The Sentence as Speech Act
from Reading Into Writing 1: English for Academic Purposes –
A Handbook for College Freshman En...
“This room is a mess.”
• Notional content
• Referential content
• Propositional content
• Speech act
• Communicative layer...
• With every utterance referring to some object
or event, or expressing a perception, thought
or belief, the speaker or wr...
• “It’s so cold.”
• “I can’t read this. I don’t have my glasses.”
• “Don’t climb the peach.” “I’ll be careful.”
• “Unbelie...
What factors inform communicative
competence/knowledge of speech acts?
• Culture – traditions / practices / references
• S...
DEFINING
Diablo is an action role-playing hack-
and-slash video game developed by
Blizzard North and released by Blizzard
...
DESCRIBING / ATTRIBUTING
Set in the fictional Kingdom of
Khanduras, located in the world of
Sanctuary, Diablo has the play...
NAMING
The expansion pack released in 1997,
which was not created by Blizzard
Entertainment, is entitled Diablo Hellfire.
ENUMERATING / LISTING
Diablo has three character classes: the
warrior, the rogue, and the sorcerer.
INSTRUCTING
The hero must kill the Skeleton King so
he can be released from his curse, kill
Archbishop Lazarus, and, event...
EXPLAINING (OPTIONS)
Players can either be aggressive towards,
or play co-operatively with, other
players.
COMPARING / CONTRASTING
Players of the original Diablo release had
to painstakingly develop characters by
acquiring skill ...
JUDGING / EVALUATING /
ASSESSING / CRITICIZING
Despite the rather pale storyline,
watered-down quests and a fair amount
of...
Other Speech Acts
• Concluding
• Corroborating / confirming
• Cross-referencing
• Defining
• Denying / contradicting
• Describing / attribut...
• Glossing
• Identifying
• Inferring
• Initiating / Introducing / Proposing
• Inquiring
• Judging / Evaluating / Assessing...
• Affirming
• Analogizing
• Analyzing
• Ascribing
• Asserting / Stating
• Assuming / Supposing / Hypothesizing /
Theorizin...
• Particularizing
• Preferring
• Proving / Supporting / Evidencing
• Reformulating / Correcting the wording
• Refuting / D...
• Summarizing
HOMEWORK
• Chapter 3: “The Sentence as a Speech Act” pp.
189-198
• Chapter 4: “Beyond The Sentence: Connecte...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

The Sentence as Speech Act Cindy Cruz-Cabrera

912

Published on

The Sentence as Speech Act - the act of communicating the writer's intention and attitude - based on Concepcion Dadufalza's chapter in Reading Into Writing 1.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
912
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "The Sentence as Speech Act Cindy Cruz-Cabrera"

  1. 1. The Sentence as Speech Act from Reading Into Writing 1: English for Academic Purposes – A Handbook for College Freshman English by Concepcion Dadufalza Cindy Cruz-Cabrera about.me/cindycruzcabrera | en.gravatar.com/cindycatz
  2. 2. “This room is a mess.” • Notional content • Referential content • Propositional content • Speech act • Communicative layers • Communicative competence
  3. 3. • With every utterance referring to some object or event, or expressing a perception, thought or belief, the speaker or writer is also performing an act: he is communicating an intention or an attitude, which may or may not be overtly expressed. • Awareness of speech acts facilitates one’s comprehension of meaning in reading and listening. • Knowledge of them enhances the effectiveness of our ability to communicate in both writing and speaking.
  4. 4. • “It’s so cold.” • “I can’t read this. I don’t have my glasses.” • “Don’t climb the peach.” “I’ll be careful.” • “Unbelievable.” “I know.” • “What are you doing here?” • “What are YOU doing here?” • “What ARE you doing here?”
  5. 5. What factors inform communicative competence/knowledge of speech acts? • Culture – traditions / practices / references • Social norms / conventions / expectations • Notions of civilized / proper / acceptable behavior • Perspectives • Frames of mind • Social class • Power • Speech conventions
  6. 6. DEFINING Diablo is an action role-playing hack- and-slash video game developed by Blizzard North and released by Blizzard entertainment on December 31, 1996.
  7. 7. DESCRIBING / ATTRIBUTING Set in the fictional Kingdom of Khanduras, located in the world of Sanctuary, Diablo has the player take control of a lone hero battling to rid the world of Diablo, the Lord of Terror.
  8. 8. NAMING The expansion pack released in 1997, which was not created by Blizzard Entertainment, is entitled Diablo Hellfire.
  9. 9. ENUMERATING / LISTING Diablo has three character classes: the warrior, the rogue, and the sorcerer.
  10. 10. INSTRUCTING The hero must kill the Skeleton King so he can be released from his curse, kill Archbishop Lazarus, and, eventually, fight Diablo himself.
  11. 11. EXPLAINING (OPTIONS) Players can either be aggressive towards, or play co-operatively with, other players.
  12. 12. COMPARING / CONTRASTING Players of the original Diablo release had to painstakingly develop characters by acquiring skill points throughout quests and assigning these to strategically chosen skills within 3 skill trees, whereas the Diablo 3 release introduced preprogrammed skills which appeared automatically in the characters once skill points have been earned.
  13. 13. JUDGING / EVALUATING / ASSESSING / CRITICIZING Despite the rather pale storyline, watered-down quests and a fair amount of necessary repetition, Diablo is a must for anyone interested in just plain fun.
  14. 14. Other Speech Acts
  15. 15. • Concluding • Corroborating / confirming • Cross-referencing • Defining • Denying / contradicting • Describing / attributing • Directing / commanding • Enumerating / listing • Exemplifying / illustrating • Generalizing
  16. 16. • Glossing • Identifying • Inferring • Initiating / Introducing / Proposing • Inquiring • Judging / Evaluating / Assessing / Criticizing • Justifying • Limiting and Restricting • Making a Transition • Naming • Narrating
  17. 17. • Affirming • Analogizing • Analyzing • Ascribing • Asserting / Stating • Assuming / Supposing / Hypothesizing / Theorizing • Classifying • Conceding • Concluding
  18. 18. • Particularizing • Preferring • Proving / Supporting / Evidencing • Reformulating / Correcting the wording • Refuting / Disproving • Reporting • Responding • Retrieving / Resuming • Specifying • Speculating
  19. 19. • Summarizing HOMEWORK • Chapter 3: “The Sentence as a Speech Act” pp. 189-198 • Chapter 4: “Beyond The Sentence: Connected Discourse” pp. 206-234

×