-·-----·----··---• Communicating about technical or specialized topics interms the layperson can understand• Communicatingby using technology, includingemerging new media• Providing instructions about how to do somethingCreativityQ• Visual design• Photo• Video• Technical illustration33HAgenda~• Technical communicationo Skillso Disciplineso Career opportunitieso Paths to careers in tech comm• Society for Technical Communicationo Valueso Benefits of membershipSkills·-·--·····-····----·······--····- ·····---·--···------··-0 -····-----·- ····--····-·····-·---·······--·-····-• Core skills in writing and editing• Creative page design• Photographyand videography• Technical illustration• International communication: "Global English" for non-native-English speakers and for translation• Training and education• Web and IT skillsWriting~"Tech writing? Yccch! Bor-r-r-r-ing!""Not so. The days of Tina theBrittle Technical Communicatorin Dilbert are gone! Newtechnologies bring newexcitement in exercisingtraditional skills."1
    • Linguistics and International CommunicationgSouroe http //WWW news comeU edujstonesfDectz/L>nguosbcsOutreach htmlRhetorical (Audience) Analysis··<0>• The basic principles of rhetoric apply to business communicationas well as to literature and the arts:o Researchyour marketo Know your readers/viewersWeb/IT Skills-©• Opportunities for bothanalytical and creativetechnical writing andmarketing communication• Web site content anddesign• Blogs• Wikis• Social media• IT expertise forcollaborative writingenvironmentsl31Education and Trainingg• Training is much morethan manuals!o Online rhetorico Tutorialso Web-based instructiono TextbooksoNewmediaCollaborationg• Teamwork is critical in technical communication• Collaborative writing is the norm in the field• Your communication skills also posture you well forleadership in collaborative teams in the workplace1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - · - - - - - - - -Disciplines··- --------- ------ ------- ---- ------------- 0;--- ----~-------------------•Technical writing and editing•Hardware and software documentation•Technical marketing communication (e.g., proposals, brochures)·Scientific writing (and "ghost writing")•Medical writing•Grant proposals•Web design• Usability and accessibility·Indexing• Information/knowledge management• Instructional design
    • Interdisciplinary Approach0An interdisciplinaryapproach is essential tosuccessful technical communication, because theprofession spans so many disciplines.Traditional Tech Writingo-1• Instructions forinstalling, maintaining,and repairing hardware• Instructions on how toproperly use software• Detailed manufacturingprocess plans• User manuals foreverything from toastersto automobiles• Medical reports andresearch articlesAerospace & Industry~• Pr~;~alsto capt~;ene~! busmess• Technical reports andpresentations• Marketing collateral toattract new customers• Multi-media presentations• Web site content anddesign• Internal policies andprocedures• Employee communications• Media relations• Community relations3)Tech Writing/EditingQl• Hardware and software documentation• Policies and procedures• Textbooks• Proposals• Marketing collateral• Video scripts• Magazine articles• Copy editing for publishersResearch·······~• Pure• Applied• Research and writingwithin the field oftechnical communication• Collaborative writingwith SMEs researchingwithin their specialtyiAdvertising & Marketing Communications···········································©• Advertising across multiple !media !o Printo RadiooTVo Billboardso Websiteso Social media• Diverse marketing collateralo Brochureso Flyerso Fact sheetso Trade show graphicsa Narrated videoo Websites
    • Writing for Non-Profits"~i • Grant proposals• Fund-raising collaterals• Literature for those whoare served by the non-profits• Web site design, content,and maintenance• Empathy andcommitmentGaming• Game designersiQ)• Documentation writersand designers• Strategy guide writers• Promotional writersExcellent article in SfCs intercom magazine:http•!ljntdey stc.oN/2012/01 lits-all-in-the-game-technical-communications-role-in-game-~iTap Core Skills"Writingaccuratelyl> Writingclearlyl> Writing conciselyl> Writing coherentlyl> Writing creativelygl> Tapping diverse medial> Crossingboundaries and culturesHealthcaregi • Editing or ghost-writingarticles by physicians formedical journals• Patient-orientedweb sitesi • Flyers describing illnesses and treatments, fordoctors offices• Medical transcription• Instructions forprescription medication• Marketing collaterals andweb sites for for-profithospitals, pharmaceuticalcompanies, etc.Career Opportunities0;•Technical communication spans many disciplines ~ thejob market is huge·Unless technology stands still, it will always be a growthmarket• Companies are beginning to realize that poor writing andpoor communication hurt their bottom line• Solving that problem taps into your core skills as EnglishmajorsGrowing Job MarketgGeograJ:!hical Distribution ofJobs in Technical CommunicationThere are 45,000+ technical writers in the U.S.!
    • Competitive Compensation0Salary Comparison Table, Part 1TeclmlcaiWriten< PubllcRdatlonsSEmployed Median Employed Employ«!. . . . 6<}.6K 74.5K 5&> 38.5K 324K 2,180 ss.6KM• hmd"" 69-7K 9.0K o.7K·"" 70.7KN~ 71-1K 65.3K 43.8K 38.61(" "~7t.SK 67.7K 47.3K 42.9K 3.82Q 64.6KConnecticut w 71.7K 72.2K"40.8K" "";<>4KVI ... 2,880 76-3K 72.9K""419K 5-0K 700 ">· K1,610 7>· K 79.7K 444K N4K ..,. 59.3K·"" 82.1K 81-5K 64.1K K·44K 4,010 48-5K 38.7K 71.0K.K .6K .K M. KData is shown for the 9 states with the highest salaries in technical writing,plus the national average.Median.52.2K55.2K""s6.6K62.6K56.2K56.7K62.6K1----------------·-----------·---------------Tech Writing Salaries Around the U.S.-··0·Tech Writing Salaries in Major Metropolitan AreasThe higher the concentration of technology and industry, the higher the salaries.On-the-Job Training0Before tech writing programs appeared inuniversities, "O.Tr" was the only path to acareer in technical communication- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1?7Competitive Compensation (Cont.)~Salary Comparison Table, Part 2Technical Writers WritersandAntborsEJnployedM~Employed~~~~..... """"Median$/• •Ore.,., 6<].61( 74-SK 52-.SK 4K 5l!.7KMo land 70.0K 6<).7K"" 55.2K nsK "-N•w 71.1K 65.3K 51.oK 464K 51.3K 48.1KHampl!lhlre?t.sK 67.7K"- ,58.2K 1.0;><;> 57-SkConnecticut qK 72.2K 4K 6,61("" 6 .SKVI I• 76.3K 72.9K 59.BK 55.2K 1,640" K ].OK"· K79.7K,,., 64.oK ss.sK" :m.K 66.3KS:uK·"" 6s.sK ""K""65.9K 58.7KCallfon>la" K 8o.1K Oo. K , K 9 .]K 6 .2Ku.s. 4512.0 6 .6K ...... 6o.5K 52•4K 68.1K 55·9KThe mean and median salaries for tech writers are much closer than for other writers,reflecting dependable income.Paths to Careers in Tech CommDegree Programs• B.A. in tech comm• M.A. in tech comm• Ph.D. in tech comm• Undergraduate minor intechcomm• A certificate based on agiven number of coursesin techcomm0-1
    • Professional Certification© • STC-developedprofessional certificationprogramo Portfolio-based, not test-basedo Candidates submit worksamples demonstratingcore competencieso Faster and cheaper thandegrees or certificatesSociety for Technical CommunicationI 0• Largest and oldest professional association dedicatedto the advancement oftechnical communication• Sets the global standards for technical communication• Members reach across every industry and continent• Produces a wide array of educational events• Publishes award-winning publications: intercom andTechnical Communication (a quarterly peer-reviewedjournal)• Maintains a comprehensive website including anextensive archive ofwebinars• Worlds largest technical communication conferenceBenefits of Membership0···• Affiliation (geographic or virtual) with an STC studentchapter•Affiliation (geographic or virtual) with an STCgeographic chapter• Affiliation with one STC special interest group (SIG) ina technical communication discipline ofparticularinterest to you• Access to salaryscales, job listings, and other valuableintellectual property on the international STC web siteSTC Membership~---------------------------------------Values and Behaviors----- ----·- -------------fQF.==c=···=··-··-=··--·=-··--=-=··=1··Values Behaviors• Innovation • Transparency• Integrity • Open communication• Professionalism • Inclusion• Respect • Leadership• CommitmentBenefits of Membership (Cont.)• Eligibility for STCstudent mentoringprograms• Professional networking• E-access to industry-leading professionalpublications• Reduced rates for STCconferences, webinars(plus free webinars), andcertification in technicalcommunication©II
    • Career GrowthzQJSociety for Technical CommunicationWb~•• A:U~Qm~~J:•s..•Special for Sigma Tau Delta Members. ~~~%iliscou~~~;~;~b;;~hl~1~for the rest of2013 (save i$37·50)•Eligible for 33% discount onstudent renewal for 2014(save $25.00)*• Sign up at the conference• Call1-571-366-1909• barbra.sanders@stc.orgOffer Ends April30!• Renew by Dec 31, 2013.•3IMentoring~Membership Levels~Student II New Technical Ii ClassicMembership ;i Communicator Member~hip~L__j~! )Questions? Come See Us!~•SMEs from STC for questions and answers•Materials on the benefits of STC membership•Materials on the various disciplines within technicalcommunication•Materials on careers in technical communication.........•Materials on core skills for technical communicators•Typical salary scales for jobs in technical communication•"Toolkit" (printed book and accompanying DVD) on how toestablish and sustain a student mentoring program•Discounted STC student memberships!•Free giveaways!
    • Better Together!The Societyfor TechnicalCommunication~!~Qf--~cc-1Thankyou for IComing! IFeel free to contact us!II• Rachel Houghton• Ijhoughton@gmail.com• Twitter rjhoughton• Bethany Bowles• bethanybowles@gmail.com• DanVoss*• daniel.w.voss@lmco.com*Co-developer of presentation.
    • Student Mentoring Programs:The Whys, Hows, and MoreBethany Bowles and Rachel HoughtonPresentation to Sigma Tau Delta International ConferenceMarch 21,2013Agenda Continued• How to start a mentoring program• Community partnerships• Individual relationships• What do you do?• Ingredients of a successful mentoring program• Turnkey package• Adapting administrative forms for mentoringprograms within the English curriculumPair English Students withProfessionals• With professors from a different university (virtualmentoring)• With professional writers, editors, and linguists (virtual orface-to-face mentoring depending upon location)/..{/:rAgenda• Adapting this STC presentation for mentoring programswithin the English curriculum• What is mentoring?• Types of mentoring• Face-to-face mentoring• Virtual mentoring• Why is it a good thing?Tailoring Mentoring Programsto the English CurriculumPossible Disciplines for Pairing• Creative writing, across all genres, leveraging subjectmatter experts (SMEs) among Sigma Tau Delta alumni• Technical writing, leveraging SMEs in STC via dualstudent memberships in Sigma Tau Delta and STC• Linguistics, leveraging SMEs among Sigma Tau Deltaalumni and global English specialists in STC
    • Key Concepts of MentoringPrograms• Pair student "novices" or mentees with professionalpractitioners (mentors)• Match mentees areas of interest with mentors areas ofSME• Avoid "direct-line" reporting relationships• Set specific objectives for the mentoring relationship,identify activities that will achieve those objectives, andestablish a means of regular communication• Communicate regularlyWhat?Individual Mentoring Relationships:Face to FaceAdministration• No need to "reinvent the wheel"!• Adapt administrative materials from STC mentoringprogram "toolkit" to establish and sustain mentoringprograms in other areas of English curriculum3 Types of Mentoring1. Within industry: pairingan experiencedpractitioner with anentry-level member ofthe profession2. Within academe: pairinga faculty member with astudent3· Pairing a professionalpractitioner with astudentIndividual Mentoring Relationships:Virtual
    • Remote/Virtual MentoringWin!Mentee Benefits* Develop networks, increasevisibility• Receive career guidance and jobsearch tips• Polish specialized skills* Prepare for the move fromacademe to industry* Enhance skills for careeradvancementWin!So,;.,tyforT~Kh!)ic31CommunkJllonOrganizational Benefits* Strengthen student communities bypartnering with professionals* Strengthen professional communitieswith new ideas and leadership• Leverage volunteer labor as M&Mscollaborate on projects to benefittheir communities and the Society* Increase retention rate of graduatingstudent membersIncrease attendance at chaptermeetings and involvement in SIGs* Bridge industry and academe* Groom leaders of tomorrowWhy?Mentor Benefits* Gain personal satisfactionhelping others reach theirpotential* Enhance coaching, feedback,leadership skills* Gain exposure to newperspectives, new mediaWin!* Expand professional networks* Get help on STC projects"4....,.ttluSOl,iitHow?
    • IngredientsTurnkey Toolkit• Specific program guidelines and• • • • procedures• Summary of successful programs* Mentor/mentee(M&M) applicationforms* M&M summary form• M&M agreement form. . . . . . . . . . . Suggested M&M activities andprojects• ... and MORE!RecruitingRecipe• Combine equal proportions ofmentees and mentors• Season with guidelines andturnkey administrative tools* Mixwell• Bake for one academic year• Garnish with job placement orgraduate school acceptanceicingWho?•Pairing
    • When? Where?... and 2011Typical Activities*Job-shadowing* Resume and portfolio assessment, interviewingskills*Jungle training for corporate America* Joint projects* Life lessons• "Reverse" mentoring (mentee teaches mentor)... happens a lot!2003 2009Mentor/Mentee Agreement!.........................................* Objectives* Expectations• Activities* Schedule* Communication channelsSuggested M&M Activities* Update the mentees resume to present his/her abilities andexperience to future employers; conduct a mock job interview* Work together to create a portfolio for the mentee to use whenjob-hunting* Arrange a job-shadowingvisit for the mentee to learn moreabout the workplace* Post what projects you are up to on the Facebook page to sharewith everyone!* Review a technical book or guide for newsletter* Preview the upcomingSTC annual conference by highlighting apresentation being done by local members
    • Suggested M&M Activities (cont)* Write a short review of one or more web sites that would interest orhelp readers* Create a short, engagingarticle that teaches a grammar and/ormechanics point- creative formatting encouraged!* Join an STC SIG in an area of mutual interest and participate in a SIC-related projecttogether.* Use social media (e.g., IM, texting, Facebook, Skype, or evenasynchronous color-coded 41e-mail ping-pong"*) to engage in somereal-time 41Chats" from time to time to get to know each otherbetter and share ideas.Sample Mentee Application FormSuitable for English CurriculumQ Jo~;>~l!:t~ $ ~-l:Z:::.; til (tW.,;-<.<-W>>~ie-1(¥1: ll-«<••g IJ,-A:1 "~""·iJ f..<>-t<&~l";<lili2liwillli;:.,.,~".~"""";_;.,~:i.Oo:.: Illllis:•oHl>J<•" ll>li><Q:;:.,..,.,.o~.tfo..o,.""·S~.A~ u 1.i1J.U"<~......,...,:•t>:hl•b"!"00Wil:t:>1;IO< 0 t!l.1lao>pl:ynlr.,~<!rf~~~:«., 0"·~-Available Materials* STC guidelines for mentoringprograms• Specific program guidelines and procedures* History of successful mentoring programs* Mentor/mentee(M&M)applicationforms* M&M summaryfonns (for making pairings)* M&M agreement fonn* Suggested M&M activities and projects* M&M contact log* Link to typical M&M Facebook page* M&M pre-assessmentfonns* M&M post-assessmentfonns* M&M program evaluation fonnPossible Activities for Mentoringwithin the English Curriculum• Co-author an article for a literary journal• Attend a local reading together• Revise a creative writing piece of the mentees• Review the mentees portfolio• Write a literature review on a topic of mutual interest• And more!Sample Mentor Application FormSuitable for English Curriculum:::~~:7.:::..,...~;. :;~~i~~;;;;;;7""·•:-,-·_:...;::i::~&: ~t«l:<.bl,._ n B>.<~ m::; .~... " """"" !l:l r.:.ri:l•..; !J !o-*-l>ii"" 0" Tk~ w ~...OM,.<;.. Ill ,..,t..,...E!o.....<ai~>"~"Y.~~~~ 0 t_..;::,.,.,., m J.-l•bh~>t, !;~< n f=-~!13llo:<:a;; n" lv::l>Oll>" 0 ,..,.~,,) JV>J!~,m f><,H,~c;>l~:::l-·~ 0 fl..ro/!h>:i;.o!ll:-.&.s IllThe Stage is Set ... Action!• Rachel Houghton* rjhoughton@gmail.com • bethanybowles@glll.aikmDan Voss*• daniel.w.voss@lmco.com* *Co-Developerof Presentation
    • CAC Blog Post2012: "Year of the Student Member" in STC!Two-thousand twelve is a great year to be a student member of STC. ,Why is that?" you ask. Well, here arefour major reasons that spring to mind.1. STC has given students voting rights in Society elections via a vote at the annual open businessmeeting last May at the international conference in Sacramento, recognizing the vital role studentsplay in the future of STC. Students will now have a say in the management of STC at the highest level.2. A significantly reduced New Technical Communicator membership fee of $160 for the first 3 yearsafter graduation makes it easier than ever before for students to continue their STC membership afterthey graduate. In the past, too many students were unable to afford to renew and enjoy the benefitsof STC membership while job-hunting.3. STC Community Affairs Committee (CAC) has two members to co-lead a Student Member Outreach:Dan Voss, a member of the Orlando Chapter, and Bethany Bowles, a student member of the OrlandoChapter from the University of Central Florida. We would be pleased to work with you to sustain andstrengthen your student communities.4. The STC Board has demonstrated its commitment to its student constituency by forming a specialtask force to foster and nurture the student communities. The task force-which understands theimportance of open communication between students and the STC Board, the CAC, and the staff atSTC headquarters-is opening a dialogue with established and newly formed student communities.Through a survey of students and advisors, we will identify the major struggles that studentcommunities face, and determine how the Society can help.As an example of the commitment of senior STC leadership to assist the student communities, task forcemember Steve Skojec, STCs director of community relations, is currently working successfully with certainstudent chapters that lost their tax-exempt status to help them regain their good standing with the IRS. Andanother task force member, STC treasurer Aiessa Moyna, is committed to helping student communitiesdevelop annual budgets so they can receive funding from the Society.A key part of the strategy for the Student Outreach initiative is forming mentoring partnerships betweenstudent and professional communities (both geographic and SIGs). The experience and advice from theprofessionals synergizes with the fresh ideas and enthusiasm of the students to benefit not only the studentchapters and other STC communities but also the Society as a whole. It is a win-win-win situation, and both thetask force and the CAC are committed to help establish and sustain such partnerships.Bethany Bowles, bethanybowles@gmail.comDan Voss, daniel.w.voss@lmco.com
    • K--SOCIETYPAGES--------------------~~~~~~--STC and Mentoring"WHAT DOES IT TAKE to start a skills, and increase my involvementmentoring program? Lots of deter-mination, lots of organization, andlots of coffee." Those are the wordsof Dan Voss and Bonnie Spivey in the2005 Proceedings for the STC Summit,as they discussed the process ofstarting a mentor program betweenthe STC Orlando Chapter and theUniversity of Central Florida. Theprogram, started in 2003, is now in itseighth year and can serve, with othercommunity mentoring programs,as a model for other communitiesinterested in setting up their own."We decided to pilot the projectby establishing a personal mentoringrelationship," Voss says today of hisrelationship with Spivey. "We foundourselves in a four-hour marathonsession over several cups of coffee atBorders. As they turned the lights outand booted us out, literally, we hadgenerated the basic guidelines andadministrative forms which remainin use in the program today." Vossremains in the program today, too, asthe manager of the program from theprofessional side, mentor within thatprogram, and CAC member focusingon the student communities."The heart of the program,"explains Voss, "is the mentor/protege(we use the word mentee) or expert/apprentice relationship." He suggeststhis relationship is best nurturedwith regular, face-to-face meetingsand reinforced with phone calls andemails to follow up on items discussedduring the meetings.Patricia Cruz, manager of theprogram from the student side, statesthat "the mentor-mentee relationshipis more symbiotic than one-sided," asboth the student and the professionalgain from the relationship. She saysof her current mentor that he "hashelped me jump-start my career intechnical communications. He hashelped me edit resumes, improve mypreviously nonexistent networking46with STC. His recommendation nodoubt helped me land my first realtechnical writingjob."Voss is currently mentoring SarahBaca, who says that in addition to allthe things shes learned from him,"I think hes gained some from ourrelationship as well.... Ive been ableto explain a little bit about newertechnologies that he is less familiarwith. I really think weve had amutually beneficial relationship." STCbenefits, too, as 40 percent of menteeshave gone on to join. Its cyclicalas well, as Voss reports that manyformer Orlando mentees later becamementors, including two who havebecome chapter presidents.So how can you start a mentorprogram in your community? Vossgives four key ingredients for asuccessful program:1. An active STC geographicalcommunity whose leadershipand members are interested ineducational outreach2. An active student organizationfocusing on technical communica-tion (most likely an STC studentchapter, although there are otheralternatives) whose leadershipand members are interested inpartnering with a professionalorganization3. A member of the geographicalcommunity who is passionateabout the project and willing toput in some time to organize andget it off the ground4. A member of the studentcommunity who is passionateabout the project and willing toput in some time to organize andget it off the groundVoss states theres no need for"reinventing wheels"-the OrlandoChapter stands ready to advise andassist. His first suggestion is to readthe Orlando mentoring programwebsite, at www.stc-orlando.org/intercomeducation/mentor/mentor.asp. That siteincludes a description of how thementoring program was conceived,implemented, and sustained; theguidelines governing the program;and many of the administrativeforms they use. The CommunityAffairs Committee (CAC) can helpany community that wishes to set upa mentoring program as well. Manyother communities have mentorprograms, including Wisconsin,Toronto, and France to name a few.Research their sites and speak to theirleaders. Let your STC connectionswork for you!Even ifyour community isnt closegeographically to a university with atech comm program, that shouldntnecessarily stop you, says Baca. "Ireally think our model could bemodified to fit the needs of studentchapters that arent geographicallyclose to professional chapters. Thebenefits are so numerous that Ithink it is really important to pursuea mentorship program." Indeed,Voss has set up a virtual, overseasmentoring program between Orlandoand STC Frances partnership withUniversity of Paris-7 (Diderot). Thereare many other formats the CAC isresearching, so keep an eye out."To STC communities that wouldlike to start a mentoring program,"enthused Cruz, "I say go for it! Itsgood for the mentees, the mentors,and the technical communicationcommunity as a whole. Plus, theprogram can really get more youngpeople to be excited in the field,and mentors everywhere can makethis happen." nApril2011
    • LBridging the Gap Between Industry and AcademeBonnie Spivey and Dan VossUsing their own mentor-mentee relationship as a pilotproject, the authors planned and implemented asuccessful mentoring program pairing professionals inthe Orlando Chapter with graduating seniors in thetechnical communication program at the University ofCentral Florida. This paper (andpresentation) providesa detailed description ofthe planning and execution ofthe new program, along withfeedbackfrom participantsat the end ofthe first year, and an update on the programmidway through its secondyear. It also provides aglimpse into the special trust that can grow betweenmentor and mentee-and the mutualpersonal andprofessional growth that can resultfrom such arelationship. In addition, the session includes a turnkeypackage (both hard-copy and electronic) ofadministrativeforms and materials that can readily beadapted to implement a mentoringprogram withinanother STC chapter or organization. The package isalso availablefrom either presenter orfrom the OrlandoChapter Education Committee.What does it take to start a mentoring program? Lots ofdetermination, lots of organization, and lots ofcoffee.Fourteen bottomless cups to be exact. Let us explain.Two years ago we initiated a mentor-mentee relationshipfor the double purpose ofthe mentoring itself and also asa pilot for a potential mentoring program between theOrlando Chapter and the University of Central Florida.At first, the mentor (a battle-scarred industry veteran)and mentee (a bright-eyed UCF senior) had to wonder ifthey would face a generation gap. But as more punch-holes appeared on the Borders Cafe frequent-drink card,the feared generation gap never materialized. In fact, wewere both thrilled to realize that our age and youth wereactually exactly what the doctor ordered for a fruitfulmentoring relationship.Imagine, then, teaming the power of age and experiencewith youth and energy to promote growth, not onlywithin the traditional framework of formal mentoringrelationships, but to benefit SIC at both the chapter andSociety levels. In keeping with this vision, the OrlandoChapter of SIC, in conjunction with UCF, instituted aformal mentoring program, pairing veterans from thefront lines of industry with talented technicalcommunication students. The goal: to bridge the gapbetween industry and academe.HISTORY/ORIGIN OF MENTORINGGenerally, mentorship pairs experts with novices topromote growth. One classic example ofa successfulmentoring relationship can be found in the realm ofAntiquity, in ancient Greece, residing somewherebetween Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Hopefully, thefruit ofour mentoring program will not fall far from thattree. Carlos Parada, author ofGenealogical Guide toGreek Mvthologv, has traced the concept ofmentoringback to Greek mythology, finding its roots in the tale ofOdysseus (Figure 1).Mentor 4 was an old friend of Odysseus. Tohim Odysseus entrusted his household when hejoined the coalition that sailed against Troy.Athena, assuming several times the shape ofMentor 4, became the guide of Odysseus sonTelemachus, giving him prudent counsel. Sincethen, wise and trusted advisers have been called"mentors." 1OK, then, so much for Antiquity. Lets hit Fast Forwardfor a few millennia. So what does all this have to dowith the new program we initiated?Types of MentoringToday, mentoring occurs within industry, withinacademe, and across the two. Within industry,mentoring programs pair senior personnel with new hiresor junior personnel. In this case, the most obviousrecipient ofmentoring is the intern. In "The MentoringProgram at Silicon Valley Chapter," published in theFebruary 2001 issue of Tieline,2Lori Fisher suggests thatcompanies like Cisco and IBM Corporation achievednotable success with their long-standing internshipprograms and "have used them to instill in participantsthe political savvy that can only be acquired with yearsofexperience."Mentor Athena Protege Telemachus Absentee Father OdysseusFigure 1. Mentoring has its roots in Antiquity.
    • Within academe, two possibilities are to pair faculty withstudents not in their classes or to pair seniors, graduatestudents, or recent graduates with underclass students topromote growth.For our purposes, we are concerned mainly withmentoring that occurs across industry and academe,pairing practicing professionals with students. For years,companies like NASA, Siemens, and AT&T have takenthis approach, often in the form of co-op programs, usingthe strategy both as a platform for early identification ofpotential leaders and as a low-risk screening process forpotential new hires.On a chapter level, members might pair workplaceresearch projects with academic researchers, involvingstudents in their projects. A prime example ofthisconcept was the creation of an educational outreachmultimedia presentation in 2002 by UCF graduatestudents Cindy Hauptner and Bob Stultz under theguidance ofDr. Dan Jones at UCF and Dan Voss ofLockheed Martin. A tremendous success, this grantprogram-described in the April 2003 edition ofMemoto Members-offered compelling proofofthe naturalsynergy between industry and academe.General GuidelinesAll types of mentoring relationships pair experts withnovices to promote growth. There are, however, certainguidelines that ensure the success ofthese connections.First and foremost, the relationships must fall outside allformal channels of supervision and evaluation. Forinstance, a supervisor, professor, or anyone to whom thementee reports directly cannot serve as mentor. The bondsoftrust will simply not form because ofthe powerdynamics.Secondly, in order for a mentoring program to developproperly, it must strike the right balance betweenstructure and flexibility. On the one hand, enoughdiscipline needs to be exerted to ensure that regular face-to-face meetings occur (e.g., a working lunch in asuitable public venue once a month); yet the door mustalways be open for the spontaneous exchanges thatnurture the relationship and develop trust.Definition of MentoringAccording to the STC Guidelines for MentoringPrograms/ mentoring is a way for more experiencedtechnical communicators to share their experiences withnew or less experienced "protege." A mentor acts as atrusted counselor, or guide, who assists the mentoredprotege in setting and achieving goals for developingcareer direction and skills. By participating in amentor/protege relationship, mentors develop valuableskills that can further their personal and professionaldevelopment as well. The relationship between mentorand protege* requires honesty, openness, commitment,and effort by both individuals. Ifthey are willing to putforth the effort, there are enormous benefits to berealized.BenefitsWhile the technical communication industry becomesincreasingly competitive, todays students must becomeprogressively more focused. Mentoring, then, seems tobe a wise decision for the mentee in terms ofenhancedskills, job placement in a fiercely competitive market,and accelerated career development. The benefits to thementor may seem less readily apparent. However,professionals who have served the mentor role havefound it to be beneficial in many ways, not the least ofwhich is the satisfaction ofhelping a beginning fellowprofessional to grow. Thus, the benefits of havingmentor/mentee relationships under the belt make theprocess a two-way street (Table 1).• Gain personal satisfaction from helping othersdiscover their potential• Enhance coaching, feedback, and leadership skills• Gain exposure to new perspectives from the mentee• Ex and rofessional networks• Develop networks• Receive career guidance• Increase their visibility• Learn to adapt to changing professional andorganizational circumstances• Develop or enhance skills needed to moveforward in their careersFor years, the Orlando Chapter has strongly supported aninformal partnership between industry and academe,although without the structure of a formal mentoringprogram. For instance, many of our chapter members(some ofwhom are graduates ofthe University ofCentral Florida) have spoken to classes, evaluatedportfolios, and invited students to conduct workplaceinterviews via visits or e-mail surveys.* For our purposes, we have adopted the term menteeinstead of protege.
    • The new mentoring relationship should serve tostrengthen the traditional ties between the chapter andthe university and also provide STC with a platform to:• Strengthen the local technical writing community• Stabilize student STC membership• Attract mentees as potential long-term STCmembers after graduation• Generate positive word-of-mouth advertisement forthe chapter• Promote STC as a professional networking society• Help the chapter execute educational outreachinitiatives at the high school and college level• Strengthen and expand the relationship betweenUCF and STC• Increase attendance at STC chapter meetings• Identify and develop potential leaders within thechapter.Increased Person-Power. From the chaptersperspective, one notable advantage resulting from thementoring program lies in the increased person-powerthat the mentees represent. The chapter workload canbe shared by mentor/mentee teams, providing thementees with a chance to gain valuable workexperience.Course Credit. On the same note, mentees have theoption of combining technical writing assignments withchapter needs. One particular example ofthis was thebrochure we generated to support our initiative to findcorporate sponsors for our chapters educationaloutreach program. Instead of creating a brochure for animaginary company to satisfy course requirements, amentee created a real-world document she, in tum, wasable to display in her portfolio. Thats a classic win-winscenano.Valuable Experience. Other chapter needs lean moretowards the administrative side ofthe spectrum.Similarly, teams have the option ofchoosing projectsthat strengthen mentees in target skill areas. Forinstance, volunteers are needed to coordinate fund-raisers, educational outreach initiatives, and publicitycampaigns. Several other opportunities are alsoavailable. The idea is to create a symbiotic relationshipbetween chapter and mentees. This is not to say thatmenteeship requires "slave labor," merely to point outthe abundant opportunities for growth.Increased Visibility. Mentoring allows the mentee tobecome more involved, providing organizations with alow-risk method of identifying potential leaders withinthe group. Also, the program provides chapter memberswho were previously inactive with an opportunity toincrease visibility by serving as a mentor or mentee.Similarly, mentors have the opportunity to sharpen their){coaching and feedback skills, while simultaneouslygaining a fresh perspective by exposure to new ideas.Preliminary ResearchThe first step in making this vision a reality was tofollow the STC Guidelinesfor Mentoring Programs,described above. This comprehensive document provedto be a tremendous resource.Silicon Valley Chapter. Before deciding on ourstrategy, we researched other mentoring programs withinSTC. Lori Fishers article, cited above, describes howthe Sjljcgp valley Chapter implemented a mentoringprogram back in 1999. Its informal program currentlyserves the needs ofthe local professionals and isfacilitated by a mentoring web page containing amentor/mentee database. There are no requirementslimiting participants, and the professionals are linkeddirectly to one another via e-mail addresses.Coordination is left to the mentee.Carolina Chapter. The Carolina Chapter offers amentoring program almost identical to the SiliconValleys. While this approach is useful to a largenetwork of individuals seeking expertise on varioustopics, the strategy did not meet the specific needs ofourchapter to forge a link between industry and academe.Lone Star Chapter. The Lone Star Chapter hasprovided its members with a mentoring program since1993. The program pairs student members and newwriters with professional practitioners for a period of sixmonths to promote growth. As outlined in "MentoringProject Helps New Technical Communicators" byprogram manager Jane Bergen, the program was initiallylimited to students, but in 1997 the chapters AdministrativeCouncil changed the guidelines to accommodate newwriters as well. Students were then permittedto enroll for a period ofno longer than six months, andafter graduation could re-enroll as new writers. Theywere assigned different mentors for each phase.Piloting the Program. As we charted the course forthe new mentoring program, we drew upon our ownexperiences to forecast the needs of future participants.Notably, we discovered that our monthly face-to-facemeetings were the main catalyst for our relationship,with communicating by phone a close second. E-mail,however, served as an important practical link as well.While switching between our mentoring and projectcoordinator hats became challenging at times, our overallexperience has been extremely positive.As we witnessed firsthand, the mentee is often reticentabout coming to the mentor in real time with questions.This is understandable, considering that the reticence
    • grows out of respect for the mentors time or position,but it can be very limiting to a mentoring relationshipbecause some ofthe most valuable feedback is often aresult of real-time communication. To benefit fully, thementee has to be comfortable calling the mentor andasking, "Hey, do you have a minute?" Otherwise, therelationship will not maximize its potential.Likewise, the mentor has to be comfortable critiquing thementees work, being honest about its quality rather thansugar-coating his or her response to spare the menteesfeelings. After all, how else does a writer learn to write?OK, then-back to Borders. Nothing happens withoutpaperwork (Figure 2).Figure 2. 14 Cups of Coffee= 1 MentoringProgramBUILDING OUR PROGRAMWe had the vision, but we needed the structure, so overseveral extensive planning sessions and with muchcaffeine, we drafted and revised the structure oftheprogram to fit the needs ofour community.Developing Guidelines and ProceduresOne ofthe first tasks was to develop guidelines andprocedures, the foundation ofthe program. We basedthe initial draft on the Lone Star Chapters procedures,adapting them to fit our needs. A notable difference inour program is the time span. We chose a one-yeartimeframe for the mentoring relationship, with anoptional extension to a second year. Essentially, theprogram spans two semesters.Eligibility. To participate, students must be enrolled inthe technical writing track at UCF and (1) be in theirsenior year ofthe undergraduate program, (2) be in thegraduate program, or (3) have graduated from eitherprogram within 6 months ofthe application date. Theidea was to focus on students closest to the job market,as we felt a mentoring program would most likely be ofgreatest benefit to them.Selection Criteria. While we wanted to include asmany interested mentees as possible, we knew we had tohave selection criteria in case the number ofmenteesexceeded the number ofmentors. Besides the obviousrestriction ofthe number of available mentors, we feltthat STC membership should also be required as areasonable prerequisite for the value received. Inaddition, we elected to take advantage ofthe existingstructure ofthe Future Technical Communicators (FTC)Club at UCF, both because we expect a significant partofthe mentee pool to come from this organization andalso because Bonnie was its current president. SinceFTC costs nothing and entails no obligation, we includedFTC membership as a requirement for mentees.Interest Surveys. Eventually, we realized that asignificant part ofthe guidelines and procedures wasdependent on the number ofmentors and mentees whowould potentially be interested in the program. Thus, wecreated interest surveys for the mentors and mentees,disseminated them via listservs and e-mail distributions,and based our decisions on the results. The tremendousresponse-a fortuitously equal base of 10 mentors and10 mentees-enabled us to customize the guidelines andprocedures to better fit the needs ofthe chapter.Creating Administrative FormsAfter a long working session (we literally worked untilthe custodial staffkicked us out ofBorders), we wereable to draft the mentor and mentee applications (Figure3), the mentor and mentee agreements, the contact log,and the implementation timeline for the program. Weknew we had to keep the forms simple and un-intimidating so as to not deter potential applicants byburying them under mountains ofpaper. We decided tomake all the forms electronic, downloadable fromwww.stc-orlando.org/education!mentor/mentor asp.Applicants merelyhad to type in their information, save andthe document, e-mail the forms to their program coordinator.Next came the mentor and mentee agreements, designedto serve both as a preliminary outline ofparticipant goalsand as an icebreaker for a teams first face-to-facemeeting. When the teams met for the first time, thementors and mentees finalized the agreements, savedcopies for their records, and e-mailed them to theirappropriate program coordinators. Finally, weestablished a basic contact log to provide basic structurewithout imposing undue paperwork.The next step in implementing the program was to gainthe Administrative Councils approval. After draftingthe mentoring packet, we e-mailed it to the core team forits feedback. After final review at an AdministrativeCouncil meeting, the program was approvedunanimously. We were good to go! Prospective mentorsand mentees were asked to submit their applications,electronically.
    • N""""•-tor Applicatioll2003--2004UCFE-mnit (Ho,me"""------------------(Work)Yeanwidt STC:Softwuedoctmtem.tionHardwsre docunertetion =OtilineHelp _Information tednol.ogy _Technictl.~nvketi~SeiertificwrittngMecic~writi.ngTecbwriti.ngeQtiJlgEtuploymftlt/Educatiw.Knowledgem~ert _Marke1ing WritingManagem.ertEddingGovernmentWritmg -Webatede~ -Electt«Ue PJI;{ishizlg =Tecb::icali11ustz-SlonDigta1mediaJowmlisrnPromoiHnliwnttngLsrge companyoperWonsSwt-up COill!)6nYoperaiioosCowsewveGr. .cdeagnOtho,________ 01h.-_ _ _ _ _ _ __Im~.lfubbies, and Extracw:ri:ular- Activi.tiell:: (typeamwt!ll inbox)Face-t.o>fac:e%"E-rn.UWilling to meet: (type an x on thelines thatapply)Tehpb:ne%Weekda: Weekda evoeti.ng~ Weeken:!sFigure 3. Applications were submitted online.Making the Pairs. We paired mentors and menteesbased on their stated goals and interests. To aid in thepairing process, we included personality profiles,preferred method of communication ratings, focus areachecklists, and short-answer questions on theapplications. For example, an extroverted, structuredmentor well-versed in online Help files would be theperfect match for an outgoing mentee who preferred awell-regimented learning environment and is interestedin pursuing a career in online documentation.Once the basic needs had been matched, other aspects,like preferred method of communication, wereconsidered. For instance, mentors who preferredcommunication via e-mail as a primary medium werepaired with mentees who also stipulated this.Kicking Off the Program. Once the programcoordinators and the chapter president finished pairingparticipants into mentor-mentee teams, participants werenotified oftheir selection and asked to fill out the initialmentor or mentee agreement forms. The group was theninvited to a mentoring kickoff session. Mentors andmentees were introduced via an innovative "treasurehunt"and asked to finalize their mentor/menteeagreements (Figure 4). From there, it boiled down toregular one-on-one communication between mentor-mentee pairs.5JGatheringFeedback. During thementor/menteerelationship, bothparticipants were askedto keep a basic contactlog, and to provide afew simple, non-time-consuming reports tothe programcoordinators at twopoints during the year,as well as a simpleevaluation at the end ofthe process.YEAR1RESULTSFigure 4. "X" markedthe spot for Sherri andBarb.At the end ofthe first year, we conducted threeevaluations to measure the effectiveness ofthementoring program and to identify improvements wecould make for Year 2: (1) we gave mentors and menteesa post-assessment with subjective numerical self-evaluations in three skills areas, and compared the resultswith a pre-assessment we administered 10 monthsearlier; (2) we had mentors and mentees numericallyevaluate their overall satisfaction and their success inmeeting their objectives; and (3) we independentlyevaluated the program by analyzing the mentor-menteeagreements and the contact logs and subjectivelyevaluating the results versus the objectives. Results ofthese evaluations are summarized in Tables 2-5.Pre- and Post AssessmentsTable 2 compares pre- and post-assessments. Menteesclearly felt much better prepared for job search andplacement as a result oftheir mentoring. They alsoreported a significant growth in job skills. The mentordata was inconclusive. Even in the one area ofimprovement Gob skills), a closer look at the data showsthis was influenced by very high scores from the threeyoungest mentors-who could reasonably be expected tostill be on the steep slope oftheir professional skillgrowth curves. Based on subjective numerical self-evaluations before and at the end ofthe mentoringprogram, mentees reported significant growth, especiallyin job search skills. Statistical results from mentors werenot significant.
    • Table 2. Analysis of Personal GrowthPost- vs Pre-Assessments: Mentees•Category MenteeGroWtlt,. :..·: Pre to PostGrowth in iob search skills 40%Growth in job knowledge (technical 28%communication)Growth in career readiness 10%Aggregate growth 24%Post- vs Pre-Assessments: Mentors/ · if;, ... Catego,.Y > Mentor ,.c~;;>. ;;~.t <i· Growth,Pre to PostGrowth in ability to teach job search skills 3%Growth in job knowledge (technical 18%communication)Growth in readiness to coach a mentee -6%Aggregate growth 6%Program EvaluationTable 3 shows how mentees and mentors evaluated theprogram on a scale of 1-10 in terms of (1) overallsatisfaction and (2) success in meeting their objectives.Dropping the highs and lows to get the truest picture, wecame up with aggregate ratings ofjust under 9 foroverall satisfaction and just under 8 for meetingobjectives. Clearly, the program was rated a success-with some room for improvement on meeting objectives.Perhaps most significantly, 5 of9 mentors signed up onthe spot for a second tour ofduty, only one said no, andthree were maybes. All 9 mentees said they wouldwelcome the opportunity to serve as mentors in thefuture.Based on numerical program evaluations, both mentorsand mentees expressed strong satisfaction with thementoring program and said it met their objectives.Table 3. Evaluation of Program SatisfactionProaram Evaluations: Mentees[/ .cat~e!};;> i Average~" , , _.;,c ,<,ti! • ·. Evaluation* ·How satisfied were you, overall, with the 9.0mentorina oroaram? (1-10)How well did you feel the program met 7.75your objectives? (1-10)Would you be willing to serve as a mentor 100% Yesin the future?• Dropping the highest and lowest scores.Post vs Pre-Assessments· Mentors. .¢~tegory ·• .Avfirage,,,,,.,·, Evi:IJ~ation-How satisfied were you, overall, with the 8.6mentorina oroaram? (1-10)How well did you feel the program met 7.8your objectives? (1-10)Would you be willing to serve again as a 5 Yes, 1 No, 3mentor in 2004-2005? Mavbes** Droppmg the two highest and two lowest scores.Analysis of Mentor-Mentee ContactLogsAs program coordinators, we came up with essentiallythe same conclusion when we independently evaluatedthe contact logs versus the mentor-mentee agreements.The results, shown in Table 4, confirm overall programsuccess, with room for improvement--especially on thenumber of face meetings, the relative lack ofwhich wefelt contributed to the difference between an 8 and a 10in meeting objectives.Analysis ofthe mentor-mentee contact logs showed amedian of 3.0 face meetings, a mix of face meetings ande-mail as the dominant communication mode, and jobsearch and placement as the primary, though not theonly, focus.T bl 4 Aa e na1ysJs ofC t t Lon ac ogl~ ,.,•;··oominant• Prinl.iirv Succe$STm Fa~· :communi· FocUs LevelMtgs cation Mode (1-10}*1 1 E-mail Job search 72 4 Mixed Job search 83 1 E-mail, STC Medical writing 6meetings4 3 "Meet to eat" Academics 85 2 E-mail Mentee 4withdrew6 3 Meet to eat, Job search 10office visit, e- and contentmail7 3 Meet to eat Resume, 10career, socialskills8 4 Face meetings, Academic, 9e-mail career9 3 Face meetings, Resume, 7e-mail chapterserviceAggregate 7.8SubJeCtive rating (1-10) by program co-coordinators.Recommendations for ImprovementCombining the feedback we received in the programevaluations with our own observations, we came up withseven areas for improvement in Year 2 (see Table 5).While we certainly want to repeat the successes in jobsearch and placement we achieved in Year 1 (several ofthe mentees found jobs quickly!), wed also like to "openthe aperture," especially in academic coaching andchapter service.Mentors and mentees suggested program improvementsfor Year 2. Above all, they stressed the importance offace-to-face meetings.
    • Table 5. Concatenated RecommendationsRecommendation$ on lmprov.emenl$for Year 2 of Mentorino Program• Start sooner. Recruit and establish mentor-mentee pairsin summer; be ready to go with the fall term.• Meet more as a group. Have a mid-year and year-endingget-together, in addition to the kickoff meeting.• Encourage participant$ to meet more face-to-face. E-mails great, but to get the most out of a mentoringrelationship, you have to meet.• Provide a little more direction. Especially at thebeginning. But also give the teams room to operate.• Promote chapter service. Working together on chapterprojects nurtures a mentoring relationship by addingpractical application of skills to a mutual goal.• Add variety. Continue to focus on job placement, but addacademic coaching, "shadowing" at work, and otheractivities.• Maintain one contact log. No need to have two, as wedid in Year 1.YEAR 2 STATUSFor Year 2 ofthe mentoring program, the co-coordinatorrole passed from the authors to the new manager ofthechapters Education Committee, Gail Lippincott; and theincoming FTC president, Jen Selix. We handed offthebaton at a midsummer planning session and passed alongthe ideas for program improvements.Our successors got offto a great start in recruiting,winding up with approximately the same number ofmentor-mentees pairs as we had in Year 1 (including acouple ofreturnees).Concerning the proposed earlier start, well, we hadntreckoned with Hurricanes Charlie, Frances, andJeanne-all ofwhich came directly over Central Florida,and which wrought havoc with everyones schedule,including the mentoring program. Jen and Gail foughtback with an innovative "virtual kickoff to set things inmotion, then used the administrative tools (mentor-mentee agreements, contact logs) to keep things on trackuntil they could get everybody out from under thewreckage and into one room at the same time.It was too early in the program when this paper went topress to make a substantive assessment on Year 2, butbased on the enthusiasm at a post-holiday group get-together, the participants appeared to have survived therainy start and the program was rapidly gatheringmomentum. Well provide a real-time update in theconference presentation.REFERENCES(1) Parada, Carlos. "Telemachus," Genealogical Guideto Greek Mythology.http://homepage.mac.com/cparada!GML/index.btml(2) Fisher, Lori. "The Mentoring Program at SiliconValley Chapter." Tieline. February, 2001.(3) "STC Guidelines for Mentoring Programs." Societyfor Technical Communication.http://www.stc.org/PDF Files/AD-I09-02.pdf(4) Bergen, Jane. "Mentoring Project Helps NewTechnical Communicators," administrative materialsfor Lone Star Chapter mentoring program.Bonnie SpiveyTechnical WriterWalt Disney World210 Celebration PlaceCelebration, FL 34747407-566-7316mailto:bonnie.j.spivey.-ND@disney.comBonnie Spivey is a technical writer at Disney Cruise Line®, and is the Publicity manager for STCs OrlandoChapter as well as a member of its active EducationCommittee. She is a 2004 graduate of the TechnicalWriting Program at UCF where she managed theTechnical Writing Computer Lab. Spivey served aspresident of the Future Technical Communicators (FTC)Club at UCF, sparking a major growth initiative thatculminated in a university-funded delegation of sixstudents to the 2004 international conference. She wasco-coordinator of the chapter and UCFs new mentoringprogram. In 2003, Spivey was a recipient of a MelissaPellegrin Memorial Scholarship Award, presentedannually to one or two undergraduate and graduatestudents in the technical writing program at UCF.Dan VossCommunications Manager, Anti-Armor WeaponsLockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control - Orlando5600 Sand Lake Road, Orlando, FL 32819407-356-6508mailto:daniel.w.voss@lmco.comDan Voss has 26 years experience in aerospace atLMMFC-0, and he has also taught high school andcollege. He is a Fellow in the Society for TechnicalCommunication and is a member of STCs OrlandoChapter, where he managed the Education Committee for11 years. He has received the Chapters DistinguishedService Award. He managed the STCs Special NeedsSIG, now the AccessAbility SIG, for 2 years, earned theSIGs Distinguished Service Award, and remains anactive leader. Voss has also served on STCsProfessionalism, Ethics, Certification, and StrategicPlanning committees. He has presented at 15international and 9 regional STC conferences. With LoriAllen, he co-authored Ethics in Technical Communication:Shades of Gray (Wiley, 1997). He is the only non-engineer ever to earn LMMFC-Os Author-of-the-Yearaward. He has also published numerous articles inprofessional journals and other publications. He recentlywon two of Lockheed Martins top awards forcommunication and performance for his leadership on asuccessful major proposal.
    • fVJUn Programme de Mentorat International?Mais Oui, Cest Possible! Absolument!By Clio Fouque and Dan VossAbstractThis paper describes a trans-Atlantic mentoring initiative involving the STC Orlando andSTC France chapters, the University of Central Florida, and the University of Paris Diderot(Paris 7). The co-authors launched their own international bilingual mentoring relationship at lastyears conference and are using it as a means ofpiloting a broader initiative. The goal was toset up a mentoring program between the STC-France chapter and the University of ParisDiderot modeled on the one between STC-Orlando and UCF. The possibility also exists forinternational exchanges and cooperation between professional technical communicators withinthe two chapters as well as technical communication students within the two universities.FROM THE NORTH AMERICAN SIDEOF THE ATLANTIC...How does a trans-Atlantic mentoring relationshipbegin? For us, it began at the AccessAbility SIGbusiness meeting on Monday morning, May 6, 2009,at the 56th annual international STC conference inAtlanta, Georgia, USA. Except we didnt know ityet! We werent personally introduced at themeeting, although we both participated. As a formermanager ofthe AccessAbility SIG, I was heartened tosee such obvious interest in the subject from anintelligent and personable young student who, by heraccent at least, I surmised was from the STC-Francechapter.Thats where serendipity stepped in. Conferences aresprawling, hectic events, and it is entirely possible tomeet somebody once at the beginning and never runinto that person again for the rest ofthe conference.And we hadnt even really met yet.But by good fortune, our paths crossed again just afew hours later when we wound up sitting next toeach other at the Marketing SIGs networking lunch.We introduced ourselves and began chattinganimatedly. In addition to our mutual interest inaccessibility, we soon learned that a number of Cliospotential career options closely matched Dansexperience and skill sets. It was evident right fromthe start that despite the age difference between us(we wont define that any more precisely! ©),ourinterests and our personalities aligned very closely.In fact, Dan was thinking, "What a shame Clio isntfrom the University ofCentral Florida! She and Iwould make a great mentor-mentee pair!" Dan wasthinking in terms ofthe mentoring program pairingUCF technical communication students withprofessionals from the STC Orlando chapter. As theluncheon wore on and their conversation raced alongnon-stop, an idea began to take shape in Dans mind."Why not?" he suddenly declared, not realizing hehad said the words aloud."Why not what?" Clio said, puzzled-wondering,perhaps, ifwe Americans typically went aroundtalking to ourselves."Oh," Dan said, laughing. "I just had a great ideaand I didnt realize I had expressed it aloud.""Whats your idea?" Clio asked.Dan told Clio about the mentoring program betweenthe STC Orlando chapter and the technicalcommunication program at the University of CentralFlorida and asked her if she might be interested in
    • pursuing a trans-Atlantic virtual partnership as amentor-mentee pair in the 2009-2010 program.Clio liked the idea. The two agreed to meet againduring the conference to establish goals andobjectives and plan activities that could beaccomplished at a distance to execute their plan.As it turned out, both were so busy during theconference that the only available "window" oftimeto hold their initial-and, given the distance that wasabout to separate them, their only-face-to-facemeeting as mentor and mentee was 40 minutes onThursday morning just before Clio had to leave forher flight back to Paris.They found a quiet meeting room in the conferencecenter, and Dan pulled up the mentor-menteeagreement form on his laptop. With the clockticking, the two wasted no time mapping outobjectives and activities that would tap Dansexperience to coach Clio in a number of areas ofprofessional interest. In addition to their mutualinterest in accessibility, those areas includedmarketing communication, particularly proposals;management techniques, including ethics in technicalcommunication; and writing for internal and externalmedia.Their objectives were defined with 20 minutes tospare, so the two decided to add one more goal-tohelp the STC-France chapter, ofwhich Clio wassecretary, to establish a mentoring program with theUniversity ofParis 7 (Diderot), where Clio wascompleting her studies for her third masters degree-this one in technical communication.Dan explained to Clio that he and his first mentee,Bonnie Spivey, had done precisely that back in 2002,leveraging their own mentoring relationship to pilotthe STC Orlando chapter!UCF mentoring program(Spivey, Voss 2002). Dan gave Clio a CD containinginformation about the program, including the varioustools he and Bonnie had developed to institute andadminister the mentoring program. (Lippincott, Selix,Spivey, Voss 2002)With time running out on Clios departure for theairport, the two shook hands (Figure 1)--both toofficially begin their own mentor-mentee relationshipS7(the forms could be completed by e-mail) and also tocommit to the goal of initiating a mentoring programbetween the STC-France chapter and the UniversityofParis Diderot, using the STC Orlando chapter!UCFprogram as a model.Figure 1. AND SO IT BEGAN. Clio and Dan outlinedthe objectives for their trans-Atlantic virtual mentoringrelationship in Atlanta last year just before Clioheaded to the airport to return to Paris.And so began their international mentoringrelationship.Shortly after Clio returned to Paris and Dan toOrlando, they completed the forms on theirmentoring relationship via e-mail and Dan submittedthem to the managers ofthe 2009-2010 STC Orlandochapter/UCF mentoring program. Since its inception,the program had had a number of successful"distance" mentoring relationships, but this one wascertainly expanding the geographic envelope!Dan sent Clio some materials on accessibility whichhe had promised her in Atlanta and then sent somematerials on ethics in technical communication-anarea they decided to explore first.It was then that an interesting series of events on bothsides ofthe Atlantic sent their mentoring relationshipinto a different direction. In France, Clio becameextremely busy due to a combination ofher studies atthe University ofParis Diderot, where she waspreparing to defend for her masters degree intechnical communication (the "soutenance") as wellas continuing to fulfill her responsibilities in her not-
    • so-part-time job in technical communication-leaving her little spare time to pursue ethics or theother areas ofprofessional development outlined intheir mentoring objectives. Meanwhile, in the UnitedStates, Dan was in the opposite situation, on a 6-weekmedical leave following surgery, where he foundhimself in a place he was unaccustomed to being-not having 15 things to do at once!He even had enough time to "dust off his highschool French, although even armed with his trustyEnglish-French dictionary and grammar book, hisFrench was no match for Clios English! [The alertreader will notice this article is "en anglais, pas enfran9ais." ©]Yet, Dans efforts and relentlessattempts at writing in her own native language keptimpressing Clio. She could not believe thatsomebody who had not practiced for such a long timecould even remember old French phrases-whichmade her smile and sometimes laugh.Clios command ofEnglish proved most fortunate,because the mentoring relationship was about to takea tum into philosophical territory-an area Dan couldsurely not have navigated "en fran9ais"!When Clio expressed her concern about herupcoming soutenance (would she pass?) as well asher search for her first full-time job in technicalcommunication (would she succeed at a criticalupcoming job interview?)---in the process revealingher own tendencies toward perfectionism and thefrustration it can create-Dan saw a perfectopportunity to do some long-distance mentoring.Himself a life-long perfectionist and "workaholic,"he had a wealth ofadvice to share on how to channelperfectionism in accordance with business priorities(read: budget limitations) and how to deal with theanxiety that results from consciously adjustingquality levels to best address business requirements.Forced into a 6-week rest from his busy job atLockheed Martin, Dan took advantage oftheopportunity to compose a series ofe-letters to Clio,using the metaphor of going on long walks togetherto explore such pressing issues as perfectionism, theanxiety attendant thereunto, self-confidence, andmore. These philosophical e-letters contain personalinformation, protected under the confidentiality of amentoring relationship and therefore are not subjectto a detailed discussion in this forum. However, thisbriefexcerpt from "A Walk in the Country" providessome insight into the unexpected tum ofevents theirmentoring relationship had taken:Lets take a walk in the country. We II start by myparents house and hike through the hayfields to thetop ofthe mountain, where we can seefor miles. Onthe way back, we II walk through the forest and comeout by the little pond at the bottom ofmy parentsproperty. You might want a light sweater, because itcan get a little chilly in the shade. When were in thesun, you IIprobably want to carry the sweater.I have put much thought into what would be the bestwayfor me to mentor you when it comes to the issuesyou have described I can definitely addressperfectionism, because that is a battle I have beenfighting myselfthrough most ofmy life. However,when you dig beneath the surface to get at theunderlying causes ofperfectionism, as well as theunderlying reasonsfor lack ofself-corifidence, youget into many other areas, particularly psychologyand spirituality. These are, ofcourse, very personalareas. I have no problem sharing at this levelfrommy side ifyou are comfortablefrom your side. Areyou?Clio responded to the "walks" with her ownphilosophical reflections. In a near-daily exchange ofe-mails, the two shared their thoughts on somedifficult family issues they were each dealing with atthe time. It soon became evident, as Dan had toldClio would most likely be the case, that mentoringoften becomes a "two-way street." ByChristmastime, their mentoring relationship haddeepened into a strong personal friendship born ofhonesty and trust.A perfect example ofthe two-way street occurred inFebruary as the deadline for this Proceedings articleapproached and the initiative to establish a formalmentoring program between the STC-France chapterand the University ofParis Diderot encountered somedelays. A very successful meeting at the UniversityofParis Diderot in January (Figure 2) had identifiedseveral students as prospective mentees, butpreparations for its annual conference in April (theContent Strategy Forum) had slowed the STC-Francechapters recruitment ofmentors to pair with the
    • students. Dan, ever deadline conscious, expressedconcern that the process wasnt moving quicklyenough. Thats when Clio introduced him to theconcept of"relativiser," a termFigure 2. EXTENDING A NEW OPPORTUNITY.Ray Gallon of the STC-France Chapter, co-managerof the new mentoring program, does some recruitingwith Clio at the University of Paris Oiderot, in theclassroom where Clio attended courses last year.which, loosely translated, means "to chill out"-notexactly Dans strong suit. © However, mentoraccepted the wise counsel from mentee, and the pairagreed to describe just the beginnings ofthe newmentoring program in this article and follow with thedetails in their presentation at the 57th annualinternational STC conference in Dallas.So ifyou are interested in the rest ofthe story, youllfind it in the Academic SIGs progression, "Acrossthe Spectrum" in a tabletop presentation entitled"Reaching Across the Atlantic-an InternationalMentoring Initiative."As this article went to "press," Clio and Dan werejust beginning to pursue the primary areas ofprofessional development they had identified in theirmeeting in Atlanta, and the STC-France!University ofParis mentoring program was like an airplane taxiingdown the runway, not yet airborne but ready to takeoff. But what Clio and Dan had not yet accomplishedin the areas ofethics, proposals, and managementpaled in comparison to all that they had shared andthe close and trusting relationship that had grownbetween them in the process.So, was the international mentoring relationship asuccess?Mais oui!FROM THE EUROPEAN SIDE OF THEATLANTIC...When Dan alluded to the mentoring program, I mustadmit I was really interested in this kind of"tutoring," which could definitely help students feelmore involved in their future field ofwork. Whatcould be a better way ofknowing about the job oftechnical communicators than as it was reallyexperienced on a daily basis? And above all, whatcould be a better way ofgaining some support otherthan family and friends-who could not understandwhy you study how to write "manuals andguides nobody reads," other than student peers andteachers?Of course, I guess that my natural curiosity,enthusiasm, and inclination towards newexperimentations that can include growing up,gaining experience, and confronting communicationissues truly helped me make my decision quiterapidly. My tendency not to be reluctant andhesitant could not have been more necessary anduseful than it was on that occasion.And so it was agreed between us. I was immediatelyconvinced that our mentoring relationship couldwork, and that we could take advantage ofthegeographical distance between us to create a newkind ofrelationship. That was the novelty I wasproud ofbringing to Dan. And I added my learning ofnew technologies and my French sayings.;-).We had a starting bond to nourish, strengthen, andexpand. We did it by many ways. Dans "Walks"were amazingly deep and enriching, full ofhints ofhow we, as sensitive human beings, can deal withrelationships and duties in private life and in theworkplace.
    • As months went by, I decided to vary the mediaI would use to correspond with Dan. I shared words,of course, but also articles and pictures ofFrenchsights, places, monuments, etc, and even oftravels Idid. Sometimes the latter ones came with comments.Sometimes with sayings. Sometimes with a mere-but powerful-smiley emoticon. © Because visualsmay speak better than words.From time to time I asked Dan about problems orsimple questions I had about my student andapprentices life. I also presented some ofmyprojects to him. He always gave me a genuineanswer: simple comments or precious advice. Hestood by me-and still stands by me--and really keptencouraging me, trying to convince me ofmy worth,ofthe wealth of accomplishments I had made ...thiswithout ever giving up. I admire him for this. I thankhim, too.I think I also tried to give him the best advice I couldin terms ofmanaging not to accept too muchworkload, trying to "relativiser" (take it easy and bepatient because there is literally "nothing you can do"without stressing over nothing), and enjoying freetime as much as he could. I introduced him to InstantMessaging, but our promising beginning in thismedium could not often be repeated because ofbadInternet connections on both sides, not to mention thetime difference. © Too bad... but there aremuch worse things in life!One achievement I am proud of? Our ongoingpersonal and professional relationship: Dan as theMentor, Clio as the Mentee.A NEW MENTORING PROGRAM ISBORN!A second one? The French version ofthe technicalcommunication mentoring program, whichwas discussed among the STC France ChaptersBoard Members, Orlando Chapter leaders, and otherenthusiastic people for months since I came backfrom the 2009 STC Summit in Atlanta. Aftera meeting including our mentor coordinator, thestudents, the University coordinators, and me inJanuary, the program has finally been launched. Atlast! You cannot imagine how proud I was to sendDan the hyperlink leading toward our mostrecent STC France Chapters newsletter announcingour new mentoring program.After several months of preparation, the STC-FranceChapter is now kicking offthe mentoring programwith mentors from our Chapter and students from myformer university (the University ofParis-Diderot).As this article went to "press," we had 5 mentors and5 mentees-a very fortunate match!-who hadcompleted the application forms (see Figure 3), andwe were in the process ofpairing them up. Thesepairings were scheduled to become official at theContent Strategy Forum in Paris Aprill5-l6, 2010,an international event co-organized by the STC-France and the STC Trans-Alpine chapters. A"Mentor-Mentee Meet-up" comer was to be set up toallow mentors and mentees to meet, share their firstthoughts and impressions, and decide ifthey actuallywant to start the great "mentoring adventure"together.STC France Mentor ApplicaUon STC France 1lentee Applicatton·~OJ<J..........r............................--·C<#l~":~"·~--·---·Figure 3. ON-LINE SIGN-UPS. STC-Franceparlayed STC-Orlandos Google-Doc forms into aweb-based application process to kick off itsmentoring program with the University of ParisDiderot.What a huge evolution! What a promising newjourney! I do not doubt that more is to come in theyears ahead.When I think it all started in that little meeting roomin the conference center in Atlanta...Vive le programme de mentorat international!
    • ABOUT THE PRESENTERSCLIO FOUQUE was born in France but has spentmost ofher life traveling, from New Caledonia to theU.S., via Reunion Island and Australia. She firstcompleted a masters degree in English from theUniversity ofReunion Island (with a full year abroadin Arkansas, U.S., and several months in Australia)and two masters degrees in tourism managementfrom the University ofBrighton in the UK and theEcole de Management de Normandie in France. Cliothen worked for several years as a writer andcustomer advisor in various tourism companies andgroups (including Air France Flying Blue) beforeentering the technical communication field. InOctober 2009, Clio graduated from the graduate-leveltechnical communication program at the UniversityofParis Diderot, completing her fourth mastersdegree. Clio has acquired a broad skill set rangingfrom e-learning and Web design to marketingwriting, information architecture, and knowledgemanagement. As she graduated, she completed along-term internship at UCatchlt, a small companywhere she served both as a writer and an editor forsearch engine optimization (SEO) web content.Following graduation, she assumed a full-timetechnical communication position at Hypertexte,focusing on Web writing, e-learning, SEO (searchengine optimization) and training. She has presentedat STC Frances annual conference as well as at theSTC France chapters Annual General Meeting andat the University ofParis. Clio is particularlyc(interested in helping to connect French- and English-speaking professionals and students.DAN VOSS has 32 years experience in aerospace atLockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control(LMMFC) where he is currently Communicationsmanager for the Tactical Missiles mission area, andhe has also taught high school and college. He is aFellow in the Society for Technical Communicationand is a member ofSTCs Orlando Chapter, where hehas been extensively involved in educationaloutreach initiatives. With Bonnie Spivey, hedeveloped a highly successful mentoring programbetween the STC Orlando Chapter and the Universityof Central Florida. Dan managed STCsAccessAbility SIG for 2 years and remains active. Hehas presented at 21 international and 9 regional STCconferences, including successful workshops onethics, editorial training, integrated strategiccommunication, the ethics ofvisual communication,and other topics. With Lori Allen, he co-authoredEthics in Technical Communication: Shades ofGray(Wiley, 1997) and has published numerous articles.With Shirley Hancock-Andersen, he co-authored theoriginal STC Ethical Guidelines in 1994. He hasreceived the Distinguished Service Award both fromthe Orlando Chapter and the AccessAbility SIG andalso the Gloria Jaffe Award for the Most OutstandingTechnical Communicator in Central Florida. Dan hasearned three ofLockheed Martins top awards forcommunication and excellence for his leadership on asuccessful major proposal and marketing campaign,and is the only non-engineer to receive LMMFCscoveted Author-of-the-Year Award.REFERENCESLippincott, Gail and Jen Selix, Bonnie Spivey, andDan Voss. "Get the Sizzle! Turnkey CD: Toolkits,Ready to Go!" Distributed at Leadership Day at 52ndInternational STC Conference, 2005, Seattle, WA.Spivey, Bonnie and Dan Voss, "Bridging the GapBetween Industry and Academe," Proceedings to52nd International STC Conference, 2005, Seattle,WA, pp. 62-68.
    • Reaching Across the Atlantic:An International Mentoring InitiativeAcademic SIG Progression: Across the SpectrumClio Fouque and Dan VossPresented at the 57th Annual STC ConferenceSession #0188: Monday, May 3, 2010, 3:15-4:30 p.m.Dallas, Texas"Building a Bridge Between Industry and Academe"A Behind-the-Scenes Look at a Successful MentoringRelationship that Piloted a Successful Mentoring ProgramWhatGenerationGap?Presented at the 52nd Annual STC ConferenceSession PDJT: May 9, 2005Seattle, WashingtonBonnie Spivey and Dan VossThe University of Central Florida and the Orlando Chapter of STCPromoting the Program• Word of mouth• Presentation at a chapter meeting• Website• E-mail to the listserv• Article in the chapter newsletter, Memo to MembersYou, Too, Can Do This!What is Mentoring?Pairing Experts with Novices to PromoteGrowth in All DirectionsMentoring Has its Roots in AntiquityDeveloping the Turnkey Package• Created administrative forms- Guidelines and Procedures- Applications- Agreement forms- Contact log- Pre-tests- Post-tests- Evaluations (pre, post)• Available on website:•..___!=~ ~W-:.-:.-http://www.stc-orlando.orqleducation/mentor/mentor.asDLinking Todays Professionals with Tomorrows LeadersKicking Off the ProgramMentees and mentors find each other after completing acampus-wide "treasure hunt"The Moment of Truth ...N
    • History Repeats Itself in Atlanta!•• The serendipity factor• An instant alliance• A new trans-Atlantic relationship• A new trans-Atlantic pilot programAn International Mentoring Relationship is BomlSharing Pictures ...•.. Across the OceanSharing Successes ...• A successful job interview!• A successful soutenance!• A successful new program!And Above All ... TRUST!Objectives of Mentoring RelationshipMentor to provide mentee with information and resources pertaining to technicalmarketing communication, proposals, writing for internal and external media, accessfb~ity.and ethics in technical communication that promotes mentees knowledge and expertise inthese areas.Mentor to provide guidance on job search and placement, professional development, andstrategies for career advancement.Mentor to assist mentee in establishing a mentoring program between professionals inthe STC-France Chapter and technical communication students at University of Paris 7.Mentor to lead mentee to expert resources on web design and graphic illustration(e.g., make e-introductions via networking within STC)Mentee to assist mentor in developing proficiency in the new social media.Mentee to help mentor gatn increased insight into the work ethic and work methods ofMGen v.~ from an international perspective, etc.Charting the CourseSharing Thoughts ..."A Walk in the Country"Promoting the New ProgramSTC France ConnexionJaruary 2010 Newskltter of the STC Franc::e ChapterSTC France to Launch Student Mentoring ProgramOne of the things thafs been keeping us busy since last Summer is an excitingnew initiative to develop a student mentorlng program, proposed by STC Francesecretary Clio Fouque, following her meeting with Dan Voss from the OrlandoChapter at the STC Summit in Atlanta last Spring.Cllo and Dan initiated a trans-Atlantic mentoring relationship as an "internationalextenslon to the longstanding Orlando Cbaptlr mtntortna prooram. Almostimrnediatety they discussed the goal of establishing a mentoring program pairingprofesstonals In the STC France Chapter with technical communication studentsfrom Universite Paris Diderot-Parls 7.The STC France leadership team will be visiting the Paris Oiderot Rive Gauchecampus later this week to present the STC France Mentorlng Project Clio will bethere to share her enthusiasm .••.Time to Recruit!
    • Extending a New OpportunityClio and Ray Gallon Recruit Menteesat the University of Paris 7 in January 2010Mentors and Mentees Finally Meet ...... at the Content Strategy Forum in Paris, April16, 2010Making "Connexions ..."Clio Chats with Laurent Jaubert, Content Manager for eBay FranceOn-Line Sign-Ups..,_&Nfl~·•·""lf:o-"w.NSTC France Chapter Parlayed STC-Orlando Chapters Google Docsinto a Web-Based Application ProcessMentors and Mentees Finally Meet ...... and the New Mentoring Program is off to a Great Start!Mission Accomplished ...Managers of New Mentoring Program, Ray Gallon and Clio Fouque
    • HandoutsMReaching Across the Atlantic: An International Mentoring Initiative,~ Session Description,CWo Fouque and Dan Voss, S]th STC Conference, DaHas, TX, May 2010.~Reaching Across the Atlantic: An International Mentoring Initiative," Presentation, C~oFouque and Dan Voss, S]tfl STC Conference, DaHas, TX, May 2010."Un Programme de Mentorat International? Mais Qui, Cest Possible! Absolument!", ClioFouque and Dan Voss. Proceedings, 57th STC Conference, DaMas, TX, May 2010."Bridging the Gap Between Industry and Academe," Bonnie Spivey and Dan Voss,Proceedings, 52nd STC Conference, Seatue, WA, May 2005, pp. 62-68."Get the SizzJe! Turnkey CD: Toolkits, Ready to Go!", Gail Uppincott, Jen Seli:x, BonnieSpivey, and Dan Voss, distributed at Leadership Day, 52nd STC Conference, Seattle, WA,May2005.Contact Information• Clio: cliofougue@qmail.com• Dan: daniel.w.voss@lmco.comAu Revoir!••~
    • SOCIETY FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONGUIDELINESFORMENTORING PROGRAMSCopies available from:Society for Technical Communication901 N. Stuart St., Suite 904Arlington, VA 22203-1822(703) 522-4114 I (703) 522-2075 (fax)stc@stc.orgwww.stc.orgAD-109-02
    • ContentsWhat is mentoring? ................................................................................................................ 109-2What principles does mentoring include? .............................................................................. 109-2What are the roles in a mentoring program? .......................................................................... 109-3Mentors role....................................................................................................................... 109-3Mentor benefits .................................................................................................................. 109-4Proteges role ...................................................................................................................... 109-4Protege benefits .................................................................................................................. 109-4How should mentors prepare for their roles? ......................................................................... 109-4How long should mentoring continue? .................................................................................. 109-5109-1C?
    • Guidelines for Mentoring ProgramsWhat is mentoring?Mentoring is a way for more experienced technical communicators toshare their experiences with new or less experienced "proteges." Amentor acts as a trusted counselor, or guide, who assists the mentoredprotege in setting and achieving goals for developing career directionand skills. By participating in a mentor/protege relationship, mentorsdevelop valuable skills that can further their personal and professionaldevelopment as well. The relationship between mentor and protegerequires honesty, openness, commitment, and effort by bothindividuals.In a mentoring relationship, mentor and protege:• Identify objectives, goals, and developmental needs.• Define and establish a plan to accomplish protege goals.• Meet regularly in person or via phone or e-mail to review andevaluate progress.A successful mentoring relationship benefits those involved throughincreased confidence and a sense of direction. The relationshipprovides a risk-free learning environment in which to offer careerguidance.Mentoring relationships can develop between individuals within anorganization, between individuals in two different organizations, orbetween students and STC professionals.Mentoring is NOT• casual advice• necessarily for everyone• on-the-job training• a guarantee of a successful careerWhat principles does mentoring include?Many mentoring programs adhere to a common set of mentoringprinciples:• Mentoring is all-inclusive; no one is excluded who wants toparticipate.109-2
    • • Mentoring is an enabling process that facilitates careerdevelopment and skills exchange.• The mentor and protege are mutually committed to a beneficialmentoring relationship.• Mentoring is based on an absolute commitment to trust andconfidentiality between participants.What are the roles in amentoring program?Mentors roleTo get the most out ofthe relationship, mentors and proteges need tounderstand their roles in the mentor program.A mentor serves as a role model, offering penalty-free advice andcounsel, and providing candid feedback to the protege.In a mentoring relationship within an organization, the mentor• Introduces the protege to people in the organization• Helps the protege get oriented• Familiarizes the protege with organizational processes andprocedures.In a mentoring relationship between organizations, the mentor• Listens and offers feedback• Recommends developmental activities• Suggest and provides resources• Communicates experiences and challenges.In a mentoring relationship between an STC professional and astudent, the mentor• Assists the student in professional networking• Provides job shadowing opportunities• Serves as a counselor and a guide.In all mentoring relationships, mentors can• Suggest methods for advancing proteges growth and offerresume assistance and long-term career guidance• Provide lists of relevant books and Web resources and introducetheir proteges to some of the jargon ofthe trade• Point out STC Society-level and chapter-level benefits• Discuss training and educational opportunities109-3
    • Mentor benefitsProteges roleProtege benefits• Explore career goals and the numerous career paths technicalcommunicator can pursue.Mentors who participate in a mentoring relationship• Gain personal satisfaction from helping others discover and reachtheir potential• Gain exposure to new perspectives from the protege• Expand professional networks• Enhance coaching, feedback, and leadership skills.The success of a mentoring relationship is often based on what theprotege wants to achieve from it. The protege should• Ask questions• Listen• Share ongoing career planning and development• Be open to the mentors suggestions• Keep the lines of communication open with his or her mentor.Proteges who participate in a mentoring relationship• Develop networks• Receive valuable sounding boards• Receive career guidance• Increase their visibility• Learn to adapt to changing professional and organizationalcircumstances• Develop or enhance skills needed to move forward in theircareers.Although a mentor can suggest growth opportunities and careerguidance, the protege is ultimately responsible for his or her owncareer development.How should mentorsprepare for their roles?To help ensure the mentor/protege relationship is successful thementor should109-4lO
    • • Be willing to commit a minimum oftwo hours a month to therelationship• Think about what relevant books and Web resources might be ofvalue to the protege.How long shouldmentoring continue?Because each individual learns and absorbs information at differentrates, the length oftime the mentoring relationship lasts depends onthe individuals involved. Therefore, each mentor and protege mustdetermine how long the mentoring relationship should continue.Some relationships last for years.To start, consider the following time scale:• 3-6 months for relationships within an organization• 6-12 months for relationships between organizations• 1-2 terms for professional/student relationships109-57(
    • NOTES
    • ProceduresandForms
    • Key StepsSociety forTechnicalCommunicationWorksheet on Student MentoringProgramsDan Voss and Bethany BowlesCAC Co-Leads for Student Outreach__ Find a student and professional to lead the program.__ Review "turnkey" source materials and adapt the guidelines, promotionals, and administrative forms tomeet your specific needs.Recruit mentors and mentees.__ Pair them based on information on their applications.__ Hold an activity-based kickoff meeting to introduce the mentor/mentee pairs and suggest activities andprojects they may wish to pursue.__ Have each M&M pair complete a mentor/mentee agreement form identifying objectives and activities tofulfill those objectives, as well as scheduling for future mentoring sessions.__Monitor the progress of the M&M pairs, encourage them to share experiences, and, if necessary, toencourage them to meet or, occasionally, intervene to resolve issues.Detailed ProceduresBC "STC Student Mentoring Programs: Investing in the Future," Proceedings, STCInternational ConferenceD "STC Student Mentoring Programs: Investing in the Future," ProgressionPresentation, Leadershi m, 59th STC ConferenceE "Invest in the Future ... Sponsor an STC Student Mentoring Program! (Update),"Overview Presentation on "Toolkit" for STC Student Mentoring Programs {PrintedReference Guide and DVD), Leaders 60th STC lntl ConferenceF "Theres Virtue in Virtual ... or An Old Dinosaur Learns New Tricks," PanelPresentation, Academic SIG-Sponsored Workshop Preceding 39th Annual Meetingof the October 2011G "Coaching Online: STCs Emerging Virtual Professional-to-Student Mentoring60th STC International ConferenceH73p
    • L *"Bridging the Gap Between Industry and Academe," Proceedings, 52"d STCConference (describing the start-up of the STC-Orlando/UCF mentoring program)M "Un Programme de Mentorat International? Mais Oui, Cest Possible!Absolument!", Proceedings, Sih STC Conference (describing how a trans-Atlanticvirtual mentoring relationship helped STC-France establish a mentoring programwith the University of Paris)N "Reaching Across the Atlantic: An International Mentoring Initiative," ProgressionPresentation, Sih STC Conference0 *"Guidelines for Mentoring Programs," STC Publication #AD-109-02, 2002Part.2- Step~by-Step Proceduresand Forms for Estab!Jshing and Su~tai~?ing,a,$tuQ~nt Men~oring Programp Worksheet/Checklist for Leadership Program Workshop, 59th STC ConferenceQ "The Two Essential Ingredients for a Successful Mentoring Program"R "STC Student Mentoring Programs: Investing in the Future," One-Page CapsuleSummary, Leadership Program, 59th STC Conferences "Recipe for Success ... Mentoring Programs"T "Step-by-Step Procedures for Initiating and Sustaining a Mentoring Program"u "STC Orlando Chapter/FTC (UCF) Mentoring Program Guidelines and Procedures,2013-2014"v *"The Mentoring Program, 2013-2014," Capsule Summary on Orlando ChapterWeb Sitew "OPERATION 9-9-9: Our Mentoring Program Needs You," Promotional on ChapterListserv Recruiting Mentors and MenteesX "Mentoring Program Off to Rousing Start in 9th Year," Article in ChapterNewsletter, Memo to Members, Describing Kickoff Meeting, November 2011y Mentor Application (skill set, interests, preferred teaching approach)z *Mentor Application (alternate format)ZA Mentor Summary (compilation of data from mentor applications, used for pairingmentors and mentees)ZB Mentor Summary (alternate format)zc Mentee Application (skills to be expanded, interests, preferred learning style)ZD *Mentee Application (alternate format)ZE Mentee Summary (compilation of data from mentee applications, used forpairing mentees and mentors)ZF Mentee Summary (alternate format)ZG "Mentor Kick-off Meeting Availability" (survey: scheduling tool for setting upkickoff meeting with goal of 100% attendance)ZH *Mentor/Mentee Agreement (for establishing objectives, activities via which topursue those objectives, and a plan for meeting)Zl "M&M Bonding Moments" (list of suggested activities and projects)ZJ Mentee Pre-Assessment Form (for program metrics and refinement)ZK Mentor Pre-Assessment Form (for program metrics and refinement)ZL Contact Log (mentors and mentees record dates of meetings as well as significantphone calls or e-mail exchanges, topics of discussion, and activitiesZM Facebook Group (informal alternative or supplement to contact log)ZN Mentee Post-Assessmentzo Mentee Program EvaluationZP Mentor Post-AssessmentZQ Mentor Program Evaluation*Also available on Orlando-STC Central Florida web site, at http://www.stc-orlando.org/education/mentor/mentor.aspL 0 C K II E ED M A R T I N *7lf
    • Two Essential Ingredients for a Successful Mentoring PrografR1. A student STC member with a strong desire to establish such a program for thebenefit ofhis/her student community and a willingness to expend about 2 monthsof concerted effort to recruit mentees and get the program offthe ground, followedby a much less work-intensive yet important administrative oversight oftheprogram.2. A professional STC member with a strong desire to establish such a program forthe benefit ofhis/her geographic or virtual community and a willingness to expendabout 2 months of concerted effort to recruit mentors and get the program offtheground, followed by a much less work-intensive yet important administrativeoversight ofthe program.75
    • Mentee • Strengthen student communities by.A Win-Win-WinDevelop network$, increase visibility · partnering . . ional$ ·..··...Receivecate~~guidance and job · • Strengthen~fd cominunii:ies with•••Formula! search tips . .•.· new ideas and leade~s~ip ..... ,.. t>oliso ~pecialiled skills • Provide.a. boost.ln vof~~*~~~;~~~~~;~~ mentors••• ·+" 7Prepaiefor the move frprn academeto industry .• skills for career. .>iMeotor · ·• · Gain personal satisfaction he!piog ··.others reachtheir potenii~f·,···; ••· .•• ·Enhancecoaching, feedback; ·~!1~1fleade~hip §~iiJ?<i·~ ;:;~~ Gain:~~·pos~~~ t(} new perspectives,••••. )f.J~!~~:d~~ofessionai.II)etwqrks• • Get:hefp on STC projects•••and mentees work together ohproJects tobenefit both their coriuiluhities and theSociety . 1! ••Increase retention rate ofSTCstudentmemberships upon g[~du ·c ,,, ·/,,·,~&Increase attendance atell sand/or involvement in virtual activities {SIGs)·leverage academe/industry partnershipsSTCs lei!ders oftomorrow;!:>?,,;,,. ,.,·• Professi</riall~~(!er to recruit mentor~ ..··.-j-t,,,,?•••/ • to-face mentoring)J·., ··Remote geographid:Communltv orSIGf;c •. sponsors a studenb::oinmunity .(virtual mentoring)."~~~?Academic SIG spons ~pen~eni· .••coml:iJr:.ei~qiJal proportions of mentees and·• .menti:>r$,::t;;:,;c .·. s~a~nYI~h~ui~~lines,anq tqrokeyadministrative tdols ·· ···· ····•·Mix well, bake f~r1 ac~4eu;ic~~ar·.Garni;hwithjob nl2r<=>rn..,,t••A Turnkey Toolkit ...No Need to ReinventtheWheel... ....res, program summary ·.l:li$tQcr,v ofa successfuImentoring, ....../~fBgf~~:. .. ·,·· .. Mentee applicatip!J fo~JJ). Mentor appli£itj(}~fof!llMentee summary.forro(for makingpairings)Mentor surn,m~ry f~r;fu {for making..•·p~irings)·es, activities)pre-assessme~t;~di;i;:.;,..,i·>·pre-assessmeht fdtrn ;i;:fi.f)
    • Recipe for Success ... Mentoring ProgramsIngredientsBased on our experience, the four key ingredients for establishing and sustaining a successfulmentoring program between an STC geographical community and technical communicationstudents (and other students interested in technical communication), are as follows:1. An active STC geographical community whose leadership and members are interested ineducational outreach2. An active student organization focusing on technical communication (most likely an STCstudent chapter, although there are other alternatives) whose leadership and members areinterested in partnering with a professional organization (as in STC!)3. A member of the geographical community who is passionate about the project andwilling to put in some time to organize and get it off the ground4. A member ofthe student community who is passionate about the project and willing toput in some time to organize and get it offthe groundSources of Information/Assistance on Mentoring Programs1. STC Community Affairs Committee (CAC)2. STC Task Force on Student Outreach Initiative3. The STC Orlando Chapter (web site, members)4. Future Technical Communicators (FTC) at the University of Central Florida (UCF)5. STC-France Chapter6. University ofParisRecipe1. Familiarize yourself with the guidelines and administrative forms developed by the STC-Orlando Central Florida chapter2. Ensure that you have the commitment and support ofyour chapter leaders3. Find a nearby university that has a technical communication degree program, preferablyone with an established STC student chapter, although you can always establish one aspart ofthe process4. And, most importantly, find a technical communication student who shares yourenthusiasm for this idea.5. Execute the process, using the event chronology on the worksheet as a guide.While there is a considerable amount of up-front work for the program coordinators-administrative tasks (although by adapting our forms to your purposes you can reduce thatconsiderably), recruiting of mentors and mentees, pairing them up, and kicking offtheprogram-the workload for the managers drops off substantially (at least 70%) once the mentor-mentee pairs are established and the program is in motion. Its basically a 2- to 3-month "sprint"at the beginning ofthe college academic year.77
    • One idea you may want to consider is to establish a personal mentoring relationship with yourstudent co-manager. Sharing the responsibility of getting a program underway enriches thementoring relationship because you are spending more time together working for a mutual goal.The CAC is currently studying several models for establishing affiliations between STCgeographical communities, SIGs, student chapters, and university-sponsored clubs for technicalcommunication students. We can help you develop the model that works best for your situation.Some form ofaffiliation with a university is important, because it can give the students andpossibly also the members of your chapter access to valuable resources, including funding forconferences and speakers, meeting space, promotional media, etc.A 4-Way Win SituationMentoring programs carry significant personal and organizational benefits.1. Students receive valuable professional coaching, sharpen their skills, network withprofessionals, enrich their resumes and portfolios, improve their job-search prospects,and gain access to STCs resources2. Professionals have the deeply fulfilling experience ofhelping the technicalcommunicators oftomorrow as they prepare for and enter our profession3. STC communities (and the Society as a whole) benefit from new perspectives, energyand enthusiasm, abundant skills in the new media, and, most importantly, a pipeline offuture leaders4. Student organizations benefit from professional oversight (mentors, chapter leaders) aswell as academic oversight (faculty advisor, professors)7Y
    • Step-by-Step Procedures for Initiating and Sustaining a Mentoring ProgramHeres a capsule summary ofthe process, showing the order in which we use the variousguidelines and administrative forms, which should avoid some reinvention of the wheel.• Professional coordinator and student coordinator recruit mentors and mentees,respectively.• Mentors and mentees submit applications identifying their areas of SME and interest,respectively, plus some other information.• Coordinators compile information on the "M&M" applications onto the mentor andmentee summary forms.• Using the information on these 2 forms as well as their personal knowledge oftheM&Ms, the coordinators make the pairings (note that the coordinators often, but notalways, are an M&M pair themselves). Weve done it successfully both ways, but theformer does have advantages.• The coordinators plan a kickoff meeting to introduce the M&Ms and give them a briefoverview on the mentoring process• Pre-kickoff orientation materials for the M&Ms include the STC guidelines formentoring programs, the guidelines for your specific program, a capsule summary ofthatprogram, and, if you wish, the article about how the STC-Orlando!UCF mentoringprogram was established and sustained• The M&Ms work together at the kickoff meeting (or whatever process is used) tocomplete the mentor/mentee agreement, wherein they establish their objectives for aspecified period (generally 2 semesters), the activities by which they plan to pursue thoseobjectives, and sign a confidentiality agreement (the coordinators, ofcourse, are alsobound by confidentiality as they work with the M&Ms through the year).• If you want "metrics" to help you improve and grow your program from year to year,have the M&Ms submit a quick and simple pre-assessment form during the kickoffmeeting.• The coordinators track the activities between the M&Ms either by asking for periodicsubmittals ofthe contact log, establishing and monitoring a Facebook group, or whateverworks best. Its important to issue occasional reminders because busy people dosometimes tend to start enthusiastically and then get overcome by events. A mentoringrelationships needs time and communication to develop.• The coordinators encourage F2F contact where possible, although successful virtualmentoring has been demonstrated as well.• They also encourage mutual projects such as the ones listed in the attached "M&MTasks." In the best ofworlds, it is sometimes possible for such projects to satisfy both atask needed by the sponsoring geographic chapter and a course assignment for thestudent. Such projects also make terrific portfolio items for students. Its very cool whenyou can pull this off, and working together on projects enhances the mentoringexperience on both sides.• If you want metrics, have the M&Ms complete a post-assessment and a programevaluation at the end ofthe year.• Occasionally, where the mentee is a junior, the M&Ms opt to extend their relationshipfor a year. They should have that option. Its only happened maybe a half dozen times inOrlando, but each time it did, great things resulted.7~
    • STC Orlando Chapter/FTC Mentoring ProgramGuidelines and Procedures2013-2014uThe mentoringprogram coordinatorsfor the 2013-14 STC year are Dan Voss, member ofthe Education Committee, and Bethany Bowles, member ofthe Education Committee andPresident ofthe Future Technical Communicators (FTC) at UCF.MissionThe mission ofthe mentoring program is to provide a structured approach by which mentorsfrom the Orlando Chapter provide one-on-one assistance to student mentees to help themestablish themselves successfully as technical communicators. The mentor helps the mentee in avariety of ways, including but not limited to the following:• Assist in job search and placement by reviewing and critiquing the mentees resume,• cover letters, and portfolios; providing career guidance; and helping to establish contacts• for interviews for internships or career placements (either via personal contacts or byhelping the mentee network within the chapter to find suitable contacts).• Increase the mentees opportunity to network with professional practitioners, and alsohelp develop his/her ability to do so effectively.• Provide insight into the role oftechnical communicators in the workplace.• Review/critique the mentees academic and/or job-related technical communicationprojects or written communiques, providing constructive criticism and suggestions forimprovement.• Answer questions; ifthe mentee so desires, provide real-time advice to help him/herresolve problems and conflicts as they arise in school or in the workplace.StrategyThe mentoring program strategy for 2013-14 is as follows:• Make the service available to any student* who requests help and meets the eligibilityrequirements listed under "Mentee Qualifications" below.• Provide one mentor per student for a period oftime of not less than 1 year and not morethan 2 years. (The general expectation is that most mentor/mentee relationships will runfor 1 year, but there is no imperative to end the relationship at that point if bothparticipants wish to continue.)*Within mentor availabilityso
    • ResponsibilitiesThe three positions in the mentoring program are program coordinator, mentor, and mentee.Responsibilities of each are listed below.Mentor Program Coordinator ResponsibilitiesNote: .ifpossible, it is preferable to have co-coordinators, one professionalfrom the EducationCommittee and one student in FTC.• Assign mentors and mentee pairs, using data on application forms.• Follow up by phone to mentors and mentees to discuss progress, problems, and ideas atleast once per month.• Remain accessible to both mentors and mentees to deal with questions or problems.• Report on progress of mentoring program to the Chapter Administrative Council.• Document program results in an appropriate STC forum.• Ensure mentors get Active Member points for their participation.Mentor Responsibilities• Agree to serve as a mentor for 2 college terms.• Work with the mentee to define specific objectives ofthe mentor/mentee relationship andto define a plan and identify activities that will achieve those objectives.• Agree to meet with the mentee an average of once per month in a suitable public setting.• Contact the mentee approximately every 2 weeks by phone or e-mail.• Help the mentee write/edit/design his or her resume, cover letters, and portfolio.• Help identify potential employers.• Help mentee learn to network, including participation and attendance at STC meetings.• Assist the mentee in other ways as mutually agreed.• Remain accessible to the mentee.• Provide candid feedback in reviews and critiques, including constructive criticism aswarranted, and recommend development activities.• Be honest and open on expectations and commitments.• Provide feedback to the mentor program coordinators on the progress ofthe relationship,including periodic e-mail messages and a brief final report and survey.• Serve as an example of a positive role model.• Communicate experiences and challenges.• Listen.Mentee Responsibilities• Consider technical communication as a primary or secondary career objective.• Join STC as a student member (if not already a student member).• Join FTC (if not already a member).*• If interested in assistance with job placement, actively seek employment in the CentralFlorida area, at least during the last 3 months of the mentoring period.• Agree to meet with the mentor an average of once per month in a suitable public setting.• Contact the mentor approximately once every 2 weeks by phone or e-mail.
    • • Remain accessible to the mentor.• Seek and accept candid feedback in reviews and critiques, including constructivecriticism as warranted.• Be honest and open on expectations and commitments.• Provide feedback to the mentoring program coordinators on the progress oftherelationship, including periodic e-mail messages and a brief final report and survey.• Ask questions.• Listen.• Communicate experiences and challenges.• Network.• Advise of academic breakthroughs.*This requirement is waived ifthe student is not from the University of Central Florida butmeets the other eligibility criteria.QualificationsThe following qualifications define mentors and mentees.Mentor Qualifications• Current or past member ofthe Orlando Chapter of STC.• At least 3 years professional experience in technical communication (exceptions can bemade if circumstances warrant).Mentee Qualifications• Current member ofthe Orlando Chapter of STC or willing to join.• Currently enrolled in the University of Central Floridas technical communicationprogram or in a related program/field, at either an undergraduate or a graduate level, or arecent graduate (within 1 year). Generally, undergraduate mentees are expected to be intheir senior year, nearing employment, but exceptions can be made if circumstanceswarrant.)• Currently a member ofFTC or willing to join.• Currently enrolled in another Central Florida college or university studying technicalcommunication or in a related field, at either an undergraduate or graduate level, or arecent graduate (within 1 year).**FTC membership requirement is waived for students who are not from UCF.ConfidentialityTo assist with the learning and networking process, mentors and mentees may share informationthat is to remain confidential. They should both exercise good judgment when disclosingsensitive personal information, and both should keep the trust ofthat confidentiality. Programcoordinators are governed by the same principle.
    • SOCIETY FOR TECHNfCAt COMMUNICATIONThe Mentoring Program2013-2014vUCFThe mentoring program pairs STC members with UCF technical communicationsstudents and students in related fields based on their stated goals and particular areas ofexpertise. The mission ofthe mentoring program is to provide a structured approach bywhich mentors from the Orlando-Central Florida STC Chapter provide one-on-oneassistance to student mentees, helping them establish themselves successfully as technicalcommunicators. The program spans 2 semesters.Mentor Benefits• Gain personal satisfactionfrom helping othersdiscover their potential• Enhance coaching,feedback, and leadershipskills• Gain exposure to newperspectives from theMentor QualificationsChapter Benefits• Strengthen the local technical writingcommunity• Stabilize student STC membership• Attract mentees as potential long-termSTC members after graduation• Generate positive word of mouthadvertisement for the chapter• Promote STC as a professionalnetworking society• Help the chapter execute educationaloutreach initiatives at the high schooland college level• Strengthen and expand the relationshipbetween UCF and STC• Increase attendance at STC chaptermeetings.• Identify and develop potential newchapter leaders.EligibilityMentee Benefits• Develop networks• Receive career guidance• Increase their visibility• Learn to adapt to changingprofessional andorganizationalcircumstances• Develop or enhance skillsneeded to move forward inMentee Qualifications• Current member ofthe Orlando-CentralFlorida Chapter of STC.• Current member ofthe Orlando Chapter ofSTC and a member ofFTC*.• At least 3 years professional experience intechnical communication (exceptions can bemade if circumstances warrant).• Studying technical communication (or arelated field) at the University ofCentralFlorida (UCF) or another Central FloridacollegeIf you are interested in participating in the mentoring program, please visit www.stc-orlando.org/education/mentor/mentor.asp for details and instructions.You can download a writable .doc file for the application and simply e-mail it toBethany Bowles at bethanybowles!al,gmail.com (mentees) or Dan Voss atdaniel.w.voss@lmco.com(mentors).*FTC membership requirement is waived for students at schools other than UCF.fJ
    • Listserv AppealOPERATION 9-9-9: Our Mentoring Program Needs You!!Would you like to share your experience and expertise and contribute to the growth of an aspiringtechnical communicator who is about to enter our profession?If the answer is Yes, then we ask you to consider participating in one ofthe most exciting andrewarding programs the Orlando Chapter has to offer--our formal mentoring program with UCF. Theprogram has a highly successful legacy and has been instrumental in sustaining and enriching thedynamic partnership with the university that has been a major factor in making our chapter anacknowledged leader in the Society. Our mentoring program, in fact, has been a model for a numberofflourishing mentoring programs in other STC communities.We really need you this year-we have a highly motivated "crop" of 9 mentees, and we need a fewmore mentors to complete the pairings. In our 8-year history, we have never had to tum away amentee, and we cannot let that happen now.We want to launch our 9th successful year with 9 mentors and 9 mentees. Thats OPERATION 9-9-9.And you are the key to mission success.The mentoring program is a true win-win proposition: the chapter benefits from new talent and apipeline of new leaders, and the students benefit from professional guidance they could never get in theclassroom, as well as substantial assistance in job search and placement.For details on the mentoring program, see the chapter web site, at http://www.stc-orlando.org/educationlmentor/mentor.asp.Dont miss this wonderful opportunity! It only takes a few minutes to fill out your mentorapplication. As a mentor myself who has had the privilege to work with several talented anddedicated technical communicators as they step into our profession, I can tell you, this has been themost satisfying element in my long association with STC. If you have any questions, please donthesitate to contact me by e-mail or by calling either of the two phone numbers listed below.As an added incentive, mentors receive 1Active Member point per month. Attend even a couple ofour chapter meetings (and you are most likely already doing that), and the commitment you make tohelp sustain our mentoring program will net you one ofour splendid Active Member shirts at the endofthe year.Dont delay! Please send your mentor application to daniel.w.voss@lmco.com andbethanybowles@gmail.com. We ask that you do this by Tuesday, Sept 13, so we can provide amentor for every mentee. We need to make the pairings based on the mentor and mentee applicationsas soon as possible and get the 9th edition ofthe STC-Orlando!UCF mentoring program off andrunning! We need to make OPERATION 9-9-9 a 100% success.Thank you for considering (and hopefully responding to) this appeal!Dan VossBethany BowlesCo-Managers, STC-Orlando!UCF Mentoring Program, 2011-2012
    • October 2011 Memo to Members NewsletterMentoring Program off to Rousing Start in 9th YearBy Bethany Bowles and Dan VossCo-ManagersSTC Orlando Mentoring Program (M&Ms)OPERATION 9-9-9 has begun! Our STC chapter has launched the 9th successful year of itsmentoring program with 9 mentors and 9 mentees joining in a "get-to-know-you" kick-offmeeting at Painted by Hue in Waterford Lakes on September 29. Everyone had the opportunityto paint his/her own ceramics as well as to partake in refreshments that included hand-madesandwiches, snacks, soft drinks, cake, and, ofcourse, M&Ms.For those who are less artistically inclined, it was an opportunity to step outside oftheir box andtry something new! And, with one notable exception, the results were quite impressive.The mentors and mentees learned who their partners would be for this years program (see box).Based on the steady "buzz" of conversation amidst the flying paintbrushes, the "M&Ms" wastedno time getting started on establishing goals, objectives, and activities for their mentoringrelationships, which will run through May 2012.The mentoring program, pairing professionals in the STC Orlando Chapter with technicalcommunication students at UCF, has had a highly successful legacy since its inception in 2003.The model for a number of other successful mentoring programs in the Society, including aprogram partnering the STC-France Chapter with the University ofParis, the Orlando mentoringprogram-co-sponsored by the STC-Orlando Chapter and Future Technical Communicators(FTC) at UCF-has been instrumental in sustaining and enriching the dynamic partnership withthe university that has been a major factor in making our chapter an acknowledged leader in theSociety.In its 9 years, the program has nurtured 70 mentor/mentee ("M&M") relationships, many ofwhich have blossomed into long-term professional relationships and friendships. Mentees havereceived valuable assistance in job search and placement, skills development, projectmanagement, big-company "politics," and many other areas of endeavor. Mentors have had theimmense personal satisfaction ofhelping new technical communicators as they enter ourprofession.9f
    • "Perhaps most gratifying is the fact that several former mentees have gone on to serve asmentors," observed Dan Voss, who, with Bethany Bowles, co-manages this years program."That plus the fact that Bethany has taught me how to use Facebook. Not how to paint coffeemugs, unfortunately, but one out oftwo isnt bad."In past years, the mentor and mentees communication was tracked through contact logs, but thisyear they have been put aside in favor ofFacebook. The new STC/FTC Mentorship group onFacebook is a great social networking tool which enables the M&Ms to share their progress inan interactive page. Rachael Blankenbecklor has already proudly proclaimed to our Facebookgroup, "I have a meeting planned for Friday with my mentor and were looking to go big on thisproject perhaps! Our first endeavor is to possibly make a short presentation for our local STCchapter about the MySTC website."Inspired by the variety of suggested activities, largely contributed by last years programcoordinator, Patricia Cruz, several M&M pairs have already gotten down to work (see boxbelow).M&MBonding Moments0¥~ the production ofan FTC newsletter: gather, edit, and inSI!!!:t articles into FTCnewsletter temp~ate; <:reate POW0 Preview the UJ?>OOtlililg STC Annual Conference by highlighting a ~Halion being done by.tm:al members jfor Mi!mo ~ Membt:rs and FTC newsfeUerl>Jo ~op tl;yer at>d pte$s ~!eue tl;) prom~;>tti! thejt>~,m STC/r"TC meeting it> .JanuaryCreate a short. lim artide for lJemo tt> Members that tti!aehes a Sfanlt1}at and/or mechanicspoint···· cfl!l!lltive fo:r:tiJal:ting encourn,gedl0 Judge the STC High School Writing Competition: Menter and Mmtee willjudge separntely,then reflect on experience in a short article. fbr Memo to Members and FTC. new&lettem0 Proflle a Central Florida teChnical. writingemployw in a mort article fur Memo wMi!mbe:r.Iand FfC newsletters0 Work togethl!l" ro create a portfi:llio fur the ment~ to UlIE! when job-huntingWrite a short rew• of one or more Web sites that would. interest or hdp n:aders of Memo tJJMi!mbe:rs and FTC newslettersFor example, Rachael Blankenbecklor and Erika Higgins are undertaking an ambitious project:developing a user tutorial for the new MySTC web platform-the need for which has alreadybeen identified at the Society level. Debra Johnson and Jessica Campbell have already arranged ajob shadowing.
    • In order to encourage the M&Ms to post on the Facebook group, Bethany proposed a contest.The first mentor/mentee pair to post on Facebook what project from the M&M Bonding pagethey are working on, and then show proofof completion, will become the proud owners of anM&M mug, compliments of Gail Lippincott. Confident in the success of her project with hermentee, Erika Higgins already issued a challenge: "Try to keep up with us fellow M&Ms. Themug is ours."OPERATION 9-9-9: Success!!!• Rachael Blankenbecklor and Erika Higgins• Jessica Campbell and Debra Johnson• Jennifer Blackwell and Mark Wray• Aidan Hitchingham and Mary Burns• Rashelle Oberle and Diane Heald• Steven Harbor and David Coverston• Zachary Sawyer and W.C. Wiese• Brittney Adams and Alex Garcia• Bethany Bowles and Dan Voss,Program managers: Bethany Bowles and Dan VossMeet the Mentors and Mentees •••Alex Garcia and Brittney Adams discuss their common love ofEdgar Allan Poe.37
    • Dan Voss and Bethany Bowles benefitfrom the artistic talents ofRachael Blankenbecklor in theabsence ofher mentor, Erika Higgins.David Coverston and Steven Harbor work on their pottery while getting to know each other.
    • Diane Heald and Rashelle Oberle manage to look wonderfully photogenic while painting theirpieces.Mary Burns shares some surprising information with her mentee, Aidan Hitchingham.ii
    • Debra Johnson and Jessica Campbell making some ambitious choices in their painting that ledto beautiful results.Zach Sawyer gives a thumbs-up while his piece is drying, as his mentor W C. Wiese shares somewords ofwisdom9o
    • Name:Mentor Application2011-2012E-mail: (Home~~~--------------------------------------------------------------(Work)Years with STC: Daytime Phone:Chapter Leadership Positions:Employment/EducationEmployer:Position:Areas of Expertise: (type an x on the lines that apply)Software documentationHardware documentationOnline HelpInformation technologyTechnical marketingScientific writingMedical writingTech writing/editingKnowledge managementMarketing WritingManagementEditingGovernment WritingWeb site designElectronic publishingTechnical illustrationGraphic designOther ----------------------------- OtherInterests, Hobbies, and Extracurricular Activities: (type answer in box)Education: (answer all that apply)Graduate DegreeUndergraduate DegreeOther specialized training(major)(major)(area)Communication ModesDigital mediaJournalismPromotional writingLarge companyoperationsStart-up companyoperationsCoursewareWhat percentage ofyour total mentoring/mentee communication do you see foresee occurring in each ofthese three media? (Tota/=100%)Face-to-face% %E-mailWilling to meet: (type an x on the lines that apply)Weekdays __ Weekday evenings __Telephone%Weekends© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • Personality/ Style ProfileTo the right ofthe scalefor each parameter, type the number youfeel best describes you.PersonalityHighly Introverted Highly Extroverted11 12 I 3 I 4 15RatingProblem-Solving StyleHighly Analytical Highly Intuitive11 12 I 3 I 4 15Rating__Preferred Teaching ModeWell Structured Largely ExperientialI 12 I3 14 I1 5Rating __Summary of Qualifications and Expectations1. Please list contributions you could make to the mentoring program.2. Please list benefits you would expect to derive from the mentoring program.AgreementI have read the guidelines and procedures for the STC Orlando-UCF mentoring program and agree to thecommitments as a mentor.*E-Signature: ____________(____ ) Date:*To complete this application, simply type your name and include your STC member number (optional) inparentheses. Send to daniel.w.voss@lmco.com and bethanybowles@gmail.com© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • Mentor Application for the STC/FTC Mentoring Program2012-2013Name:E-mail:Daytime Phone:Eligibility for Program: (Check the boxes which apply)D Current STC student member0 Willing to join STC as student member ($75/yr)D Current FTC member0 Willing to join FTC ($10)0 Graduate student in tech communication program at UCFD Senior in undergraduate technical communication program at UCFD Recent graduate (< 1 yr) oftechnical communication program at UCFAcademic ProfileGrad GPA (ifapplicable) in majorUndergraduate GPA in majorMinor (ifapplicable)Co-curricular activities (Type your answers in the box.)Areas of Planned Study/ Expertise: (Check the boxes which apply)D Software documentationD Hardware documentationD Online Help0 Information technologyD Technical marketingD Scientific writingD Medical writingD Tech writing/editing0 Knowledge ManagementD Marketing WritingD Management0 EditingD Government WritingD Web site designD Electronic publishingD Technical illustrationD Graphic designD Digital mediaD JournalismD Promotional writingD Large company operationsD Start-up company operationsD Coursewareoveralloverall© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • Other (Type any additional areas of study.)Interests, Hobbies, and Extracurricular Activities: (Type your answers in the box.)Work ProfileCurrently employed D Part-time D Full-time Hours per weekEmployer:Position:Previous Employment: (ifapplicable)Mentee Personality/ Style ProfileTo the right ofthe scale, for each parameter, circle the number on the scale youfeel best describes you.PersonalityHighly Introverted Highly ExtrovertedD D D D D Rating1 2 3 4 5Problem-Solving StyleHighly Analytical Highly IntuitiveD D D D D Rating1 2 3 4 5Preferred Teaching ModeWell Structured Largely ExperientialD D D D D Rating1 2 3 4 5Communication ModesWhat percentage ofyour total mentoring/mentee communication do you seeforesee occurring in each ofthese threemedia? (Iotal=100%)Face-to-face E-mail% %Willing to meet: (Check each box that applies.)Weekdays D Weekday evenings 0Telephone%Weekends DSummary of Qualifications and Expectations1. Please list benefits you expect to derive from the mentoring program.© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • 2. Please list specific efforts you are willing to make as part of the mentoring program.AgreementI have read the guidelines and procedures for the STC Orlando-UCF mentoring program and agree to thecommitments as a mentee.*E-Signature: Date:STC Member Number:*To complete this application, simply type your name and the date and include your STC member number(optional). Send to bethanybowles@gmail.com and daniel.w.voss@lmco.com.© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • ..s>"TC:•MentorSummary2011-2012Name,:>lAreaofExpertise~C~:trib~~~on,,,,;;•I·Emplo~etll:~.Fa~~.·.Pr9~Ie,:!fll·r~~cii~~~ilInterests..·"····.i..Mtgs··•Solvm~PIMode·..•··Notes:12341=HighlyIntroverted,5=HighlyExtroverted1=HighlyAnalytical,5=HighlyIntuitive1=WellStructured,5=LargelyExperientialD=Weekdays,E=Weeknights,W=WeekendsAvail4NJ~
    • -Cl-.lNameNotes:1234MentorSummary2011-2012sTECHNIC~COMMUNICATORS~AreaofEmployerExpertise/Contribution1=HighlyIntroverted,5=HighlyExtroverted1=HighlyAnalytical,5=HighlyIntuitive1=WellStructured,5=LargelyExperientialD=Weekdays,E=Weeknights,W=Weekends%FaceMtgs%E-Mail%PhoneIntro/Extro1ProblemSolving2LearningInterestsAvail4Modi~~
    • Name:E-mail:TC:Mentee Application2011-2012Daytime Phone: ( )~--~--------~~~---,Eligibility for Program: (type an x on the lines which apply)Current STC student memberorWilling to join STC as student member ($55/yr)Current FTC memberorWilling to join FTC (no cost or obligation)Graduate student in tech communication program at UCForSenior in undergraduate technical communication program at UCForRecent graduate(< I yr) oftechnical communication program at UCFGrad GPA (if applicable)Undergraduate GPAMinor (ifapplicable)Co-curricular activitiesAcademic Profilein majorm maJoroveralloverallAreas of Planned Study/ Expertise: (Type an x on the lines that apply)Software documentationHardware documentationOnline HelpInformation technologyTechnical marketingScientific writingMedical writingTech writing/editingKnowledge mgmtMarketing WritingManagementEditingGovernment WritingWeb site designElectronic publishingTechnical illustrationGraphic designOther ----------------------------- OtherDigital mediaJournalismPromotional writingLarge companyoperationsStart-up companyoperationsCoursewareInterests, Hobbies, and Extracurricular Activities: (type answers in box)Currently employed Part-timeEmployer:Position:Previous Employment: (if applicable)Work ProfileFull-time Hours per week - -© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • Mentee Personality/Style ProfileTo the right ofthe scale, for each parameter, circle the number on the scale youfeel best describes you.PersonalityHighly Introverted Highly ExtrovertedII 12 I 3 I 4 Is RatingProblem-Solving StyleHighly Analytical Highly Intuitive11 12 I 3 I 4 15Rating__Preferred Learning ModeWell Structured Largely Experiential3 14 5Rating___Communication ModesWhat percentage ofyour total mentoring/mentee communication do you seeforesee occurring in each ofthese threemedia? (Total= I00%)Face-to-face E-mail% %Willing to meet: (type an x on the lines that apply)Weekdays __ Weekday evenings __Telephone%WeekendsSummary of Qualifications and Expectations1. Please list benefits you expect to derive from the mentoring program.2. Please list specific efforts you are willing to make as part ofthe mentoring program.AgreementI have read the guidelines and procedures for the STC Orlando-UCF mentoring program and agree to thecommitments as a mentee.*E-Signature: ____________ (____ ) Date:*To complete this application, simply type your name and include your STC member number (optional) inparentheses. Send to daniel.w.voss@lmco.com and bethanybowles@gmail.com© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • Mentee Application for the STC/FTC Mentoring Program2012-2013Name:E-mail:Daytime Phone:Eligibility for Program: (Check the boxes which apply)0 Current STC student member0 Willing to join STC as student member ($75/yr)0 Current FTC member0 Willing to join FTC ($10)0 Graduate student in tech communication program at UCF0 Senior in undergraduate technical communication program at UCF0 Recent graduate(< 1 yr) oftechnical communication program at UCFAcademic ProfileGrad GPA (if applicable) in majorUndergraduate GPA in majorMinor (if applicable)Co-curricular activities {Type your answers in the box.)Areas of Planned Study/ Expertise: (Check the boxes which apply)0 Software documentation0 Hardware documentation0 Online Help0 Information technology0 Technical marketing0 Scientific writing0 Medical writing0 Tech writing/editing0 Knowledge Management0 Marketing Writing0 Management0 Editing0 Government Writing0 Web site design0 Electronic publishing0 Technical illustration0 Graphic design0 Digital media0 Journalism0 Promotional writing0 Large company operations0 Start-up company operations0 Coursewareoveralloverall© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication/00
    • Other (Type any additional areas of study.)Interests, Hobbies, and Extracurricular Activities: (Type your answers in the box.)Work ProfileCurrently employed D Part-time D Full-time Hours per weekEmployer:Position:Previous Employment: (if applicable)Mentee Personality/ Style ProfileTo the right ofthe scale, for each parameter, circle the number on the scale youfeel best describes you.PersonalityHighly Introverted Highly ExtrovertedD D D D D Rating1 2 3 4 5Problem-Solving StyleHighly Analytical Highly IntuitiveD D D D D Rating1 2 3 4 5Preferred Teaching ModeWell Structured Largely ExperientialD D D D D Rating1 2 3 4 5Communication ModesWhat percentage ofyour total mentoring/mentee communication do you seeforesee occurring in each ofthese threemedia? (Total=JOO%)Face-to-face E-mail% %Willing to meet: (Check each box that applies.)Weekdays 0 Weekday evenings 0Telephone%Weekends 0Summary of Qualifications and Expectations1. Please list benefits you expect to derive from the mentoring program.© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication10 (
    • 2. Please list specific efforts you are willing to make as part ofthe mentoring program.AgreementI have read the guidelines and procedures for the STC Orlando-UCF mentoring program and agree to thecommitments as a mentee.*E-Signature: Date:STC Member Number:*To complete this application, simply type your name and the date and include your STC member number(optional). Send to bethanybowles@gmail.com and daniel.w.voss@lmco.com.© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communicationl ()"
    • -~TC:•MenteeSummary2011-2012UCF~NameNotes:12345·..AreaQ£S....tudy~~~elyeareerFocus--l-Ye~~~ll.~..~~·.E.....·.l-..:o;ll...·.···T·lnt.ro/·····~··.··P...•.•.r.•o.•-.·.···b·······lem··.··.·•.•lLeatriing.,JnterestsJ·•<•···iliail·-·1PhoneI.Extro2-SplviniMode4···Jr=junior,Sr=senior,Gr=graduate1=HighlyIntroverted,5=HighlyExtroverted1=HighlyAnalytical,5=HighlyIntuitive1=WellStructured,5=LargelyExperientialD=Weekdays,E=Weeknights,W=Weekends..,.:A..·5;,vallt}JflJ
    • -0~NameNotes:12345MenteeSummary2011-2012sTEICAL~COMMUNICATORS~AreaofStudy/LikelyCareerFocusYear1Jr=junior,Sr=senior,Gr=graduate1=HighlyIntroverted,5=HighlyExtroverted1=HighlyAnalytical,5=HighlyIntuitive1=WellStructured,5=LargelyExperientialD=Weekdays,E=Weeknights,W=WeekendsWork(hr/wk)%FaceMtgs%E-Mail%Phonelntro/Extro2ProblemSolving3LearningInterestsAvai15Mode4JN}J
    • ••••••••••••••••••Mentorship Kick-off Meeting AvailabilityWhich dates and times would you be available for the mentorship kick-off meeting? Please check as manyboxes as possible; only use "not available" or leave a time slot unchecked if you have a "hard" conflict such aswork, class, or a pre-commitment. Our goal is to achieve 100% attendance, which is why we are askingeveryone to be available on as many of these dates and times as possible. You may specify your preferencesin the space provided below; we will do our best to accommodate them.*RequiredTop of FonnWhat time(s) are you available on Tuesday, Nov. 2? *r~~j .mii+Mornmg~-j !BY· ·.:3Afternoonf::~,~~7 pm onwardsr"3..<.<Not availableWhat time(s) are you available on Thursday, Nov. 4? •·r,~..... /;Morningf>l.· .:);Afternoonr-·· 7 pm onwardsr.uwk Not availableWhat time(s) are you available on Friday, Nov. 5? *iii>!M~"_I !@fud#Morningf::!~tternoonpg~7 pm onwardsr1JN t ·1 bl"""• o ava1 a eWhat time(s) are you available on Saturday, Nov. 6? *tf::Morningr~.·n•Atternoonr~«~••"·/1#.7 pm onwardsr-:~..•Not availableWhat time(s) are you available on Sunday, Nov. 7? *r:., <· Morningrftr:nif/>Afternoon/OS
    • ••Notes: Please indicate any special schedulin considerations that ou would like us to make e. .date/ time, venue suggestions).Last Name*First Name*Contact Number •Contact E-Mail ADD BOX HEREI Mentor ;1Are you a mentor or a mentee? * ...:JBottom of FormPowered by ,Google Docs Report Abuse -,Terms of Service_-Additional Terms__ /{Formatted: Hidden-------------------------------------{-F:..:o::r.::m:::a:.:tted=:.::..:.H:::idde=:.:.n_________/0~
    • Mentor Name:Mentee Name:Date:2t+Mentor/Mentee Agreement2011- 2012Please answer the questions below at theinitial meeting between mentor and menteeand complete the agreement at the bottom.If you are not able to complete theagreement at the kick-off meeting, pleaseemail the electronic copy to the programcoordinators at daniel.w.voss@lmco.com andbethanybowles@gmail.com.1. What are your mutual objectives for your mentoring experience?2. What skills or knowledge will the mentor pass on to the mentee? Be specific.3. How do you plan to achieve your mutual objectives?1107
    • 4. How often and in what form will you communicate?5. How will you determine if you have achieved the desired objectives?We agree that anything discussed in the meetings will remain confidential unless otherwisespecified. We also agree that if any problems develop in this mentoring partnership we willseek the support of the program coordinators.Mentor Signature:Date:Mentee Signature:Date:I 0 i2
    • Sign•np-Q......,£)MAMBondingMo10ents••BondingMo~nentsReviewatechnicalbookorguideforMtMnewsletterOverseetheproductionofFTCnewsletter:gather,edit,andinsertarticlesintoFTCnewslettertemplate;createPDFPreviewtheupcomingSTCAnnualConferencebyhighlightingapresentationbeingdonebylocalmembers(forMtMandFTCnewsletters)DevelopflyerandpressreleasetopromotetheMarchspecialevent(fulldayworkshoponusability)eCreateashort,funarticleforMtMthatteachesagrammarand/ormechanicspoint-creativeformattingencouraged!~
    • -..........<:0Sign•np••MoreBondingMo01ents...JudgetheSTCHighSchoolWritingCompetition:MentorandMenteewilljudgeseparately,thenreflectonexperienceinashortarticleforMtMandFTCnewslettersProfileaCentralFloridatechnicalwritingemployerinashortarticleforMtMandFTCnewslettersRevisetheFTCbylawstoincludeneweventsandpracticesWriteasoftwarereviewforMtMandFTCnewslettersCreatethecertificatesfortheMarchspecialevent(max100attendees)GWriteashortreviewofoneormoreWebsitesthatwouldinterestorhelpreadersofMtMandFTCnewsletters
    • MENTEE Self-AssessmentPrior to Mentoring Program2004-2005Name: (Strictly confidential; for statistical purposes only)Date:Rate your readiness to search for and find a job in technical communication in the followingspecific areas, on a scale of 1 to 5, as follows: (1) weak or non-existent; (2) marginal; (3)OK, but with significant room for improvement; (4) good, with some room forimprovement; (5) excellent.ResumePortfolioInterviewing skills __ Knowledge ofjob market__ Business contactsNetworking skills __ Knowledge ofsalaries ConfidenceRate your level of knowledge in the following areas, based on your academic preparationand any other experience you may have. Use the same 1-5 scale as above.Software documentationHardware documentationOnline HelpInformation technologyTechnical marketingScientific writingMedical writingTech writing/editingKnowledge management __Marketing writingManagementEditingGovernment writingWeb site designElectronic publishingTechnical illustrationGraphic designOther--------------- OtherDigital mediaJournalismPromotional writingLarge companyoperationsStart-up companyoperationsCoursewareRate your readiness to begin a professional career in technical communication from thefollowing standpoints. Use the same 1-5 scale as above.Understanding ofthe corporate work environmentGrasp ofthe business value oftechnical communicationAwareness ofthe role ofethics in technical communicationUnderstanding ofthe nature and importance of group dynamics in the workplace __Understanding ofthe importance of interpersonal relations in the workplaceKnowledge ofhow to play "office politics" and live to see tomorrowSense ofhow to anticipate trouble coming and stay out of itAppreciation ofthe importance ofcommunication on the jobThis assessment is to be completed upon the conclusion of the mentoring process.© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical CommunicationIll
    • c:FUTURE YECNNICJU COMMUNICATORSSOCIETY FOR TECHN!CAt COMMUNICATION UCFMENTOR Self-AssessmentPrior to Mentoring ProgramName: (Strictly confidential; for statistical purposes only)Date:Rate your readiness to help a technical communication student search for and find a job intechnical communication in the following specific areas, on a scale of 1 to 5, as follows: (1)weak or non-existent; (2) marginal; (3) OK, but with significant room for improvement; (4)good, with some room for improvement; (5) excellent.Resume polishing __ Interviewing skills __ Knowledge ofjob market __ Business contactsPortfolio building __ Networking skills __ Knowledge of salaries __ Confidence building __How close to the cutting edge do you feel you are in the following specialized skills of theprofession? Use a similar 1-5 scale, as follows: (1) little or no expertise; (2) marginal; (3)functional knowledge, but not cutting edge; (4) proficient, but not necessarily on the cuttingedge of the latest research; (5) excellent-and definitely on the cutting edge.Software documentationHardware documentationOnline HelpInformation technologyTechnical marketingScientific writingMedical writingTechnical writing/editingKnowledge management __Marketing writingManagementEditingGovernment writingWeb site designElectronic publishingTechnical illustrationGraphic designOther--------------- OtherDigital mediaJournalismPromotional writingLarge companyoperationsStart-up companyoperationsCoursewareRate your readiness to coach a beginning technical communicator in the following areas.Use the same 1-5 scale as for the first item above.Understanding ofthe corporate work environmentGrasp ofthe business value oftechnical communicationAwareness ofthe role of ethics in technical communicationUnderstanding ofthe nature and importance of group dynamics in the workplace __Understanding ofthe importance of interpersonal relations in the workplaceKnowledge ofhow to play "office politics" and live to see tomorrowSense ofhow to anticipate trouble coming and stay out of itAppreciation ofthe importance of communication on the jobThis assessment is to be completed before beginning the mentoring process.© 2003. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • STC-UCF Mentoring ProjectTeam Contact Record*2004-2005*This log is a mutual responsibility of each mentor-mentee team. Either the mentor or the mentee can beresponsible for maintaining it and sending it to the program coordinators when requested. One goodapproach is to bring the log to meetings and update it each time.© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical CommunicationIl 3
    • Use of Facebook Group for Monitoring MentorI Mentee RelationshipsFrom: Bethany Bowles [mailto:ucf.ftc@gmail.com]Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 4:10PMTo: Voss, Daniel WSubject: EXTERNAL: Give Us an Update on Your Mentoring RelationshipHaving trouble viewing this email? Click hereHi, just a reminder that youre receiving this email because you have expressed an interest in Future TechnicalCommunicators. Dont forget to add ucf.ftc@gmail.com to your address book so well be sure to land in your inbox!You may unsubscribe if you no longer wish to receive our emails.r.-.... rrn-a·· li Like.,c:....~COMMUNICATORSIn This IssueUpdate Us!Facebook GroupJoin our joint Mentor/MenteeGroup on Facebook!If you have any questions about thisyears mentorship program, feel freeto email me and I will be happy toget back to you.Mentorship Program ChairContact InformationDear Daniel,Dan Voss and I would like to thankyou for your participation in this yearsmentoring program. We have nowreached the end of the first semesterof your relationship and are eager tohear how you are progressing.Update Us!Well, the end of the year is near and, moreimportantly to us mentees, final exams are almostupon us. I wanted to make sure that everyone ishappy with the progress of their mentoringrelationship thus far. I want to hear, at least briefly,I/Lf
    • Dan Voss:daniel.w.voss@lmco.comBethany Bowles:bethanybowles@gmail.comFacebook Groupfrom each of you about what youve been up to:your accomplishments, your goals, your struggles.Please, send Dan and Lan email. We cant wait tohear about your progress. If you are unsatisfied withyour mentoring relationship thus far, please, let usknow so that we can have the opportunity to resolveany obstacles you may be facing that are preventingyou from in pursuing a mutually beneficialpartnership with your mentor/mentee.have a forum where mentors and mentees can share what projects they areworking on and what they are learning through their partnership. We encourage you tojoin! Please, use this page as a place to brag. Make others jealous. Hearing about thesuccesses will spur everyone else on. If you prefer to take a more modest approachand keep your comments private, send an email to Dan and me.I hope you are already reaping the rewards of a fruitful mentoring relationship. Please,dont hesitate to contact Dan and I with any questions, suggestions, or concerns.Sincerely,Bethany BowlesForward emailThis email was sent to daniel.w.voss@lmco.com by ucf.ftc@qmail.com iUpdate Profile/Email Address Instant removal with SafeUnsubscriberM ! Privacy Policy.Future Technical Communicators I 4000 Central Florida Blvd. : Orlando FL 32816liS
    • TCMENTEE Self-AssessmentFollowing Completion of Mentoring Program2004-2005Name: (Strictly confidential; for statistical purposes only)Date:Rate your readiness to search for and find a job in technical communication in the followingspecific areas, on a scale of 1 to 5, as follows: (1) weak or non-existent; (2) marginal; (3)OK, but with significant room for improvement; (4) good, with some room forimprovement; (5) excellent.ResumePortfolioInterviewing skills __ Knowledge ofjob market __ Business contactsNetworking skills __ Knowledge of salaries ConfidenceRate your level of knowledge in the following areas, based on your academic preparationand any other experience you may have. Use the same 1-5 scale as above.Software documentationHardware documentationOnline HelpInformation technologyTechnical marketingScientific writingMedical writingTech writing/editingKnowledge management __Marketing writingManagementEditingGovernment writingWeb site designElectronic publishingTechnical illustrationGraphic designOther--------------- OtherDigital mediaJournalismPromotional writingLarge companyoperationsStart-up companyoperationsCoursewareRate your readiness to begin a professional career in technical communication from thefollowing standpoints. Use the same 1-5 scale as above.Understanding ofthe corporate work environmentGrasp ofthe business value oftechnical communicationAwareness ofthe role ofethics in technical communicationUnderstanding ofthe nature and importance of group dynamics in the workplace __Understanding ofthe importance of interpersonal relations in the workplaceKnowledge ofhow to play "office politics" and live to see tomorrowSense ofhow to anticipate trouble coming and stay out of itAppreciation ofthe importance of communication on the jobThis assessment is to be completed upon the conclusion of the mentoring process.© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • Name:Date:Mentor:SOCIETY FOR TECHNICAl COMMUNICATIONProgram Evaluation (Mentee)2003-2004UCFPlease answer the questions below and return it to the program co-coordinators(.daniel.w.voss@lmco.com and futuretek2003@hotmail.com). All responses will be heldin strict confidence. If you need more space, attach another sheet, keyed to the item(s).1. How satisfied, overall, were you with your experience in the mentoringprogram? Please rate on a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being the highest. __2. How well do you feel you and your mentor met the objectives you setout to achieve? Rate on scale of 1 to 10.3. What specific benefits do you feel you gained from the experience?4. What was it about the program that you felt worked best? Why?© 2003. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communicationl{]
    • 5. Please list suggestions on how the program could be improved.6. What do you feel was the greatest single challenge you faced in yourmentoring relationship? How successful were you in overcoming it?7. Other comments.8. Would you be willing to serve as a mentor after you gain a couple yearsexperience in the field? _© 2003. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication
    • TCMENTOR Self-AssessmentFollowing Completion of Mentoring Program2004-2005Name: (Strictly confidential; for statistical purposes only)Date:Rate your readiness to help a technical communication student search for and find a job intechnical communication in the following specific areas, on a scale of 1 to 3, as follows: (1)Satisfactory; but with room for improvement (2) Very good; yet still a little room forimprovement (3) Excellent; mastery achieved.Resume polishing __ Interviewing skills __ Knowledge ofjob market __ Business contactsPortfolio building __ Networking skills __ Knowledge ofsalaries __ Confidence building __How close to the cutting edge do you feel you are in the following specialized skills of theprofession? Use a 1-5 scale, as follows: (1) little or no expertise; (2) marginal; (3) functionalknowledge, but not cutting edge; (4) proficient, but not necessarily on the cutting edge of thelatest research; (5) excellent-and definitely on the cutting edge.Software documentationHardware documentationOnline HelpInformation technologyTechnical marketingScientific writingMedical writingTechnical writing/editingKnowledge management __Marketing writingManagementEditingGovernment writingWeb site designElectronic publishingTechnical illustrationGraphic designOther--------------- OtherDigital mediaJournalismPromotional writingLarge companyoperationsStart-up companyoperationsCoursewareRate your readiness to coach a beginning technical communicator in the following areas.Use the same 1-3 scale as for the first item above.Understanding ofthe corporate work environmentGrasp ofthe business value oftechnical communicationAwareness ofthe role of ethics in technical communicationUnderstanding ofthe nature and importance of group dynamics in the workplace __Understanding ofthe importance of interpersonal relations in the workplaceKnowledge of how to play "office politics" and live to see tomorrowSense ofhow to anticipate trouble coming and stay out of itAppreciation ofthe importance ofcommunication on the jobThis assessment is to be completed upon the conclusion of the mentoring process.© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication117
    • Name:Date:Mentee:Program Evaluation (Mentor)2004-2005Please answer the questions below and return it to the program co-coordinators(glippincott@earthlink.net and futuretek2004@hotmail.com). All responses will be heldin strict confidence. Ifyou need more space, attach another sheet, keyed to the item(s).1. How satisfied, overall, were you with your experience in the mentoringprogram? Please rate on a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being the highest. __2. How well do you feel you and your mentee met the objectives you setout to achieve? Rate on a scale of 1 to 10.3. What specific benefits do you feel you gained from the experience?4. What was it about the program that you felt worked best? Why?© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communication/JO
    • 5. Please list suggestions on how the program could be improved.6. What do you feel was the greatest single challenge you faced in yourmentoring relationship? How successful were you in overcoming it?7. Other comments.8. May we re-enroll you in the mentoring program for the 2005-2006chapter year? __(New mentees will be assigned at the beginning of the Fall term at UCF. You also havethe option of a second year with your 2004-2005 mentee if you both want to continue. Ifthat is the case, please so indicate below.)© 2004. Mentoring Project, Orlando Chapter, Society for Technical Communicationl J. {
    • NOTES